Podcasts about astronomers

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Scientist who studies celestial bodies

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  • 1,665EPISODES
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  • Nov 25, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about astronomers

Show all podcasts related to astronomers

Latest podcast episodes about astronomers

StarDate Podcast
Moon and Regulus

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 2:14


Regulus, the star at the heart of the lion, has a small, faint companion. Astronomers have known about it for a while, but they've never seen it. In fact, they've had a hard time figuring out its details. That's because the two stars are quite close together, and because Regulus itself is far brighter than the companion. So trying to see the other star is like trying to pick out a flashlight right next to a searchlight. Astronomers discovered the companion by breaking the light from Regulus into its individual wavelengths or colors. Patterns in that rainbow of colors reveal details about Regulus. Detailed observations reveal a second pattern mingling with the first — the imprint of the companion. A study last year got the best look yet at that second imprint, allowing astronomers to nail down some of the companion's details. It's about a third the mass of the Sun, compared to almost four times the Sun's mass for Regulus. Its surface is thousands of degrees hotter than the Sun's. And it's about six percent the Sun's diameter. The star is becoming a white dwarf — the final stage of life for a Sun-like star. Eventually, the star will get even smaller, and a bit cooler. That'll make it even harder to see through the glare of brilliant Regulus. Look for Regulus near the Moon the next couple of nights. It rises below the Moon late tonight, and stands to the lower left of the Moon at first light. It'll be even closer to the Moon tomorrow night.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

Looking Up
Looking Up: Astronomical Observance From the Grand Canyon (Featuring Tyler Nordgren)

Looking Up

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 29:13


Dean is headed off to spend some time as Astronomer in Residence at the Grand Canyon for the next few months, and previous holder of the position and artist, Tyler Nordgren (@NightSkyPark) joins to preview the experience.

StarDate Podcast

A NASA spacecraft whose launch window opens tomorrow is being sent on a suicide mission. It will destroy itself by slamming into a small asteroid. By doing so, it may help save lives by keeping future asteroids from slamming into Earth. DART — the Double Asteroid Redirection Test — will arrive at a binary asteroid in about 10 months. The larger member of the system, Didymos, is a half-mile in diameter. Its companion, Dimorphos, is only about a tenth of a mile across. DART will hit Dimorphos head on, at a speed of about 15,000 miles per hour. The impact should change the smaller space rock's orbit. Astronomers will use several telescopes to track the impact and its aftermath to see how much the orbit changes. The goal is to help determine if we could deflect an asteroid on a collision course with Earth. An asteroid the size of Dimorphos could cause a lot of damage. And a larger asteroid could cause a global catastrophe. If we know about the impact far enough in advance, though, we might be able to push the asteroid onto a safe path. One way is by slamming stuff into it, and this is the first test to see how well that might work. DART is expected to shorten the length of Dimorphos's orbit by several minutes. Astronomers will precisely measure the orbit to see if that's the case — telling us if we're on the right track in the effort to save Earth from killer asteroids. Tomorrow: Hitting a cosmic reset button.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

StarDate Podcast
Alien Hunters

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 2:14


A new project says it's time for ET to come in from the cold. It plans to look for evidence of alien civilizations not in other star systems, but right here in our own. Astronomers have been searching for extraterrestrial intelligence for decades. They've used radio telescopes to hunt for signals from other star systems. More recently, they've also been hunting for high-powered lasers. So far, they haven't found a thing. Project Galileo will look for evidence that other civilizations are poking around the solar system. The project is headed by Avi Loeb, a scientist at Harvard. The project was motivated by several developments. In 2017, the first known interstellar object, ‘Oumuamua, passed through the solar system. It moved in odd ways. It might have been a comet. But Loeb suggested it could have been a probe from another civilization. And this June, the military released a report on UFOs seen in the last decade by military pilots. The report said many of the sightings couldn't be explained — but it didn't say they were extraterrestrial. The plan calls for Galileo to scan the skies for evidence of UFOs with a network of small telescopes. It'll also look for more interstellar visitors like ‘Oumuamua. It'll even scan for alien satellites in orbit. The project will use AI to sift through all the data. And it'll make its findings public — letting the rest of us know if it sees any evidence of alien technology close to home.  Script by Damond Benningfield   Support McDonald Observatory

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Ireland set to experience a partial lunar eclipse this morning

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 5:25


Frances McCarthy, Astronomer, describes this morning's partial lunar eclipse.

StarDate Podcast
Moon and Aldebaran

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 2:14


Astronomers spent decades hunting for planets around the star Aldebaran, the bright orange “eye” of the bull. And they found one. But their work also revealed details about Aldebaran itself. The astronomers looked at Aldebaran hundreds of times with telescopes at McDonald Observatory and elsewhere. They measured a small shift in its light caused by the gravitational tug of the planet. A few years ago, other astronomers combined those observations with some made by a space telescope. They found changes on the surface of Aldebaran caused by sound waves rippling through its interior. How the waves move through the star reveals important details about how the star is put together, just as sound waves moving through Earth reveal details about how it's put together. Those details helped revise much of our knowledge of Aldebaran. They showed that it's only about 16 percent heavier than the Sun — a good bit less massive than earlier estimates. They also showed that it's about six-and-a-half billion years old — a couple of billion years older than the Sun. So the hunt for planets around other stars is also helping us learn about the stars themselves. Aldebaran is especially easy to find the next couple of nights because it's close to the Moon. It rises a little below the Moon early this evening, and about the same distance to the right of the Moon tomorrow night. The two bodies will stay close together throughout both nights.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

UFO Encounters World-Wide
Ep.#28 Today We Have Special Guest, Author, Researcher, Investigator, and Astronomer "Marc D'Antonio"!!

UFO Encounters World-Wide

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 60:45


In today's Episode we have special guest, Long time Researcher and Investigator of the UFO subject, Author, and One of The best Astronomers I know "Marc D'Antonio"! We will be discussing his work with MUFON as the Chief Photo/Video Analyst, and His Show on YouTube called "SkyTour Live with Marc D'Antonio" on KGRAdb Radio! I also have some questions about his Astronomy work with his very own Observatories which he runs while doing his Show on YouTube. You can also read Marc's Book called "The Populated Universe" which is available on Amazon, In the book he has taken his extensive Astronomy background and squarely placed a focus on Exoplanet research and explores the scientific search for extraterrestrial life and makes the case for what he believes is the predisposition of the Universe to the creation of the building blocks of life and very likely life itself. You Can Now also SPONSOR/DONATE TO THE SHOW WITH OUR PAYPAL - https://paypal.me/JessePmufonFI -@JessePmufonFI- AND GET A SHOUT OUT ON THE SHOW, This will help continue the show into the new year to continue bringing you the BEST content, this is a Listener Supported show and we Thank you all for Tuning in every week!! So as always, Strap on Those Seatbelts were going for a ride!! MARC'S BIO: Marc D'Antonio has a degree in Astronomy and is the Mutual UFO Network's (MUFON) Chief Photo/Video Analyst, host of SkyTour Radio on KGRA, and host and creator of the popular SkyTour LiveStream with Marc Dantonio, a group of LIVE deep sky observatories on YouTube where people can go to watch beautiful deep sky objects materialize before their eyes in mere seconds courtesy of the SkyTour LiveStream Remote Observatories and their research telescopes. Marc is the CEO of FX Models, a model making and visual/special effects company specializing in digital/physical models, and organic visual effects in the film industry. He has an extensive work history in the Film and Television arena appearing regularly on several networks and television series/shows. His efforts creating the Aerial Anomaly Detection System (formerly called UFOTOG2), a remote system to detect advanced propulsion at play in our local universe with Academy Award winner Douglas Trumbull, promises to bring ufology into the 21st Century. CONTACT ME: TWITTER- @AATPEAK WEBSITE- UFOENCOUNTERSWORLDWIDE.WORDPRESS.COM EMAIL- UFOENCOUNTERSWORLDWIDE@GMAIL.COM SPONSOR/DONATE TO HELP THE SHOW - PAYPAL - https://paypal.me/JessePmufonFI -@JessePmufonFI - AND GET A SHOUT OUT ON THE SHOW!

Tales in Two Minutes- Jay Stetzer, Storyteller
Astronomer and the Chauffeur

Tales in Two Minutes- Jay Stetzer, Storyteller

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 2:24


My friend Steve is an astronomer, and he spends much of his time traveling around the country giving lectures on the topic.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
NOIRLab - Resolving A Discrepancy In The Hubble Constant

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 20:34


The Hubble Constant tells us how fast the universe is expanding. However, different methods of measuring the Hubble Constant give different results. In this podcast, NOIRLab's John Blakeslee describes data his team has collected to help resolve this discrepancy.  Bio: Rob Sparks is in the Communications, Education and Engagement group at NSF's NOIRLab. John Blakeslee is an Astronomer at NSF's NOIRLab studying galaxies, galaxy clusters, and the expansion of the universe. He completed his PhD at MIT, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship at the CalTech. Dr Blakeslee has worked as a Research Scientist with the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera project at Johns Hopkins University, a faculty member at Washington State University, a Staff Astronomer with the Canadian National Research Council in Victoria, British Columbia, and the Chief Scientist of Gemini Observatory. In addition to doing research, he now serves as the Head of Science Staff for Observatory Support at NOIRLab.   Links: https://noirlab.edu/public/news/noirlab2123/ https://noirlab.edu/public/blog/hubble-constant-result/ NOIRLab social media channels can be found at: https://www.facebook.com/NOIRLabAstro https://twitter.com/NOIRLabAstro https://www.instagram.com/noirlabastro/ https://www.youtube.com/noirlabastro   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1799: #COP26Glasgow: India asks for $1 Trillion; & What is to be done? Vijay Vaitheeswaran, @TheEconomist

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 11:45


Photo:  Examples of trillions we can grasp.             "Like great friends, galaxies stick together. Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have spotted a handful of great galactic pals bonding back when the universe was a mere 4.6 billion years old. The universe is believed to be 13.7 billion years old.  Collectively, these great galactic buddies are called galaxy clusters. A typical galaxy cluster can contain hundreds of galaxies and trillions of stars." #COP26Glasgow: India asks for $1 Trillion; & What is to be done? Vijay Vaitheeswaran, @TheEconomist https://www.bloomberg.com/green?sref=5g4GmFHo

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

https://spacescoop.org/en/scoops/2121/a-stellar-ballet/ Astronomers in Japan studied data that ALMA, the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, collected on a binary star system, XZ Tauri, for over three years, in 2015, 2016 and 2017. And with that volume of data, they've produced the first-ever “ALMA Animation” of the twin stars in a binary star system circling each other.    We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

PlanetGeo
Can Aliens See Us? Dr. Jackie Faherty

PlanetGeo

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 34:22


Astronomers can detect other planets orbiting around stars in the sky.  But, can those planets see us?  That's the question, and Dr. Jackie Faherty has answers!  This conversation is based on a paper that Dr. Faherty coauthored recently, found here.   We interviewed Dr. Jackie Faherty about it!  You can follow Dr. Faherty on Twitter and visit her website to learn more!Please leave us a review and rating!  Follow us on all the social medias we are @planetgeocast——————————————————Website: https://planetgeocast.comInstagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.com

StarDate Podcast
Passing By

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 2:14


A space rock as long as a football field or bigger will glide past Earth tonight. 2019 XS will pass about 350,000 miles away — half-again the distance between Earth and the Moon. Such encounters happen all the time. This one was forecast well in advance because the asteroid was discovered several years ago. Astronomers have observed it many times since then, allowing them to plot its orbit well into the future. But many visiting asteroids aren't discovered until they're right on top of us — usually because they're quite small. Astronomers have been searching for close-approaching asteroids for decades. If an asteroid as big as 2019 XS hit Earth, it could cause extensive damage. And if a bigger one hit us, it could threaten life across the whole planet. Finding and tracking such planet-killers far enough in advance might give us time to mount a defense. We'd need to know as much as possible about the specific asteroid — not just its size and speed, but what it's made of, how it's put together, how it spins, and other details. So when asteroids pass close by, scientists try to observe them. In the case of 2019 XS, a NASA station that tracks missions to the planets will bounce radio signals off the asteroid from Thursday through Sunday. It'll “catch” the reflections from the asteroid to make images. Scientists will study the pictures to learn more about this close-flying neighbor. Tomorrow: looking for darkness.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

The Ancients
The First Astronomers

The Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 47:22


For thousands of years indigenous Australians, the longest living culture on Earth, have been fascinated by the stars. In this episode Kamilaroi man and ANU astrophysics graduate Peter Swanton shines a light on the great depth of knowledge indigenous Australians associate with various constellations: from the multi-layered story about the Southern Cross to the unique study of the Dark Emu to how Torres Strait islanders used the phases of the Moon for weather predictions and seasons. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Avatar: The Last Airbender: Distorted Reality

In their search for a way to strike down the Water Nation before Seiryu's Moon, the gang- with a little help from Kanna- makes their way to the home of an eccentric woman known as The Astronomer... but Aang is unprepared for what he discovers upon arrival Meanwhile, Princess Katara continues her efforts to convince Sokka of her plan, hopeful he will join her in conquering Ba Sing Sei --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/atla-distorted-reality/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/atla-distorted-reality/support

The Daily Article
An asteroid astronomers didn't know existed just missed us: Good news in surprising places

The Daily Article

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 9:21


Abortion rates continue to drop in the US, but still almost 20 percent of pregnancies in the US end in abortion. In The Daily Article for November 5, 2021, Dr. Jim Denison breaks down why protecting only lives that are “viable” endangers all of us, not just the unborn. The question is not whether you should intercede and use your influence on behalf of life, but how. The Daily Article is written by Dr. Jim Denison and narrated by Chris Nichter. Subscribe to the newsletter at denisonforum.org/subscribe.

Nerdin' About
Güt for your Health

Nerdin' About

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 52:31


Open any social media app, and you're bound to be bombarded with ads and images of “wellness”. But can our health be hyped by adding or removing a single food? What's the science behind gluten and could a sprinkle of something special support your thyroid? Desiree Nielsen (she/her), Registered Dietician, is here to debunk some diet myths and explore how taking a more holistic approach rather than subscribing to the latest fad will be more beneficial to our health. A transcript of the episode can be found here: https://bit.ly/3bAQLBz Find Desiree on her website or on Instagram @desireenielsenrd Check out Desiree's podcast The Allsorts Podcast, which covers nutrition science with a roster of very cool guests. Or try some recipes from Desiree's cookbook “Eat More Plants” for nutrition-packed plant goodness. Also mentioned in this episode: Ask an Astronomer with Dr. Eldon Yellowhorn and the Maintenance Phase podcast.

Name Drop San Diego
Astronomer Lisa Will studies the stuff between stars

Name Drop San Diego

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 32:16


Dr. Lisa Will is a professor of astronomy and physics at San Diego City College and she's also the resident astronomer at the Fleet Science Center in Balboa Park. She oversees not one but two planetariums, and just generally loves everything related to space and sci-fi.

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
Astronomers See White Dwarf “switch on and off” For First Time

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 26:52


The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.SpaceTime Series 24 Episode 124*Astronomers see white dwarf “switch on and off” for first timeAstronomers have for the first time seen a white dwarf star appear to abruptly switch off and then on again.*A new study looks at the deep roots of Australian geologyA new study has shown for the first time that the Australian land mass is made up of different building blocks that fused together over 1.3 billion years ago.*Blue Origin announces plans for private space stationAmazon founder Jeff Bezos's space company Blue Origin has announced plans to build a privately owned and operated space station in low Earth orbit over the next few years.*The Science ReportPeople on the Autism spectrum more likely to self-harmArctic summer sea ice now less than half what it was in the 1980sDinosaur footprints tell a new storySkeptic's guide to shonky university coursesFor more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ If you love this podcast, please get someone else to listen too. Thank you…Sponsor Details:This episode is brought to you with the support of NameCheap…cheap domain names is just the beginning of your own online presence. We use them and we love them. Get our special deal…just visit: https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/namecheap and help support the show.For more SpaceTime visit https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com (mobile friendly). For enhanced Show Notes including photos to accompany this episode: https://www.bitesz.com/show/spacetime/blog/ RSS feed: https://www.spreaker.com/show/2458531/episodes/feed Email: mailto:SpaceTime@bitesz.comTo receive the Astronomy Daily Newsletter free, direct to your inbox...just join our mailing list at www.bitesz.com or visit https://www.bitesz.com/p/astronomy-daily/Help support SpaceTime: The SpaceTime with Stuart Gary merchandise shop. Get your T-Shirts, Coffee Cups, badges, tote bag + more and help support the show. Check out the range: http://www.cafepress.com/spacetime Thank you.If you're enjoying SpaceTime, please help out by sharing and telling your friends. The best recommendation I can get is one by you. Thank you…https://spacetimewithstuartgary.comhttps://bitesz.com

The Daily Space
Astronomers Discover 63 Galaxies in Protocluster

The Daily Space

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 19:55


Astronomers researching the G237 protocluster find 63 galaxies within, all producing stars and more galaxies at a high rate, acting as a “shipyard” for their region of the cosmos. Plus, Juno looks inside Jupiter's cloud bands and a review of “Invasion” on AppleTV+

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
The Large Magellanic Cloud Cannibalizing Smaller Galaxies

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 17:03


The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.SpaceTime Series 24 Episode 123*The Large Magellanic Cloud cannibalizing smaller galaxiesScientists have confirmed that the Large Magellanic Cloud has been cannibalizing smaller galaxies. Astronomers already knew that large galaxies like the Milky Way grow by merging with or cannibalizing smaller galaxies. But now a report in the journal Nature has shown that a small satellite dwarf galaxy like the Large Magellanic Cloud has in turn absorbed an even smaller galaxy in its vicinity.*NASA's first test of optical communications technologyNASA is about to test a new optical laser communications system in space for the first time. The Laser Communications Relay Demonstration is gearing up for launch next month with the payload now fully integrated into its host spacecraft and ready for its final testing before being lofted into orbit.*One Web's constellation passes the halfway markOne Web have launched another 36 broadband internet satellites into orbit.*The Science ReportDiscovery of the first fossil evidence of modern human remains from the Pleistocene in Sulawesi.The US State Department provides details on America's current nuclear weapons stockpile.A new study suggests horses were first domesticated in the Volga-Don region of Russia.Skeptic's guide to schadenfreude over COVID deniers who get sick.For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ If you love this podcast, please get someone else to listen too. Thank you…Your support is needed...SpaceTime is an independently produced podcast (we are not funded by any government grants, big organisations or companies), and we're working towards becoming a completely listener supported show...meaning we can do away with the commercials and sponsors. We figure the time can be much better spent on researching and producing stories for you, rather than having to chase sponsors to help us pay the bills.That's where you come in....help us reach our first 1,000 subscribers...at that level the show becomes financially viable and bills can be paid without us breaking into a sweat every month. Every little bit helps...even if you could contribute just $1 per month. It all adds up.By signing up and becoming a supporter at the $5 or more level, you get immediate access to over 240 commercial-free, double, and triple episode editions of SpaceTime plus extended interview bonus content. You also receive all new episodes on a Monday rather than having to wait the week out. Subscribe via Patreon or Supercast (you get a month's free trial with Supercast to see if it's really for you or not)....and share in the rewards. Details at Patreon www.patreon.com/spacetimewithstuartgary or Supercast - https://bitesznetwork.supercast.tech/ Details at https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com or www.bitesz.com Sponsor Details:This episode is brought to you with the support of NameCheap…cheap domain names is just the beginning of your own online presence. We use them and we love them. Get our special deal…just visit: https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/namecheap and help support the show.For more SpaceTime visit https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com (mobile friendly). For enhanced Show Notes including photos to accompany this episode: https://www.bitesz.com/show/spacetime/blog/ RSS feed: https://www.spreaker.com/show/2458531/episodes/feed Email: mailto:SpaceTime@bitesz.comTo receive the Astronomy Daily Newsletter free, direct to your inbox...just join our mailing list at www.bitesz.com or visit https://www.bitesz.com/p/astronomy-daily/Help support SpaceTime: The SpaceTime with Stuart Gary merchandise shop. Get your T-Shirts, Coffee Cups, badges, tote bag + more and help support the show. Check out the range: http://www.cafepress.com/spacetime Thank you.

Trekzone Podcasts
A White Dwarf; An Extragalactic Exoplanet and Blue Origin’s Space Station

Trekzone Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 16:33


Astronomers have found the future of our sun, a really old white dwarf thats switching on and off, the first extra galactic exoplanet has been found and Blue Origin's plans to build its own space station by the end of the decade.. The post A White Dwarf; An Extragalactic Exoplanet and Blue Origin's Space Station appeared first on Trekzone.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Guide To Space - Dark Energy Seems To Be Changing Over Time

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 11:42


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Y266jhhteQ From February 5, 2019. Astronomers working with the NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory and ESA's XMM-Newton have developed a technique to watch quasars and track the expansion of the Universe over the last 9 billion years.   What they found is that the mysterious dark energy that's currently accelerating the expansion of the Universe doesn't appear to be a fixed amount. It's changing, and appears to be increasing over time.    If true, it's a groundbreaking discovery in cosmology, and it could just fortell the end of the Universe.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

Walkabout the Galaxy
A World That's Out Of This Galaxy

Walkabout the Galaxy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 48:50


Almost all exoplanets have been discovered in our local neighborhood of the Milky Way, with a few exceptions due to gravitational microlensing, still within our galaxy. Astronomers have likely identified the first exoplanet in a distant galaxy by it eclipsing an X-ray source. We also check in on models of cosmological inflation, and the Moon still has surprises in store. All this, trivia, sci-fi rants, and more with the Astroquarks on Walkabout the Galaxy.

StarDate Podcast
Snarling Wolf

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 2:14


Wolf 359 likes to snarl. The star produces huge outbursts of energy. That could be a problem for life on any planets that orbit the star. Wolf 359 is one of our closest neighbors — less than eight light-years away. Only a few star systems are closer. Other than those big outbursts, the star is amazingly meek. It's less than one-tenth as massive as the Sun, and just one-tenth of one percent as bright. But Wolf 359 generates a powerful magnetic field. Lines of magnetic force can tangle, then snap. That produces a flare — a powerful outburst of X-rays and gamma rays. A recent study says the star probably produces outbursts as strong as anything ever seen from the Sun several times a day. And once a month or so, it can produce an outburst up to a hundred times stronger: a super-flare. Astronomers have found evidence of two planets orbiting the star. Neither is likely to be a home for life. But if there are planets in the right location for life, the flares could be a problem. They could heat up and erode some of a planet's atmosphere, and deliver a good jolt of energy to the surface. A planet might be able to handle the flares. But the flares wouldn't make it any easier for life around this tiny star. Wolf 359 is in Leo, which is high in the eastern sky at dawn. The star is well below Regulus, the lion's bright heart. But despite all the snarling, you need a telescope to see this close neighbor.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast
Scientists may have found the first planet outside our galaxy

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 6:51


Astronomers believe they have found signs of the first planet to be discovered outside our galaxy. Located 28 million light-years away from the Milky Way, the possible planet's discovery has 'huge' implications for the future of space study.

Evin Weiss Podcast
SETI: Looking for Life across the Universe - Senior SETI Astronomer Seth Shostak

Evin Weiss Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 33:47


Seth claims to have developed an interest in extraterrestrial life at the tender age of ten, when he first picked up a book about the Solar System. This innocent beginning eventually led to a degree in radio astronomy, and now, as Senior Astronomer, Seth is an enthusiastic participant in the Institute's SETI observing programs. In addition, Seth is keen on outreach activities: interesting the public – and especially young people – in science in general, and astrobiology in particular. He's co-authored a college textbook on astrobiology, and has written three trade books on SETI. In addition, he's published more than 400 popular articles on science including regular contributions to NBC News MACH, gives many dozens of talks annually, and is the host of the SETI Institute's weekly science radio show, “Big Picture Science.” New videos: https://www.youtube.com/TrueStoriesSc...New exclusive podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast... --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/evinweiss/support

ThePrint
Pure Science: Astronomers discover faster than usual Fast Radio Bursts

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 10:34


Astronomers have recorded over 1600 Fast Radio Bursts — mysterious, high energy radio pulses coming periodically from a spot in the sky — in under 60 hours. Where these radio signals come from and what causes them is a mystery. ThePrint's Sandhya Ramesh explains the observations, which pose more questions than answers to our understanding of these high energy phenomena. 

Physics World Stories Podcast
Searching for signs of alien technologies

Physics World Stories Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 43:12


Astronomers are looking for the technosignatures of advanced civilizations

Highlights from The Hard Shoulder
''BMI was invented by an astronomer, it only measures your ratio of height to weight''

Highlights from The Hard Shoulder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 12:47


''BMI was invented by an astronomer, it only measures your ratio of height to weight''

StarDate Podcast
Webb Telescope

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 2:14


Hubble Space Telescope has revealed some of the earliest galaxies in the universe — “cities” of stars as they looked when the universe was about half a billion years old. Astronomers would like to see even deeper, though — to the time when the first galaxies were taking shape. And if everything goes well, they'll soon get a new tool for the search. James Webb Space Telescope is being prepared for launch this fall. It's the largest space telescope ever built. Its main mirror spans about 21 feet. And it will collect almost seven times as much light as Hubble. That will allow the telescope to see galaxies taking shape roughly a quarter of a billion years after the Big Bang. Those observations will help scientists understand how massive clouds of gas and dust came together to make stars and galaxies. Webb is designed to study the universe at infrared wavelengths, which are invisible to the human eye. Most infrared comes from objects that are fairly cool. That includes clouds that are giving birth to stars, and disks around stars that are giving birth to planets. It also includes the planets themselves — those orbiting other stars, and those in our own solar system. Webb will try to measure the atmospheres of some of those distant worlds. If any of them have life, the telescope might be able to see some of the chemistry it produces — sniffing out signs of life with a giant new “eye” in space. We'll have more about the James Webb Space Telescope tomorrow. Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Armchair astronomers could help find hidden worlds

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 3:18


Dr Meg Schwamb, astronomer at Queen's University Belfast, discusses a new online initiative from the university asking volunteers to come forward and help to search for extra solar planets.

WIRED Science: Space, Health, Biotech, and More
Astronomers Get Ready to Probe Europa's Hidden Ocean for Life

WIRED Science: Space, Health, Biotech, and More

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 9:01


Jupiter's most enigmatic moon, one of a few ocean worlds in the solar system, will be the target of upcoming missions by NASA and the European Space Agency.

StarDate Podcast

The space around a black hole can be busy. As gas funnels into a black hole, it can form a disk that's heated to millions of degrees. And the spin of the disk and the black hole can create a strong magnetic field. The field can sculpt powerful “jets” that shoot gas from the disk into space at almost the speed of light. Astronomers should learn more about that process with a space telescope that's scheduled for launch this fall. It's called IXPE — the Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Explorer. The craft will carry three telescopes that are sensitive to X-rays, which are produced by some of the most powerful objects and events in the universe. The telescopes will feed light to instruments that will detect X-rays that have been polarized — they move through space in sync, like members of a marching band. The X-rays can be polarized by magnetic fields, so studying them reveals how the fields align, how they're created, and more. The list of targets includes black holes large and small, plus the remnants of exploded stars. Among those remnants are magnetars. These tiny, ultra-dense corpses produce magnetic fields that are trillions of times stronger than Earth's. IXPE should map those fields, helping scientists determine how magnetars are born, how they evolve, and how they affect the space around them. IXPE isn't the only space telescope being prepared for launch. We'll talk about a much bigger one tomorrow. Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
Plans Announced for an Aussie Lunar Rover

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 39:08


To become a SpaceTime supporter and unlock commercial free editions of the show, gain early access and bonus content, please visit https://bitesz.supercast.com/ . Premium version now available via Spotify.The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.SpaceTime Series 24 Episode 118*Plans announced for an Aussie lunar roverNASA has asked the Australian Space Agency to develop a robotic rover to find, study and transport regolith on the lunar surface.*Astronomers conduct a supernova post mortemAstronomers have delved deep into the remains of a thermonuclear supernova explosion. The new data reported in the Astrophysical Journal has allowed scientists to study the devastated remains of the progenitor white dwarf star which triggered the blast – in incredible detail.*A new hypothetical protoplanetA team of planetary scientists have come up with a something new to look for in the heavens called a synestia -- a huge, at this stage still hypothetical spinning, donut-shaped mass of hot, vaporized rock, formed as planet-sized objects smash into each other.*Space the final frontier‘I hope I never recover from it' – they were the words of a highly emotional William Shatner following his journey into space aboard Blue Origin's New Shepard.*The Science ReportAustralians advised to get a booster third COVID-19 vaccination shot.60% of Antarctic ice shelves vulnerable to melt-induced cracks which could trigger ice shelf collapse.Roof top solar systems could provide is more than the world's total energy consumption in 2018.Converting to renewable energy will cost Australian consumers over a trillion dollars.Skeptic's guide to the dangers of hyperbaric oxygen therapy.For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ If you love this podcast, please get someone else to listen too. Thank you…For more SpaceTime visit https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com (mobile friendly). For enhanced Show Notes including photos to accompany this episode: https://www.bitesz.com/show/spacetime/blog/ RSS feed: https://rss.acast.com/spacetime Email: mailto:SpaceTime@bitesz.comTo receive the Astronomy Daily Newsletter free, direct to your inbox...just join our mailing list at www.bitesz.com or visit https://www.bitesz.com/p/astronomy-daily/

Tech News Now
Mysterious radio signal coming from Milky Way baffles astronomers

Tech News Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 4:32


It exhibits a range of characteristics that make it highly unusual and unlike other radio sources from the depths of our galaxy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The European Skeptics Podcast
TheESP – Ep. #295 – Leo Burtscher and Climate Change

The European Skeptics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 44:32


In this episode we interview the German astronomer and climate activist, Dr. Leonard (Leo) Burtscher. Leo is a staff scientist at the observatory of Leiden University as well as active in the German skeptics, GWUP. He studies active galactic nuclei in Leiden since 2017 and communicates his research to younger and older audiences. He is also informing the public about the climate crisis in his spare time as a co-founder of the grass-roots movement Astronomers for Planet Earth. Enjoy!

David Gornoski
Science and U: Radio Signal in the Milky Way - A Neighbor's Choice

David Gornoski

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 21:59


David Gornoski begins the segment by responding to a listener's email on what type of foods we can avoid to reduce vegetable oil consumption. Plus, physicist Dr. Weiping Yu joins David to comment on the latest science news. What is the "extraordinary" unknown radio signal that Astronomers have discovered coming from the Milky Way? Is there a fifth fundamental force of nature? Listen to the full segment to find out and more. Visit A Neighbor's Choice website at aneighborschoice.com

ESOcast HD
Meet 42 Asteroids in Our Solar System (ESOcast 243 Light)

ESOcast HD

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 1:17


Astronomers have used the ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile to image 42 of the biggest main-belt asteroids. Meet some of the 42 in this video summarising the discovery!

ESOcast SD
Meet 42 Asteroids in Our Solar System (ESOcast 243 Light)

ESOcast SD

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 1:17


Astronomers have used the ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile to image 42 of the biggest main-belt asteroids. Meet some of the 42 in this video summarising the discovery!

StarDate Podcast
Fomalhaut

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 2:14


Autumn has few bright stars to call its own. In fact, it really has only one major star: Fomalhaut. And not surprisingly, it's known as the Autumn Star. It's low in the southeast as night falls now, far to the lower left of the planet Jupiter, which looks like a brilliant star. If you see Fomalhaut, you'll notice that there are no other bright stars anywhere around it. That's a bit misleading, because Fomalhaut appears to have two companion stars. That makes it a triple system. Both companions are faint, though, so you can't see them with the eye alone. The brighter of the two is below Fomalhaut, in the same constellation — Piscis Austrinus, the southern fish. The other is above Fomalhaut, in the adjoining constellation Aquarius — an indication of just how spread out the system is. The closer star is about a light-year from Fomalhaut, while the other is about two and a half light-years away. It's hard to be sure that such widely separated stars really do form a system. The stars share the same motion through space, they have the same composition, and they're the same age. That suggests that they were born together, from the same cloud of gas and dust. Astronomers can't be certain the stars are bound to each other, though, without plotting their orbits. But it would take millions of years for the stars to complete a single orbit, so there's no way to confirm that Fomalhaut and its faint companions really are stellar siblings.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

StarDate Podcast
Protected Space

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 2:14


The spectrum of radio waves is chopped up like the egg in an egg salad. Different chunks of spectrum are reserved for different uses: radio and TV broadcasts, cell phones, military transmissions, orbiting satellites, and many others. Several wavelength bands are set aside for radio astronomy — the study of radio waves from the universe. The waves are produced by the remnants of exploded stars, stellar corpses, supermassive black holes, planetary magnetic fields, and many other sources. The radio waves can reveal details about these sources that astronomers can't learn any other way. Even with some wavelengths reserved, though, radio astronomy is facing challenges. Devices that broadcast at the surrounding wavelengths often “bleed” into the protected bands, for example. Radio telescopes can pick up the transmissions of cell phones and orbiting satellites. Signals from these sources can overpower anything that comes from beyond Earth. And the problem is only likely to get worse in the years ahead. Astronomers do what they can to manage the problem. They place their radio telescopes in remote locations. They shield the receivers, and use computers to filter out interference from Earthly sources. They're even considering placing telescopes on the far side of the Moon, where terrestrial signals would be blocked. Still, there's only so much they can do to protect their fragments of the radio spectrum.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

Good Heavens!  The Human Side of Astronomy
How Meteors Impact Us Today (Part 2)

Good Heavens! The Human Side of Astronomy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 34:53


Barringer Meteor Crater in Arizona, just over 30 miles outside of Flagstaff.  What slammed into what is now part of the Arizona desert to make this giant three-quarter-mile-wide and some 600-feet-deep hole in the ground? Scientists believe the meteor was between 150 and 200 feet wide.  Earth is impacted routinely by meteors and micrometeors, tens of thousands of tons per year in fact, but thankfully a majority of these are no bigger than a sand grain or fine dust.  But once in a great while, KABOOM! The Earth gets blasted by a much larger meteor. There are other geological signs of impact craters throughout our planet. Astronomers are working diligently to try and detect what are known as "near-earth asteroids and meteors" before they catch us off guard.  So how do such wonders point us to the glory of God? How can they remind us of who God us? How do they fit in with our understanding of the heavens that God has created?  Come and see!  On part two of our discussion about these enigmatic floating rocks, Wayne and Dan take you around the world to some of the more well-known impact sites and meditate on what we can glean from them about our Creator, the Lord Jesus Christ.  Resources for our these episodes on meteors: Meteorites book:  https://www.amazon.com/Meteorites-Story-Our-Solar-System/dp/0228101743/  Book:  Night Sky with the Naked Eye https://www.amazon.com/Night-Sky-Naked-Eye-Constellations/dp/1624143091/ Best Meteor Showers in 2021 https://skyandtelescope.org/observing/best-meteor-showers-in-2021/ Meteor in Russia from 2013 - Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBLjB5qavxY

Daily Emunah Podcast - Daily Emunah By Rabbi David Ashear

The pasuk says in Tehillim perek 19 “השמים מספרים כבוד קל ומעשי ידיו מגיד הרקיע – David HaMelech is telling us that he looked at the creations in the world in amazement, seeing the greatness of Hashem in them. Studies have shown that the entire earth in which we live upon is 1.3 million times smaller than the Sun and there are stars in outer space that are big enough to contain 9.3 billion suns inside of them. The vastness is mind boggling. Astronomers estimate that there are two trillion galaxies just in the observable universe and all of the stars, planets and galaxies that we can see make up just 4% of the entire Universe. Which means there's another 96% which we can't see, detect or even comprehend. One of the reasons Hashem made the world like this is for us to realize His greatness. Somebody could become a believer in Hashem just by observing His creations. Rav Shach once went to visit someone in the hospital. At that time, the Rabbi himself was in his 90's and the hospital staff accorded him great honor. One of the top doctors there escorted the Rabbi out of the hospital when he left and Rav Shach turned to him and asked what kind of car he drove. The doctor answered, “A Mercedes.” Rav Shach then asked when he bought the car, to which the doctor replied, six months before that. Rav Shach asked further, why he needed a new car and what was wrong with his previous one. The doctor said, “Rabbi, I did have a Mercedes before as well, but they are always updating and making the car better.” Rav Shach then said, “We see from here, even the best cars on the market always have more room to improve in.” “Yes,” replied the doctor. Rav Shach then said, “I know you're an expert cardiologist. What do you think about doing something to the heart to improve it? Can you think of something in the heart that needs improving upon and fix it? Maybe one of the chambers is too small or maybe one of the lobes is too far to the left?” The doctor said, “No, the heart is perfect and doesn't need any improvements.” Rav Shach then said, “Please tell me, who can make something so perfect that never needs improving upon?” The doctor replied, “Only G-d.” And they both smiled. The brain is perfect, the eyes are perfect, every body part is perfect because they are the makings of Hashem. After David HaMelech wrote seven pesukim in that mizmor about the world, he switched gears and started speaking about the Torah saying, “תורת ה' תמימה משיבת נפש”, and he continued with more pesukim. Rabbi Zamir Cohen explained as follows: From a person observing the world and the creations of Hashem, we can come to emunah, but we'll still be left with a lot of questions regarding how and why things came into being. For that, Hashem gave us the ultimate gift, the Torah which is תמימה– complete – and has the answers to all of those questions. And that brings a person peace of mind – משיבת נפש. When a person has clarity, he feels at ease. For millennia, philosophers and laymen have been trying to figure out the purpose of the world. How did the world start? How did man start? Is there life after death? All of these questions and more have perplexed the minds of mankind for all of history. But we have all of the answers right in front of us, children in kindergarten know how the world started and know how Adam was created. We know our purpose, we know there is Olam Haba. Having clarity gives us peace of mind. As we begin once again reading the Torah from Bereshit, let us appreciate this wondrous gift that Hashem has shared with us.

Conversation Happens
Special Lady Day 19: Hypatia and Victoria Kawēkiu Kaʻiulani Lunalilo Kalaninuiahilapalapa Cleghorn

Conversation Happens

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 111:27


 This episode covers Hypatia: mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher, and Victoria Kawēkiu Kaʻiulani Lunalilo Kalaninuiahilapalapa Cleghorn, Hawaii's Crown Princess. https://www.specialladyday.com/

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Today we bring you another episode in our new series, Famous Women Astronomers, with the story of Dr. Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin.   Cecilia Helena Payne was born in Wendover, Buckinghamshire, England on May 10th, 1900. Her father was a fellow of Oxford University and a historian, but he drowned in a canal when she was only 4 years old.   Her mother was Emma Leonora Helena (Pertz) Payne, who was a skilled artist. She raised her 3 children alone after her husband's death. She ensured that all her children got good educations, Cecilia's brother became an archeologist and her younger sister was an architect.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://astrogear.spreadshirt.com/ for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Astrosphere New Media. http://www.astrosphere.org/ Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

Curiosity Daily
Psychosomatic Illnesses and Seeing Behind a Black Hole

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 14:04


Neurologist Suzanne O'Sullivan demystifies psychosomatic illnesses. Then, learn how scientists saw behind a black hole.  Additional resources from neurologist Suzanne O'Sullivan Pick up "The Sleeping Beauties And Other Stories of Mystery Illness" here: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/606597/the-sleeping-beauties-by-suzanne-osullivan/  NHS page: https://www.uclh.nhs.uk/our-services/find-consultant/dr-suzanne-osullivan  Follow @Suz_OSullivan on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Suz_OSullivan  Scientists saw behind a black hole for the first time by Briana Brownell Wilkins, D. R., Gallo, L. C., Costantini, E., Brandt, W. N., & Blandford, R. D. (2021). Light bending and X-ray echoes from behind a supermassive black hole. Nature, 595(7869), 657–660. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03667-0  XMM-Newton sees light echo from behind a black hole. (2021). Esa.int. https://www.esa.int/ESA_Multimedia/Images/2021/07/XMM-Newton_sees_light_echo_from_behind_a_black_hole  Sophie, S. (2021, August 3). Astronomers spot light from behind a black hole for the first time — proving Einstein right, again. Cbsnews.com. https://www.cbsnews.com/news/supermassive-black-hole-light-behind-einstein/  ‌Patel, N. V. (2021, July 28). Astronomers have spotted x-rays from behind a supermassive black hole. MIT Technology Review; MIT Technology Review. https://www.technologyreview.com/2021/07/28/1030233/x-rays-behind-supermassive-black-hole/  Shah, S. (2021). Scientists spot light behind a black hole for the first time | Engadget. Engadget; Engadget. https://www.engadget.com/black-hole-light-behind-092317917.html  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
George's Random Object - Object 56: The Next Best Thing to an Exoplanet

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 10:35


George's Random Astronomical Object presents the star HD 191089.  Astronomers may not have found an exoplanet orbiting this star, but they found the next best thing.   Brief biographgy: George Bendo is an astronomer who specializes in studying interstellar dust and star formation in nearby galaxies.  He currently works at the Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics at the University of Manchester, and his primary role is to support other astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA).  He has been creating biweekly episodes of George's Random Astronomical Object since 2019. https://www.randomastronomicalobject.com/   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://astrogear.spreadshirt.com/ for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Astrosphere New Media. http://www.astrosphere.org/ Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

StarDate Podcast
Busy Galaxy

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 2:14


Our home galaxy, the Milky Way, is like a leaky faucet. It gives birth to new stars a few drips at a time — the equivalent of no more than a few Suns per year. By contrast, a galaxy seen when the universe was young is like a fire hose: It's giving birth to thousands of stars a year. SPT0346-52 is so far away that we see it when the universe was just a billion years old. The galaxies of that era were stuffed with hydrogen and helium — the raw materials for making stars. Even for that era, though, SPT0346-52 is a standout. The galaxy is only a few thousand light-years across. That means its total mass and volume are much less than one percent of the Milky Way's. Yet it appears to be giving birth to the equivalent of as many as 4500 Suns every year. That makes it one of the most prolific star factories ever discovered — star-for-star, it's hundreds of thousands of times busier than the Milky Way. Astronomers are still trying to figure out why it's so busy. It could be two galaxies that are merging. That process would slam together their clouds of gas, squeezing them and triggering a massive starburst — a torrent of new stars from a busy galaxy. The galaxy is much too far and faint to see without a major telescope. But it's in the constellation Horologium, the pendulum clock. From the southern half of the United States, it scoots low across the southern horizon before dawn.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

Slow Burn
One Year: Elvis, the Pledge, and Extraterrestrials

Slow Burn

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 59:54


Three stories from one day in August 1977. Elvis Presley dies, and the National Enquirer goes after the ultimate tabloid scoop: a photo of the King in his coffin. A New Jersey high schooler becomes a pariah when she refuses to stand for the Pledge of Allegiance. Astronomers in Ohio get a mysterious signal from outer space—could it be a message from aliens? One Year is produced by Josh Levin, Evan Chung, and Madeline Ducharme. Mixing by Merritt Jacob. To support this show, subscribe to One Year on Apple, Spotify, or wherever you listen. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices