Podcasts about Cloud

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Visible mass of liquid droplets or frozen crystals suspended in the atmosphere

  • 9,683PODCASTS
  • 33,604EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 27, 2022LATEST
Cloud

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Cloud

Show all podcasts related to cloud

Latest podcast episodes about Cloud

ESV: Read through the Bible
January 27: Exodus 13–15; Matthew 19:1–15

ESV: Read through the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 13:52


Morning: Exodus 13–15 Exodus 13–15 (Listen) Consecration of the Firstborn 13 The LORD said to Moses, 2 “Consecrate to me all the firstborn. Whatever is the first to open the womb among the people of Israel, both of man and of beast, is mine.” The Feast of Unleavened Bread 3 Then Moses said to the people, “Remember this day in which you came out from Egypt, out of the house of slavery, for by a strong hand the LORD brought you out from this place. No leavened bread shall be eaten. 4 Today, in the month of Abib, you are going out. 5 And when the LORD brings you into the land of the Canaanites, the Hittites, the Amorites, the Hivites, and the Jebusites, which he swore to your fathers to give you, a land flowing with milk and honey, you shall keep this service in this month. 6 Seven days you shall eat unleavened bread, and on the seventh day there shall be a feast to the LORD. 7 Unleavened bread shall be eaten for seven days; no leavened bread shall be seen with you, and no leaven shall be seen with you in all your territory. 8 You shall tell your son on that day, ‘It is because of what the LORD did for me when I came out of Egypt.' 9 And it shall be to you as a sign on your hand and as a memorial between your eyes, that the law of the LORD may be in your mouth. For with a strong hand the LORD has brought you out of Egypt. 10 You shall therefore keep this statute at its appointed time from year to year. 11 “When the LORD brings you into the land of the Canaanites, as he swore to you and your fathers, and shall give it to you, 12 you shall set apart to the LORD all that first opens the womb. All the firstborn of your animals that are males shall be the LORD's. 13 Every firstborn of a donkey you shall redeem with a lamb, or if you will not redeem it you shall break its neck. Every firstborn of man among your sons you shall redeem. 14 And when in time to come your son asks you, ‘What does this mean?' you shall say to him, ‘By a strong hand the LORD brought us out of Egypt, from the house of slavery. 15 For when Pharaoh stubbornly refused to let us go, the LORD killed all the firstborn in the land of Egypt, both the firstborn of man and the firstborn of animals. Therefore I sacrifice to the LORD all the males that first open the womb, but all the firstborn of my sons I redeem.' 16 It shall be as a mark on your hand or frontlets between your eyes, for by a strong hand the LORD brought us out of Egypt.” Pillars of Cloud and Fire 17 When Pharaoh let the people go, God did not lead them by way of the land of the Philistines, although that was near. For God said, “Lest the people change their minds when they see war and return to Egypt.” 18 But God led the people around by the way of the wilderness toward the Red Sea. And the people of Israel went up out of the land of Egypt equipped for battle. 19 Moses took the bones of Joseph with him, for Joseph1 had made the sons of Israel solemnly swear, saying, “God will surely visit you, and you shall carry up my bones with you from here.” 20 And they moved on from Succoth and encamped at Etham, on the edge of the wilderness. 21 And the LORD went before them by day in a pillar of cloud to lead them along the way, and by night in a pillar of fire to give them light, that they might travel by day and by night. 22 The pillar of cloud by day and the pillar of fire by night did not depart from before the people. Crossing the Red Sea 14 Then the LORD said to Moses, 2 “Tell the people of Israel to turn back and encamp in front of Pi-hahiroth, between Migdol and the sea, in front of Baal-zephon; you shall encamp facing it, by the sea. 3 For Pharaoh will say of the people of Israel, ‘They are wandering in the land; the wilderness has shut them in.' 4 And I will harden Pharaoh's heart, and he will pursue them, and I will get glory over Pharaoh and all his host, and the Egyptians shall know that I am the LORD.” And they did so. 5 When the king of Egypt was told that the people had fled, the mind of Pharaoh and his servants was changed toward the people, and they said, “What is this we have done, that we have let Israel go from serving us?” 6 So he made ready his chariot and took his army with him, 7 and took six hundred chosen chariots and all the other chariots of Egypt with officers over all of them. 8 And the LORD hardened the heart of Pharaoh king of Egypt, and he pursued the people of Israel while the people of Israel were going out defiantly. 9 The Egyptians pursued them, all Pharaoh's horses and chariots and his horsemen and his army, and overtook them encamped at the sea, by Pi-hahiroth, in front of Baal-zephon. 10 When Pharaoh drew near, the people of Israel lifted up their eyes, and behold, the Egyptians were marching after them, and they feared greatly. And the people of Israel cried out to the LORD. 11 They said to Moses, “Is it because there are no graves in Egypt that you have taken us away to die in the wilderness? What have you done to us in bringing us out of Egypt? 12 Is not this what we said to you in Egypt: ‘Leave us alone that we may serve the Egyptians'? For it would have been better for us to serve the Egyptians than to die in the wilderness.” 13 And Moses said to the people, “Fear not, stand firm, and see the salvation of the LORD, which he will work for you today. For the Egyptians whom you see today, you shall never see again. 14 The LORD will fight for you, and you have only to be silent.” 15 The LORD said to Moses, “Why do you cry to me? Tell the people of Israel to go forward. 16 Lift up your staff, and stretch out your hand over the sea and divide it, that the people of Israel may go through the sea on dry ground. 17 And I will harden the hearts of the Egyptians so that they shall go in after them, and I will get glory over Pharaoh and all his host, his chariots, and his horsemen. 18 And the Egyptians shall know that I am the LORD, when I have gotten glory over Pharaoh, his chariots, and his horsemen.” 19 Then the angel of God who was going before the host of Israel moved and went behind them, and the pillar of cloud moved from before them and stood behind them, 20 coming between the host of Egypt and the host of Israel. And there was the cloud and the darkness. And it lit up the night2 without one coming near the other all night. 21 Then Moses stretched out his hand over the sea, and the LORD drove the sea back by a strong east wind all night and made the sea dry land, and the waters were divided. 22 And the people of Israel went into the midst of the sea on dry ground, the waters being a wall to them on their right hand and on their left. 23 The Egyptians pursued and went in after them into the midst of the sea, all Pharaoh's horses, his chariots, and his horsemen. 24 And in the morning watch the LORD in the pillar of fire and of cloud looked down on the Egyptian forces and threw the Egyptian forces into a panic, 25 clogging3 their chariot wheels so that they drove heavily. And the Egyptians said, “Let us flee from before Israel, for the LORD fights for them against the Egyptians.” 26 Then the LORD said to Moses, “Stretch out your hand over the sea, that the water may come back upon the Egyptians, upon their chariots, and upon their horsemen.” 27 So Moses stretched out his hand over the sea, and the sea returned to its normal course when the morning appeared. And as the Egyptians fled into it, the LORD threw4 the Egyptians into the midst of the sea. 28 The waters returned and covered the chariots and the horsemen; of all the host of Pharaoh that had followed them into the sea, not one of them remained. 29 But the people of Israel walked on dry ground through the sea, the waters being a wall to them on their right hand and on their left. 30 Thus the LORD saved Israel that day from the hand of the Egyptians, and Israel saw the Egyptians dead on the seashore. 31 Israel saw the great power that the LORD used against the Egyptians, so the people feared the LORD, and they believed in the LORD and in his servant Moses. The Song of Moses 15 Then Moses and the people of Israel sang this song to the LORD, saying,   “I will sing to the LORD, for he has triumphed gloriously;    the horse and his rider5 he has thrown into the sea.2   The LORD is my strength and my song,    and he has become my salvation;  this is my God, and I will praise him,    my father's God, and I will exalt him.3   The LORD is a man of war;    the LORD is his name. 4   “Pharaoh's chariots and his host he cast into the sea,    and his chosen officers were sunk in the Red Sea.5   The floods covered them;    they went down into the depths like a stone.6   Your right hand, O LORD, glorious in power,    your right hand, O LORD, shatters the enemy.7   In the greatness of your majesty you overthrow your adversaries;    you send out your fury; it consumes them like stubble.8   At the blast of your nostrils the waters piled up;    the floods stood up in a heap;    the deeps congealed in the heart of the sea.9   The enemy said, ‘I will pursue, I will overtake,    I will divide the spoil, my desire shall have its fill of them.    I will draw my sword; my hand shall destroy them.'10   You blew with your wind; the sea covered them;    they sank like lead in the mighty waters. 11   “Who is like you, O LORD, among the gods?    Who is like you, majestic in holiness,    awesome in glorious deeds, doing wonders?12   You stretched out your right hand;    the earth swallowed them. 13   “You have led in your steadfast love the people whom you have redeemed;    you have guided them by your strength to your holy abode.14   The peoples have heard; they tremble;    pangs have seized the inhabitants of Philistia.15   Now are the chiefs of Edom dismayed;    trembling seizes the leaders of Moab;    all the inhabitants of Canaan have melted away.16   Terror and dread fall upon them;    because of the greatness of your arm, they are still as a stone,  till your people, O LORD, pass by,    till the people pass by whom you have purchased.17   You will bring them in and plant them on your own mountain,    the place, O LORD, which you have made for your abode,    the sanctuary, O Lord, which your hands have established.18   The LORD will reign forever and ever.” 19 For when the horses of Pharaoh with his chariots and his horsemen went into the sea, the LORD brought back the waters of the sea upon them, but the people of Israel walked on dry ground in the midst of the sea. 20 Then Miriam the prophetess, the sister of Aaron, took a tambourine in her hand, and all the women went out after her with tambourines and dancing. 21 And Miriam sang to them:   “Sing to the LORD, for he has triumphed gloriously;  the horse and his rider he has thrown into the sea.” Bitter Water Made Sweet 22 Then Moses made Israel set out from the Red Sea, and they went into the wilderness of Shur. They went three days in the wilderness and found no water. 23 When they came to Marah, they could not drink the water of Marah because it was bitter; therefore it was named Marah.6 24 And the people grumbled against Moses, saying, “What shall we drink?” 25 And he cried to the LORD, and the LORD showed him a log,7 and he threw it into the water, and the water became sweet. There the LORD8 made for them a statute and a rule, and there he tested them, 26 saying, “If you will diligently listen to the voice of the LORD your God, and do that which is right in his eyes, and give ear to his commandments and keep all his statutes, I will put none of the diseases on you that I put on the Egyptians, for I am the LORD, your healer.” 27 Then they came to Elim, where there were twelve springs of water and seventy palm trees, and they encamped there by the water. Footnotes [1] 13:19 Samaritan, Septuagint; Hebrew he [2] 14:20 Septuagint and the night passed [3] 14:25 Or binding (compare Samaritan, Septuagint, Syriac); Hebrew removing [4] 14:27 Hebrew shook off [5] 15:1 Or its chariot; also verse 21 [6] 15:23 Marah means bitterness [7] 15:25 Or tree [8] 15:25 Hebrew he (ESV) Evening: Matthew 19:1–15 Matthew 19:1–15 (Listen) Teaching About Divorce 19 Now when Jesus had finished these sayings, he went away from Galilee and entered the region of Judea beyond the Jordan. 2 And large crowds followed him, and he healed them there. 3 And Pharisees came up to him and tested him by asking, “Is it lawful to divorce one's wife for any cause?” 4 He answered, “Have you not read that he who created them from the beginning made them male and female, 5 and said, ‘Therefore a man shall leave his father and his mother and hold fast to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh'? 6 So they are no longer two but one flesh. What therefore God has joined together, let not man separate.” 7 They said to him, “Why then did Moses command one to give a certificate of divorce and to send her away?” 8 He said to them, “Because of your hardness of heart Moses allowed you to divorce your wives, but from the beginning it was not so. 9 And I say to you: whoever divorces his wife, except for sexual immorality, and marries another, commits adultery.”1 10 The disciples said to him, “If such is the case of a man with his wife, it is better not to marry.” 11 But he said to them, “Not everyone can receive this saying, but only those to whom it is given. 12 For there are eunuchs who have been so from birth, and there are eunuchs who have been made eunuchs by men, and there are eunuchs who have made themselves eunuchs for the sake of the kingdom of heaven. Let the one who is able to receive this receive it.” Let the Children Come to Me 13 Then children were brought to him that he might lay his hands on them and pray. The disciples rebuked the people, 14 but Jesus said, “Let the little children come to me and do not hinder them, for to such belongs the kingdom of heaven.” 15 And he laid his hands on them and went away. Footnotes [1] 19:9 Some manuscripts add and whoever marries a divorced woman commits adultery; other manuscripts except for sexual immorality, makes her commit adultery, and whoever marries a divorced woman commits adultery (ESV)

Newt's World
Episode 365: Mark Mills on The Cloud Revolution

Newt's World

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 51:30


What does the future hold? Mark Mills makes the case that a roaring 2020s is arriving, and it won't come from any singular invention but from the convergence of radical advances in the three primary technology domains: microprocessors, materials, and machines. Accelerating this technological revolution is The Cloud, history's biggest infrastructure. Mills new book, The Cloud Revolution: How the Convergence of New Technologies Will Unleash the Next Economic Boom and A Roaring 2020s is out now. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Google Cloud Platform Podcast
Resiliency at Shopify with Camilo Lopez and Tai Dickerson

Google Cloud Platform Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 39:58


Carter Morgan and Stephanie Wong host Shopify guests Camilo Lopez and Tai Dickerson this week. Shopify streamlines the online purchasing process so merchants and customers can transact with confidence. Camilo and Tai talk in-depth about Shopify's tech stack and why the choices made are so important to performance. Shopify engineers use a combination of Ruby on Rails, MySQL and Google products like Kubernetes. Resiliency systems like active-active configurations, chat ops for quick solutions, and bot and overload protection are worked in. By leveraging these tools and staying flexible in their resiliency efforts, Shopify is able to adjust to new merchant requirements and teams are able to work efficiently. While tech continues to progress and change, the Shopify culture remains a driving force for advancement, Camilo tells us. The company ideals and axioms help steer the brand and dictate which technologies they'll use to solve new and changing client demands. The 2014 outage shaped the future of these cultural ideals, emphasizing the need for quick action and resiliency components like constraints to ensure system safety. Shopify engineers also built enhanced testing tools like Toxiproxy to simulate poor network conditions and account for potential issues. The 2021 Black Friday Cyber Monday shopping season was Shopify's biggest yet. Camilo and Tai describe how Shopify's resiliency culture and intense prep work made the biggest shopping weekend of the year so successful. By offering educational tools and a support network that values good communication, their company culture continues to grow, and Tai tells us how it's not just the software that should be resilient. Building a resilient, flexible company culture is just as important. Camilo talks about Shopify's recent shift to a completely remote work place and the new challenges and opportunities it presents. Camilo Lopez Camilo has worked at Shopify for more than 10 years, he has been an IC and a manager leading teams that take care of Shopify's scalability and resiliency. Tai Dickerson Tai is a production engineer at Shopify, where she shares her passion for resilience engineering with others via paper discussions and as a leader in Shopify's Resiliency SIG. Cool things of the week Machine images is GA docs New Cloud Logging and Monitoring capabilities Monitoring third-party applications: MariaDB docs Monitoring third-party applications: MySQL docs Monitoring third-party applications: Memcached docs Starting with version 2.8.0, the Ops Agent supports Ubuntu 21.10. For more information, see Linux operating systems docs Interview Shopify site Kubernetes site GKE site Kafka site Redis site Elastic Search site Memcached docs Toxiproxy site Shopify Engineering site Shopify Careers site BFCM Twitter Thread site Shopify engineers deliver on peak performance during Black Friday Cyber Monday 2021 blog Cloud, Load, and Modular Code: What 2022 Looks Like for Shopify blog Terri Haber on Resiliency at Scale site Terri Haber on Enforced Pacing site Bart Jedrocha on Load Testing site Bart Jedrocha on Tooling for Load Testing site Bart Jedrocha on The Future of Load Testing site Ryan McIlmoyl on Code Red site Ryan McIlmoyl on Working with IMOC site Camilo Lopez on The 2014 Outage site Camilo Lopez on Holiday Season Learnings site Tai Dickerson on Doing Things Differently site Tai Dickerson on Learning & Community site What's something cool you're working on? Stephanie is working on season 2 of the Where the Internet Lives podcast. Carter is working on season 2 of VM End to End. Hosts Carter Morgan and Stephanie Wong

Squawk on the Street
Rollercoaster Week Rolls On: Markets Rally Ahead of Fed Decision, Exclusives With the CEOs of Boeing and AT&T, and the Cloud Boosts Microsoft

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 45:36


One day after another furious late session rebound for stocks – this one falling short – Carl Quintanilla, Jim Cramer and David Faber explored what to make of the markets rallying hours ahead of a much-anticipated Fed decision and statement. Microsoft giving the tech sector a big boost after reporting quarterly results and guidance. The anchors reacted to Microsoft's earnings call, including CFO Amy Hood's cloud growth comments that lifted the stock and CEO Satya Nadella's remarks on how the Activision Blizzard deal could help Microsoft shape the metaverse. In an exclusive, Phil LeBeau and Jim interviewed Boeing CEO Dave Calhoun, who explained why the company's $4.4 billion charge in the fourth quarter should not overshadow the progress his company is making. David spoke exclusively with AT&T CEO John Stankey about the company's quarterly results, the wireless/broadband wars and when Stankey expects the “Warner Bros. Discovery” merger to close.

Screaming in the Cloud
Walking the Arcane Halls of AWS with Rachel Kelly

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 37:05


About RachelRachel Kelly is a Senior Engineer at Fastly in Infrastructure, and is a proud career-switcher over to tech as of about eight years ago. She lives in the Pacific Northwest and spends her time thinking about crafts, cycling, leadership, and ditching Google. Previously, she worked at Bright.md wrestling Ansible and Terraform into shape, and before then, a couple years at Puppet.  You can reach Rachel on twitter @wholemilk, or at hello@rkode.com.Links: Fastly: https://www.fastly.com SeaGL: https://seagl.org Twitter: https://twitter.com/wholemilk TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by LaunchDarkly. Take a look at what it takes to get your code into production. I'm going to just guess that it's awful because it's always awful. No one loves their deployment process. What if launching new features didn't require you to do a full-on code and possibly infrastructure deploy? What if you could test on a small subset of users and then roll it back immediately if results aren't what you expect? LaunchDarkly does exactly this. To learn more, visit launchdarkly.com and tell them Corey sent you, and watch for the wince.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key or a shared admin account isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And no, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. A periodic subject that comes up from folks desperate to sell people things is this idea of cloud repatriation, where people have put their entire business in the cloud decided, “Mmm, not so much. I'll build some data centers and move it there.” It's an inspiring story if you're selling things for data centers, but it's not something we're seeing widespread evidence of, and I maintain that.Today, we're going to talk about that, only completely different. My guest today is Rachel Kelly, senior infrastructure engineer at Fastly. And no, Fastly has not done a cloud repatriation of which I am aware. But Rachel, you've done a career repatriation. You went from working with AWS in your previous company to working in bare metal. First, welcome to the show, and thank you for joining me.Rachel: Thanks, Corey. Super happy to be here.Corey: Now, let's talk about why you would do such a thing. It feels almost like you're Benjamin Button-ing here.Rachel: Yeah, a bit. The normal flow has been to go from sort of a sysadmin level, where you're managing servers fairly directly, to an operational level, where you are managing entire swathes of servers to entire data centers and so forth. But I went from managing just the SaaS web app to managing enormous groups of servers in data centers all over the world. And I did that because the provisioning of the web app, even on AWS, was absolutely my favorite part. What I've always wanted to get better with is the Linux and networking side of how our internet runs, and at Fastly, we are responsible for such a huge percentage of traffic all over the world. We have enormous customers who rely on us to deliver that data. And I get to be part of the group of people that puts those enormous groups of servers into production.Corey: I started my career in the more traditional way of starting out in data centers, building things out, and then finally scampering off into a world of cloud. And you learn things going through the data center side of the world that don't necessarily command the same levels of attention in the cloud environment because you don't have to think about these things. Networking is a great example. During the Great Recession, there was a salary freeze. I was not super thrilled in my job, but I couldn't find another one, so I spent the year learning how networks worked, and it made me a better systems administrator as a direct result of this. Same story with file systems, not necessarily because I did extensive amounts of work with their innards, but because every sysadmin interview under the sun asked the same questions about how inodes work, how journaling works, et cetera, and you have to be able to pass the trivia-based hazing process in order to get a job when you've just been fired from your last one.So, that became where I was focusing on these things. And now looking at a world of cloud, feels like we don't really need that in any meaningful sense. I mean, a couple people need to know it, but by and large no one has to think about it. So, is that just a bunch of useless knowledge that is taking up valuable space in your brain that could be used for other stuff or do you think that there's a valid story for folks who are working in purely cloud environments to still learn how the things underlying these concepts work?Rachel: First of all, I think that there is so much that we can do with less particular networking knowledge than we've ever needed in the past, thanks so much in part to AWS and all of their hangers-on. But yes, there are still people who need this networking knowledge. And once you have that kind of knowledge, once you're able to see how the routes talk to each other, and how your firewalls actually work, and how to abstract out these larger networks and determining your subnetting and everything, you can utilize that really beautifully, even in something like VPC on AWS. Without that kind of knowledge, like, you can still get quite a bit done—which I think is a testament to the power of abstraction in AWS—but I mean, boy oh boy, what you can do once you have some of that knowledge.Corey: I'm not allowed in the AWS data centers because I'm very bad at dodging bullets, but I find the knowledge is still useful because it helps me reason about things. When I know what—at least in a traditional environment—it's doing, I know what AWS is emulating, and I can safely assume that I haven't discovered some bug in their network stack for almost anything reasonable that I'd be working on other than maybe their documentation explaining it. So, when I start reasoning about it from that perspective, things make a lot more sense. And that's always been helpful. The argument historically has been when you're hiring—at least in the earlier days of cloud—well, I'm trying to hire, but it's hard to find cloud talent, so the story was always, “Oh, don't worry. If you've worked in a data center, we'll teach you the cloudy pieces because it's the natural evolution of things.” And there's a whole cottage industry of people training for exactly that use case. Because you are who you are, and doing what you do, how do you find hiring works when you're going the exact opposite direction?Rachel: Oh, my gosh, it's so interesting. In my area, we are trying to build these huge groups of servers based on bare metal. Do we hire sysadmins? Maybe. Do we hire ops folks? Maybe. Do we hire network engineers? Also, maybe.There are so many angles that we need to be aware of when pulling new talent into our area. And I think it's fascinating what all of these different, largely, like, non-programmer types have to contribute to the provisioning process. We need someone with expertise in security, and quality, and networking, and file systems, and everything else between those items. And it's really exciting seeing what people can add to our process.Corey: There's so much in there that I love, but at the part I'm going to focus on is you're talking about new hires as being additive. And that is valuable. It can lead to some pretty toxic and shitty behaviors, where it's, “We want to make sure everyone we hire is schmucks we've hired now.” Like, no, that is not what we're talking about. But culture is something you get whether you want it or not, and I firmly believe teams are atomic, when you bring someone new in or let someone go, you haven't changed the team, you have a new team, in many respects, and that dynamic becomes incredibly important.The idea of hiring people for strength has always been what I look for, as opposed to absence of weakness, where it's okay, I'm going to ask you a whole bunch of questions around all the different aspects of computing; I'm going to find the area you're bad at, and we just beat the snot out of you on that. It's, yeah, if I want to join a fraternity, I would.Rachel: [laugh]. Yeah, when I was job seeking, I wound up in interviews at places where their method of interviewing was very much hazing. “Well, let's see, I haven't read your resume. It says that you've set up a few things with Nginx. Do you know about this particular command in Nginx?” It's like, “Well, geez, I could look it up and figure it out, but that's not the point of this job.”I mean, we work together collaboratively every day, and if that doesn't sound familiar to you, I'm going to leave this interview. But yes, I mean, everybody's additive. There was another gal who joined at the same time that I did at Fastly, and we both have a very operational background. And we were additive to the very strong networking and data center engineers who were already on the team. And as far as I can tell, the team changed overnight when we joined.It is now our role—both this other gal's and mine—to work so much on the automation piece of our build process, which has been focused on lightly in some areas, but that we can bring that with—even just shell scripting, we are able to enhance that process by so much. And I just fantasize about the day that we can get someone in who is directly on our team and focused on security, or directly on our team and focused on testing. The heights we could soar to with that kind of in-department knowledge, where we're still focused on creating these builds, it's just so exciting to think about.Corey: It is and it's easy to look at data centers as the way things used to be but not the future at all, but CDNs are increasingly becoming something very different than they used to be. And I admit I'm a little stodgy; I tend to fight the tide. There's value in having something that is serving static assets close to your customer. There's value to the CDN, in following the telco story, of aspiring to be more than just the quote-unquote, “Dumb pipe,” because that's a commodity; you want to add differentiated value. But I'm also leery to wind up putting things that look like business logic into the edge at this stage.And I'm starting to feel like I might be wrong as far as the way that the world views these things. But I like the idea that if a CDN takes an outage—which is not common, but it does happen—that I should be able to seamlessly—well, “Seamlessly”—failover to a different CDN within an hour or so. But if there's significant business logic in your CDN, you've got to either have that replicated in near real-time between the two providers, or your migration is now measured with a calendar instead of a stopwatch.Rachel: Yeah, absolutely. I mean, that's an incredibly hard problem. We want to be able to really provide that uptime. And we don't really have outages. Everybody remembers—well, listeners of this show will probably remember, the Fastly outage, but—Corey: The Fastly outage, and that's the—Rachel: The—Corey: —best part is the fact that I'm talking about ‘the' and everyone knows the one I'm talking about, that says something.Rachel: Yeah. In June of this year, we had an outage for 45 minutes, and it was just an incredible and beautiful effort on the engineering side to get us back up as quick as possible. There were a handful of naysayers, certainly, in the outage, but we fixed it real fast. One thing that I loved was your tweet about it in June, when our outage happened. “The fact that Fastly was able to detect, identify, and remediate this clearly complex problem as quickly as they did may be one of the most technically impressive things I've seen in years.” I appreciated that so much. So, many folks internal to Fastly appreciated that point of view so much because the answer to should I have a backup CDN? Like, yeah, maybe, and it is complicated because you have so much logic on the edge right there, but really, the answer is, we really do a good job of staying up. And that cannot be the full picture for any company that needs just a ton of HA, but that is what we'd really like to present, we really want you to be able to trust us. And I feel like we have demonstrated that.Corey: I would argue from where I sit you absolutely have. If this were a three times a week situation, it wouldn't matter, no one would care because no one's going to trust the CDN that breaks like that.Rachel: Right.Corey: It gets to the idea of utility computing. And that means different things to different people, but to me, what that says is that when I use an actual utility, like water or electricity, when I turn the faucet or flip a switch, I don't wonder if it's going to work or not. Of course, now I have IoT light switches, so I absolutely wonder if it's going to work or not, but going to the water story, yeah, I turn on the faucet, if something doesn't happen, or the water comes out a different color than expecting, I have immediate concerns. And that is extraordinarily atypical and I can talk about that one time it happened. It's not that every third time I go and wash my hands, the water catches fire because there's fracking nearby, or something. Or it's poisonous because I live in Flint. It is just a thing that works.No one is going to sit here and have a business problem and say, “You know what I really need? I really need a local point of presence close to my users so that the static asset can be served more quickly and efficiently to this.” No, the business problem is, “Our website is slow, so people aren't using it.” It's how do you speak to things like that? And how do you make working with it either programmatically or through a console—because surprise, business users generally don't interact with things via APIs—how do you make that straightforward? How do you make that accessible, and Fastly does—Rachel: Oh gosh.Corey: —a bang-up job on this.Rachel: I think that Fastly has done a good job on it. How that has happened, I simply cannot tell you whatsoever. I am so far from support and marketing. I know that those folks work their tails off and really are focused on selling the story of you need your assets to be more easily delivered to the people who want to consume it. No, and you would never use that as a soundbite for Fastly because it [laugh] it sounds like a robot said it.Corey: It's always—I was gonna interesting, but I'm also going to go with strange—the ability to, for whatever reason, build out a large scaling infrastructure business like this—CDNs are one of those businesses where you're not going to come up with this in your garage and a cloud provider tonight and be ready to deploy in a couple of weeks. It takes time to get these facilities out there. It takes tremendous capital investment. But I want to switch a little bit because I know that you're a believer in this in the same way that I am. As much fun as it is to talk smack about cloud providers, I think it's impossible to effectively understate just how transformative the idea of being able to prototype things via a cloud provider is.Yeah, it's not going to be all businesses, I'm not going to build a manufacturing company on a cloud provider overnight in my spare time, but I can build the bones of a SaaS app and see if it works or not without having to buy infrastructure or entering into long-term contracts. I just need a credit card and then I'll use a free tier that's going to lie to me and then hit me with a surprise $60,000 bill. But yeah, you know, the thought is there.Rachel: The thought is there. I think that if you know a little bit what you're doing with a not even terribly clever operations engineer to get into AWS with you, you can prototype that for pretty cheaply. If you're not spending all this money on transfer fees and whatever else. If you really just want this small mock up of hey, does this work? Can it be reached from the network? Again, getting your networking knowledge in will only serve you, even in this setting, even though we're in the modern era.I mean, I think it's incredible, and I think it's responsible for the total democratization of the modern internet as we know it. Yes, there are other cloud providers, but AWS is who brought this to everybody. Their support for when you run into a jam is some of the most technical and capable of any support organization I've ever interfaced with. And at my previous role we did all the time because, you know, the internet gets complicated, if you can imagine that. And I just think that's phenomenal.On AWS, I want something where I'm hooking up some VPC to this Redis Database over here to a few EC2 instances with backups going over here, and some extremely restricted amount of dummy data flowing from all of those objects. And there's nothing like that. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah. And part of the reason behind this, as it turns out, is architectural. The billing system aspires to an eight-hour consistency model, in which case, I spin up something and it shows up in the bill eight hours later. In practice, this can take multiple days. But it's never going to get fixed until the business decides, all right, you can set up a free tier account with the following limits on it, and to get past these, you have to affirmatively upgrade your account so we can start charging you and we automatically going turn things off or let you stop adding storage to it or whatnot, whenever you cross these limits.Well today, you can do whatever you want for the first eight hours. And the way to fix this is, cool, Amazon eats it. Whenever their billing system doesn't catch something, they eat the free tier. And given how much they love money, and trimming margins, and the rest, suddenly you have an incentive because if someone screws up royally and gets that $60,000 bill before the billing system can clamp down on it, okay, great. I would rather the $1.6 trillion company eat that bill than the poor schmoo sitting in their dorm room halfway around the world.Rachel: That's such a good point. Some schmo in their dorm room. How many kids have been bitten by this that we don't hear about because people become ashamed of “Stupid mistakes” like that—that was big air quotes, for those of you at home. It's not a stupid mistake.Corey: People think I'm kidding when I say this, but Robinhood had a tragic story, right? A 19-year-old was day-trading, saw on the app that he had lost $900,000—which turned out not to be true once things settled—and killed himself. And that is tragic. It is not a question of if, it's a question of when someone sees this, reads that you're on the hook for it, support takes a few days to respond, they see their life flashing before their eyes because in many cases, that is more money than people in some of these places will expect to earn in a year, and does something horribly tragic. And at that point, there's a bell that has been rung that cannot be unrung.Of all the things I want to fix, yeah, I complain and I whine about an awful lot of stuff, but this is the one that has the most tragic consequences. No story for a human is going to end in tragedy because of the usurious pricing for Managed NAT Gateway data transfer, but a surprise bill that we know support is going to wipe over something like that, that is going to break people. And that's not okay.Rachel: No, it's not okay. I think that you write very well about that topic in particular, and I really would love to see some changes take place. I know that Amazon knows their business better than to need to rely on some Adore Me-style subscription model that you can't figure out how to get out of. Like, have some faith in your products or don't sell it.Corey: I really, really wish that more companies saw it that way. And the hell of it is the best shining example is a recurring sponsor of this show: Oracle Cloud. Oracle is, let's be honest, they're Oracle; that's less a brand than a warning label in many cases, but I've often said the Oracle Cloud biggest challenge is the word Oracle at the front of it—Rachel: Absolutely.Corey: —because their service offering is legitimate, their free tier is actually free—I've been running some fairly beefy stuff there for over a year, and have never been charged a dime for it. And it's not because I'm special; it's because I haven't taken the affirmative upgrade-my-account step. And their data transfer pricing is great. Within the confines of those things, yeah, it's terrific. I can't speak to what it looks like a super large-scale for a cloud-native app, yet, but that's going to change; people are starting to take them a lot more seriously.And I've got to say, in previous years in the re:Invent keynotes, they've made fun and kicked at Oracle a fair bit, which no one has any sympathy for. Now, I don't think that would lend the same way, just among people who have decided to suspend disbelief long enough and kick the tires in the Oracle free tier. It's like, well, yeah, you can say a lot of negative things about Oracle—and I have a list of them—but you know, what I never got with Oracle: A surprise bill. And its Oracle we're talking about, where surprise billing is the entire reason that they—Rachel: It's the model.Corey: —are a company.Rachel: Yeah. [laugh].Corey: That is the model. And in this case, they are nailing it. And I've often said that you can buy my attention, but not my opinion. Long before they sponsored this show, I was talking, like, this about this particular offering. “Oh, so you're saying we should migrate everything to Oracle databases?” “Good, Lord, no. Not without talking with someone who's been down that path.” And almost everyone who has will scream at you about it. It's a separate model. It's a separate division. It's a separate way of thinking about things. And I'm a big fan of that.Rachel: Oh, that's great. There have been ruinous results of Oracle's decisions and acquisitions in our industry, and yet, this does appear to be a slice of the market that they have given autonomy to the people running it. And I feel like that's really the key. I know just a hair about the product process—the new product introduction process at Amazon in general, And therefore, I actually do have a bit of faith that they will fix this. It's just a huge problem, and when Oracle is eating your lunch, I mean, I just—you really have some things to reconsider.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Rising Cloud, which I hadn't heard of before, but they're doing something vaguely interesting here. They are using AI, which is usually where my eyes glaze over and I lose attention, but they're using it to help developers be more efficient by reducing repetitive tasks. So, the idea being that you can run stateless things without having to worry about scaling, placement, et cetera, and the rest. They claim significant cost savings, and they're able to wind up taking what you're running as it is, in AWS, with no changes, and run it inside of their data centers that span multiple regions. I'm somewhat skeptical, but their customers seem to really like them, so that's one of those areas where I really have a hard time being too snarky about it because when you solve a customer's problem, and they get out there in public and say, “We're solving a problem,” it's very hard to snark about that. Multus Medical, Construx.ai, and Stax have seen significant results by using them, and it's worth exploring. So, if you're looking for a smarter, faster, cheaper alternative to EC2, Lambda, or batch, consider checking them out. Visit risingcloud.com/benefits. That's risingcloud.com/benefits, and be sure to tell them that I said you because watching people wince when you mention my name is one of the guilty pleasures of listening to this podcast.Corey: I am an Amazon fan. I think that given the talent, and the insight, and the drive that they have there—not to mention the fact that they're a $1.6 trillion company—if they want to do something, it will get done. And there are very few bounds I would put on it. Which means that everything that Amazon does, is, on some level, a choice. There are very few things they could not achieve with concerted effort if they cared enough.Corey: I want to also tell a story about you for a change, because why not? Back in 2018, I was just really getting to have an audience, and the rest, and I found myself at the replay party at re:Invent. And it was a weird moment for me because I'd finished most of my speaking stuff, I had hung out with my meetups and my friends and the rest, and I'm wandering around the party—Rachel: Your DevOps stand-up, as I recall.Corey: That's what it w—that's what it was. Yeah, my DevOps stand-up, cloud comedy, whatever you want to call it. And I'm walking around, and it's isolating and weird after something like that—back in the before times, at least—and when people know me as a character, more or less, but not as a person, and it's isolating, and it's lonely, and it's—again, you don't feel great after four days in Las Vegas, and it's dark, and it's hard to tell who's who we ran into each other and just started walking around and having a conversation outside because apparently 4000 decibels as a little much for volume for both of us. And it was just great finding someone who I can talk to as a human being. There's not enough of that in different ways. Because remember, back then, I was an independent consultant I didn't have colleagues to hang out with. It was—Rachel: Oh, that was pre-Duckbill.Corey: That was when I was still the Quinn Advisory Group.Rachel: Oh, very good. Okay. Yes, I do remember that.Corey: The Duckbill Group was formed about a month-and-a-half after that as memory serves.Rachel: Oh, okay. Cool.Corey: But yeah, same problem. It's, how do I build this? How do I turn this into something was a separate problem that hadn't quite—hadn't come up with an answer yet. So, I'm an independent consultant, wandering around, feeling lonely. My clients are all off doing their own things because it turns out that I'm great at representing clients in meetings with Amazon execs, but lousy at representing them on the dance floor.So, it was just the empathy that exuded from you was just phenomenal. And I don't know ever thank you for just how refreshing it was to be able to just step back from the show for a minute and be a person. So thanks.Rachel: Oh, likewise. I remember I had gotten in touch with you beforehand as well to say, like, “I'm going to be at re:Invent. I don't know any women who will be there. Can you please introduce me to some?” And you introduce me to some lovely people who, along with you, really helped me navigate my first re:Invent in a huge way, which was—you think it's going to be overwhelming, multiply that by ten or a hundred. That is how much information is coming at you all the time when you are at re:Invent.So, to go to this funny party where there was like some EDM DJ, who I think was, like, well-known or something in 2018, be like, [laugh] that's really not my thing. But I want to bum around this party, I do want to see what's going on, and if I can touch base with anybody else that I have met during this conference. And I remember we, kind of like, stuck close to each other. And that was so—that was, it was so human. And I appreciated that so much from you as well.I was sent by my company—as anybody who goes to [OSCON 00:31:03] or re:Invent are, if they pay full freight [laugh]—it was so lovely to just have a buddy to bum around with and make fun of things, and talk shop, and everything in between.Corey: I do want to give one small tip, something buried in there that I think is just something I've been doing extensively for a while, but I haven't really ever called it out, or at least not recently—and I'll do a tweet thread about this after we're done recording—the counterpoint that I want to that I want to point out is that introductions are great, but every person I introduced you to, I had your permission to give their email address to them, and I reached out to them independently in every case and said, “Hey, someone would like”—once I was had your permission to reference you—“She would like to talk to other folks who don't look like me who are going to re:Invent. May I introduce you?” The idea of a double opt-in introduction goes so far. And I'm talking about this for folks who aren't me. In my case, fine. If some rando wants to introduce me to some other rando, knock yourself out. There is very little showing up in my inbox that I am not going to have some way of handling. But not everyone thinks about things that way, and it just shows a baseline level of human respect.Rachel: Yeah, absolutely. I actually just did that this morning. I'm sure all of us get these calls a few times a year: “I'm thinking about switching to tech because the money's there, the stability is there, the job market is there, and I have been underpaid and treated poorly for a long time,” or whatever variation on that story that I know we all are aware of. And I talked with him for a while last night, and then I put him in touch with the dual opt-in emails with someone in the field that he's looking at, exactly, and a recruiter friend of mine to help give more perspective on the industry as a whole. And with both of those people, I asked permission to introduce them to the friend of mine who had reached out to me, and both of them responded right away because when you are fielding questions like these all day, you become familiar with the kindest way to do that.And I really love being able to use my network in that way. Yes, I know a person at X, and yes, I would love to introduce you to Y. And I will make sure that everybody agrees and knows that this is coming, and I'm not just taken by surprise. Where I do get those emails and I understand that etiquette is something to learn, it isn't directly common-sense sometimes. And then you sit down and you think about it, or someone says to you like, “I really need you to give me a heads up before giving my contact information to someone that I don't know.”Corey: It happens. It's about being accessible. It's about making the industry better than it is. And on that topic, I have one more area I want to delve into before we call it a show, and that is you are on the program committee for SeaGL, the Seattle GNU/Linux conference.Rachel: That's right.Corey: I have fond memories of that conference, once upon a time. I gave a keynote a few years ago back when I was, you know, able to go places without it being a deadly risk, and much more involved in the community side of the world when it comes to conferences. I've unfortunately pulled back from a lot of it, just due to demands on my time. But great conference. Enjoyed a lot of the conversations once you, sort of, steered around the true believers around some areas of things, to the point where it subverts, you know, being civil to people. But it was a good conference. There was a lot to recommend it.Rachel: SeaGL is a beautiful little conference. It is community-focused. We don't let sponsors get on stage. We really restrict how much the people giving us money are able to dictate what we do. What we do is create a platform for people to discuss open-source in a human way, I would say.I think in our earlier days, we had a lot of focus on software freedom at all costs, and that has softened in the name of humans and social justice in a way that I feel very proud of. I have been the program chair for three years now, and it's just wonderful seeing the trends that come up every year. Our conference is Friday and Saturday, November 5th and 6th, so I hope that by the time you hear this, you will still have an opportunity to go to that; I'm not sure. Some of the themes this year have just been so interesting. It's all about—and this will be very interesting to a particular subset of people, and maybe not to everybody—but about open-source governance, and how do we maintain the soul and the purpose of an open-source project, while keeping people housed and fed who are working on these things, and to not sign over all the rights of a given project to our corporate overlords and such.So, there's a number of talks that are going to be talking about that. A few years ago, the trend that I was really excited about that I personally gave a talk about as well, is how to start owning and managing your own data entirely. I gave a talk on trying to get off Google, which is Herculean and close to impossible. And I understand that, and that's frustrating. But you know, we see these trends where we're trying to help our community protect itself and remain open at the same time in a technical and open-source context. And it's just an exciting and lovely organization and event each year. This is our second year being virtual. I was shocked by how good our virtual experience was last year. And I have high hopes for this year, too. So, I hope you can come check it out.Corey: I would highly recommend it though I believe this will be airing after the show goes out.Rachel: Ah darn.Corey: But there's always next year.Rachel: That's right. And they're all recorded as well, all the talks will be recorded. The publication date on those might be a little bit after but yes, they will all be up.Corey: But we will of course include links to that in the [show notes 00:37:13] because there's always next year.Rachel: That's right.Corey: I want to thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Rachel: I think probably the best place is on Twitter. That is @wholemilk on Twitter. Like, the dairy product by the gallon that's me.Corey: And that link to that will go in the [show notes 00:37:33] as well. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I really appreciate it.Rachel: Thank you, Corey. This has been great.Corey: It really has. Rachel Kelly, senior infrastructure engineer at Fastly. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with a comment telling me that you should absolutely shove your business logic fully into the CDN, then wind up not being able to edit the comment because it's locked to a single CDN.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

AWS Morning Brief
ClickOps

AWS Morning Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 7:09


Want to give your ears a break and read this as an article? You're looking for this link.https://www.lastweekinaws.com/blog/clickopsNever miss an episode Join the Last Week in AWS newsletter Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts Help the show Leave a review Share your feedback Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts What's Corey up to? Follow Corey on Twitter (@quinnypig) See our recent work at the Duckbill Group Apply to work with Corey and the Duckbill Group to help lower your AWS bill

The Boundaries.me Podcast
Episode 308 - The Dr. Cloud Show Live - Beware of Your Obstacles - 1-4-2022

The Boundaries.me Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 72:49


On this episode of The Dr. Cloud Show:   Sherry is trying to reconcile with family and wants to take the emotions out of it. She feels the need to appeal to the emotional aspects of their problems. It's exhausting and painful. Is there a healthier way to go about reconciling?   Written Question: When people you're close to cross your boundaries, is it too harsh to not want contact?   Benjamin's wife is distrustful of him in the most important areas like his love and faithfulness to her and in their finances. He's not sure what he can do differently.   Written Question: I'm returning to my ex-fiance after 2 years, they are working through issues. The problem is that the people closest to me aren't convinced things are all that different.   Robin and John are setting a boundary with their daughter-in-law. She's been rude in the past. As a result, they don't have the relationship they'd like to with their grandchildren. How can they find a middleground?   Are you having difficulty with trusting someone you're close to? Maybe you're trying to rebuild trust but you get set back by reliving what happened. Is this person worthy of giving your trust to in the first place? We have a two hour live workshop coming up on Trust! It's on February 21st. If you can't attend live, don't worry! All purchases include endless streaming access to the recording and the outline. https://www.boundaries.me/trust   Get a free 14 day trial to Boundaries.me with over 90 video courses, daily coaching emails and more. We've got courses on codependency, finding safe people, dealing with a narcissist, and over 90 other courses. You'll also get daily coaching videos delivered to your inbox--short 2-4 minute videos that give you one thing to do that day to build your way to a better version of yourself. We've also got a members-only support community on the site where you can discuss what you're learning, and get support and share support along the way. It's a free two-week trial, cancel at anytime, and only $9 a month after that. https://www.boundaries.me

The Official SaaStr Podcast: SaaS | Founders | Investors
SaaStr 521: How To Create a High Performing Sales Organization: Five Strategies for Driving Peak Performance Through Reimagined Management with Hootsuite CRO Melissa Murray Bailey

The Official SaaStr Podcast: SaaS | Founders | Investors

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 24:00


Driving peak sales performance is a mission most SaaS companies strive to accomplish. Yet, sales team targets are often set extremely high, with management expecting their teams to miss. This might bring success for the company, but it leads to negative experiences for the sales rep, and your teams may ultimately fail to perform to their fullest potential. Hootsuite CRO Melissa Murray Bailey shares secrets to running a successful SaaS sales team and reducing employee turnover. 

New Life Live with Steve Arterburn
New Life Live: January 26, 2022

New Life Live with Steve Arterburn

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 49:05


Topics: Teens, Marijuana, Pornography, Brain Issues, Sexual Abuse, Same-Sex Attraction, Dating, Engagement Hosts: Chris, Dr. Sheri Keffer, Special Guest Host Zach Matchett, Student Pastor at Northview Church in Carmel, Indiana Caller Questions: I have a 16yo son addicted to vaping THC who just got expelled from a Christian boarding school; how can I handle this?  What happens to the brains of porn-addicted men if they The post New Life Live: January 26, 2022 appeared first on New Life.

So techt Deutschland
Startup organisiert digitales Vermächtnis

So techt Deutschland

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 32:38


Der Tod ist in unserem Kulturkreis noch ein tabuisiertes oder stigmatisiertes Thema, sagt Uwe Böhler. Er ist Gründer und CEO von Cloud of Legacy, einem Startup für digitale Nachlässe. Sein Produkt ziele zwar auf den Moment des Todes ab, sei aber eine Hommage an das Leben, findet Böhler. Als Quereinsteiger Mitte 50 will sich der ehemalige Manager noch einmal neu erfinden. Uwe Böhler erzählt im ntv-Podcast "So techt Deutschland", wie er sich mit dem Slogan "be disruptive" ermutigt hat, noch einmal neue Wege zu gehen. Sie haben Fragen an Frauke Holzmeier und Andreas Laukat? Dann schreiben Sie eine E-Mail an sotechtdeutschland@ntv.de.

extraETF Podcast – Erfolgreiche Geldanlage mit ETFs
#83 Korrektur bei Technologieaktien | Deshalb immer breit streuen

extraETF Podcast – Erfolgreiche Geldanlage mit ETFs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 9:55


Praktisch alle Kryptowährungen und Technologieaktien mussten in den vergangenen Tagen deutliche Verluste hinnehmen. Innerhalb weniger Tage hat der gesamte Krypto- und Technologiemarkt bis zu 40 Prozent an Wert verloren. Dieser rasante Sinkflug hat vor allem Börsenneulingen schmerzhaft gezeigt, wie risikoreich es ist, nur auf eine oder wenige Aktien zu setzen. Ist dein Portfolio auch davon betroffen? In dieser Episode erkläre ich dir, wie du dich jetzt verhalten solltest, wie du Risiken in deinem Portfolio künftig minimierst und in den Griff bekommst – und warum es gut ist, etwas Cash verfügbar zu haben. Viel Spaß beim Anhören! +++ Rabattaktion bis Ende Januar: Jetzt 30 Prozent sparen auf ein extaETF Finanzmanager Jahresabo. Einfach dazu beim Upgrade den Code: 2022 im Warenkorb eingeben. Infos unter https://de.extraetf.com/service/finanzmanager +++ Informationen zu im Podcast besprochenen Themen: Zum extraETF Rebalancing-Rechner https://de.extraetf.com/finanzrechner/rebalancing-rechner Ideen für deine ETF-Anlage: Musterportfolios https://de.extraetf.com/etf-portfolio Hier kannst du ein Extra-Magazin abonnieren https://shop.extraetf.com/ Link zur neuesten Ausgabe des Extra-Magazins: https://shop.extraetf.com/collections/einzelausgaben?utm_source=podcast +++ Tipp: Mit einem Scalable Capital Broker Depot kannst du ETFs und Aktien ganz besonders günstig handeln und ansparen. Teste das Broker-Angebot von Scalable Capital und eröffne ein kostenfreies Wertpapierdepot. Jetzt Scalable Capital Broker Depot eröffnen! https://de.extraetf.com/go/scalablecapital-broker +++ ++++++++ Anmeldung für den extraETF Newsletter https://de.extraetf.com/service/etf-newsletter extraETF Finanzmanager: Überwache deine Portfolios https://de.extraetf.com/offer/overview extraETF App: Die beste App für ETF-Anleger https://de.extraetf.com/service/extraetf-app ++++++++ Wenn du dich noch intensiver über ETFs informieren möchtest, dann kann ich dir unsere Social-Media-Kanäle empfehlen. In unserer Facebook-Gruppe „ETF-Strategie by extraETF“ kannst du dich mit über 50.000 Anlegern über ETFs austauschen. Hier geht es zu Facebook-Gruppe. https://www.facebook.com/groups/173765373152193 Spannende Infos, News und Aktuelles rund um extraETF.com findest du auf unserem Instagram-Kanal. Wir freuen uns auf deinen Besuch! https://www.instagram.com/extraetf_de/ ++++++++ Es handelt sich dabei um einen Werbe- oder einen Affiliate-Link. Wenn du diesen Link klickst und etwas kaufst oder abschließt, erhalten wir eine Provision. Dir entstehen dadurch keine Mehrkosten. Vielen Dank für deine Unterstützung.

State of Love and Trust
New Ed Single & Next Record w/ Andrew Watt Reaction

State of Love and Trust

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 58:28


Jason and Paul critique Ed's newest single "Brother the Cloud" from his new record Earthling. Next they discuss the prospect of Andrew Watt producing the next Pearl Jam record as predicted by Vedder himself in a recent interview. Then the guys debate the most Essential Song from Vs. All that and the Lyric and Live Cut of the Week - Long Road. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

FINRA Unscripted
Deep Learning: The Future of the Market Manipulation Surveillance Program

FINRA Unscripted

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 30:14


FINRA's Market Regulation and Technology teams recently wrapped up an extensive project to migrate the majority of FINRA's market manipulation surveillance program to using deep learning in what is perhaps the largest application of artificial intelligence in the RegTech space to date. On this episode, we hear from Susan Tibbs, senior vice president of Market Manipulation in the Market Regulation Quality of Markets group, and from C.K. Chow, principal developer with the Technology team, about how the use of deep learning is making FINRA's market surveillance data more digestible and increasing the efficiency and flexibility of the program. How are we doing? Take the FINRA Unscripted survey today. Resources mentioned in this episode:Episode 13: How the Cloud and Machine Learning Have Transformed FINRA Market SurveillanceEpisode 67: FINRA's R&D Program: Exploring the Future of Advanced AnalyticsEpisode 68: Augmenting the Exam and Risk Monitoring Program with Data Analytics and Technology

Screaming in the Cloud
Drawing from the Depths of Experience with Deirdré Straughan

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 41:12


About DeirdréFor over 35 years, Deirdré Straughan has been helping technologies grow and thrive through marketing and community. Her product experience spans consumer apps and devices, cloud services and technologies, and kernel features. Her toolkit includes words, websites, blogs, communities, events, video, social, marketing, and more. She has written and edited technical books and blog posts, filmed and produced videos, and organized meetups, conferences, and conference talks. She just started a new gig heading up open source community at Intel. You can find her @deirdres on Twitter, and she also shares her opinions on beginningwithi.comLinks: “Marketing Your Tech Talent”: https://youtu.be/9pGSIE7grSs Personal Webpage: https://beginningwithi.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/deirdres TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by LaunchDarkly. Take a look at what it takes to get your code into production. I'm going to just guess that it's awful because it's always awful. No one loves their deployment process. What if launching new features didn't require you to do a full-on code and possibly infrastructure deploy? What if you could test on a small subset of users and then roll it back immediately if results aren't what you expect? LaunchDarkly does exactly this. To learn more, visit launchdarkly.com and tell them Corey sent you, and watch for the wince.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Rising Cloud, which I hadn't heard of before, but they're doing something vaguely interesting here. They are using AI, which is usually where my eyes glaze over and I lose attention, but they're using it to help developers be more efficient by reducing repetitive tasks. So, the idea being that you can run stateless things without having to worry about scaling, placement, et cetera, and the rest. They claim significant cost savings, and they're able to wind up taking what you're running as it is, in AWS, with no changes, and run it inside of their data centers that span multiple regions. I'm somewhat skeptical, but their customers seem to really like them, so that's one of those areas where I really have a hard time being too snarky about it because when you solve a customer's problem, and they get out there in public and say, “We're solving a problem,” it's very hard to snark about that. Multus Medical, Construx.ai, and Stax have seen significant results by using them, and it's worth exploring. So, if you're looking for a smarter, faster, cheaper alternative to EC2, Lambda, or batch, consider checking them out. Visit risingcloud.com/benefits. That's risingcloud.com/benefits, and be sure to tell them that I said you because watching people wince when you mention my name is one of the guilty pleasures of listening to this podcast.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the best parts about running this podcast has been that I can go through old notes of conferences I've went to, and the people whose talks I've seen, the folks who have done interesting things that back when I had no idea what I was doing—as if I do now—and these are people I deeply admire. And now I have an excuse to reach out to them and drag them onto this show to basically tell them that until they blush. And today is no exception for that. Deirdré Straughan has had a career that has spanned three decades, I believe, if I'm remembering correctly.Deirdré: A bit more, even.Corey: Indeed. And you've been in I want to say marketing, but I'm scared to frame it that way, not because that's not what you've been doing, but because so few people do marketing to technical audiences well, that the way you do it is so otherworldly good compared to what is out there that it almost certainly gives the wrong impression. So, first things first. Thank you for joining me.Deirdré: Very happy to. Thank you for having me. It's always a delight to talk with you.Corey: So, what is it you'd say it is you do, exactly? Because I'm doing a very weak job of explaining it in a way that is easy for folks who have never heard of you before—which is a failing—to contextualize?Deirdré: Um, well, there's one—you know, I was until recently working for AWS, and one of the—went to an internal conference once at which they said—it was a marketing conference, and they said, “As the marketing organization, our job is to educate.” Now, you can discuss whether or not we think AWS does that well, but I deeply agree with that statement, that as marketers, our job is to educate people. You know, the classical marketing is to educate people about the benefits of your product. You know, “Here's why ours is better.” The Kathy Sierra approach to that, which I think is very, very wise is, don't market your product by telling people how wonderful the product is. Tell them how they can kick ass with it.Corey: How do you wind up disambiguating between that and, let's just say it's almost a trope at this point where someone will talk about something, be it a product, be it an entire Web3 thing, whatever, and when someone comes back and says, “Well, I don't think that's a great idea.” The response is, “Oh, no, no. You just need to be educated properly about it.” Or, “Do your own research.” That sort of thing. And that is to be clear, not anything I've ever seen you say, do, or imply. But that almost feels like the wrong direction to take that in, of educating folks.Deirdré: Well, yeah, I mean, the way it's used in those terms, it sounds condescending. In my earliest, earlier part of my career, I was dealing with consumer software. So, this was in the early days of CD recording. We were among the pioneering CD recording products, and the idea was to make it—my Italian boss saw this market coming because he was doing recording CDs as a service, like, you were a law firm that needed to store a lot of data, and he would cut a CD for you, and you would store that. And you know, this was on a refrigerator-sized thing with a command-line interface, very difficult to use, very easy to waste these $100 blank CDs.But he was following the market, and he saw that there was going to be these half-height CD-ROM drives. And he said, “Well, what we need to go with that is software that is actually usable by the consumer.” And that's what we did; we created that software. And so in that case, there were things the customer still had to know about CDR, but my approach was that, you know, I do the documentation, I have to explain this stuff, but I should have to explain less and less. More and more of that should be driven into the interface and just be so obvious and intuitive that nobody ever has to read a manual. So, education can be any of those things. Your software can be educating the customer while they're using it.Corey: I wish that were one of those things we could point out and say, “Well, yeah, years later, it's blindingly obvious to everyone.” Except for the part where it's not, where every once in a while on Twitter, I will go and try a new service some cloud company launches, or something else I've heard about, and I will, effectively, screenshot and then live tweet my experiences with it. And very often—I'll get accused of people saying, “Ahh, you're pretending to be dumb and not understanding that's how that interface works.” No, I'm not. It turns out that the failure mode of bad interfaces and of not getting this right is not that people look at it and say, “Ah, that product is crap.” It's that, “Oh, I'm dumb, and no one ever told me about it.”That's why I'm so adamant about this. Because if I'm looking at an interface and I get something wrong, it is extremely unlikely that I'm the only person who ever has. And it goes beyond interfaces, it goes out to marketing as well with poor messaging around a product—when I say marketing, I'm talking the traditional sense of telling a story, and here's a press release. “Great. You've told me what it does, you told me about big customers and the rest, but you haven't told me what painful problem do I have that it solves? And why should I care about it?” Almost like that's the foregone conclusion.No, no. We're much more interested in making sure that they get the company name and history right in the ‘About Us' at the bottom of the press release. And it's missing the forest for the trees, in many respects. It's—Deirdré: Yeah.Corey: —some level—it suffers from a similar problem of sales, where you have an entire field that is judged based upon some of the worst examples out there. And on the technical side of the world—and again, all these roles are technical, but the more traditional, ‘I write code for a living' types, there's almost a condescension or a dismissiveness that is brought toward people who work in sales, or in marketing, or honestly, anything that doesn't spend all their time staring into an IDE for a living. You know, the people who get to do something that makes them happy, as opposed to this misery that the coder types that we sometimes find ourselves trapped into. How have you seen that?Deirdré: Yeah. And it's also a condescension towards customers.Corey: Oh absolutely.Deirdré: I have seen so many engineers who will, you know, throw something out there and say, “This is the most beautiful, sexy, amazing thing I've ever done.” And there have been a few occasions when I've looked at it and gone, you know, “Yes, I can see how from a technical point of view, that's beautiful and amazing and sexy, but no customer is ever going to use it.” Either because they don't need it or because they won't understand it. There's no way in that context to have that make sense. And so yeah, you can do beautiful, brilliant engineering, but if you never sell it and no one ever uses it, what's the point?Corey: One am I of the ways that I've always found to tell a story that resonates—and it sometimes takes people by surprise when they're doing a sponsorship or something I do, or whatnot, and they're sitting there talking about how awesome everything is, and hey, let's do a webinar together. And it's cool, we can do that, but I'd rather talk to one of your customers because you can say anything you want about your product, and I can sit here and make fun of it because I have deep-seated personality problems, and that's great. But when a customer says, “I have this problem, and this is the thing that I pay money for to fix that problem,” it is much harder for people to dismiss that because you're voting with your dollars. You're not saying this because if your product succeeds, you get to go buy a car or something. Now, someone instead is saying this because, “I had a painful point, and not only am I willing to pay money to make this painful thing go away, but then I want to go out in public and talk about that.”That is an incredibly hard thing to refute, bordering on the impossible, in some circumstances. That's what always moved me. If you have a customer telling stories about how great something is, I will listen. If you have your own internal employees talking about great something is, I have some snark for you.Deirdré: And that is another thing AWS gets right, is they—Corey: Oh, very much so.Deirdré: —work very hard to get the customer in front of the audience. Although, with a new technology service, et cetera, there was a point before you may have those customers in which the other kind of talk, where you have a highly technical engineer speaking to a highly technical audience and saying, “Here's our shiny new thing and here's what you can do with it,” then you get the customers who will come along later and say, “Yes, we did thing with the shiny new thing, and it was great.” An engineer talking about what they did is not always to be overlooked.Corey: Your career trajectory has been fascinating to me in a variety of different ways. You were at Sun Microsystems. And I guess personally, I just hope that when you decide to write your memoirs, you title it, The Sun Also Crashes. You know, it's such a great title; I haven't seen anything use it yet, and I hope I live to see someone doing that.And then you were at Oracle for ten months—wonder how that happened? For those who are unaware, there was an acquisition story—and then you went to spend three-and-a-half years running educational programs and community at Joyent, back before. Community architect—which is what you were at the time—was really a thing. Community was just the people that showed up to talk about the technology that you've done. You were one of the first people that I can think of in this industry when I've been paying attention, who treated it as something more than that. How do you get there?Deirdré: So, my early career, I was living in Italy because I was married to an Italian at the time, and I had already been working in tech before I left the United States, and enjoyed it and wanted to continue it. But there was not much happening in tech in Italy then. And I just got very, very lucky; I fell in with this Italian software entrepreneur—absolute madman—and he was extremely unusual in Italy in those days. He was basically doing a Silicon Valley-style software startup in Milan. And self-funded, partly funded by his wealthy girlfriend. You know, we were small, scrappy, all of that. And so he decided that he could make better software to do CD recording, as these CD-ROM drives were becoming cheaper, and he could foresee that there would be a consumer market for them.Corey: What era was this? Because I remember—Deirdré: This—Corey: —back when I was in school, basically when I was failing out of college, burning a bunch of CDRs to play there, and every single tool I ever used was crap. You're right. This was a problem.Deirdré: So, we started on that software in, ohh, '91.Corey: Yeah.Deirdré: Yeah. His goal was, “I'm going to make the leading CD recording software for the Windows market.” Hired a bunch of smart engineers, of which there are plenty in Italy, and started building this thing. I had done a project for him, documenting another OCR—Optical Character Recognition—product, and he said, “How would you like to write a book together about CD recording?” And it's like, “Okay, sure.”So, we wrote this book, and, you know, it was like, basically, me reading and him explaining to me the various color book specs from Philips and Sony that explain, you know, right down to the pits and lands, how CD recording works, and then me translating it into layman's terms. And so the book got published in January of 1993 by Random House. It's one of the first books, if not the first book in the world to actually be published with a CD included.Corey: Oh, so you're ultimately the person who's responsible—indirectly—for hey, you could send CDs out, and then the sea of AOL mailers showing up—basically the mini-frisbee plague that lasted a decade or so, for the rest of us?Deirdré: Yeah. And this was all marketing. For him, the whole idea of writing a book was a marketing ploy because on the CD, we included a trial version of the software. And that was all he wanted to put on there, but I thought, “Well, let's take this a step further.” This was—I had been also doing a little bit of work in journalism, just to scrape by in Italy.I was actually an Italian computer journalist, and I was getting sent to conferences, including the launch of Adobe PDF. Like, they sent me to Scotland to learn about PDFs. Like, “Okay.” But then it wasn't quite ready at the time, so I ended up using FrameMaker instead. But I made an entire hypertext version of that book and put it on that CD, which was launched in early '93 when the internet was barely becoming a thing.So, we launched the book, sold the book. Turned out the CD had been manufactured wrong and did not work.Corey: Oh, dear.Deirdré: And I was just dying. And the publisher said, “Well, you know, if you can get ahold of the readers, the people”—you know, because they were getting complaints—they said, “If you can reach the readers somehow and let them know, there's a number they can call and we'll send them a replacement disk.” We had put our CompuServe email address in the book. It's like, “Hey, we'd love to hear from you. Write to us at”—Corey: Weren't those the long string of numbers as a username.Deirdré: Yeah.Corey: Yeah.Deirdré: Mm-hm. You could reach it via external email at the time, I believe. And we didn't really expect that many people would bother. But, you know, because there was this problem, we were getting a lot of contacts. And so I was like, I was determined I was going to solve this situation, and I was interacting with them.And those were my first experiences with interacting with customers, especially online. You know, and we did have a solution; we were able to defuse the situation and get it fixed, but, you know, so that was when I realized it was very powerful because I could communicate very quickly with people anywhere in the world, and—quickly over whatever the modem speed was [laugh] at that time, you know, 1800 baud or something. And so I got intr—I had already been using CompuServe when I was in college, and so I was interested in how do you communicate with people in this new medium.And I started applying that to my work. And then I went and applied it everywhere. It's like, “Okay, well, there's this new thing coming, you know, called the internet. Well, how can I use that?” Publishing a paper manual seems kind of stupid in this day and age, so I can update them much more quickly if I have it on a website.So, by that time, the company had been acquired by Adaptec. Adaptec had a website, which was mostly about their cables and things, and so I just, kind of, made a section of the website. It was like, “Here is all about CDR.” And it got to where it was driving 70% of the traffic to Adaptec, even though our products were a small percentage of the revenue. And at the same time, I was interacting with customers on the Usenet and by email.Corey: And then later, mailing lists, and the rest. And now it—we take it for granted, but it used to be that so much of this was unidirectional, where at an absolute high level, the best you could hope for in some cases is, “I really have something to say to this author. I'm going to write a letter and mail it to the publisher and hope that they forward it.” And you never really know if it's going to wind up landing or not? Now it's, “I'm going to jump on Twitter and tell this person what I think.”And whether that's a good or bad change, it has changed the world. And it's no longer unidirectional where your customers just silent masses anymore, regardless of what you wind up doing or selling. And I sell consulting services. Yeah, I deal with customers a lot; we have high bandwidth conversations, but I also do an annual charity t-shirt drive and I get a lot of feedback and a lot of challenges with deliveries in the rest toward the end of the year. And that is something else. We have to do it. It's not what it used to be just mail a self-addressed stamped envelope to somewhere, and hope for the best. And we'll blame the post office if it doesn't work. The world changed, and it's strange that happens in your own lifetime.Deirdré: Yeah. And there were people who saw it coming, early on. I became aware of The Cluetrain Manifesto because a customer wrote to me and said, I think you're the best example I see out there of people actually living this. And The Cluetrain Manifesto said, “The internet is going to change how companies interact with customers. You are going to have to be part of a conversation, rather than just, we talk to you and tell you what's what.” And I was already embracing that.And then it has had profound implications. It's, in some ways, a democratization of companies and their products because people can suddenly be very vociferous about what they think about your product and what they want improved, and features they'd like added, and so forth. And I never said the customer is always right, but the customer should always be treated politely. And so I just developed this—it was me, but it was a persona which was true to me, where I am out here, I'm interacting with people, I am extremely forthcoming and honest—Corey: That you are, which is always appreciated, to be clear. I have a keen appreciation for folks who I know beyond the shadow of a doubt will tell me where I stand with them. I've never been a fan of folks who will, “I can't stand that guy. Oh, great, here he comes. Hi.” No.There is something very refreshing about the way that you approach honesty, and that you have always had that. And it manifests in different forms. You are one of those people where if you say something in public, be it in writing, be it on stage, be it in your work, you believe it. There has never been a shadow of doubt in my mind that someone could pay you to say something or advocate for something in which you do not believe.Deirdré: Thanks. Yeah, it's just partly because I've never been good at lying. It just makes me so deeply uncomfortable that I can't do it. [laugh].Corey: That's what a good liar would say, let's be very clear here. Like, what's the old joke? Like, “If you can only be good at one thing, be good at lying because then you're good at everything.” No.Deirdré: [laugh].Corey: It's a terrible way to go through life.Deirdré: Yeah. And the earn trust thing was part of my… portfolio from very early on. Which was hilarious because in those days, as now, there were people whose knee-jerk reaction was, if you're out here representing a company, you automatically must be lying to me, or about to lie to me, or have lied to me. But because I had been so out there and so honest, I had dozens of supporters who would pile in and say, “No, no, no. That's not who she is.” And so it was, yeah, it was interesting. I had my trolls but I also had lots of defenders.Corey: The real thing that I've seen as well sometimes is when someone is accused of something like that, people will chime in—look, like, I get this myself. People like you. I don't generally have that problem—but people will chime in with, like, “I don't like Corey, but no, he's generally right about these things.” That's, okay, great. It's like, the backhanded compliment. And I'll take what I can get.I want to fast-forward in time a little bit from the era of mailing books with CDs in them, and then having to talk to people via other ways to get them in CompuServe to 2013 when you gave a talk at one of—no, I'm not going to say, ‘one of.' It is the best community conference of which I am aware. Monktoberfest as put on by our friends at RedMonk. It was called “Marketing Your Tech Talent” and it's one of those videos it's worth the watch. If you're listening to this, and you haven't seen it, you absolutely should fix that. Tell me about it. Where did the talk come from?Deirdré: As you can see in the talk, it was stuff I had been doing. It actually started earlier than that. When I joined Sun Microsystems as a contractor in 2007, my remit was to try to get Sun engineers to communicate. Like, Sun had done this big push around blogging, they'd encourage everybody to open up your own blog. Here's our blogging platform, you can say whatever you want.And there were, like, 3000 blogs, about half of which were just moribund; they had put out one or two posts, and then nothing ever again. And for some reason—I don't know who decided—but they decided that engineers had goals around this and engineering teams had to start producing content in this way, which was a strange idea. So, I was brought on. It's, like, you know, “Help these engineers communicate. Help them with blogging, and somehow find a way to get them doing it.”And so I did a whole bunch of things from, like, running competitions to just going and talking to people. But we finally got to where Dan Maslowski, who was the manager who hired me in, he said, “Well, we've got this conference. It was the SNIA, the Storage Networking Industries Association Conference. We're a big sponsor, we've got, like, ten talks. And why don't you just go—you know, I'm going to buy you a video camera, go record this thing.”And I'd used a video camera a little bit, but, you know, it's like, never in this context, so it's like, okay, let's figure out, you know, what kind of mic do I need? And so I went off to the conference with my video blogging rig, and videoed all those talks. And then the idea was like, “Okay, we'll put them up on”—you know, Sun had its own video channels and things—“We'll put it out there, and this information will then be available to more people; it'll help the engineers communicate what they're doing.”And the funny part was, I run into with Sun, the professional video people wanted nothing to do with it. Like, “Your stuff is not high enough quality. You don't meet our branding guidelines. You cannot put this on the Sun channels.” Okay, fine. So, I started putting it on YouTube, which in those days meant splitting it into ten-minute segments because that was all they would give you. [laugh]. And so it was like, everything I was doing was guerilla marketing because I was always in the teeth on somebody in the corporation who wanted to—it's like, “Oh, we're not going to put out video unless it can be slickly produced in the studio, and we're only going to do that for VPs, not for engineers.”Corey: Oh, yeah. The little people, as it were. This talk, in many ways—I don't know if ever told you this story or not—but it did shape how I approached building out my entire approach: The sponsorship side of the business that I have, how I approach communicating with people. And it's where in many ways, the newsletter has taken its ethos. One of the things that you mentioned in that talk was, first, you were actually the first time that I ever saw someone explicitly comparing the technical talent slash DevRel—which is not a term I would call it, but all right—to the Hollywood model, where you have this idea that there's an agent that winds up handling these folks that are freelancers. They are named talent. They're the ones that have the draw; that's what people want, so we have to develop this.Okay, what why is it important to develop this? Because you absolutely need to have your technical people writing technical content, not folks who are divorced from that entire side of the world because it doesn't resonate, it doesn't land. This is I think, what DevRel was sort of been turned into; it's, what it DevRel? Well, it's special marketing because engineers need special handling to handle these things. No, I think it's everyone needs to be marketed to in a way that has authenticity that meets them where they are, and that's a little harder to do with people who spend their lives writing code than it would be someone who is it was at a more accessible profession.But I don't think that a lot of it's being done right. This was the first encouragement that I'd gotten early on that maybe I am onto something here because here's someone I deeply respect saying a lot of the same things—from a slightly different angle; like I was never doing this as part of a large technology company—but it was still, there's something here. And for better or worse. I think I've demonstrated by now that there is some validity there. But back then it was transformational.Deirdré: Well, thank you.Corey: It still kind of is in many respects. This is all new to someone.Deirdré: Yeah. I felt, you know, I'd been putting engineers in front of the public and found it was powerful, and engineers want to hear from other engineers. And especially for companies like Sun and Oracle and Joyent, we're selling technology to other technologists. So, there's a limited market for white papers because VPs and CEOs want to read those, but really, your main market is other technologists and that's who you need to talk to and talk to them in their own way, in their own language. They weren't even comfortable with slickly produced videos. Neither being on the camera nor watching it.Corey: Yeah, at some point, it was like, “I look too good.” It's like, “Oh, yeah. It's—oh, you're going to do a whole video production thing? Great.” “Okay. [unintelligible 00:24:13] the makeup artists coming in.” Like, “What do you mean makeup?” And it's—Deirdré: Oh, it was worse at Sun. We wasted so much money because you would get an engineer and put him in the studio under all these lights with these great big cameras, and they would just freeze.Corey: Mmm.Deirdré: And it's like, you know, “Well, hurry up, hurry up. We've got half an hour of studio time. Get your thing; say it.” And, [frantic noise]. You know, whereas I would take them in some back conference room and just set up a camera and be sitting in a chair opposite. It's like, “Relax. Tell me what you want to tell me. If we have to do ten takes, it's fine.” Yeah, video quality wasn't great, but the content was great.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key or a shared admin account isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And no, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: Speaking of content, one more topic I want to cover a little bit here is you recently left your job at AWS. And even if you had not told me that, I would have known because your blog has undergone something of a renaissance—beginningwithi.com for those who want to follow along, and of course, we'll put links to this in the [show notes 00:25:08]—you've been suddenly talking about a lot of different things. And I want to be clear, I don't recall any of these posts being one of those, “I just left a company, I'm going to set them on fire now.”It's been about a variety of different topics, though, that have been very top-of-mind for folks. You talk about things like equal work for equal pay. You talk about remote work versus cost of commuting a fair bit. And as of this recording, you most recently wound up talking specifically about problematic employers in tech. But what you're talking about is also something that this happened during the days of the Sun acquisition through Oracle.So, people are thinking, like, “Wait a minute, is she subtweeting what happened today”—no. These things rhyme and they repeat. I'm super thrilled whenever I see this in my RSS reader, just because it is so… they oh, good. I get I'm going to read something now that I'm going to enjoy, so let me put this in distraction-free mode and really dig into it. Because your writing is a joy.What is it that has inspired you to bring that back to life? Is it just to having a whole bunch of free time, and well, I'm not writing marketing stocks anymore, so I guess I'm going to write blog posts instead.Deirdré: My blog, if you looked at our calendar, over the years, it sort of comes and goes depending what else is going on in my life. I actually was starting to do a little bit more writing, and I even did a few little TikTok videos before I quit AWS. I'm starting to think about some of the more ancient history parts of my career. It's partly just because of what's been going on in the world. [Brendan 00:26:35] and I moved to Australia a year ago, and it was something that had been planned for a long time.We did not actually expect that we would be able to move our jobs the way we did. And then, you know, with pandemic, everything changed; that actually accelerated our departure timeline because we've been planning initially to let our son stay in school in California, through until he finished elementary, but then he wasn't in school, so there seems no point, whereas in Australia, he could be in a classroom. And so, you know, the whole world is changing, and the working world is changing, but also, we all started working from home. I've been working from home—mostly—since 1993. And I was working very remotely because I was working from Italy for a California company.And because I was one of the first people doing it, the people in California did not know what to make of me. And I would get people who would just completely ignore any emails I sent. It was like as if I did not exist because they had never seen me in person. So, I would just go to California four times a year and spend a few weeks, and then I would get the face time, and after that it was easy to interact any way I needed to.Corey: It feels like it's almost the worst kind of remote because you have most people at office, and then you have a few outliers, and that tends to, in my experience at least, lead to a really weird team dynamics where you have almost a second class of folks who aren't taken nearly as seriously. It's why when we started our company here, it was everyone is going to be remote all the time. We were distributed. There is no central office because as soon as you do, that's where things are disastrous. My business partner and I live a couple states apart.Deirdré: Yeah. And I think that's the fairest way to do it. In companies that have already existed, where they do have headquarters, and you know, there's that—Corey: Yeah, you can't suddenly sell your office space, and all 300,000 employees [laugh] are now working from home. That's a harder thing, too.Deirdré: Yeah. But I think it's interesting that the argument is being framed as like, “Oh, people work better in the office, people learn more in the office.” And we've even had the argument trotted out here that people should be forced back to the office because the businesses in the central business district depend on that. It's like—Corey: Mmm.Deirdré: —well, what about the businesses that have since, you know in the meantime sprung up in the more suburban centers? Now, you've got some thriving little cafes out there now? Are we supposed to just screw them over? It's ultimately people making economic arguments that have nothing to do with the well-being of employees. And the pandemic at least has—I think, a lot of people have come to realize that life is just too short to put up with a lot of bullshit, and by and large, commuting is bullshit. [laugh].Corey: It's a waste of time, it's not great for the environment, there's—yeah, and again, I'm not sitting here saying the entire world should do a particular thing. I don't think that there's one-size-fits-everyone solutions possible in this space. Some companies, it makes sense for the people involved to be in the same room. In some cases, it's not even optional. For others, there's no value to it, but getting there is hard.And again, different places need to figure out what's right for them. But it's also the world is changing, and trying to pretend that it hasn't, it just feels regressive, and I don't think that's going to align with where the industry and where people are going. Especially in full remote situations we've had the global pandemic, some wit on Twitter recently opined that it's never been easier for a company to change jobs. You just have to wait for the different the new laptop to show up, and then you just join a different Zoom link, and you're in your new job. It's like, “You know, you're not that far from wrong here.”Deirdré: [laugh]. Yep.Corey: There's no, like, “Well, where's the office? What's the”—no. It is, my day-to-day looks remarkably similar, regardless of where I work.Deirdré: Yeah.Corey: That means something.Deirdré: I was one of the early beneficiaries as well of this work-life balance, that I could take my kid to school in the morning, and then work, and then pick her up from school in the afternoon and spend time with her. And then California would be waking up for meetings, so after dinner, I'd be having meetings. Yeah, sometimes it was pain, but it was workable, and it gave me more flexibility, you know, whereas the times I had to commute to an office… tended to be hellish. I think part of the reason the blog has had a lot more activities I've just been in sort of a more reflective phase. I've gotten to this very privileged position where I suddenly realized, I actually have enough money to retire on, I have a husband who is extremely supportive of whatever I want to do, and I'm in a country that has a public health care system, if it doesn't completely crumble under COVID in the next few weeks.Corey: Hopefully, we'll get this published before that happens.Deirdré: Yes. And so I don't have to work. It's like, up to this point in my career, I have always desperately needed that next job. I don't think I have ever been in the position of having competing offers. You know, there's people who talk about, you know, you can always go find a better offer. It's like, no, when you're a weirdo like me and you're a middle-aged woman, is not that easy.Corey: People saying that invariably—“So, what is your formal job?” Like, “Oh, SDE3.” Like, okay, great. So, that means that they're are mul—not just, they don't probably need to hire you; they need to hire so many of you that they need to start segregating them with Roman numerals. Great.Maybe that doesn't apply to everyone. Maybe that particular skill set right now is having its moment in the sun, but there's a lot of other folks who don't neatly fit into those boxes. There's something to be said for empathy. Because this is my lived experience does not mean it is yours. And trying to walk a mile in someone else's shoes is almost increasingly—especially in the world of social media—a bit of a lost skill.Deirdré: [laugh]. I mean, it's partly that recruiters are not always the sharpest tools in the shed, and/or they're very young, very new to it all. It's just people like to go for what's easy. And like, for example, me at the moment, it's easy to put me in that product marketing manager box. It's like, “Oh, I need somebody to fill that slot. You look like that person. Let's talk.” Whereas before, people would just look at my resume and go, “I don't know what she is.”Corey: I really think the fact that you've never had competing offers just shows an extreme lack of vision from a number of companies around what marketing effectively to a technical audience can really be. It's nice to see that what you have been advocating for and doing the work for, for your entire career is really coming into its own now.Deirdré: Yeah. We'll see what happens next. It's been interesting. Yeah, I've never had so much attention from recruiters as when I got AWS on my resume. And then even more once it said, product marketing manager because, you know, “Okay. You've got the FAANG and you've got a title we recognize. Let's talk to you.”Corey: Exactly. That's, “Oh, yay. You fit in that box, finally.” Because it's always been one of those. Yeah, like, “What is it you actually do?” There's a reason that I've built what I do now into the last job I'll ever have. Because I don't even know where to begin describing me to what I do and how I do it. Even at cocktail parties, there's nothing I can say that doesn't sound completely surreal. “I make fun of Amazon for a living.” It's true, but it also sounds psychotic, and here we are. It's—Deirdré: Well, it's absolutely brilliant marketing, and it's working very well for you. So [laugh].Corey: The realization that I had was that if this whole thing collapsed and I had to get a job again, what would I be doing? It probably isn't engineering. It's almost certainly much more closely aligned with marketing. I just hope I never have to find out because, honestly, I'm having way too much fun.Deirdré: Yeah. And that's another thing I think is changing. I think more and more of us are realizing working for other people has its limitations. You know, it can be fun, it can be exciting, depending on the company, and the team, and so on. But you're very much beholden to the culture of the company, or the team, or whatever.I grew up in Asia, as a child, of American expats. So, I'm what is called a third culture kid, which means I'm not totally American, even though my parents were. I'm not—you know, I grew up in Thailand, but I'm not Thai. I grew up in India, but I'm not Indian. You're something in between.And your tribe is actually other people like you, even if they don't share the specific countries. Like, one of my best friends in Milan was a woman who had grown up in Brazil and France. It's like, you know, no countries in common, but we understood that experience. And something I've been meaning to write about for a long time is that third culture kids tend to be really good at adapting to any culture, which can include corporate cultures.So, every time I go into a new company, I'm treating that as a new cultural experience. It's like, Ericsson was fascinating. It's this very old Swedish telecom, with this wild old history, and a footprint in something like 190 countries. That makes it amazingly unique and fascinating. The thing I tripped over was I did not know anything about Swedish culture because they give cultural training to the people who are actually going to be moving to Sweden.Corey: But not the people working elsewhere, even though you're at a—Deirdré: Yeah.Corey: Yeah, it's like, well, dealing with New Yorkers is sort of its own skill, or dealing with Israelis, which is great; they have great folks, but it's a fun culture of management by screaming, in my experience, back when I had family living out there. It was great.Deirdré: One of my favorite people at AWS is Israeli. [laugh].Corey: Exactly. And it's, you have to understand some cultural context here. And now to—even if you're not sitting in the same place. Yeah, we're getting better as an industry, bit by bit, brick by brick. I just hope that will wind up getting there within my lifetime, at least.I really want to thank you for taking the time to come on the show. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Deirdré: Oh. Well, as you said, my website beginningwithi.com, and I am on Twitter as @deirdres. That's D-E-I-R-D-R-E-S. [laugh]. So.Corey: And we will, of course, include links to that in the [show notes 00:36:23].Deirdré: So yeah, I'm pretty out there, pretty easy to find, and happy to chat with people.Corey: Which I highly recommend. Thank you again, for being so generous with your time, not just now, but over the course of your entire career.Deirdré: Well, I'm at a point where sometimes I can help people, and I really like to do that. The reason I ever aspired to high corporate office—which I've now clearly I'm not ever going to make—was because I wanted to be in a position to make a difference. And so, even if all the difference I'm making is a small one, it's still important to me to try to do that.Corey: Thank you again. I really do appreciate your time.Deirdré: Okay. Well, it was great talking to you. As always.Corey: Likewise. Deirdré Straughan, currently gloriously unemployed. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry insulting comment that you mailed to me on a CDR that doesn't read.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

This Is Your Afterlife
From Certainty to Uncertainty with Ross Simonini: Part 2

This Is Your Afterlife

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 41:51


Was it a dream, alien abduction, angel visitation, or something else? Whatever it was, artist/musician/writer Ross Simonini refuses to dismiss the flying experience he had as a child. We take a tour of some of Ross' more extreme consciousness-shifting experiences in part 2 of our conversation. He also tells me about the play he wrote as a kid for his loved ones to perform at his funeral. Get my full convo with Ross (even more than Parts 1 and 2 combined!), every installment of the debrief podcast This Is Your Aftershow, and shoutouts in future episodes at https://www.patreon.com/davemaher (patreon.com/davemaher). By joining, you're helping me realize my dream of making this show my living. For both a foundation and a deeper exploration of some of the ideas we talk about, check out Ross' essay, https://believermag.com/the-all-ross-simonini/ ("The All," in The Believer). Follow Ross on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rosssimonini/ (@rosssimonini), visit his website https://www.rosssimonini.com/ (rosssimonini.com), and if you're in New York City, go see his art show http://anonymousgallery.com/exhibition/ross-simonini ("The All" at Anonymous Gallery) until February 19, 2022!  Subscribe to my weekly newsletter, https://thisisdavemaher.substack.com/ (Hella Immaculate)! And follow me @thisisdavemaher on https://twitter.com/ThisIsDaveMaher (Twitter), https://www.tiktok.com/@thisisdavemaher (TikTok), and https://www.instagram.com/thisisdavemaher/ (Instagram). --- Transcript: https://app.podscribe.ai/series/1246109 (This Is Your Afterlife on Podscribe) Music = Future: "Use Me" / James Blackshaw: "The Cloud of Unknowing" / Four Tet: "Two Thousand and Seventeen" / Johnnie Frierson: "Miracles" Support this podcast

New Life Live with Steve Arterburn
New Life Live: January 25, 2022

New Life Live with Steve Arterburn

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 49:05


Topics: Adult Children, Grandparenting, Emotional Abuse, Sex Addiction, Separation Hosts: Steve Arterburn, Dr. Jill Hubbard, Becky Brown Caller Questions: Interview with Michelle Spatafora, founder of Faithful Workouts and a speaker at New Life's Lose It For Life Extensive.  What can I do to heal after my daughter asked me to move out and stop taking care of my grandchild?  How do The post New Life Live: January 25, 2022 appeared first on New Life.

Digital Forensic Survival Podcast
DFSP # 310 - Cloud Network Segmentation

Digital Forensic Survival Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 13:11


This week is about cloud network segmentation. Network segmentation has security advantages, and that's regardless of whether or not security is the intention. There are some big differences between traditional on-prem network segmentation and cloud infrastructure segmentation. As a DFIR practitioner, knowing the difference is vital for your incident response preparedness. This week I will break it down from a DFIR point of view and provide some necessary insight that will help you better structure your investigations involving cloud assets.

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe
Tech Bytes: Managing SaaS Risks With Smarter, Cloud-Delivered Security (Sponsored)

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 16:13


On today's Tech Bytes podcast, sponsored by Palo Alto Networks, we're going to talk about how a SASE architecture and a next-generation CASB, or Cloud Access Security Broker, can help security teams manage SaaS risks. The post Tech Bytes: Managing SaaS Risks With Smarter, Cloud-Delivered Security (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Tech Bytes: Managing SaaS Risks With Smarter, Cloud-Delivered Security (Sponsored)

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 16:13


On today's Tech Bytes podcast, sponsored by Palo Alto Networks, we're going to talk about how a SASE architecture and a next-generation CASB, or Cloud Access Security Broker, can help security teams manage SaaS risks. The post Tech Bytes: Managing SaaS Risks With Smarter, Cloud-Delivered Security (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Brakeing Down Security Podcast
April Wright and Alyssa Miller- Open Source sustainabilty

Brakeing Down Security Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 26:49


Alyssa Milller (@AlyssaM_InfoSec) April Wright (@Aprilwright) 0. Open Source issues (quick discussion, because I value your opinions, and supply chain is important in the IoT world too.) Log4j and OSS software management and profitability Free as in beer, but you pay for the cup… (license costs $$, not the software).  “If you make money using our software, you must buy a license” - not an end-user license Open source conference at Whitehouse: https://www.zdnet.com/article/log4j-after-white-house-meeting-google-calls-for-list-of-critical-open-source-projects/ https://www.wsj.com/articles/white-house-convenes-open-source-security-summit-amid-log4j-risks-11642119406 “For too long, the software community has taken comfort in the assumption that open source software is generally secure due to its transparency and the assumption that many eyes were watching to detect and resolve problems,” said Kent Walker, chief legal officer at Google in a blog post published after the meeting. “But in fact, while some projects do have many eyes on them, others have few or none at all.”  Show was inspired by this Twitter conversation: https://twitter.com/aprilwright/status/1461724712455782400?t=Fv2tmSTXrn-SSjPCka3gxg&s=19 https://twitter.com/AlyssaM_InfoSec/status/1464661807751213056?t=CFy-hgcHo2a8NwowKYo0hg&s=19 IOT architecture (https://www.avsystem.com/blog/iot-ecosystem/) Open source IoT platforms: https://www.record-evolution.de/en/open-source-iot-platforms-making-innovation-count/ Cloud services - processing messages, register/de-register devices, pass messages to other devices/gateways Gateways -  Devices -  Mobile apps - SDKs -  integrations Cloud services DO go offline, point of failure: https://www.datacenterdynamics.com/en/news/aws-us-east-1-outage-brings-down-services-around-the-world/ Connectivity and sharing mesh networks assumes you like your neighbors. Sidewalk Whitepaper: https://m.media-amazon.com/images/G/01/sidewalk/final_privacy_security_whitepaper.pdf network vulnerabilities: https://fractionalciso.com/why-you-should-not-be-using-xfinitywifi-hotspots/  Stalking/privacy vs. tracking/surveillance Fine GPS locations Nearby devices triangulate (via BLE, wifi, or 900mhz) We want to find our lost devices, but devices can be used for stalking https://www.autoevolution.com/news/police-claim-apple-has-unwillingly-created-the-most-convenient-stalking-device-179228.html Just have an iPhone and you'll be able to find a stalking device, just install a 100MB app (Ring, Alexa, etc) to detect all devices in the area, or use the right ecosystem to find these items (or know every possible device that could be used to track someone) What do companies want with that information? What is a ‘happy medium' to allow you to find your dog, but not to track people? Device controls? Buzzers? (how loud can you make a noise in a small device?) Size issues, battery life, beaconing, self-identification (“Hi, I am a lost device…”) Is what Airtags doing enough to reduce the fear? Are we designing to edge cases? There are cheaper/easier ways to track someone (phones have a longer standby time than fetch/airtag/tile) How often do you lose your keys? Why is your dog not on a leash or properly trained? What will it take to make these kinds of devices more secure?  https://spectrum.ieee.org/why-iot-sensors-need-standards Will it take privacy protections to motivate IoT devices to design a better IoT device? Or force standards to be followed, like https://www.ioxtalliance.org/get-ioxt-certified? Or NIST standards: https://nvlpubs.nist.gov/nistpubs/SpecialPublications/NIST.SP.800-213-draft.pdf https://csrc.nist.gov/publications/detail/sp/800-213a/final - detailed specs Threat modeling, vulnerabilities in IoT networks and platforms Does your Iot Platform give out SDKs for integrations or allowing 3rd party products or apps? https://www.iot-inspector.com/blog/advisory-multiple-issues-realtek-sdk-iot-supply-chain/ https://www.avsystem.com/blog/iot-ecosystem/ Old and outdated libraries, like TCP vulnerabilities (RIPPLE20) https://www.businessinsider.com/iot-security-privacy https://www.eurofins-cybersecurity.com/news/security-problems-iot-devices/ https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1302/1302.0939.pdf - Security and Privacy Issues in Wireless Mesh Networks: A Survey https://krebsonsecurity.com/2021/09/apple-airtag-bug-enables-good-samaritan-attack/ https://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=GZ4VSNFMBDHLRJUK Opt-out of Amazon sidewalk     Amazon Sidewalk discussion: https://www.silabs.com/support/training/amazon-sidewalk-development/amz-103-amazon-sidewalk-technology-architecture-and-infrastructure Fetch: As one example, this week we announced Fetch, a compact, lightweight device that will clip to your pet's collar and help ensure they're safe. If your dog wanders outside a perimeter you've set using the Ring app, Fetch will let you know. In the future, expanding the Amazon Sidewalk network will provide customers with even more capabilities like real-time location information, helping you quickly reunite with your lost pet. For device makers, Fetch also serves as a reference design to demonstrate the potential that devices connected to a broad, reliable network can provide to their customers. https://www.aboutamazon.com/news/devices/introducing-amazon-sidewalk  

Journey Church Podcast
From the crowd to the cloud

Journey Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 40:27


The weekly podcast from Journey Church, led by Pastor JJ Vasquez.

AWS Morning Brief
AWS Boldly Responds With Silence

AWS Morning Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 9:31


AWS Morning Brief for the week of January 24, 2022 with Corey Quinn.

VIVE CHURCH with Adam Smallcombe
A Little Cloud | Pastor Adam Smallcombe | VIVE Church

VIVE CHURCH with Adam Smallcombe

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 37:48


It's often said when it rains it pours, but when you are in a season of drought, how strong is your faith that the rain is coming?God's infinite power is displayed through his sovereignty. Nothing happens in the universe without God's permission. Pastor Adam Smallcombe talks about the story of Elijah praying for rain. Elijah prayed seven times and all his servant reported was seeing a little cloud. This may have not looked like what Elijah was praying for but he had full expectation that the Lord would deliver. Every significant thing God does starts as a seed. Sometimes we need to adjust what we are looking for. Open your eyes to see the subtle ways God is working for you. If you give God permission, what starts out subtle becomes significant. Watch as Pastor Adam Smallcombe delivers a powerful sermon in continuation of the Infinite series, "A Little Cloud".

The Boundaries.me Podcast
Episode 307 - The Dr. Cloud Show Live - Making Your Goals Happen - 12-31-2021

The Boundaries.me Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 89:18


On this episode of The Dr. Cloud Show:   Patty wants to know if the person she's dating is the right person to marry. She needs to know better how she's feeling. What's the right way to have that conversation with him?   What makes a good accountability partner?   Ryan is suffering from depression. He's seeing a therapist and it isn't going great. What's an effective strategy for finding a good therapist?   A viewer wrote in asking about goal setting. They want to get out of debt and lose weight. While they know what they should do, how do you get motivated to actually do it?   How do you set boundaries if you fear retaliation from people? What step can you take to reinforce your boundaries when people disregard them?   Are you having difficulty with trusting someone you're close to? Maybe you're trying to rebuild trust but you get set back by reliving what happened. Is this person worthy of giving your trust to in the first place? We have a two hour live workshop coming up on Trust! It's on February 21st. If you can't attend live, don't worry! All purchases include endless streaming access to the recording and the outline. https://www.boundaries.me/trust   Get a free 14 day trial to Boundaries.me with over 90 video courses, daily coaching emails and more. We've got courses on codependency, finding safe people, dealing with a narcissist, and over 90 other courses. You'll also get daily coaching videos delivered to your inbox--short 2-4 minute videos that give you one thing to do that day to build your way to a better version of yourself. We've also got a members-only support community on the site where you can discuss what you're learning, and get support and share support along the way. It's a free two-week trial, cancel at anytime, and only $9 a month after that. https://www.boundaries.me

New Life Live with Steve Arterburn
New Life Live: January 24, 2022

New Life Live with Steve Arterburn

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 49:05


Topics: Sexual Integrity, Boundaries, Adult Children, Anxiety, Intimacy Hosts: Steve Arterburn, Becky, Dr. Jill Hubbard, Becky Brown Caller Questions: After going to Every Man's Battle, my wife asked me to leave because I didn't answer her question 100% honest; what's an acceptable timeframe for me to be out of the house?  What steps can we take to help my 21yo daughter who The post New Life Live: January 24, 2022 appeared first on New Life.

Emmanuel Wesleyan Church
It's In The Cloud

Emmanuel Wesleyan Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 53:26


Are you connected with us? Be sure you're following us on social media: Instagram: @emmanuelsalisbury Facebook: @Emmanuel Salisbury Youtube: @Emmanuel Church

Ultima Final Fantasy | The Ultimate Final Fantasy Podcast

Kaleb and Joe are back, and they've brought along a review of the latest entry into a different legendary series; Super Smash Bros. Cloud appearing as a non-dlc character in the game's roster forced them into the game, and now you can hear their review as well as a battle of the Clouds. Enjoy! If you would like to contact Ultima Final Fantasy, check out the links below: Watch us play and record our podcast live on Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/ultimafinalfantasy Check out our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/ultimafinalfantasy Podcast RSS Feed: https://ultimafinalfantasy.libsyn.com/rss Official Podcast Network Site: https://geekdomentertainment.net/ Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/UltimaFinalFantasy Discord Server: discord.gg/cFFx4N5 Tweet Joe: https://twitter.com/JosephDeGolyer Tweet Kaleb: https://twitter.com/UFFPodcast   Other Helpful Links: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/ultimafinalfantasy Amazon Affiliate Link: https://amzn.to/38tceeQ Paypal Donations: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=PV47BX468GPN2 Check Out Our other gaming show, [Nude]Clan: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/nudeclangaming RSS Feed: https://nudeclan.libsyn.com/rss   #finalfantasy #jrpg #gaming #squareenix

ESV: Straight through the Bible
January 22: Exodus 13–15

ESV: Straight through the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 11:55


Exodus 13–15 Exodus 13–15 (Listen) Consecration of the Firstborn 13 The LORD said to Moses, 2 “Consecrate to me all the firstborn. Whatever is the first to open the womb among the people of Israel, both of man and of beast, is mine.” The Feast of Unleavened Bread 3 Then Moses said to the people, “Remember this day in which you came out from Egypt, out of the house of slavery, for by a strong hand the LORD brought you out from this place. No leavened bread shall be eaten. 4 Today, in the month of Abib, you are going out. 5 And when the LORD brings you into the land of the Canaanites, the Hittites, the Amorites, the Hivites, and the Jebusites, which he swore to your fathers to give you, a land flowing with milk and honey, you shall keep this service in this month. 6 Seven days you shall eat unleavened bread, and on the seventh day there shall be a feast to the LORD. 7 Unleavened bread shall be eaten for seven days; no leavened bread shall be seen with you, and no leaven shall be seen with you in all your territory. 8 You shall tell your son on that day, ‘It is because of what the LORD did for me when I came out of Egypt.' 9 And it shall be to you as a sign on your hand and as a memorial between your eyes, that the law of the LORD may be in your mouth. For with a strong hand the LORD has brought you out of Egypt. 10 You shall therefore keep this statute at its appointed time from year to year. 11 “When the LORD brings you into the land of the Canaanites, as he swore to you and your fathers, and shall give it to you, 12 you shall set apart to the LORD all that first opens the womb. All the firstborn of your animals that are males shall be the LORD's. 13 Every firstborn of a donkey you shall redeem with a lamb, or if you will not redeem it you shall break its neck. Every firstborn of man among your sons you shall redeem. 14 And when in time to come your son asks you, ‘What does this mean?' you shall say to him, ‘By a strong hand the LORD brought us out of Egypt, from the house of slavery. 15 For when Pharaoh stubbornly refused to let us go, the LORD killed all the firstborn in the land of Egypt, both the firstborn of man and the firstborn of animals. Therefore I sacrifice to the LORD all the males that first open the womb, but all the firstborn of my sons I redeem.' 16 It shall be as a mark on your hand or frontlets between your eyes, for by a strong hand the LORD brought us out of Egypt.” Pillars of Cloud and Fire 17 When Pharaoh let the people go, God did not lead them by way of the land of the Philistines, although that was near. For God said, “Lest the people change their minds when they see war and return to Egypt.” 18 But God led the people around by the way of the wilderness toward the Red Sea. And the people of Israel went up out of the land of Egypt equipped for battle. 19 Moses took the bones of Joseph with him, for Joseph1 had made the sons of Israel solemnly swear, saying, “God will surely visit you, and you shall carry up my bones with you from here.” 20 And they moved on from Succoth and encamped at Etham, on the edge of the wilderness. 21 And the LORD went before them by day in a pillar of cloud to lead them along the way, and by night in a pillar of fire to give them light, that they might travel by day and by night. 22 The pillar of cloud by day and the pillar of fire by night did not depart from before the people. Crossing the Red Sea 14 Then the LORD said to Moses, 2 “Tell the people of Israel to turn back and encamp in front of Pi-hahiroth, between Migdol and the sea, in front of Baal-zephon; you shall encamp facing it, by the sea. 3 For Pharaoh will say of the people of Israel, ‘They are wandering in the land; the wilderness has shut them in.' 4 And I will harden Pharaoh's heart, and he will pursue them, and I will get glory over Pharaoh and all his host, and the Egyptians shall know that I am the LORD.” And they did so. 5 When the king of Egypt was told that the people had fled, the mind of Pharaoh and his servants was changed toward the people, and they said, “What is this we have done, that we have let Israel go from serving us?” 6 So he made ready his chariot and took his army with him, 7 and took six hundred chosen chariots and all the other chariots of Egypt with officers over all of them. 8 And the LORD hardened the heart of Pharaoh king of Egypt, and he pursued the people of Israel while the people of Israel were going out defiantly. 9 The Egyptians pursued them, all Pharaoh's horses and chariots and his horsemen and his army, and overtook them encamped at the sea, by Pi-hahiroth, in front of Baal-zephon. 10 When Pharaoh drew near, the people of Israel lifted up their eyes, and behold, the Egyptians were marching after them, and they feared greatly. And the people of Israel cried out to the LORD. 11 They said to Moses, “Is it because there are no graves in Egypt that you have taken us away to die in the wilderness? What have you done to us in bringing us out of Egypt? 12 Is not this what we said to you in Egypt: ‘Leave us alone that we may serve the Egyptians'? For it would have been better for us to serve the Egyptians than to die in the wilderness.” 13 And Moses said to the people, “Fear not, stand firm, and see the salvation of the LORD, which he will work for you today. For the Egyptians whom you see today, you shall never see again. 14 The LORD will fight for you, and you have only to be silent.” 15 The LORD said to Moses, “Why do you cry to me? Tell the people of Israel to go forward. 16 Lift up your staff, and stretch out your hand over the sea and divide it, that the people of Israel may go through the sea on dry ground. 17 And I will harden the hearts of the Egyptians so that they shall go in after them, and I will get glory over Pharaoh and all his host, his chariots, and his horsemen. 18 And the Egyptians shall know that I am the LORD, when I have gotten glory over Pharaoh, his chariots, and his horsemen.” 19 Then the angel of God who was going before the host of Israel moved and went behind them, and the pillar of cloud moved from before them and stood behind them, 20 coming between the host of Egypt and the host of Israel. And there was the cloud and the darkness. And it lit up the night2 without one coming near the other all night. 21 Then Moses stretched out his hand over the sea, and the LORD drove the sea back by a strong east wind all night and made the sea dry land, and the waters were divided. 22 And the people of Israel went into the midst of the sea on dry ground, the waters being a wall to them on their right hand and on their left. 23 The Egyptians pursued and went in after them into the midst of the sea, all Pharaoh's horses, his chariots, and his horsemen. 24 And in the morning watch the LORD in the pillar of fire and of cloud looked down on the Egyptian forces and threw the Egyptian forces into a panic, 25 clogging3 their chariot wheels so that they drove heavily. And the Egyptians said, “Let us flee from before Israel, for the LORD fights for them against the Egyptians.” 26 Then the LORD said to Moses, “Stretch out your hand over the sea, that the water may come back upon the Egyptians, upon their chariots, and upon their horsemen.” 27 So Moses stretched out his hand over the sea, and the sea returned to its normal course when the morning appeared. And as the Egyptians fled into it, the LORD threw4 the Egyptians into the midst of the sea. 28 The waters returned and covered the chariots and the horsemen; of all the host of Pharaoh that had followed them into the sea, not one of them remained. 29 But the people of Israel walked on dry ground through the sea, the waters being a wall to them on their right hand and on their left. 30 Thus the LORD saved Israel that day from the hand of the Egyptians, and Israel saw the Egyptians dead on the seashore. 31 Israel saw the great power that the LORD used against the Egyptians, so the people feared the LORD, and they believed in the LORD and in his servant Moses. The Song of Moses 15 Then Moses and the people of Israel sang this song to the LORD, saying,   “I will sing to the LORD, for he has triumphed gloriously;    the horse and his rider5 he has thrown into the sea.2   The LORD is my strength and my song,    and he has become my salvation;  this is my God, and I will praise him,    my father's God, and I will exalt him.3   The LORD is a man of war;    the LORD is his name. 4   “Pharaoh's chariots and his host he cast into the sea,    and his chosen officers were sunk in the Red Sea.5   The floods covered them;    they went down into the depths like a stone.6   Your right hand, O LORD, glorious in power,    your right hand, O LORD, shatters the enemy.7   In the greatness of your majesty you overthrow your adversaries;    you send out your fury; it consumes them like stubble.8   At the blast of your nostrils the waters piled up;    the floods stood up in a heap;    the deeps congealed in the heart of the sea.9   The enemy said, ‘I will pursue, I will overtake,    I will divide the spoil, my desire shall have its fill of them.    I will draw my sword; my hand shall destroy them.'10   You blew with your wind; the sea covered them;    they sank like lead in the mighty waters. 11   “Who is like you, O LORD, among the gods?    Who is like you, majestic in holiness,    awesome in glorious deeds, doing wonders?12   You stretched out your right hand;    the earth swallowed them. 13   “You have led in your steadfast love the people whom you have redeemed;    you have guided them by your strength to your holy abode.14   The peoples have heard; they tremble;    pangs have seized the inhabitants of Philistia.15   Now are the chiefs of Edom dismayed;    trembling seizes the leaders of Moab;    all the inhabitants of Canaan have melted away.16   Terror and dread fall upon them;    because of the greatness of your arm, they are still as a stone,  till your people, O LORD, pass by,    till the people pass by whom you have purchased.17   You will bring them in and plant them on your own mountain,    the place, O LORD, which you have made for your abode,    the sanctuary, O Lord, which your hands have established.18   The LORD will reign forever and ever.” 19 For when the horses of Pharaoh with his chariots and his horsemen went into the sea, the LORD brought back the waters of the sea upon them, but the people of Israel walked on dry ground in the midst of the sea. 20 Then Miriam the prophetess, the sister of Aaron, took a tambourine in her hand, and all the women went out after her with tambourines and dancing. 21 And Miriam sang to them:   “Sing to the LORD, for he has triumphed gloriously;  the horse and his rider he has thrown into the sea.” Bitter Water Made Sweet 22 Then Moses made Israel set out from the Red Sea, and they went into the wilderness of Shur. They went three days in the wilderness and found no water. 23 When they came to Marah, they could not drink the water of Marah because it was bitter; therefore it was named Marah.6 24 And the people grumbled against Moses, saying, “What shall we drink?” 25 And he cried to the LORD, and the LORD showed him a log,7 and he threw it into the water, and the water became sweet. There the LORD8 made for them a statute and a rule, and there he tested them, 26 saying, “If you will diligently listen to the voice of the LORD your God, and do that which is right in his eyes, and give ear to his commandments and keep all his statutes, I will put none of the diseases on you that I put on the Egyptians, for I am the LORD, your healer.” 27 Then they came to Elim, where there were twelve springs of water and seventy palm trees, and they encamped there by the water. Footnotes [1] 13:19 Samaritan, Septuagint; Hebrew he [2] 14:20 Septuagint and the night passed [3] 14:25 Or binding (compare Samaritan, Septuagint, Syriac); Hebrew removing [4] 14:27 Hebrew shook off [5] 15:1 Or its chariot; also verse 21 [6] 15:23 Marah means bitterness [7] 15:25 Or tree [8] 15:25 Hebrew he (ESV)

The Boundaries.me Podcast
Episode 306 - The Dr. Cloud Show Live - Look Forward With a Hopeful Vision - 12-29-2021

The Boundaries.me Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 80:53


On this episode of The Dr. Cloud Show:   Rebecca wants to know some techniques for being more like herself in front of men she's attracted to. She gets anxious and becomes less of her confident self.   Trying to reconnect with her passions in life, Collette, 65, is looking for tips to start her journey of self discovery.   Margot started a fast friendship with a guy. She says it's not romantic. They're close but he's backed away and she doesn't know why. How can she find out why he's gone cold? He's not open about it.   Are you having difficulty with trusting someone you're close to? Maybe you're trying to rebuild trust but you get set back by reliving what happened. Is this person worthy of giving your trust to in the first place? We have a two hour live workshop coming up on Trust! It's on February 21st. If you can't attend live, don't worry! All purchases include endless streaming access to the recording and the outline. https://www.boundaries.me/trust   Get a free 14 day trial to Boundaries.me with over 90 video courses, daily coaching emails and more. We've got courses on codependency, finding safe people, dealing with a narcissist, and over 90 other courses. You'll also get daily coaching videos delivered to your inbox--short 2-4 minute videos that give you one thing to do that day to build your way to a better version of yourself. We've also got a members-only support community on the site where you can discuss what you're learning, and get support and share support along the way. It's a free two-week trial, cancel at anytime, and only $9 a month after that. https://www.boundaries.me

Steve Deace Show
Old Man Yells at Cloud | Crushing Crenshaw | 1/21/22

Steve Deace Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 94:53


Steve, Todd, and Aaron are joined by Rachel Semmel from the Center for Renewing America for the Deace Group roundtable to discuss Joe Biden's press conference and why conservatives are rightly ripping Rep. Dan Crenshaw. In Hour Two, it's Feedback Friday as Steve fields listener questions and comments. Go to BUILT.com and use promo code “DEACE” to save 15% off your first order. Use promo code “DEACE” for 15% off at BUILT.com! To get 50% off your first order go to KEEPS.com/GROW. Order Omega XL and get a second bottle FREE. Visit OMEGAXL.com/STEVE Go to HomeTitleLock.com and register your address to see if you're already a victim. And enter RADIO for your 60-day money-back guarantee.  Go to RealEstateAgentsITrust.com! Try ScoreMaster for free and see how many plus points you can add to your credit score! Go to ScoreMaster.com/STEVE Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Official SaaStr Podcast: SaaS | Founders | Investors
SaaStr 520: 10 Learnings Scaling from Consumer to SMB to Enterprise with Grammarly Head of Organizations Revenue Dorian Stone

The Official SaaStr Podcast: SaaS | Founders | Investors

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 21:38


Every high-growth organization inevitably reaches the point of pivoting its strategy and offerings to capture new audiences—a journey made more complex with the new demands emerging this past year. In this session, Dorian Stone will share lessons learned from Grammarly's evolution from consumer to SMB to enterprise, address common assumptions and pitfalls in the process of scaling, and reveal must-know strategies to drive efficient growth this year and beyond.

New Life Live with Steve Arterburn
New Life Live: January 21, 2022

New Life Live with Steve Arterburn

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 49:05


Topics: Same-Sex Attraction, Parenting, Boundaries, Emotional Abuse, Drug Addiction, Adult Children Hosts: Steve Arterburn, Becky Brown, Chris Williams Caller Questions: How do I deal with my brother living a homosexual lifestyle? I have little kids and don't know how to deal with it.  I get triggered by my brother and feel powerless and suicidal by what he says; what should l do?  The post New Life Live: January 21, 2022 appeared first on New Life.

We Have Concerns
Lightning Seen and Lightning Round

We Have Concerns

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 54:36


Hey! If you're enjoying the show, please take a moment to rate/review it on whatever service you use to listen.Here's the iTunes link: http://bit.ly/wehaveconcerns And here's the Stitcher link: http://bit.ly/stitcherwhconcernsJeff on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jeffcannataAnthony on Twitter: http://twitter.com/acarboniNew view of lightning: https://www.quantamagazine.org/radio-telescope-reveals-how-lightning-begins-20211220/Double speed learning: https://digest.bps.org.uk/2021/12/21/watching-a-lecture-twice-at-double-speed-can-benefit-learning-better-than-watching-it-once-at-normal-speed/Space sleeping bag: https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-59591301Celebrity worship makes you dumb: https://bmcpsychology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40359-021-00679-3Spinal chord reconstruction in mice: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.abh3602Happiness in the age of Covid: http://scipg.com/index.php/103/article/view/487If you've seen a story you think belongs on the show, send it to wehaveconcernsshow@gmail.com or leave it on the subreddit: http://reddit.com/r/wehaveconcerns

How Did This Get Made?
Shadow in the Cloud Minisode

How Did This Get Made?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 32:18


Rockabilly Aliens, Dating Apps, and Motherf****ing Gremlins!  All this and much more on this week's minisode! Paul offers up some tips on the helpline, digs into your Corrections and Omissions from last week's Shadow in the Cloud episode and yes, we clarify exactly how many Gremlins were on that plane, and Paul announces next week's movie!For more Matinee Monday content, check out Paul's Youtube pagehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ikagk-WhC-YFor upcoming HDTGM info visit https://www.hdtgminfo.com/HDTGM Discord: discord.gg/hdtgmPaul's Discord: https://discord.gg/paulscheerCheck out Paul and Rob Huebel live on Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/friendzone) every Thursday 8-10pm ESTSubscribe to The Deep Dive with Jessica St. Clair and June Diane Raphael here: listen.earwolf.com/deepdiveSubscribe to Unspooled with Paul Scheer and Amy Nicholson here: listen.earwolf.com/unspooledCheck out The Jane Club over at www.janeclub.comCheck out new HDTGM merch over at https://www.teepublic.com/stores/hdtgmWhere to Find Jason, June & Paul:@PaulScheer on Instagram & Twitter@Junediane on IG and @MsJuneDiane on TwitterJason is Not on Twitter

The JRPG Report
JRPG Report Episode 201 - Neptunia: Sisters vs Sisters Battle System Detailed

The JRPG Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 33:13


It's Episode 201, so let me say thank you to all those support this podcast and said congrats on making it 200 shows. You all rock! Now onto the next 200 with news from the JRPG world. We've got a fresh trailer and details on the battle system of Neptunia: Sisters vs Sisters. I'll tell you everything we know so far about this April Japanese release. Also in April, Kingdom Hearts will celebrate 20 years since it's release on PS2. On April 10th they will have celebration in Tokyo. Will this be the stage for the next announcement? Next month will see the Cloud releases for all the games on Switch. You can check out the demos now, and see if the potential shortfalls I talk about are present. Also covered in this podcast: Shikabanegurai no Boukenmeshi, EGGLIA: Rebirth, Pokemon Legends Arceus, Monster Hunter Rise, Ys IX: Monstrum Nox, and The Legend of Heroes: Trails from Zero. Don't forget to check out our Sunday Special this week with the OST for Dragon Quest VIII. Support the podcast here https://www.patreon.com/JRPGReport Paypal: Direct support available via jamesfisherproductions@gmail.com Leave us a review on Apple or your favorite listening place. Like our Facebook Page We now have a website! www.jrpgreport.com Follow us on Twitter @Jrpgreport JRPG videos on Youtube Email me at jrpgreport@gmail.com Check out these fine sources for more information on the stories I cover: https://www.gematsu.com/ and https://www.siliconera.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jrpgreport/message

7 Minute Security
7MS #504: Monitoring All Your Cloud Thingies with UptimeRobot

7 Minute Security

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 40:47


Hey friends, today we're talking about how to monitor all your cloud thingies (Web servers, mail servers, etc.) with UptimeRobot. And I'm sharing some fun tips to monitor your internal thingies as well - without the use of any extra agent software.

AWS Morning Brief
The Gruntled Developer

AWS Morning Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 6:05


Links: S3 Bucket Negligence Award: http://saharareporters.com/2022/01/10/exclusive-hacker-breaks-nimc-server-steals-over-three-million-national-identity-numbers Anyone in a VPC, any VPC, anywhere: https://Twitter.com/santosh_ankr/status/1481387630973493251 A disgruntled developer corrupts their own NPM libs ‘colors' and ‘faker', breaking thousands of apps: https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/dev-corrupts-npm-libs-colors-and-faker-breaking-thousands-of-apps/ “Top ten security best practices for securing backups in AWS”: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/top-10-security-best-practices-for-securing-backups-in-aws/ Glue: https://aws.amazon.com/security/security-bulletins/AWS-2022-002/ CloudFormation: https://aws.amazon.com/security/security-bulletins/AWS-2022-001/ S3-credentials: https://simonwillison.net/2022/Jan/18/weeknotes/ TranscriptCorey: This is the AWS Morning Brief: Security Edition. AWS is fond of saying security is job zero. That means it's nobody in particular's job, which means it falls to the rest of us. Just the news you need to know, none of the fluff.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at Thinkst Canary. Most companies find out way too late that they've been breached. Thinkst Canary changes this and I love how they do it. Deploy canaries and canary tokens in minutes, and then forget about them. What's great is then attackers tip their hand by touching them, giving you one alert, when it matters. I use it myself and I only remember this when I get the weekly update with a, “We're still here, so you're aware,” from them. It's glorious. There is zero admin overhead to this, there are effectively no false positives unless I do something foolish. Canaries are deployed and loved on all seven continents. You can check out what people are saying atcanary.love. And, their Kube config canary token is new and completely free as well. You can do an awful lot without paying them a dime, which is one of the things I love about them. It is useful stuff and not a, “Oh, I wish I had money.” It is spectacular. Take a look. That'scanary.love because it's genuinely rare to find a security product that people talk about in terms of love. It really is a neat thing to see.Canary.love. Thank you to Thinkst Canary for their support of my ridiculous, ridiculous nonsense.Corey: So, yesterday's episode put the boots to AWS, not so much for the issues that Orca Security uncovered, but rather for its poor communication around the topic. Now that that's done, let's look at the more mundane news from last week's cloud world. Every day is a new page around here, full of opportunity and possibility in equal measure.This week's S3 Bucket Negligence Award goes to the Nigerian government for exposing millions of their citizens to a third party who most assuredly did not follow coordinated disclosure guidelines. Whoops.There's an interesting tweet, and exploring it is still unfolding at time of this writing, but it looks that making an API Gateway ‘Private' doesn't mean, “To your VPCs,” but rather, “To anyone in a VPC, any VPC, anywhere.” This is evocative of the way that, “Any Authenticated AWS User,” for S3 buckets caused massive permissions issues industry-wide.And a periodic and growing concern is one of software supply chain—which is a fancy way of saying, “We're all built on giant dependency chains”—what happens when, say, a disgruntled developer corrupts their own NPM libs ‘colors' and ‘faker', breaking thousands of apps across the industry, including some of the AWS SDKs? How do we manage that risk? How do we keep developers gruntled?Corey: Are you building cloud applications with a distributed team? Check out Teleport, an open-source identity-aware access proxy for cloud resources. Teleport provides secure access for anything running somewhere behind NAT: SSH servers, Kubernetes clusters, internal web apps, and databases. Teleport gives engineers superpowers.Get access to everything via single sign-on with multi-factor, list and see all of SSH servers, Kubernetes clusters, or databases available to you in one place, and get instant access to them using tools you already have. Teleport ensures best security practices like role-based access, preventing data exfiltration, providing visibility, and ensuring compliance. And best of all, Teleport is open-source and a pleasure to use. Download Teleport at goteleport.com. That's goteleport.com.AWS had a couple of interesting things. The first is “Top ten security best practices for securing backups in AWS”. People really don't consider the security implications of their backups anywhere near seriously enough. It's not ‘live' but it's still got—by definition—a full set of your data just waiting to be harvested by nefarious types. Be careful with that.And of course, AWS had two security bulletins, one about its Glue issues, one about its CloudFormation issues. The former allowed cross-account access to other tenants. In theory. In practice, AWS did the responsible thing and kept every access event logged, going back for the full five years of the service's life. That's remarkably impressive.And lastly, I found an interesting tool called S3-credentials last week, and what it does is it helps generate tightly-scoped IAM policies that were previously limited to a single S3 bucket, but now are limited to a single prefix within that bucket. You can also make those credential sets incredibly short-lived. More things like this, please. I just tend to over-scope things way too much. And that's what happened Last Week in AWS: Security. Please feel free to reach out and tell me exactly what my problem is.Corey: Thank you for listening to the AWS Morning Brief: Security Edition with the latest in AWS security that actually matters. Please follow AWS Morning Brief on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Overcast—or wherever the hell it is you find the dulcet tones of my voice—and be sure to sign up for the Last Week in AWS newsletter at lastweekinaws.com.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Screaming in the Cloud
Learning to Give in the Cloud with Andrew Brown

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 38:40


About AndrewI create free cloud certification courses and somehow still make money.Links: ExamPro Training, Inc.: https://www.exampro.co/ PolyWork: https://www.polywork.com/andrewbrown LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrew-wc-brown Twitter: https://twitter.com/andrewbrown TranscriptAndrew: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief cloud economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Rising Cloud, which I hadn't heard of before, but they're doing something vaguely interesting here. They are using AI, which is usually where my eyes glaze over and I lose attention, but they're using it to help developers be more efficient by reducing repetitive tasks. So, the idea being that you can run stateless things without having to worry about scaling, placement, et cetera, and the rest. They claim significant cost savings, and they're able to wind up taking what you're running as it is in AWS with no changes, and run it inside of their data centers that span multiple regions. I'm somewhat skeptical, but their customers seem to really like them, so that's one of those areas where I really have a hard time being too snarky about it because when you solve a customer's problem and they get out there in public and say, “We're solving a problem,” it's very hard to snark about that. Multus Medical, Construx.ai and Stax have seen significant results by using them. And it's worth exploring. So, if you're looking for a smarter, faster, cheaper alternative to EC2, Lambda, or batch, consider checking them out. Visit risingcloud.com/benefits. That's risingcloud.com/benefits, and be sure to tell them that I said you because watching people wince when you mention my name is one of the guilty pleasures of listening to this podcast.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. My guest today is… well, he's challenging to describe. He's the co-founder and cloud instructor at ExamPro Training, Inc. but everyone knows him better as Andrew Brown because he does so many different things in the AWS ecosystem that it's sometimes challenging—at least for me—to wind up keeping track of them all. Andrew, thanks for joining.Andrew: Hey, thanks for having me on the show, Corey.Corey: How do I even begin describing you? You're an AWS Community Hero and have been for almost two years, I believe; you've done a whole bunch of work as far as training videos; you're, I think, responsible for #100daysofcloud; you recently started showing up on my TikTok feed because I'm pretending that I am 20 years younger than I am and hanging out on TikTok with the kids, and now I feel extremely old. And obviously, you're popping up an awful lot of places.Andrew: Oh, yeah. A few other places like PolyWork, which is an alternative to LinkedIn, so that's a space that I'm starting to build up on there as well. Active in Discord, Slack channels. I'm just kind of everywhere. There's some kind of internet obsession here. My wife gets really mad and says, “Hey, maybe tone down the social media.” But I really enjoy it. So.Corey: You're one of those folks where I have this challenge of I wind up having a bunch of different AWS community Slacks and cloud community, Slacks and Discords and the past, and we DM on Twitter sometimes. And I'm constantly trying to figure out where was that conversational thread that I had with you? And tracking it down is an increasingly large search problem. I really wish that—forget the unified messaging platform. I want a unified search platform for all the different messaging channels that I'm using to talk to people.Andrew: Yeah, it's very hard to keep up with all the channels for myself there. But somehow I do seem to manage it, but just with a bit less sleep than most others.Corey: Oh, yeah. It's like trying to figure out, like, “All right, he said something really useful. What was that? Was that a Twitter DM? Was it on that Slack channel? Was it that Discord? No, it was on that brick that he threw through my window with a note tied to it. There we go.”That's always the baseline stuff of figuring out where things are. So, as I mentioned in the beginning, you are the co-founder and cloud instructor at ExamPro, which is interesting because unlike most of the community stuff that you do and are known for, you don't generally talk about that an awful lot. What's the deal there?Andrew: Yeah, I think a lot of people give me a hard time because they say, Andrew, you should really be promoting yourself more and trying to make more sales, but that's not why I'm out here doing what I'm doing. Of course, I do have a for-profit business called ExamPro, where we create cloud certification study courses for things like AWS, Azure, GCP, Terraform, Kubernetes, but you know, that money just goes to fuel what I really want to do, is just to do community activities to help people change their lives. And I just decided to do that via cloud because that's my domain expertise. At least that's what I say because I've learned up on in the last four or five years. I'm hoping that there's some kind of impact I can make doing that.Corey: I take a somewhat similar approach. I mean, at The Duckbill Group, we fixed the horrifying AWS bill, but I've always found that's not generally a problem that people tend to advertise having. On Twitter, like, “Oh, man, my AWS bill is killing me this month. I've got to do something about it,” and you check where they work, and it's like a Fortune 50. It's, yeah, that moves markets and no one talks about that.So, my approach was always, be out there, be present in the community, talk about this stuff, and the people who genuinely have billing problems will eventually find their way to me. That was always my approach because turning everything I do into a sales pitch doesn't work. It just erodes confidence, it reminds people of the used mattress salesman, and I just don't want to be that person in that community. My approach has always been if I can help someone with a 15-minute call or whatnot, yeah, let's jump on a phone call. I'm not interested in nickel-and-diming folks.Andrew: Yeah. I think that if you're out there doing a lot of hard work, and a lot of it, it becomes undeniable the value you're putting out there, and then people just will want to give you money, right? And for me, I just feel really bad about taking anybody's money, and so even when there's some kind of benefit—like my courses, I could charge for access for them, but I always feel I have to give something in terms of taking somebody's money, but I would never ask anyone to give me their money. So, it's bizarre. [laugh] so.Corey: I had a whole bunch of people a year or so after I started asking, like, “I really find your content helpful. Can I buy you a cup of coffee or something?” And it's, I don't know how to charge people a dollar figure that doesn't have a comma in it because it's easy for me to ask a company for money; that is the currency of effort, work, et cetera, that companies are accustomed to. People view money very differently, and if I ask you personally for money versus your company for money, it's a very different flow. So, my solution to it was to build the annual charity t-shirt drive, where it's, great, spend 35 bucks or whatever on a snarky t-shirt once a year for ten days and all proceeds go to benefit a nonprofit that is, sort of, assuaged that.But one of my business philosophies has always been, “Work for free before you work for cheap.” And dealing with individuals and whatnot, I do not charge them for things. It's, “Oh, can you—I need some advice in my career. Can I pay you to give me some advice?” “No, but you can jump on a Zoom call with me.” Please, the reason I exist at all is because people who didn't have any reason to did me favors, once upon a time, and I feel obligated to pay that forward.Andrew: And I appreciate, you know, there are people out there that you know, do need to charge for their time. Like—Corey: Oh. Oh, yes.Andrew: —I won't judge anybody that wants to. But you know, for me, it's just I can't do it because of the way I was raised. Like, my grandfather was very involved in the community. Like, he was recognized by the city for all of his volunteer work, and doing volunteer work was, like, mandatory for me as a kid. Like, every weekend, and so for me, it's just like, I can't imagine trying to take people's money.Which is not a great thing, but it turns out that the community is very supportive, and they will come beat you down with a stick, to give you money to make sure you keep doing what you're doing. But you know, I could be making lots of money, but it's just not my priority, so I've avoided any kind of funding so like, you know, I don't become a money-driven company, and I will see how long that lasts, but hopefully, a lot longer.Corey: I wish you well. And again, you're right; no shade to anyone who winds up charging for their time to individuals. I get it. I just always had challenges with it, so I decided not to do it. The only time I find myself begrudging people who do that are someone who picked something up six months ago and decided, oh, I'm going to build some video course on how to do this thing. The end. And charge a bunch of money for it and put myself out as an expert in that space.And you look at what the content they're putting out is, and one, it's inaccurate, which just drives me up a wall, and two, there's a lack of awareness that teaching is its own skill. In some areas, I know how to teach certain things, and in other areas, I'm a complete disaster at it. Public speaking is a great example. A lot of what I do on the public speaking stage is something that comes to me somewhat naturally. So, can you teach me to be a good public speaker? Not really, it's like, well, you gave that talk and it was bad. Could you try giving it only make it good? Like, that is not a helpful coaching statement, so I stay out of that mess.Andrew: Yeah, I mean, it's really challenging to know, if you feel like you're authority enough to put something out there. And there's been a few courses where I didn't feel like I was the most knowledgeable, but I produced those courses, and they had done extremely well. But as I was going through the course, I was just like, “Yeah, I don't know how any this stuff works, but this is my best guess translating from here.” And so you know, at least for my content, people have seen me as, like, the lens of AWS on top of other platforms, right? So, I might not know—I'm not an expert in Azure, but I've made a lot of Azure content, and I just translate that over and I talk about the frustrations around, like, using scale sets compared to AWS auto-scaling groups, and that seems to really help people get through the motions of it.I know if I pass, at least they'll pass, but by no means do I ever feel like an expert. Like, right now I'm doing, like, Kubernetes. Like, I have no idea how I'm doing it, but I have, like, help with three other people. And so I'll just be honest about it and say, “Hey, yeah, I'm learning this as well, but at least I know I passed, so you know, you can pass, too.” Whatever that's worth.Corey: Oh, yeah. Back when I was starting out, I felt like a bit of a fraud because I didn't know everything about the AWS billing system and how it worked and all the different things people can do with it, and things they can ask. And now, five years later, when the industry basically acknowledges I'm an expert, I feel like a fraud because I couldn't possibly understand everything about the AWS billing system and how it works. It's one of those things where the more you learn, the more you realize that there is yet to learn. I'm better equipped these days to find the answers to the things I need to know, but I'm still learning things every day. If I ever get to a point of complete and total understanding of a given topic, I'm wrong. You can always go deeper.Andrew: Yeah, I mean, by no means am I even an expert in AWS, though people seem to think that I am just because I have a lot of confidence in there and I produce a lot of content. But that's a lot different from making a course than implementing stuff. And I do implement stuff, but you know, it's just at the scale that I'm doing that. So, just food for thought for people there.Corey: Oh, yeah. Whatever, I implement something. It's great. In my previous engineering life, I would work on large-scale systems, so I know how a thing that works in your test environment is going to blow up in a production scale environment. And I bring those lessons, written on my bones the painful way, through outages, to the way that I build things now.But the stuff that I'm building is mostly to keep my head in the game, as opposed to solving an explicit business need. Could I theoretically build a podcast transcription system on top of Transcribe or something like that for these episodes? Yeah. But I've been paying a person to do this for many years to do it themselves; they know the terms of art, they know how this stuff works, and they're building a glossary as they go, and understanding the nuances of what I say and how I say it. And that is the better business outcome; that's the answer. And if it's production facing, I probably shouldn't be tinkering with it too much, just based upon where the—I don't want to be the bottleneck for the business functioning.Andrew: I've been spending so much time doing the same thing over and over again, but for different cloud providers, and the more I do, the less I want to go deep on these things because I just feel like I'm dumping all this information I'm going to forget, and that I have those broad strokes, and when I need to go deep dive, I have that confidence. So, I'd really prefer people were to build up confidence in saying, “Yes, I think I can do this.” As opposed to being like, “Oh, I have proof that I know every single feature in AWS Systems Manager.” Just because, like, our platform, ExamPro, like, I built it with my co-founder, and it's a quite a system. And so I'm going well, that's all I need to know.And I talk to other CTOs, and there's only so much you need to know. And so I don't know if there's, like, a shift between—or difference between, like, application development where, let's say you're doing React and using Vercel and stuff like that, where you have to have super deep knowledge for that technical stack, whereas cloud is so broad or diverse that maybe just having confidence and hypothesizing the work that you can do and seeing what the outcome is a bit different, right? Not having to prove one hundred percent that you know it inside and out on day one, but have the confidence.Corey: And there's a lot of validity to that and a lot of value to it. It's the magic word I always found in interviewing, on both sides of the interview table, has always been someone who's unsure about something start with, “I'm not sure, but if I had to guess,” and then say whatever it is you were going to say. Because if you get it right, wow, you're really good at figuring this out, and your understanding is pretty decent. If you're wrong, well, you've shown them how you think but you've also called them out because you're allowed to be wrong; you're not allowed to be authoritatively wrong. Because once that happens, I can't trust anything you say.Andrew: Yeah. In terms of, like, how do cloud certifications help you for your career path? I mean, I find that they're really well structured, and they give you a goal to work towards. So, like, passing that exam is your motivation to make sure that you complete it. Do employers care? It depends. I would say mostly no. I mean, for me, like, when I'm hiring, I actually do care about certifications because we make certification courses but—Corey: In your case, you're a very specific expression of this that is not typical.Andrew: Yeah. And there are some, like, cases where, like, if you work for a larger cloud consultancy, you're expected to have a professional certification so that customers feel secure in your ability to execute. But it's not like they were trying to hire you with that requirement, right? And so I hope that people realize that and that they look at showing that practical skills, by building up cloud projects. And so that's usually a strong pairing I'll have, which is like, “Great. Get the certifications to help you just have a structured journey, and then do a Cloud project to prove that you can do what you say you can do.”Corey: One area where I've seen certifications act as an interesting proxy for knowledge is when you have a company that has 5000 folks who work in IT in varying ways, and, “All right. We're doing a big old cloud migration.” The certification program, in many respects, seems to act as a bit of a proxy for gauging where people are on upskilling, how much they have to learn, where they are in that journey. And at that scale, it begins to make some sense to me. Where do you stand on that?Andrew: Yeah. I mean, it's hard because it really depends on how those paths are built. So, when you look at the AWS certification roadmap, they have the Certified Cloud Practitioner, they have three associates, two professionals, and a bunch of specialties. And I think that you might think, “Well, oh, solutions architect must be very popular.” But I think that's because AWS decided to make the most popular, the most generic one called that, and so you might think that's what's most popular.But what they probably should have done is renamed that Solution Architect to be a Cloud Engineer because very few people become Solutions Architect. Like that's more… if there's Junior Solutions Architect, I don't know where they are, but Solutions Architect is more of, like, a senior role where you have strong communications, pre-sales, obviously, the role is going to vary based on what companies decide a Solution Architect is—Corey: Oh, absolutely take a solutions architect, give him a crash course in finance, and we call them a cloud economist.Andrew: Sure. You just add modifiers there, and they're something else. And so I really think that they should have named that one as the cloud engineer, and they should have extracted it out as its own tier. So, you'd have the Fundamental, the Certified Cloud Practitioner, then the Cloud Engineer, and then you could say, “Look, now you could do developer or the sysops.” And so you're creating this path where you have a better trajectory to see where people really want to go.But the problem is, a lot of people come in and they just do the solutions architect, and then they don't even touch the other two because they say, well, I got an associate, so I'll move on the next one. So, I think there's some structuring there that comes into play. You look at Azure, they've really, really caught up to AWS, and may I might even say surpass them in terms of the quality and the way they market them and how they construct their certifications. There's things I don't like about them, but they have, like, all these fundamental certifications. Like, you have Azure Fundamentals, Data Fundamentals, AI Fundamentals, there's a Security Fundamentals.And to me, that's a lot more valuable than going over to an associate. And so I did all those, and you know, I still think, like, should I go translate those over for AWS because you have to wait for a specialty before you pick up security. And they say, like, it's intertwined with all the certifications, but, really isn't. Like—and I feel like that would be a lot better for AWS. But that's just my personal opinion. So.Corey: My experience with AWS certifications has been somewhat minimal. I got the Cloud Practitioner a few years ago, under the working theory of I wanted to get into the certified lounge at some of the events because sometimes I needed to charge things and grab a cup of coffee. I viewed it as a lounge pass with a really strange entrance questionnaire. And in my case, yeah, I passed it relatively easily; if not, I would have some questions about how much I actually know about these things. As I recall, I got one question wrong because I was honest, instead of going by the book answer for, “How long does it take to restore an RDS database from a snapshot?”I've had some edge cases there that give the wrong answer, except that's what happened. And then I wound up having that expire and lapse. And okay, now I'll do it—it was in beta at the time, but I got the sysops associate cert to go with it. And that had a whole bunch of trivia thrown into it, like, “Which of these is the proper syntax for this thing?” And that's the kind of question that's always bothered me because when I'm trying to figure things like that out, I have entire internet at my fingertips. Understanding the exact syntax, or command-line option, or flag that needs to do a thing is a five-second Google search away in most cases. But measuring for people's ability to memorize and retain that has always struck me as a relatively poor proxy for knowledge.Andrew: It's hard across the board. Like Azure, AWS, GCP, they all have different approaches—like, Terraform, all of them, they're all different. And you know, when you go to interview process, you have to kind of extract where the value is. And I would think that the majority of the industry, you know, don't have best practices when hiring, there's, like, a superficial—AWS is like, “Oh, if you do well, in STAR program format, you must speak a communicator.” Like, well, I'm dyslexic, so that stuff is not easy for me, and I will never do well in that.So like, a lot of companies hinge on those kinds of components. And I mean, I'm sure it doesn't matter; if you have a certain scale, you're going to have attrition. There's no perfect system. But when you look at these certifications, and you say, “Well, how much do they match up with the job?” Well, they don't, right? It's just Jeopardy.But you know, I still think there's value for yourself in terms of being able to internalize it. I still think that does prove that you have done something. But taking the AWS certification is not the same as taking Andrew Brown's course. So, like, my certified cloud practitioner was built after I did GCP, Oracle Cloud, Azure Fundamentals, a bunch of other Azure fundamental certifications, cloud-native stuff, and then I brought it over because was missing, right? So like, if you went through my course, and that I had a qualifier, then I could attest to say, like, you are of this skill level, right?But it really depends on what that testament is and whether somebody even cares about what my opinion of, like, your skillset is. But I can't imagine like, when you have a security incident, there's going to be a pop-up that shows you multiple-choice answer to remediate the security incident. Now, we might get there at some point, right, with all the cloud automation, but we're not there yet.Corey: It's been sort of thing we've been chasing and never quite get there. I wish. I hope I live to see it truly I do. My belief is also that the value of a certification changes depending upon what career stage someone is at. Regardless of what level you are at, a hiring manager or a company is looking for more or less a piece of paper that attests that they're to solve the problem that they are hiring to solve.And entry-level, that is often a degree or a certification or something like that in the space that shows you have at least the baseline fundamentals slash know how to learn things. After a few years, I feel like that starts to shift into okay, you've worked in various places solving similar problems on your resume that the type that we have—because the most valuable thing you can hear when you ask someone, “How would we solve this problem?” Is, “Well, the last time I solved it, here's what we learned.” Great. That's experience. There's no compression algorithm for experience? Yes, there is: Hiring people with experience.Then, at some level, you wind up at the very far side of people who are late-career in many cases where the piece of paper that shows that they know what they're doing is have you tried googling their name and looking at the Wikipedia article that spits out, how they built fundamental parts of a system like that. I think that certifications are one of those things that bias for early-career folks. And of course, partners when there are other business reasons to get it. But as people grow in seniority, I feel like the need for those begins to fall off. Do you agree? Disagree? You're much closer to this industry in that aspect of it than I am.Andrew: The more senior you are, and if you have big names under your resume there, no one's going to care if you have certification, right? When I was looking to switch careers—I used to have a consultancy, and I was just tired of building another failed startup for somebody that was willing to pay me. And I'm like—I was not very nice about it. I was like, “Your startup's not going to work out. You really shouldn't be building this.” And they still give me the money and it would fail, and I'd move on to the next one. It was very frustrating.So, closed up shop on that. And I said, “Okay, I got to reenter the market.” I don't have a computer science degree, I don't have big names on my resume, and Toronto is a very competitive market. And so I was feeling friction because people were not valuing my projects. I had, like, full-stack projects, I would show them.And they said, “No, no. Just do these, like, CompSci algorithms and stuff like that.” And so I went, “Okay, well, I really don't want to be doing that. I don't want to spend all my time learning algorithms just so I can get a job to prove that I already have the knowledge I have.” And so I saw a big opportunity in cloud, and I thought certifications would be the proof to say, “I can do these things.”And when I actually ended up going for the interviews, I didn't even have certifications and I was getting those opportunities because the certifications helped me prove it, but nobody cared about the certifications, even then, and that was, like, 2017. But not to say, like, they didn't help me, but it wasn't the fact that people went, “Oh, you have a certification. We'll get you this job.”Corey: Yeah. When I'm talking to consulting clients, I've never once been asked, “Well, do you have the certifications?” Or, “Are you an AWS partner?” In my case, no, neither of those things. The reason that we know what we're doing is because we've done this before. It's the expertise approach.I question whether that would still be true if we were saying, “Oh, yeah, and we're going to drop a dozen engineers on who are going to build things out of your environment.” “Well, are they certified?” is a logical question to ask when you're bringing in an external service provider? Or is this just a bunch of people you found somewhere on Upwork or whatnot, and you're throwing them at it with no quality control? Like, what is the baseline level experience? That's a fair question. People are putting big levels of trust when they bring people in.Andrew: I mean, I could see that as a factor of some clients caring, just because like, when I used to work in startups, I knew customers where it's like their second startup, and they're flush with a lot of money, and they're deciding who they want to partner with, and they're literally looking at what level of SSL certificate they purchased, right? Like now, obviously, they're all free and they're very easy to get to get; there was one point where you had different tiers—as if you would know—and they would look and they would say—Corey: Extended validation certs attend your browser bar green. Remember those?Andrew: Right. Yeah, yeah, yeah. It was just like that, and they're like, “We should partner with them because they were able to afford that and we know, like…” whatever, whatever, right? So, you know, there is that kind of thought process for people at an executive level. I'm not saying it's widespread, but I've seen it.When you talk to people that are in cloud consultancy, like solutions architects, they always tell me they're driven to go get those professional certifications [unintelligible 00:22:19] their customers matter. I don't know if the customers care or not, but they seem to think so. So, I don't know if it's just more driven by those people because it's an expectation because everyone else has it, or it's like a package of things, like, you know, like the green bar in the certifications, SOC 2 compliance, things like that, that kind of wrap it up and say, “Okay, as a package, this looks really good.” So, more of an expectation, but not necessarily matters, it's just superficial; I'm not sure.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: You've been building out certifications for multiple cloud providers, so I'm curious to get your take on something that Forrest Brazeal, who's now head of content over at Google Cloud, has been talking about lately, the idea that as an engineer is advised to learn more than one cloud provider; even if you have one as a primary, learning how another one works makes you a better engineer. Now, setting aside entirely the idea that well, yeah, if I worked at Google, I probably be saying something fairly similar.Andrew: Yeah.Corey: Do you think there's validity to the idea that most people should be broad across multiple providers, or do you think specialization on one is the right path?Andrew: Sure. Just to contextualize for our listeners, Google Cloud is highly, highly promoting multi-cloud workloads, and one of their flagship products is—well, they say it's a flagship product—is Anthos. And they put a lot of money—I don't know that was subsidized, but they put a lot of money in it because they really want to push multi-cloud, right? And so when we say Forrest works in Google Cloud, it should be no surprise that he's promoting it.But I don't work for Google, and I can tell you, like, learning multi-cloud is, like, way more valuable than just staying in one vertical. It just opened my eyes. When I went from AWS to Azure, it was just like, “Oh, I'm missing out on so much in the industry.” And it really just made me such a more well-rounded person. And I went over to Google Cloud, and it was just like… because you're learning the same thing in different variations, and then you're also poly-filling for things that you will never touch.Or like, I shouldn't say you never touch, but you would never touch if you just stayed in that vertical when you're learning. So, in the industry, Azure Active Directory is, like, widespread, but if you just stayed in your little AWS box, you're not going to notice it on that learning path, right? And so a lot of times, I tell people, “Go get your CLF-C01 and then go get your AZ-900 or AZ-104.” Again, I don't care if people go and sit the exams. I want them to go learn the content because it is a large eye-opener.A lot of people are against multi-cloud from a learning perspective because say, it's too much to learn all at the same time. But a lot of people I don't think have actually gone across the cloud, right? So, they're sitting from their chair, only staying in one vertical saying, “Well, you can't learn them all at the same time.” And I'm going, “I see a way that you could teach them all at the same time.” And I might be the first person that will do it.Corey: And the principles do convey as well. It's, “Oh, well I know how SNS works on AWS, so I would never be able to understand how Google Pub/Sub works.” Those are functionally identical; I don't know that is actually true. It's just different to interface points and different guarantees, but fine. You at least understand the part that it plays.I've built things out on Google Cloud somewhat recently, and for me, every time I do, it's a refreshing eye-opener to oh, this is what developer experience in the cloud could be. And for a lot of customers, it is. But staying too far within the bounds of one ecosystem does lend itself to a loss of perspective, if you're not careful. I agree with that.Andrew: Yeah. Well, I mean, just the paint more of a picture of differences, like, Google Cloud has a lot about digital transformation. They just updated their—I'm not happy that they changed it, but I'm fine that they did that, but they updated their Google Digital Cloud Leader Exam Guide this month, and it like is one hundred percent all about digital transformation. So, they love talking about digital transformation, and those kind of concepts there. They are really good at defining migration strategies, like, at a high level.Over to Azure, they have their own cloud adoption framework, and it's so detailed, in terms of, like, execution, where you go over to AWS and they have, like, the worst cloud adoption framework. It's just the laziest thing I've ever seen produced in my life compared to out of all the providers in that space. I didn't know about zero-trust model until I start using Azure because Azure has Active Directory, and you can do risk-based policy procedures over there. So, you know, like, if you don't go over to these places, you're not going to get covered other places, so you're just going to be missing information till you get the job and, you know, that job has that information requiring you to know it.Corey: I would say that for someone early career—and I don't know where this falls on the list of career advice ranging from, “That is genius,” to, “Okay, Boomer,” but I would argue that figuring out what companies in your geographic area, or the companies that you have connections with what they're using for a cloud provider, I would bias for learning one enough to get hired there and from there, letting what you learn next be dictated by the environment you find yourself in. Because especially larger companies, there's always something that lives in a different provider. My default worst practice is multi-cloud. And I don't say that because multi-cloud doesn't exist, and I'm not saying it because it's a bad idea, but this idea of one workload—to me—that runs across multiple providers is generally a challenge. What I see a lot more, done intelligently, is, “Okay, we're going to use this provider for some things, this other provider for other things, and this third provider for yet more things.” And every company does that.If not, there's something very strange going on. Even Amazon uses—if not Office 365, at least exchange to run their email systems instead of Amazon WorkMail because—Andrew: Yeah.Corey: Let's be serious. That tells me a lot. But I don't generally find myself in a scenario where I want to build this application that is anything more than Hello World, where I want it to run seamlessly and flawlessly across two different cloud providers. That's an awful lot of work that I struggle to identify significant value for most workloads.Andrew: I don't want to think about securing, like, multiple workloads, and that's I think a lot of friction for a lot of companies are ingress-egress costs, which I'm sure you might have some knowledge on there about the ingress-egress costs across providers.Corey: Oh, a little bit, yeah.Andrew: A little bit, probably.Corey: Oh, throwing data between clouds is always expensive.Andrew: Sure. So, I mean, like, I call multi-cloud using multiple providers, but not in tandem. Cross-cloud is when you want to use something like Anthos or Azure Arc or something like that where you extend your data plane or control pla—whatever the plane is, whatever plane across all the providers. But you know, in practice, I don't think many people are doing cross-cloud; they're doing multi-cloud, like, “I use AWS to run my primary workloads, and then I use Microsoft Office Suite, and so we happen to use Azure Active Directory, or, you know, run particular VM machines, like Windows machines for our accounting.” You know?So, it's a mixed bag, but I do think that using more than one thing is becoming more popular just because you want to use the best in breed no matter where you are. So like, I love BigQuery. BigQuery is amazing. So, like, I ingest a lot of our data from, you know, third-party services right into that. I could be doing that in Redshift, which is expensive; I could be doing that in Azure Synapse, which is also expensive. I mean, there's a serverless thing. I don't really get serverless. So, I think that, you know, people are doing multi-cloud.Corey: Yeah. I would agree. I tend to do things like that myself, and whenever I see it generally makes sense. This is my general guidance. When I talk to individuals who say, “Well, we're running multi-cloud like this.” And my response is, “Great. You're probably right.”Because I'm talking in the general sense, someone building something out on day one where they don't know, like, “Everyone's saying multi-cloud. Should I do that?” No, I don't believe you should. Now, if your company has done that intentionally, rather than by accident, there's almost certainly a reason and context that I do not have. “Well, we have to run our SaaS application in multiple cloud providers because that's where our customers are.” “Yeah, you should probably do that.” But your marketing, your billing systems, your back-end reconciliation stuff generally does not live across all of those providers. It lives in one. That's the sort of thing I'm talking about. I think we're in violent agreement here.Andrew: Oh, sure, yeah. I mean, Kubernetes obviously is becoming very popular because people believe that they'll have a lot more mobility, Whereas when you use all the different managed—and I'm still learning Kubernetes myself from the next certification I have coming out, like, study course—but, you know, like, those managed services have all different kind of kinks that are completely different. And so, you know, it's not going to be a smooth process. And you're still leveraging, like, for key things like your database, you're not going to be running that in Kubernetes Cluster. You're going to be using a managed service.And so, those have their own kind of expectations in terms of configuration. So, I don't know, it's tricky to say what to do, but I think that, you know, if you have a need for it, and you don't have a security concern—like, usually it's security or cost, right, for multi-cloud.Corey: For me, at least, the lock-in has always been twofold that people don't talk about. More—less lock-in than buy-in. One is the security model where IAM is super fraught and challenging and tricky, and trying to map a security model to multiple providers is super hard. Then on top of that, you also have the buy-in story of a bunch of engineers who are very good at one cloud provider, and that skill set is not in less demand now than it was a year ago. So okay, you're going to start over and learn a new cloud provider is often something that a lot of engineers won't want to countenance.If your team is dead set against it, there's going to be some friction there and there's going to be a challenge. I mean, for me at least, to say that someone knows a cloud provider is not the naive approach of, “Oh yeah, they know how it works across the board.” They know how it breaks. For me, one of the most valuable reasons to run something on AWS is I know what a failure mode looks like, I know how it degrades, I know how to find out what's going on when I see that degradation. That to me is a very hard barrier to overcome. Alternately, it's entirely possible that I'm just old.Andrew: Oh, I think we're starting to see some wins all over the place in terms of being able to learn one thing and bring it other places, like OpenTelemetry, which I believe is a cloud-native Kubernetes… CNCF. I can't remember what it stands for. It's like Linux Foundation, but for cloud-native. And so OpenTelemetry is just a standardized way of handling your logs, metrics, and traces, right? And so maybe CloudWatch will be the 1.0 of observability in AWS, and then maybe OpenTelemetry will become more of the standard, right, and so maybe we might see more managed services like Prometheus and Grafa—well, obviously, AWS has a managed Prometheus, but other things like that. So, maybe some of those things will melt away. But yeah, it's hard to say what approach to take.Corey: Yeah, I'm wondering, on some level, whether what the things we're talking about today, how well that's going to map forward. Because the industry is constantly changing. The guidance I would give about should you be in cloud five years ago would have been a nuanced, “Mmm, depends. Maybe for yes, maybe for no. Here's the story.” It's a lot less hedge-y and a lot less edge case-y these days when I answer that question. So, I wonder in five years from now when we look back at this podcast episode, how well this discussion about what the future looks like, and certifications, and multi-cloud, how well that's going to reflect?Andrew: Well, when we look at, like, Kubernetes or Web3, we're just seeing kind of like the standardized boilerplate way of doing a bunch of things, right, all over the place. This distributed way of, like, having this generic API across the board. And how well that will take, I have no idea, but we do see a large split between, like, serverless and cloud-natives. So, it's like, what direction? Or we'll just have both? Probably just have both, right?Corey: [Like that 00:33:08]. I hope so. It's been a wild industry ride, and I'm really curious to see what changes as we wind up continuing to grow. But we'll see. That's the nice thing about this is, worst case, if oh, turns out that we were wrong on this whole cloud thing, and everyone starts exodusing back to data centers, well, okay. That's the nice thing about being a small company. It doesn't take either of us that long to address the reality we see in the industry.Andrew: Well, that or these cloud service providers are just going to get better at offering those services within carrier hotels, or data centers, or on your on-premise under your desk, right? So… I don't know, we'll see. It's hard to say what the future will be, but I do believe that cloud is sticking around in one form or another. And it basically is, like, an essential skill or table stakes for anybody that's in the industry. I mean, of course, not everywhere, but like, mostly, I would say. So.Corey: Andrew, I want to thank you for taking the time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more about your opinions, how you view these things, et cetera. Where can they find you?Andrew: You know, I think the best place to find me right now is Twitter. So, if you go to twitter.com/andrewbrown—all lowercase, no spaces, no underscores, no hyphens—you'll find me there. I'm so surprised I was able to get that handle. It's like the only place where I have my handle.Corey: And we will of course put links to that in the [show notes 00:34:25]. Thanks so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I really appreciate it.Andrew: Well, thanks for having me on the show.Corey: Andrew Brown, co-founder and cloud instructor at ExamPro Training and so much more. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry comment telling me that I do not understand certifications at all because you're an accountant, and certifications matter more in that industry.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

2X eCommerce Podcast
S06 EP57: The Outlook for eCommerce in 2022 w/ Mike Shapaker

2X eCommerce Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 39:40


On today's episode, Kunle is joined by Mike Shapaker, CMO at ChannelAdvisor, an SaaS company offering businesses a centralised platform to streamline operations, expand to new channels and grow sales.With the full-blown expansion of eCommerce and democratisation of Martech, businesses are in a race to be everywhere their customers are. And the ever-shifting privacy landscape has made it all the more important for businesses to be ahead of the curve. Since we're at the start of 2022, there's no better time than now to take stock of the eCommerce landscape and plan for the year.In this episode, Kunle and Mike talk about the major trends to look out for in 2022. You will get to hear about why we aren't quite done with supply chain issues, why more and more retailers are becoming marketplaces and why you should know about Shoppable Media. This is a great episode for business owners and marketers.-----------SPONSORS:This episode is brought to you by:Klaviyo This episode is brought to you by Klaviyo – a growth marketing platform that powers over 25,000 online businesses. Direct-to-Consumer brands like ColourPop, Huckberry, and Custom Ink rely on Klaviyo.Klaviyo helps you own customer experience and grow high-value customer relationships right from a shopper's first impression through to each subsequent purchase, Klaviyo understands every single customer interaction and empowers brands to create more personalized marketing moments.Find out more on klaviyo.com/2x.  RewindThis episode is brought to you by Rewind - the #1 Backup and Recovery App for Shopify and BigCommerce stores that powers over 80,000 online businesses.Direct-to-Consumer brands like Gymshark and MVMT Watches rely on Rewind.Cloud based ecommerce platforms like Shopify and BigCommerce do not have automatic backup features. Rewind protects your store against human error, misbehaving apps, or collaborators gone bad with Automatic backups!For a free 30-day trial, Go to Rewind Backups, reach out to the Rewind team via chat or email and mention '2x ecommerce'GorgiasThis episode is brought to you by Gorgias, the leading helpdesk for Shopify, Magento and BigCommerce merchants. Gorgias combines all your communication channels including email, SMS, social media, livechat, and phone, into one platform.This saves your team hours per day & makes managing customer orders a breeze. It also integrates seamlessly with your existing tech stack, so you can access customer information and even edit, return, refund or create an order, right from your helpdesk.Go to Gorgias.com and mention 2x ecommerce podcast for two months free.

New Life Live with Steve Arterburn
New Life Live: January 20, 2022

New Life Live with Steve Arterburn

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 49:05


Topics: Adult Children, Boundaries, Physical Abuse, Anger, Sexual Abuse Hosts: Steve Arterburn, Dr. Jill Hubbard, Special Guest Dr. Jim Burns, president of HomeWord, author, and Fearless Parenting Workshop presenter Caller Questions: We still support our 24yo daughter who we adopted at 15yo; when do we draw the line with her meth addiction?  What do I do if my wife punched me? I The post New Life Live: January 20, 2022 appeared first on New Life.

Streaming Audio: a Confluent podcast about Apache Kafka
Optimizing Cloud-Native Apache Kafka Performance ft. Alok Nikhil and Adithya Chandra

Streaming Audio: a Confluent podcast about Apache Kafka

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 30:40


Maximizing cloud Apache Kafka® performance isn't just about running data processes on cloud instances. There is a lot of engineering work required to set and maintain a high-performance standard for speed and availability. Alok Nikhil (Senior Software Engineer, Confluent) and Adithya Chandra (Staff Software Engineer II, Confluent) share about their efforts on how to optimize Kafka on Confluent Cloud and the three guiding principles that they follow whether you are self-managing Kafka  or working on a cloud-native system: Know your users and plan for their workloadsInfrastructure matters for performance as well as cost efficiency Effective observability—you can't improve what you don't see A large part of setting and achieving performance standards is about understanding that workloads vary and come with unique requirements. There are different dimensions for performance, such as the number of partitions and the number of connections. Alok and Adithya suggest starting by identifying the workload patterns that are the most important to your business objectives for simulation, reproduction, and using the results to optimize the software.   When identifying workloads, it's essential to determine the infrastructure that you'll need to support the given workload economically. Infrastructure optimization is as important as performance optimization. It's best practice to know the infrastructure that you have available to you and choose the appropriate hardware, operating system, and JVM to allocate the processes so that workloads run efficiently. With the necessary infrastructure patterns in place, it's crucial to monitor metrics to ensure that your application is running as expected consistently with every release. Having the right observability metrics and logs allows you to identify and troubleshoot issues relatively quickly. Profiling and request sampling also help you dive deeper into performance issues, particularly, during incidents. Alok and Adithya's team uses tooling such as the async-profiler for profiling CPU cycles, heap allocations, and lock contention.Alok and Adithya summarize their learnings and processes used for optimizing managed Kafka as a service, which can be applicable to your own cloud-native applications. You can also read more about their journey on the Confluent blog. EPISODE LINKSSpeed, Scale, Storage: Our Journey from Apache Kafka to Performance in Confluent CloudCloud-Native Apache KafkaJoin the Confluent CommunityLearn more with Kafka tutorials, resources, and guides at Confluent DeveloperLive demo: Intro to Event-Driven Microservices with ConfluentUse PODCAST100 to get an additional $100 of free Confluent Cloud usage (details)Watch the video version of this podcast

NC F&B Podcast
Finding Work/Life Balance In A Cloud of Southern Smoke

NC F&B Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 57:51


"On a very special episode" of the NC F&B, the guys sit down with Matthew Register & Rodolfo Sandoval and discover how to find work/life balance in the restaurant industry. Here's some things discovered and discussed; How do you organize your weekly schedule? Who to have as a support system? When to schedule family time? What is a "tweezer chef" and a Pibil Taco? Why you should care even if you don't have a family?     Support our Sponsors: Need a Gig? Go to GigPro NCFB! and get your first gig, free of charge, from GigPro! SPOT ON Tech that helps your business grow. Call Tanya 858-213-7820 or email her tanyam@spoton.com Drink Joe Van Gogh Coffee! Proof Alcohol Ice Cream Think Differently About Dessert Triangle Wine Company Use promo code 'NCFB' at checkout! The NC F&B Podcast is Produced and Engineered by Max Trujillo of Trujillo Media For booking or questions about the show, contact: max@ncfbpodcast.com or matt@ncfbpodcast.com 

Digital Jung: The Symbolic Life in a Technological Age

In this episode:We talk about the value of letting things happen and why Jung felt it was essential for the task of individuation.Let's make this a conversation:Do you have a comment or  question about this episode, or about something you would like me to address in a future episode? Please contact me on Instagram (@digital.jung), Facebook (facebook.com/jungiananalyst), or Twitter (@Jason_E_Smith).For more on living a symbolic life:Please check out my book, Religious but Not Religious: Living a Symbolic Life, available from Chiron Publications.Sources for quotes and more:'The Integration of the Personality' by C.G. Jung.'Tao Te Ching,' Translated by Richard Wilhelm.'Some keep the Sabbath going to Church' by Emily Dickinson.'The Spiritual Life' by Evelyn Underhill. 'The Wisdom of Insecurity' by Alan Watts.'Religious but Not Religious' by Jason E. Smith.'The Cloud of Unknowing.''Lost' by David Wagoner.'Oceans' by Juan Ramón Jiménez.'Love in the Void,' a collection of writings by Simone Weil.'Encounters with the Soul' by Barbara Hannah.'Visions Seminars' by C.G. JungTransformation Symbolism in the Mass  from 'Collected Works, vol. 11' by C.G. Jung.Like this podcast?Please consider leaving a review at one of the following sites:Apple PodcastsSpotifyPodchaserMusic:"Dreaming Days," "Slow Vibing," and "The Return" by Ketsa are licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

The Freddie & Alyssa Show
#211: The Freddie & Alyssa Show: Remembering Betty White, Freddie Getting Recognized in Florida, and How Euphoria Star Angus Cloud Got Cast in a Hit Show Without Really Trying

The Freddie & Alyssa Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022


On episode 211 of The Freddie & Alyssa Show we sit down and remember Betty White, share a fabulous fan encounter in Florida, and discuss how Euphoria star Angus Cloud got cast in a hit show without really trying.

Daily Tech News Show (Video)
Cloud, Community, & Content – DTNS 4194

Daily Tech News Show (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022


What does Microsoft hope to gain from the buyout of Activision Blizzard and what does it mean for the videogaming industry? Plus does Microsoft see the Exynos 2200 chip as a threat to the Xbox? Starring Tom Merritt, Sarah Lane, Scott Johnson, Roger Chang, Joe, Amos MP3 Download Using a Screen Reader? Click here Multiple versions (ogg, video etc.) from Archive.org Follow us on Twitter Instgram YouTube and Twitch Please SUBSCRIBE HERE. Subscribe through Apple Podcasts. A special thanks to all our supporters–without you, none of this would be possible. If you are willing to support the show or to give as little as 10 cents a day on Patreon, Thank you! Become a Patron! Big thanks to Dan Lueders for the headlines music and Martin Bell for the opening theme! Big thanks to Mustafa A. from thepolarcat.com for the logo! Thanks to our mods Jack_Shid and KAPT_Kipper on the subreddit Send to email to feedback@dailytechnewsshow.com Show Notes To read the show notes in a separate page click here!

Daily Tech News Show
Cloud, Community, & Content – DTNS 4194

Daily Tech News Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022


What does Microsoft hope to gain from the buyout of Activision Blizzard and what does it mean for the videogaming industry? Plus does Microsoft see the Exynos 2200 chip as a threat to the Xbox? Starring Tom Merritt, Sarah Lane, Scott Johnson, Roger Chang, Joe, Amos MP3 Download Using a Screen Reader? Click here MultipleContinue reading "Cloud, Community, & Content – DTNS 4194"

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Day Two Cloud 130: Getting Started With OpenShift For Kubernetes Orchestration

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 47:50


On today's Day Two Cloud we have a career conversation with Angela Andrews, a Solution Architect at Red Hat. Angela provides an introduction to OpenShift, a cloud-based offering for running and orchestrating Kubernetes containers in public clouds and on premises from Red Hat. We also discuss how to integrate communication skills with technical knowledge, the role of a Solution Architect, how to stay on top of new and changing technologies, and more. The post Day Two Cloud 130: Getting Started With OpenShift For Kubernetes Orchestration appeared first on Packet Pushers.

The Boundaries.me Podcast
Episode 305 - The Dr. Cloud Show Live - Looking Back With Kind Eyes - 12-27-2021

The Boundaries.me Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 73:01


On this episode of The Dr. Cloud Show:   A viewer wrote in when we were live asking about their binge eating problem. They need help getting to the root of the problem.   Shanna has a mother-in-law that has relied on her and her husband as an emotional crutch for years. How can they remain compassionate while setting boundaries about not being a parent to their parent?   Katherine's boyfriend is a recovering alcoholic that relapsed. What's her role and what boundaries can she use to protect herself?   Kerri is 57 and is conflicted about getting back into the dating world. She freaks out when she starts connecting. How can she learn to get more comfortable with the process?   Are you having difficulty with trusting someone you're close to? Maybe you're trying to rebuild trust but you get set back by reliving what happened. Is this person worthy of giving your trust to in the first place? We have a two hour live workshop coming up on Trust. It's on February 21st. If you can't attend live, don't worry! All purchases include endless streaming access to the recording and the outline. https://www.boundaries.me/trust   Get a free 14 day trial to Boundaries.me with over 90 video courses, daily coaching emails and more. We've got courses on codependency, finding safe people, dealing with a narcissist, and over 90 other courses. You'll also get daily coaching videos delivered to your inbox--short 2-4 minute videos that give you one thing to do that day to build your way to a better version of yourself. We've also got a members-only support community on the site where you can discuss what you're learning, and get support and share support along the way. It's a free two-week trial, cancel at anytime, and only $9 a month after that. https://www.boundaries.me

New Life Live with Steve Arterburn
New Life Live: January 19, 2022

New Life Live with Steve Arterburn

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 49:05


Topics: Counseling, Narcissists, Annulment, Anger, Verbal Abuse Hosts: Steve Arterburn, Becky Brown, Chris Williams Caller Questions: Should I confront my wife's therapist? Her therapist has categorized me as borderline and a narcissist without ever seeing me.  I am my wife's third husband, and I would like her to get her second marriage annulled so I can receive the sacraments, but she The post New Life Live: January 19, 2022 appeared first on New Life.

Discover Your Talent–Do What You Love | Build a Career of Success, Satisfaction and Freedom
1050. A Day in the Life of a Non-Traditional Learning Advisor, with Sravan Ankaraju

Discover Your Talent–Do What You Love | Build a Career of Success, Satisfaction and Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 39:10


Sravan Ankaraju's twenty-five years in the field of data science and innovation provided him with a robust understanding of the intersections between technology and the economy. In 2015, Sravan co-founded Divergence Academy, where is he responsible for the vision and business development for industry-focused technology education. Divergence Academy offers immersive programs in data science, cybersecurity, and cloud computing.