Podcasts about Backwards

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 2,138PODCASTS
  • 3,019EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 24, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Backwards

Show all podcasts related to backwards

Latest podcast episodes about Backwards

Another Episode Podcast
Episode 174 - Sleepless in Seattle - HANKSgiving w/ Alana Gonzalez

Another Episode Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 72:36


Howdy friends! During this festive HANKSgiving we do our best to give Hanks onto thee. This week was no disappointment. Sleepless in Seattle although slow at times turned out to be an entertaining watch for the panel. There were laughs, some with tears and games were played.    Email the shows at AnotherEpisodePodcast@gmail.com Instagram - www.instagram.com/AnotherEpisodePodcast Twitter - www.twitter.com/AnotherEpPod Facebook - www.facebook.com/anotherepisodepodcast Follow Matt's Twitch channel at www.twitch.tv/mattopoly83 Please rate, review and share with your friends! Thanks for listening... THANKS MORE for Subscribing! Theme Songs "Chop This Synopsis" by www.twitter.com/Bob_Fred_Rick "Guess the Age" by www.twitter.com/brandonalberda "Box Office Theme Song" by www.twitter.com/StuMcCallister "Did You Hear That Sound" by www.twitter.com/hibbzilla "Backwards 4 Words" by Listener Stacy

The Howie Carr Radio Network
Biden Goes Gas Backwards - 11.23.21 - Hour 3

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 39:21


Howie this hour talks about Biden releasing oil from our reserves in an attempt to lower gas prices, we'll see how that goes.

The Biggs & Barr Show
Backwards Pants | Popular Mullets | You Don't NEED To Know

The Biggs & Barr Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 44:46


The Latest | Kid Puts Pants On Backwards | Mullets Are Popular | OttaWHAT? | Joke Text | DUGY Needs To Know Everything | Instant Answer Question Time

The big d z one
How I did with survivor series 2021 and backwards world rant

The big d z one

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 23:48


Why do people like hells who trash the city they live in or try to keep a face away from the ring and take away a career or something the face work on for years this wrold is truly backwards!!! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bigdcountry/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bigdcountry/support

Munger Place Church - Dallas, Texas
Reading Romans Backwards

Munger Place Church - Dallas, Texas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 31:19


I learned this week that the key to understanding Romans is to read it backwards. When you start at the end, you see that Paul really wants for the Romans is unity. Unity wasn't any easier 2,000 years ago than it is today. Which doesn't make it any less important. Preacher: Andrew Forrest Scripture: Romans 16

Rejoice in the Lord Video

Backwards (broadcast date: 11/21/2021)

The Urban Exodus Podcast
A film journalist's Covid move inspires a new chapter and a place to call home

The Urban Exodus Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 64:49


I'm excited to invite you to my conversation with Alicia Malone. Alicia is a recent Maine transplant, who relocated from Los Angeles during Covid. Alicia was born and raised in Australia. She is a published author, film expert, and most well known for her role as a host on Turner Classic Movies. Her two books -- Backwards and in Heels  and The Female Gaze - focus on the role of women in cinema history, and the accomplishments and struggles of many female filmmakers today.Ever since she was a kid, Alicia has been obsessed with cinema. She knew she wanted to someday work in the film industry, and was super focused towards manifesting her goal of building a career in the highly competitive entertainment industry. Instead of going to college, Alicia moved to Sydney right out of high school to work behind the scenes in television production. After cutting her teeth as a film journalist in Australia, she moved to Los Angeles, with the specific goal in mind to one day work as a host for Turner Classic Movies. Contrary to the many assumptions about the role of a television host, Alicia writes all of her own scripts, and loves the viewing and researching process more than her time on camera.As a child, Alicia grew up on a farm and always dreamed that she would go back to live in the country someday. It was always that “one day” sort of dream, but when the pandemic hit, that dream finally seemed like a viable option. Alicia was working remotely, and taking trips every couple of months to film for Turner Classic Movies at their headquarters in Atlanta. She realized nothing was keeping her in the stressful, congested, party scene of Los Angeles. On a whim, she found a monthly Airbnb rental in a town in Maine that she had only driven through once. Even though she'd never spent anytime there, that one drive thru was enough to enchant her and make her want test the waters to see if could feel like home. In less than a month, she knew this was where she wanted to plant permanent roots. She quickly bought her first home because she saw real estate prices increasing and inventory decreasing. While most of her work takes place outside of her small community, Alicia is currently pursuing a dream to open a local independent theater. She wants to show classic and contemporary films and is looking forward to contributing to the "movie memories" of others.Alicia is such an inspiration, not only because of the joy and tenacity with which she approaches following her dreams, but the life she has built for herself on her own terms. I know how grateful she is to make the shift back to small town life after decades of building her career in big cities. I love hearing about how returning to a small town has allowed her to re-experience her childhood rural roots, and also return to a more authentic version of herself - even dyeing her hair back to her natural blonde. Alicia took her physical move as an opportunity for a mental shift as well in prioritizing her health, and also stepping back from the rat race and ‘more is more' mentality. In our conversation, we speak about her advice for urbanites making the dramatic shift to small town life, moving while single, Alicia's lifestyle and career choices, and the changes she has witnessed in herself since leaving the bustle of city life. This is a story of following your intuition, new beginnings, and the pursuit of happiness. I hope you enjoy listening. You can find photos of my visit with Alicia and links to her books and social accounts by visiting the Urban Exodus Blog. 

Life is Unfair
S4 Ep5: 4.05 Forwards Backwards

Life is Unfair

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 74:51


This week we discuss Forwards Backwards introducing Betsy the cow. Tangents include Christmas traditions, shitty comic book store employees, and the legacy of Greg Loren Durand's America's Caesar.

Another Episode Podcast
Episode 173 - The Burbs w/ Adam Degi

Another Episode Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 74:08


Howdy Epi-Hoes! Guest comedian Adam Degi returns for our next installment of HANKSgiving! This time around we tackle the Tom Hanks classic The Burbs. Hanks gives another goofy performance mixed in with some spooky thrills. We play some games, we listen to some clips and we laugh along the way. Listen in as we try to make Adam's newest comedy album 'Limp Nodes' climb up the Itunes comedy charts. You can pick up a copy of Adam's album right HERE! Email the shows at AnotherEpisodePodcast@gmail.com Instagram - www.instagram.com/AnotherEpisodePodcast Twitter - www.twitter.com/AnotherEpPod Facebook - www.facebook.com/anotherepisodepodcast Follow Matt's Twitch channel at www.twitch.tv/mattopoly83 Please rate, review and share with your friends! Thanks for listening... THANKS MORE for Subscribing! Theme Songs "Chop This Synopsis" by www.twitter.com/Bob_Fred_Rick "Guess the Age" by www.twitter.com/brandonalberda "Box Office Theme Song" by www.twitter.com/StuMcCallister "Did You Hear That Sound" by www.twitter.com/hibbzilla "Backwards 4 Words" by Listener Stacy

WOE.BEGONE
46: Information sent backwards through time tends to propagate backwards through time.

WOE.BEGONE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 24:02


Some of life's harshest lessons are learned on the toilet. [Warning: this episode contains a description of gore and violence. Listener discretion is advised.] Skip the intro announcement: 1:37 The reprise songs from episode 45 of WOE.BEGONE are available now as an EP. Get "I wonder what it is about that place." on bandcamp at woebegonepod.bandcamp.com for $2.50 or as part of your Patreon pledge at patreon.com/woe_begone. On Patreon, you can also get early access to episodes, instrumentals, the Aliza Schultz podcast, Q&As, a secret Discord channel, Director's commentaries, cat clips, and more. PATREON: http://patreon.com/woe_begone ALIZA SCHULTZ: http://anchor.fm/alizaschultz TRANSCRIPTS: http://WOEBEGONEPOD.com TWITTER: @WOEBEGONEPOD REDDIT: /r/DOGCATCHER and /r/WOEBEGONE MUSIC: http://woebegonepod.bandcamp.com DISCORD: https://discord.gg/pn9kjTBYPD

Anime Fans Against Anime
Anime Fans Against Anime, Dog Days' 7-13 | DOG is GOD Backwards

Anime Fans Against Anime

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 92:11


Richard's alternate identity, Lionel, joins us this week as we put the last of these dogs on their leashes!

K92 Mornin' Thang
Backwards Backwards: Accents

K92 Mornin' Thang

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 9:05


An all-accent edition of the Backwards Backwards Game

POD LEDOM
TLUAV ARYT: That's POD LEDOM VAULT Spelled Backwards

POD LEDOM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 73:43


The Hosts respond to your emails! For the third time! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/podledom/support

Another Episode Podcast
Episode 172 -Toy Story w/ Megan Cottington-Heath

Another Episode Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 73:55


Howdy Epi-Hoes! Today we kick off our November series HANKSgiving! All Tom Hanks movies, all month. We had returning guest comedian Megan Cottington-Heath on the show to discuss the animated Hanks classic TOY STORY! We talk about Toys, Ghosts and parenting styles. We played some games and listened to some clips too! Email the shows at AnotherEpisodePodcast@gmail.com Instagram - www.instagram.com/AnotherEpisodePodcast Twitter - www.twitter.com/AnotherEpPod Facebook - www.facebook.com/anotherepisodepodcast Follow Matt's Twitch channel at www.twitch.tv/mattopoly83 Please rate, review and share with your friends! Thanks for listening... THANKS MORE for Subscribing! Theme Songs "Chop This Synopsis" by www.twitter.com/Bob_Fred_Rick "Guess the Age" by www.twitter.com/brandonalberda "Box Office Theme Song" by www.twitter.com/StuMcCallister "Did You Hear That Sound" by www.twitter.com/hibbzilla "Backwards 4 Words" by Listener Stacy

The Leading Voices in Food
We've Had it Backwards - New Model Explains Weight Gain and Obesity

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 25:20


A paper just released in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition challenges, and I mean really challenges conventional thinking about nutrition, weight gain, and what has caused the very rapid and profound increase in obesity rates over the last 50 years. This is a landmark paper by any standard, and saying that it will raise eyebrows is an understatement. The paper is authored by a number of distinguished nutrition scientists. The lead author is Dr. David Ludwig from Harvard University. Interview   David Ludwig MD, PhD is Professor of Nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health, and Professor of Pediatrics in the Harvard Medical School. He has published innumerable books and papers on nutrition, contributors to obesity and diabetes, and what might be done with both practice and policy to improve things. He has a real remarkable breadth and scope of his work. David, Time Magazine once named you a warrior in work on obesity. This is exactly how I see you as well. You're really challenging the traditional ways of thinking, and as I said, you've broken new ground. So I'm proud to say that you and I have been friends for a number of years, and I'm also proud to say that we've written a number of things together. So thanks so much for being with us today. It's a real honor to have you.   Thanks, Kelly. Great to be with you. And I'm sitting here in my office looking at a plaque I have on the wall of an op-ed we wrote for the Washington Post almost two decades ago, so it's been a real honor and productive pleasure to know you.   The pleasure has been mine. So let's talk about the paper. So in this paper, you and your co-authors challenged the widely-embraced energy balance model. So can you say what the energy balance model is?   Well, the notion of energy balance is really just a restatement of physics, the first law of physics that says, that speaks to energy conservation, and it's commonly interpreted that in order to gain weight, you have to have a positive energy balance, that is you have to consume more calories than you burn off, and that to lose weight, you have to reverse that. You have to have a negative energy balance. You have to consume fewer calories than you burn off. But we argue first off that this doesn't tell us anything about causality, cause and effect, what's actually driving obesity. We use the example of a fever. Of course, a fever can only happen if the body generates more heat than it dissipates, more heat into the body than heat out of the body. But that's obvious that's, it's, you know, we don't need to be emphasizing that in textbooks. We don't need to be teaching patients that notion. The question is what's cause and what's effect? And the conventional way of thinking is that the positive energy balance is driving weight gain, is causing obesity. So we're surrounded by all these convenient, inexpensive, energy-dense, hyper-palatable, highly tasty foods. We lose control. We overeat them. We don't burn off those excess calories with our modern lifestyle, and so those excess calories get forced into fat cells, and we gain weight. So ultimately this view considers all calories are alike to the body, and that we have to eat fewer calories, and ideally burn more of them off by exercise to address the problem. So that's the conventional way of thinking.   So you have a different, and very science-based explanation for all of this that I'll get to in a minute, but before we do that, why did the field come to adopt this energy balance model?   Well, it does seem to make sense, and certainly over the short term, we know that this way of viewing things applies. If you force feed an animal, or if we just intentionally overeat ourselves, we can gain weight, and conversely, if we put ourselves on a low calorie diet, we can lose weight for a while, but characteristically, we know the body isn't a, you know, an inert energy storage depot. The body fights back in a dynamic way against changes in body weight and in energy balance, and this is something that almost every dieter has experienced, right? If it were just a matter of eating less and moving more, 150 calories less a day, that's a serving of juice, 150 calories out more a day, that's walking moderately for half hour, then virtually every weight problem should be solved within, you know, months to at most, a few years, but that's not the case. Very few people can adhere to, can stay with low calorie diets for very clear reasons. The first thing that happens is we get hungry, and hunger isn't a fleeting feeling. It's a primary biological signal that the body wants more calories. And even if we could, those few of us who are highly-disciplined, and can resist hunger, the body fights back in other ways, most notably by slowing down metabolism, which means that to keep the weight coming off, even as we're getting hungrier. We have to keep eating less and less, because the body's getting more efficient. So the conventional way of thinking about things, all calories are alike, calorie in calorie out, just eat less and move more. Doesn't seem to address the difficulty that people are facing, and recognize that despite a lot of attention to calorie balance, the obesity epidemic is getting worse and worse every year. I mean, the data just from the last year suggests that the weight gain during the pandemic was even faster than it was just prior.   Well, let's talk for a minute about what's at stake here. So vast numbers of people in the United States, both adults and children are overweight. This is increasingly becoming true of essentially every country in the world. The amount of weight that people have been gaining seems to be going up over time, and people find it very difficult, perhaps for the reasons you mentioned, to lose weight and keep it off, so it's a pretty dire situation then, and given the health consequences of excess weight, and the psychosocial implications of things, there's really a lot at stake here, isn't there?   Certainly so. We know that in childhood, obesity can affect virtually every organ system in the body, and set the stage for a lifetime increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, even many cancers. Among adults, the majority, and in fact 70% of adults in the United States have at least overweight, if not obesity, and this is becoming a huge driver of the chronic health burden on the healthcare system, and which so many patients themselves experience, in terms of diabetes, risk for heart disease, fatty liver, orthopedic problems, sleep apnea. So we have a problem that has gotten so much attention, and yet keeps getting worse with every effort that we can bring to bear. My coauthors and I have this new paper in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, arguing it's time for new thinking. And the carbohydrate insulin model that we are proposing is perfectly consistent with the laws of physics around energy balance, but it suggests that we've been coming at the problem in exactly the opposite way than would be most effective.   So let's talk about that. So if you have a different explanation than the traditional energy balance model, what is it exactly?   So the usual way of thinking, as we considered earlier is that overeating causes weight gain, and that certainly happens in the short term, but that model has a hard time explaining why people are gaining weight year after year, and their bodies are wanting to hold onto those calories. So we argue that a metabolic perspective would better explain this continuing creep upward in the so-called body weight set point. So the carbohydrate insulin model suggests that we've had it backwards, that overeating is not the primary cause of weight gain, that the body's process of gaining weight, and storing too much fat is driving overeating. So overeating and a positive calorie balance certainly has to exist. That's a law of physics, but it's a downstream effect. It's not at the source of the problem. And so this may sound a little surprising. How could the body gaining weight cause us to overeat? Well, let's take the example of an adolescent during the growth spurt. We know a teenager might consume hundreds, or a thousand calories more than he or she might have a few years earlier, and that adolescent is growing really quickly, but which comes first? Is the overeating that that child is doing causing the growth, or is the rapid growth and the deposition of many calories into new body tissue causing that adolescent to get hungry and to eat more? Neither explanation violates any law of physics, but they have radically different implications to how we understand growth, and what we might do about growth disorders. In the case of the adolescent, it's clearly the other way. It's the growth that's driving the overeating, and how do we know that? Well, Kelly, neither you or I, no matter how much we're going to eat or overeat are going to grow any taller. So something in the body is regulating hunger, based on the needs of growth, and we argue that the same thing is happening in the case of obesity, that the aspects of our diet, importantly, including the processed carbohydrates that flooded our diet during the low fat years, that these are triggering fat cells in the body to hoard too many calories, to hold onto too many calories, so there are fewer calories available for the muscle, the liver, and the brain, and our body recognizes that. We get hungry, and we eat more as a consequence.   You mentioned the highly processed foods, especially carbohydrates that bombarded the American scene during the low fat craze. Explain more about that.   These processed carbohydrates, that at one point, just 20 to 30 years ago, people thought, and you can find many examples of this written in the literature. In fact, the first food guide pyramid is a clear illustration of the fact that all fats were considered unhealthy, because they have so many calories per bite, more than twice the calories per gram than carbohydrates. Whereas the bottom of the food guide pyramid, you know, we were supposed to eat six to 11 servings of grains, many of which were highly processed. Sugar was considered benign, and a good way to, and this is what they said, dilute out fat calories. The problem is that these processed carbohydrates, white bread, white rice, potato products, virtually all of the prepared breakfast cereals, and of course, concentrated sugars, and sugary beverages. So when you eat these foods in substantial amount, and it's worse if the meal is also low in fat and protein, because they tend to slow down digestion. So if you just eat a lot of these processed carbohydrates, the body digests it into glucose literally in minutes. So blood sugar shoots upwards 10, 20, 30 minutes later, and that causes a lot of the hormone insulin to be produced. I sometimes refer to insulin as the Miracle-Gro for your fat cells, just not the sort of miracle you want happening in your body. We know that when a person with diabetes gets started on insulin, they'll typically gain weight, and if insulin is given in excess dose, they'll gain a lot of weight. So insulin is the hormone that promotes fat storage, and we argue that basically just endocrinology 101, all these processed carbohydrates, by stimulating more insulin than we would normally make on a less processed, lower carbohydrate diet, are driving too many of the incoming calories from a meal into storage and fat cells, instead of into muscle where they can burn. And so when you store, all it takes us to store one gram of fat too much a day to explain basically the whole of obesity, if one looks from childhood to adulthood.   So David, provide some context for this, if you would. So what fraction of the American diet is comprised of these kinds of foods, and what would that number be if people followed the recommended dietary guidelines you suggested?   Well, back in the 1950s, it's not as if Americans were extremely healthy. We had much higher rates of heart disease, although much of that related to smoking, and we of course, had many fewer medications, and surgical procedures to help prevent or treat heart disease. But at that time, obesity rates were much, much lower, you know, about only one third of the rates they are today. And at that time in the 1950s, Americans ate about 40% of their calories as fat, and about 40% as carbohydrate, and maybe 15 to 20% as protein. Because of concerns around saturated fat and heart disease, which then got generalized to all fats being bad, well, we got the low fat diet of the 1980s, nineties, and the beginning of the century. Fat came down as a proportion of our diet. Carbs went up, but also the processing of those carbs. We got foods like the fat-free SnackWells cookies, a whole range of these fat-reduced products that simply took out fat, dumped in sugar and starch. These are after all processed foods, so they're not going to be putting in fruits and vegetables. And these products were considered healthy. We ate them as we were told to eat them, and at that time, obesity rates really exploded. And we're arguing that this is not just an association, that this change to our diet has played an important role in driving obesity, and that by bringing both the total amount of carbohydrates down, not necessarily a very low carb or ketogenic diet, but bringing them back down, maybe to what might oftentimes be characterized as a Mediterranean diet, focusing on getting rid of the processed carbs, eating more of the delicious and nutritious high fat foods, like nuts and nut butters, olive oil, avocado, even real dark chocolate. All of these high fat high, calorie foods look a whole lot healthier than the processed carbohydrates do in the best cohort studies.   You know, it's a somewhat hopeful message, isn't it? Because you're not just telling people you have to eat less of everything, but there are actually some things that are quite delicious where you can eat more, and maybe that hope will lead more people to try this sort of approach.   That is exactly the issue with the conventional approach. If all calories are alike, and overeating is the primary problem, then we really just have to control our appetites. We have to discipline ourselves. Yes, clearly the conventional thinking recognizes that environment has a lot to do with it, and psychology of behavior, but ultimately, one way or another, you have to cut back on calories, because overeating is driving the problem. But if the driver is at the fat cells, if the foods that we're eating are triggering our fat cells to store too many calories, and that's what's causing the hunger and the overeating, then just eating less doesn't solve the problem, and it actually could make it worse by slowing down your metabolism. So this model argues that a focus on what you eat, not how much is more effective. You focus on controlling the quality of the foods, importantly, the processed carbs, but there are other aspects that can help hormonal and metabolic response. That's what the person focuses on, and we let the body, based on our hunger levels, and satiety levels, determine how much we need to satisfy metabolic requirement.   So you've got what we call in the field a testable hypothesis, that people will do better if they follow the approach that you've mentioned, compared to the traditional approach. And you put that to a test in a study that we're going to be talking about in a second podcast. But before we get to that, what sort of pushback, if you had, as your paper has been published, are corporate interests involved in this picture at all?   Yeah, let me just say that we recognize that these ideas are not fully proven. There are animal studies, we've done one of them that provides what we could call a proof of concept, that when you give rodents, and this has been reproduced by many different groups. This is a very rigorous finding. When you give rodents high glycemic index, versus low-glycemic index starch, so that's fast-digesting, versus slow-digesting starch. You keep everything else the same, the ones that get the fast-digesting starch, that's like, all of those processed carbs we're eating that raise insulin a lot, well, they in fact show this whole sequence of events. Their insulin levels initially go up, they start getting fatter, and their energy expenditure goes down. They start moving less, and if you restrict their calories to that of the control animal, they're still fatter, because more calories wound up getting stored than burnt in muscle. So they wind up getting more fat tissue, and less lean tissue, even at the same total body weight when you prevent their weight from going up. So we argued that there's no way to explain that finding based on the conventional, calorie in, calorie out way of thinking. We need to examine whether this applies in humans, and to whom, you know? It may be that one model explains certain situations, or certain people better than the other, but it is a testable hypothesis. Unfortunately, this debate has become polarized, and we, in our article, specifically invite opponents to work with us on generating common ground. There's plenty of basis for common ground already, and in our article, which is freely available online at American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. We put out a diagrammatic model in which each step leads to another step, and each of these steps is testable. So we can figure out what we got right, what needs improvement, you know, and where common ground is. After all, this is what science is supposed to be about, to come up with new ways of thinking for intractable problems.   You know, you reminded me when you talked about the animal studies of work that occurred many decades ago on something that people in the field were referring to as the cafeteria diet. And I remember the slide that I used for years in my own talks that was given to me by Ted Van Itallie, one of the pioneers in the obesity field, that showed a rat sitting on top of basically a junk food diet, where they take animals, and in the cage, they would put Cheetos and Hershey bars, and marshmallows, and things like that. And the animals would eat a lot of those things, and gain an enormous amount of weight. But people were really attributing the weight gain to the fact that these were highly palatable foods. The animals would eat a lot of it just because it tasted really good, and that would bring a lot of calories, and that was the reason for the weight gain. And what you're saying is just, "Wait a minute, what happens to be that food that goes in there is a really important part of the picture," And that's been proven by controlling the calories in the experiment that you set.   Well, I think that's a really great point that you raised that it's easy to think in the cafeteria diet model, that the animals are getting fat because of the tastiness of the food, but these studies can't distinguish tastiness, and whatever that means, and we could come back to that point, because tastiness is elusive. It's a very squishy term to define, for reasons we can consider, but it's impossible in these studies to distinguish tastiness from the nutrient content of the foods, and they tend to be full of sugar and processed carbs. In fact, the few studies that have aimed to disentangle this provide clear support for the carbohydrate insulin model that tastiness by itself, when you control nutrients, does not result in obesity, but the nutrients, even in a bland or untasty diet does result in weight gain in animals.   Fascinating science. So, David, what do you think are some of the main policy implications of all this?   Well, there has been push back. Some of that relates to just the difficulty of paradigm change, amidst scientific uncertainty. You know, we need ultimately to be all working together on all sides of this. But in addition, there's resistance from the food industry that loves the notion that all calories are alike. All calories are alike, and there are no bad foods, and that you can drink a sugary beverage, have any kind of junk food, as long as you eat less of other things, or burn off those calories with physical activity. Whereas if this way of thinking, involving the carbohydrate insulin model, this opposite cause and effect conception is correct, then those foods have adverse effects on our metabolism above and beyond their calorie content. And that from that perspective, you really, can't just outrun a bad diet, that we really need to be thinking about how our food is influencing our hormones and metabolism, otherwise we're going to set ourselves up for failure, and that's not a message that many, although not all in the food industry like to hear, because it requires corporate responsibility for helping to create the nutritional nightmare that confronts so many of us, and especially children throughout so much of their days.   You reminded me about an interesting parallel with tobacco here, where the tobacco companies, you know, long after it was known that cigarettes were killing people, just said that it's not the tobacco that's killing the people, it's the fact that they're just consuming too much of it, and the food companies have made very much that same argument. And then the tobacco researchers said, "No, tobacco is bad in any amount, and even a little of it can be harmful." And that's not totally true of the processed foods you're talking about. I'm assuming people can have them in small amounts, but the parallel really kind of exists there, doesn't it? That these things are risky, and dangerous really, after you go beyond whatever that small amount is, and then you're going to have trouble, no matter what you're doing elsewhere in your diet?   The metaphor with tobacco is useful to a point, although it can also elicit some strong responses, because obviously, tobacco products aren't needed for survival, food clearly is. But I do think that there are some parallels that if these highly processed carbohydrates are undermining our metabolism, and also triggering, in part because of the metabolic changes. Fat cells communicate with the brain in many ways, including by releasing or withholding nutrients. If these foods are also triggering pathways in the brain that make managing calorie balance increasingly difficult, then we do really begin to need to think about food way beyond calorie issues, and that all calories aren't alike, and that the food industry may indeed have to manage the food supply in a way that makes weight control easier rather than harder.   The paper we were discussing today was published in September, 2021 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and is publically available for free.   Bio: David S. Ludwig, MD, PhD is an endocrinologist and researcher at Boston Children's Hospital. He holds the rank of Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Ludwig is the founding director of the Optimal Wellness for Life (OWL) program, one of the country's oldest and largest clinics for the care of overweight children. For 25 years, Dr. Ludwig has studied the effects of diet on metabolism, body weight and risk for chronic disease – with a special focus on low glycemic index, low carbohydrate and ketogenic diets. He has made major contributions to development of the Carbohydrate-Insulin Model, a physiological perspective on the obesity pandemic. Described as an “obesity warrior” by Time Magazine, Dr. Ludwig has fought for fundamental policy changes to improve the food environment. He has been Principal Investigator on numerous grants from the National Institutes of Health and philanthropic organizations totaling over $50 million and has published over 200 scientific articles. Dr. Ludwig was a Contributing Writer at JAMA for 10 years and presently serves as an editor for American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. He appears frequently in national media, including New York Times, NPR, ABC, NBC, CBS and CNN. Dr. Ludwig has written 3 books for the public, including the #1 New York Times bestseller Always, Hungry? Conquer Cravings, Retrain your Fat Cells, and Lose Weight Permanently.  

Side Pull
69 Backwards // 96

Side Pull

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 68:36


Cap get's solicited. CSGO Major drama. Roster shuffle? Joey goes on a date. Join the discord: https://discord.gg/ywfSXEg @leafeator @capcasts

I Survived Theatre School
Molly Smith Metzler

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 62:10


Intro: Gina is co-hostless and doing her best. PLEASE SUBSCRIBE, RATE, and REVIEW you beautiful Survivors!Interview: SUNY Geneseo, Boston University, Tisch, Juilliard, Playwriting MFAs, competition in writing programs, Marsha Norman, Cry It Out, MAID on Netflix, Hollywood sea changes, female-centered shows, domestic violence, emotional abuse, Hulu, theatre is behind, denial, making mistakes, bad reviews.COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT (unedited):1 (10s):And I'm Gina Polizzi. We went to theater school2 (12s):Together. We survived it.1 (14s):We didn't quite understand it. 20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all2 (21s):Survived theater school. And you will too. Are we famous yet?1 (34s):Hello? Hello. Hello survivors. This is Gina. This week. We are sons' cohost, just one host today. I'm missing my better half BAAs. His boss is actually attending to a friend who got terrible health news this week. And she is in her very boss like way being there for her friend and being the amazing person and friend that she is, which is why everybody loves buzz. Anyway, she'll be back next week if you're not. But today we have, honestly, you guys, this is the interview I have been waiting for.1 (1m 19s):Molly Smith. Metzler is a writer extraordinaire. You may have heard of her latest project made number three on Netflix entering its 28th day online, which has some very special meaning for Netflix that I hope to know more about one day and previous to me being the showrunner for maid, she also worked on shameless and several other successful television shows. And before that she was a playwright. And actually I got to know her work because I directed a play of hers called cry it out.1 (1m 59s):And it was a fantastic experience. And I started communicating with her over email when I was directing. And I was so impressed with the way that she responded to me. I mean, a that she responded to me at all that she was available to me at all. And not something you always get with a playwright and B that she really took her time with her responses and see that her responses ended up being pretty impactful for me, just not necessarily related to the play, but as a person. And I'm a little embarrassed that when I talked to her and I told her the way that she had impacted me, I just started seriously just crying, crying, crying.1 (2m 45s):And I was having this thought like, I, this is not a moment I want to be crying. And I'm generally in life. I, I welcomed here as, as a person who struggles to access their emotions. I do. I welcome a good cry, but it not want to be crying to Molly Smith Metzler in this great interview. But you know, it is what it is. If I'm going to be honest, I have to be honest. I can't be choicy about when I'm being myself. That's my, that's my mantra. Recently you have to be yourself in all the ways. Some of those ways are ugly and disgusting and you know, unsavory, and some of them are fine and some of them are be even beautiful.1 (3m 31s):So I'm working on embracing the, a mess that I am, but I really think you're going to enjoy this interview with Molly. She's fantastic. Even without the always wonderful presidents, presidents presence, maybe she should be president even without the always wonderful presence of BAAs. We still managed to have a great conversation and actually that whole experience of her at the last minute, not being able to do this and this being the first time we're doing this with one host, turns out to have been a good thing for us to go through, to learn that.1 (4m 14s):Yeah, sometimes we're not both going to be available and sometimes when I'm not available, she'll be doing an episode on her own. So, you know, whatever we're growing, changing learning, Hey, we're in 22 countries. Now, if you have a, not a subscribed to this podcast, please do. If you have not rated this podcast or given it a review, please, please, please, please, please, please do it seriously. Please do it, please. I'm begging you. Please do it, but okay. Anyway, here's Molly Smith message.0 (4m 53s):Well,1 (5m 0s):No problem whatsoever. Fortunately, my partner is Jen. Her very good friend just got diagnosed with cancer yesterday and she's with her right now helping. So she's not going to be able to join us. This is actually the first time we're doing an interview with just me. So we'll see how it goes.3 (5m 23s):Yeah,1 (5m 24s):It is. And she just, she has a lot of experience with, with cancer. So she's sort of like the first people, first person people call, which is like,3 (5m 38s):Yeah,1 (5m 38s):Exactly, exactly. But anyway, congratulations, Molly Smith. Metso you survived theater school and you're going to have to clarify for me because it looks like you went to four schools, but you didn't go to four theater schools. Did you?3 (5m 52s):I went to four schools. I did. They're not all theater schools, but I went to undergrad, SUNY Geneseo in Western New York and I was an English major. And then I went to Boston university and got a master's in creative writing with a concentration in playwriting. And then I went to Tisch and got an MFA in playwriting dramatic writing. And then I went to Juilliard, which is, you don't really get a degree there. It's called an artist diploma, but it's just finishing school basically.1 (6m 20s):Oh, okay. So the decision to, to do the MFA, were you thinking at that time that you, maybe you were going to be a teacher, I'm always curious about MFA's and writing because you know, if you learned what you needed to know and you know, why not just put yourself out there and be a writer?3 (6m 40s):I think it's very scary to take that jump. The thing about school that I got addicted to is that I'm actually way too social to be a writer. I like being around other writers and every, and every time you get a graduate program, you're with a bunch of writers and you have deadlines and you kind of, you know, it's a really public way to study writing versus alone in your apartment while way to say, you know, and I kept getting academic support to attend the programs. And so that was part of it. I'm not sure I would have gone deep into debt to get all those degrees, but I think giving me aid, I kept going. Yeah.1 (7m 16s):Okay, fantastic. And did you always know from day one that you, I mean, since you were in high school anyway, that you wanted to be a writer that you wanted to write dramatically?3 (7m 26s):I always loved writing. I had journals and I'm from a very young age. I love to write, but I had a sort of more academic feeling about it. I thought I was going to get a PhD in English and join the academy and be a professor. And I didn't know, I was creative in the sense of dramatic writing until my senior year of college. When I took a playwriting class, I didn't know I was a playwright. And I also didn't know. I was funny. Those two things emerged at the same time. Wow.1 (7m 54s):Oh, so you didn't have experience with theater before then?3 (7m 58s):Well, I grew up a ballerina, so I had a great sense of the stage and the relationship between an audience and someone onstage. I really like, I understood light and the power of an audience, but I, no, I didn't grow up a theater nerd at all. I grew up a nerd nerd, like an actual,1 (8m 18s):So that must've been like just a whole new, exciting world. Did you decide pretty much right away that you were going to be getting your MFA when you discovered that you liked to play with?3 (8m 27s):Yeah, I did. I took this introduction to play right in class and it was one of those things. People talk about this, like in a romantic relationship where you're just like, it changes your whole life. And I didn't have that in a romantic relationship, but I had that with playwriting. One-on-one where, you know, I just, I, it came, I don't want to say easily to me cause it was really easy to play it, but it came, it was like a big release in my life that I arrived at playwriting and loved doing it. And it's like a big jigsaw and you can stay up all night doing it. And I knew from the very first, basically from the first act of a play that I wrote that it's what I wanted to do. I'm very lucky. It was very clear.1 (9m 5s):Yeah. Yeah. That is really lucky. So we have talked to almost 60 people now, the majority of them have been actors. So we've really delved deep into like everything about being an actor, especially at the age of undergrad and what that's like to be growing up, you know, just growing up and then trying to figure out yourself well enough to be an actor and all the stuff that comes along with that, including, you know, the competitive best with your cohort. But I imagine that's what it, well, I don't want to imagine what it's like, what is it like with your cohort when you're all writers and you're presumably reading each other's work critiquing each other's work, does it get really competitive?3 (9m 55s):I suspect that it can, you know, I feel very lucky cause I have never experienced that directly in a graduate program situation. Part of it is I think I went to really great places where everyone had gotten in was incredibly talented and brought such a unique point of view and voice that none of us were trying to raise the same place. So it was really easy to just support each other. And also it's fun, you know, you're reading it aloud. So if something's in the south, you're trying an accent and it's super bad cause you're a playwright. So I found it, you know, I became close with the other writers and I mean, I'm married. One of them, I call him my husband, he and I were in the same graduate program at Tisch. And there is something beautiful about meeting someone in a writing workshop because you're just sort of naked.3 (10m 41s):It's all, you know, I imagine it's like, I understand my actors fall in love too. It's like, you're just so vulnerable and you know, each other in a deep way. But my experience has been that writers are pretty, pretty darn supportive of each other. And if you're not, you kind of don't fit in, like if you're a jerk, if you're competitive jerk, like you're not meant to be a playwright, playwrights need to love people. Cause that's what we do, you know? Yeah.1 (11m 1s):Yeah. That's a very good point. Actually, we talked to CISA Hutchinson yesterday and basically said, yeah, isn't she awesome?3 (11m 8s):She's in a beautiful inside and out like just, but yeah.1 (11m 12s):Yeah. She, and she echoed the same thing in what you're saying. So I guess we're going to stop asking this question about competition. It's just that it's so much of a part of like the act. And I think it's part of just how the program is structured. I mean, you're literally up for the same parts against each other and they PO posted on a wall and everybody shows up to3 (11m 35s):Absolutely. And you know, I was at Juilliard where they still cut people. You know, that system has changed a little bit, but I was at the, the version of Juilliard that was structured to drop 10% of the class out. And I feel like you don't get, I don't know. I learned a lot about that cause they cut playwrights as well. And I feel like that doesn't, that doesn't bring forth good creative work from anybody that pressure of, you know, is Sally going to get cut instead of me that's that's, that's not good skills. I don't think1 (12m 5s):It's true. And at the same time, like a lot of the people who were cut from our program went on to have better careers than the majority of us. So it's just like not a lot of rhyme or reason to it.3 (12m 15s):It's like SNL. Yeah. I mean, yes. It's not a predictor. You got it. Right.1 (12m 20s):Exactly. Okay. So you graduated or you've finally finished school with Julliard after doing it for, for a number of years then what happened next? You were, you were married or you're in a relationship and w how did, how do two writers figure out what their next steps are going to be when school's over?3 (12m 40s):Well, I don't know how to writers in general would do, but I can tell you how Colin and I did it, which is that we we've never been competitive because we write really different plays. Like I am talking to, you know, especially as a playwright, my, my work tends to, I mean, I've written Boulevard, comedy. It's like, I really like to laugh. My husband's play is everyone's on meth and they're an Appalachian. It's like, we are, we are really young and yang. And, but I think being, I really recommend being married to, or spending your life with another writer, if you are a writer because they get it and they get you in like a deep, deep way. So if you have to stay up to four o'clock in the morning, cause you're inspired and you have to finish the scene, you know, there's, there's just a, there's no jealousy about that.3 (13m 25s):There's an acceptance. And our, it really, I think I often say, I don't think I'd be a playwright. Certainly won't be any of the things that I am a mother, you know, like everything is because it's all. And I, I had someone who believed in me more than I believed in myself and at points that is everything because, you know, your play opens in New York, you get just the worst reviews in the world and you take, you know, you'd take to the bed and you don't think you're ever going to write again. And it's so important who you decided to spend your life with because, you know, con only saw me as a writer first and foremost. And you know, it's like at the same goes for him. So we, yeah, but just technically do we have money? You know, we lived in a apartment in Brooklyn that we got to kind of like a hookup.3 (14m 9s):My husband was, he managed the bar downstairs, so he knew the guy. And so we got this apartment that we could actually afford, but we both worked full time waiting tables and bartending. And then if I get into the O'Neil, for instance, he would do extra bartending support me being at the O'Neil. And you know, he went up to LA for a few months and did a bunch of meetings and screenwriting stuff. And I supported him with the Juilliard money. Like we just have always worked it out. And for the last handful of years, when we finally don't have to, we can both be working in. It's great.1 (14m 39s):Yeah. That's nice that, by the way, that makes so much sense about the difference in your writing because in watching made, you know, I remember getting to the end of the first episode that he wrote and not, not having known throughout the episode that he wrote it and being like, wow, this is really, really different than Molly's writing. And of course it, it was his, and I kind of tend towards that darker stuff too. So yeah. And by the way, the series is fantastic. It is so good. And how you were having such a moment, you're getting great reviews. People are loving. I saw even today, it's number three on Netflix. How are you doing with success? Because people assume that it's all great, but I'm guessing it's not.1 (15m 23s):And I'm guessing it's kind of scary too.3 (15m 27s):Oh, well this is all pretty, just great. You know, like I think there's probably two things that are tricky about it, which I'll tell you in a second, but the fact is, it's just, it's great. Especially because it's made, you know, made is the closest to play writing. I've done for the screen. I see the show as 10 individual plays and it's really just about cleaning and feelings. It's the most character driven thing I've seen on TV in a long time. There's no murder. There's no cool accents. We're not in Hawaii. It's just about one woman's cleaning and feelings. And every time we turned in an episode, I thought Netflix would call and be like, you know, this is too weird.3 (16m 9s):Like the couch can't eat her. That's just too weird, you know, but they let me make this like, you know, artistic, I think like they're beautiful thing. And I didn't really believe that they were going to air it. And then I didn't really believe that people were going, gonna watch it. And so the fact that the fact that it is exactly what I wanted it to be and people love it. It's very, I don't really, I think it's really exciting just as a writer, it's exciting. It's like, oh, maybe we can return to doing harder things on the screen and on the stage again, you know, I think audiences weren't deterred by the fact that it was difficult, you know, they leaned in. And so I feel like it's really, it's mostly just fantastic.3 (16m 49s):I am surprised that people love it this much, but no, I'm just, I'm so proud of it. So it feels great. That's all there is. Do it.1 (16m 57s):What were the, you said there you'll tell me about the two things that have been challenging.3 (17m 1s):Yes, it is challenging. I, and I know you'll relate to this, but coming up in the theater, there are so many of us that, that are just working hard and waiting tables and waiting for a break. And that was me as well. And you want to help every single one of those people and you want to help every single one of those people whose cousin is also in LA. So like, that's the part that's really hard for me is that I can't, I can't do for everyone. And I want to, and especially theater people, like if you, if someone sends me a cold email that the subject is like a MF playwright, like I read it and then I, you know, I, I can't help it.3 (17m 42s):So that's a little hard cause I want to be good to everyone. And, and can't so that's, that's hard for me. And the other thing that's just hard is, you know, I spend my life in sweatpants and now suddenly have to do a bunch of stuff where I look, I have to look very, you know, Like, you know, writers or writers were writers for a reason. And so, so suddenly I have to like I to buy lipstick. And so that part of it is a little being articulate. Like next to Margot, Robbie is very difficult for me, but1 (18m 14s):I didn't realize until just today that she was the producer. So she's, she's the person who optioned the book.3 (18m 20s):So she and John Wells got the book together. John Wells is a very famous producer. He did west wing ER, and shameless, which is how I know him. I worked in my last four seasons of shameless is a writer on the show. So when he and Margo got the book, LA had just done cry it out, it was cried out, was up like, like had just closed when they got the book and it's a play about moms. And I think they were like, oh, we know a person who writes about moms and they handed me the book. It was so kismet.1 (18m 49s):Wow. That's fantastic. And, but you had to, I mean, I read the book too. You had to create a whole narrative. That's not in the book. So how does that, I'm curious about that process and how it works. Is it that you kind of sit down as the show runner and hatch a basic idea that you, that you then have some writers help you with or do you have to outline all of the stories and everybody else just writes them? Or how does it work?3 (19m 20s):Well, it's a, it's a little bit different with every project. Oh, I'm with a story like made, you know, whenever the memoir I learned so much, like it was, it's really an educational tool and I didn't want to sacrifice any of that. On the other hand, when you go and sit down with your husband or wife and Saturday night to watch Netflix, you don't want to lecture and you don't want to like TV, shouldn't taste like TV, shouldn't taste like broccoli, right. It should taste like it should be a sneak attack. Kind of like my plate is like, I like to sneak people into learning something. So I knew kind of off the bat that that made was an incredible engine, the memoir, and that I wanted all the takeaway to be the same. But I also knew that we were going to have to create a lot of story to do that.3 (20m 1s):So to answer your question, when I first said I would do the book and when we were taking out and pitching it to Netflix, pitching it to HBO, you know, all the places I would have to say, this is what I'm going to do. You know, we're gonna, we're going to do 10 episodes. Her mom's going to be a huge character. Her dad's got a huge character. We're going to really build up. Sean. We're going to get to know some of the people in the houses we're going to get to know Regina, she's an invented character, but this is how she'll structure in the plot. And you really have to know the nuts and bolts of what you're going to do. And the tone of it, like it's kinda like giving a 45 minute presentation on what the show will be. And then hopefully someone like Netflix is like, okay, great. Here's, here's a green light and get your writer's room. So then you hire a handful.3 (20m 42s):If you're lucky, you know, I could, I didn't have any, no one told me what to do. I got to hire whoever I wanted. And I hired only four writers, three of whom are playwrights, three of whom. I'm sure. You know, cause it's Colin, Becca bronzer, Marcus Garley so really accomplished playwrights. And then Michelle, Denise Jackson, who is not a playwright, but should be like, she's an honorary playwright, you know? And so w and then the five of us sit down and we take what I've said, you know, about the show, the 45 minute presentation, and we flush it out. What are we doing in every episode? What does this look like? And that, that process in the writer's room is the closest, you'll get to a table read in the theater, you know, where you're just at the table, you're reading that play.3 (21m 24s):And then you talk about it for, you know, nine days. That's a writer's room is that every day. So it's very, very, very cool experience and everyone's sharing secrets and, and we disagree sometimes and we do puzzles and there's a lot of talk about lunch.1 (21m 43s):That's what everybody says.3 (21m 47s):But also what was cool that mean is that these five, these four writers and me, the five of us, we all really connected to different things in the memoir. And we also, all of us come from all of us can relate to the memoir in different ways. And so you get five different perspectives on something. And I think, you know, Becca brown center did so much of the writing of Regina, and I think she could really connect to Regina. And, you know, that character would not feel quite as beautifully drawn if Becca weren't in the writers room. Like, so, so much of it is it's a dinner party. And the result of that dinner party is character. You know? So it's really, it's the most important thing you do is those writers.1 (22m 26s):That is okay. So I also just learned that today that you didn't write that Regina monologue, because, and this is about my own projection that when I'm watching it, I'm going, oh my God, this is so similar to Claire, Claire. Is that the name of the character and cry it out. That lives up high, up on the hill.3 (22m 45s):Oh, Adrian. Adrian.1 (22m 47s):Yeah. Thank you. Sorry. I was thinking, I was thinking, it sounded like an Adrian, my likes. So that's fascinating that, that,3 (22m 53s):Well, let me explain one further thing, which is, so that's how the show gets written. And yes, Becca brown said, I wrote that monologue, but the other thing that the show runner does is it is my job to then go through all 10 episodes and make sure it sounds like one person wrote them. And, and so the showroom, so you kind of divide the writing in the room and then all funnels back to me and I rewrite it or fix things. Or sometimes, you know, sometimes you're doing a major rewrite sometimes you're just like with Regina monologue, it was so beautiful. You know, we, we had to cut a couple of things for production, but like, it's, it's back as work. And, but it's, that's what TV writing is. It's like, there'll be stuff that Becca wrote in episode seven that she didn't write, or, you know, like TV is very collaborative and then it all funnels through the showrunner who does a pass to make sure it's, it's up to the standard that I want.3 (23m 44s):It's totally what I want. You know, it is, it is a writing job as a group, and then it is ultimately one person's writing job it's book. Does that make sense?1 (23m 51s):Yeah, it does. And thank you so much for answering that question because I have always wondered. And also even on television shows that have, have a different director, every episode, I'm always thinking, how are they keeping true to the tone, but not now, now I understand it. Well, I have so many things to ask you. I want to talk to you about just one thing is that you have said that you love writing about class, which is a big part of made and your, and your place. But, so I want to talk a little bit about that, but I also kind of want to talk maybe first about the thing that you said you were surprised that people like to made, and I've heard a lot of female writers express, something like that.1 (24m 36s):I'm surprised. And maybe people just say it in a way as, as you know, not, not trying to try to be humble. Right. Okay. But I believe that you are surprised by it because it does seem like a kind of recent thing that the universe is allowing us to tell women's stories and having them at the forefront. I mean, it seems really pretty recent. And so are you, do you feel like this is you're part of a big sea change in terms of what's being represented on screen?3 (25m 7s):You know, absolutely. I was talking to Netflix yesterday and they said last year it was Bridgford, you know, these are a lot of things, but they were saying last year, people, the surprise was everyone loved Britain and love Queens gambit. And this year one loves squid game and loves made, which cracks me up. But, but they think to be in the same sentence as Queens gambit as the limited series. I mean, I think that's so exciting as a female writer, because she was an alcoholic kind of like piece of crap who was amazing at chess and went on this like beautiful arc that was not traditionally feminine. It was usually that's a man, like that's usually a male going through that and were riveted by his addiction and his dysfunction and made his, you know, I think we're continuing what Queens gambit did as well.3 (25m 50s):Like it's, you know, Alex has a lot of things, but she's not a woman. She is a character going through an arc and she makes a ton of mistakes and she, you know, is a product of where she comes from. And that is enough to carry a show. And I feel like that is it you're right. It's so recent. And I therefore assumed it would be treated like a, you know, like a niche, you know, maybe 500,000 people will watch it kind of like, cause we don't show up for those shows, but all of a sudden we really show up for those shows and we want to see a multidimensional and rich and layered woman at the story of her own dance story. It's really like exciting.3 (26m 31s):It's exciting.1 (26m 33s):That's what I think about stuff like this. I just imagine, you know, the people who are traditionally in charge of these things, I just mentioned it, but I imagine a bunch of guys sitting around being like, can you imagine people really want to hear about these dang? I mean, I feel like it must be a surprise to, to sort of the old guard that, you know, because of course everything does have to be motivated about what's going to be a return on your investment. And that, that that's understandable. It's I'm not saying anybody's bad for that, but it is curious to me that there was just this, there was an assumption that if you made a female centered show, nobody would want to watch it.1 (27m 16s):Except for every time they make a female centered, anything people want to watch it. Why is this keep being a surprise?3 (27m 24s):I think it's going to stopping a surprise pretty soon because this cracked me up. But my friend was doing a pitch yesterday at Hulu. And I guess like the conversation kind of organically came up with like, well, what's our main, you know, like what's the, you know, the producer was in it, but like, you know, people are starting to look for the, the queen scam, but you know, trying to look for the female, you know, the unconventional sort of what's the would be a surprising female story. We're starting to like, not only are we starting to have it at the table, that the market is the, market's starting to recognize that we're going to get eyes on the screen and it's, you know, I shouldn't be so surprised by made.1 (28m 5s):Right. Right. And it helps that we have people like Margot, Robbie and Reese Witherspoon and females who are having more of a say about what gets produced, you know, with what, what books get optioned and then what gets produced.3 (28m 17s):Absolutely. And, and more and more women are taking those jobs and taking those positions. And it's a good, it's a sea change. I also dare say, I think TV and film has ahead of it than theater. I have to say, I think1 (28m 29s):Girl, that's another thing I was going to say. Cause you had a quote in something I read theater is behind theater is so behind and this is, unfortunately it came as a surprise to me. Like when I woke up to the fact that theater is so behind, it was sad and it also doesn't make sense. It also, you know, it should be it's, it was 40 years ago. It was the most progressive part of art, I think.3 (28m 55s):Yeah. Well the theater doesn't treat women as, as minority voices and they have, and like that's, what's so crazy is we've, you know, I think we've carved out space for there's so much equality and, and like, it's exciting to see the programming in theaters change. And like it's not just white men anymore. That's all, that's very, very exciting. But heterosexual women stories that mother's stories about our struggles stories about, you know, me and my friends, there's no space for us on the New York stage. There's no space for my friends and I on the New York stage. And I feel like, and then, you know, you don't go up in New York, then you don't go all across the regions.3 (29m 36s):And I think a great example is actually cried out because that had a huge regional presence because I think people are starved for players like that, that are about women and just, you know, and not women on Mars and not, not necessarily, you know, like it just normal women, women having, you know, the Wendy Wasserstein plays of today are not produced in New York. And it's, it's a, it's a huge issue I think.1 (30m 0s):Yeah, yeah, it is. So, okay. So the other thing is that you love to write about class, which I find fascinating. I love to read about it in any case, what is your personal connection to your fascination with that issue?3 (30m 17s):Well, I think I grew a group of the Hudson valley, the daughter of two teachers. So, you know, I, I, I can't relate to made, for instance, in the sense of, I always had food and I always had a certain amount of like structure and S and security, but I, my parents were incredibly well educated and they kind of like my dad went to Cornell and it was sort of something we heard a lot about, even though we didn't kind of grow up in a moneyed area or money to house, there was a sense of, there was a sense of you could scholarship your way into the next strata. And I think that I find that fascinating because it's just not true. I, it's almost impossible.3 (30m 59s):It's almost impossible to change your class in America. And it's, it's, I feel like those walls are getting higher, not lower. And I watch people through everything they have at, at, at those chances to change, you know, change their stripes. And I just think the way we, we work in this country is we it's, we've made that harder and harder. There is no bootstrap narrative there. It does. There's no bootstraps it doesn't, it's not a thing in this country. So I find that fascinating because I felt very jipped. You know, I felt like I worked very, very hard and like I was always getting A's and being sophisticated and like, I couldn't graduate and get a, you know, a little studio in New York and intern at a publishing house.3 (31m 42s):You know, like a lot of my friends who came from money could, and there's just, it's so ingrained in our culture and it makes me mad and it's not, you know, it's not fair. Especially when I had a child and started thinking about cried out and just the way we treat that money directly affects maternity leave in this country too. And like, I can't compete with somebody who has a trust fund, you know, I had to put queer where I could afford her. And it's just bullshit that you can claw your way out of the class that you're born into. It's it's extremely rare. So I love that1 (32m 16s):It's bullshit and it's really dangerous cause it makes people feel so inadequate when they can't, you know, and that, that's also a great scene. I think it's in the first episode. Yeah. It's in the first episode when she goes and she's talking to the social worker and she's saying, so I can't get a job because I don't have a daycare and I can't get daycare cause I don't have a job. So I have to get a dog to prove that I didn't deserve daycare. I mean, it's, it's also3 (32m 40s):Backwards. Yeah. You're at a humongous disadvantage. If you are born into, you know, if you're born into poverty, you're at a humongous disadvantage in this country and it's like getting worse. That's the other thing is it's not, I mean, I have to leave. That's part of why made is, is touching so many people's sense of justice too. It's like, oh yeah, it's getting worse. Like, why aren't we talking about this? It's you know, Alex and I are, are not facing the same problems. And it's just by where I was born and where she was born and you know, you what family, your brand and who dictates so much of your struggle.1 (33m 17s):Yeah. And, and that, that the sort of historical narratives would have you believe that it's, it's the opposite of that and that, and that everybody left England to get away from that. But then yeah, just creative things I think here. So another thing that I heard or read that you said that really took my breath away is you said that when you became a mother, your, you didn't say your resolve for your career. You, the phrase that I that's sticking out to me, as you said, I went from being the secretary of my own company to the CEO. And it just, that just really like hit me in the center of my chest.1 (33m 58s):Can you just say a little bit more about it? What, what you meant by that?3 (34m 3s):Sure. I think that we'll probably like probably like many women when they become moms. I, I was frustrated that I had, I had this thing that I was good at, that I had studied for so many years that I've given so much time and love to my playwriting career and that it did not love me back in the sense that I could not afford to take core to a music class, you know? And it made me very, it made me very frustrated that, you know, I, I had devoted my, my self to this, this field that I had a passive relationship with. Like I was waiting for someone to call and tell me they were going to do a reading or, you know, or I was waiting for my career to start.3 (34m 50s):And I think what happened when I had, when I had Cora was I, I wanted to provide for her. And I also wanted to, I wanted to show her that you could be tough and you could be an active participant in your career like that. I didn't have to wait for it to happen. And so part of it was, I was, I just kind of said the things we all want to say out loud as a women, but I actually said them, which was like, Hey agents, what the F I am funny and talented. I want to work in TV. I want to take a music class with my daughter. What do I have to do to do that? And I you'd be shocked. I think how freeing and wonderful it is to just stand up for yourself and to make demands. And, you know, and I wanted to, I wanted to take an expensive music class with my daughter and I wanted to have a career.3 (35m 32s):And I was like, I'm not going to wait for it to happen because I know if someone gives me a chance I'm going to do, I'm going to go far in this field. Like, cause I don't know. Does that make sense? So I kind of like, wait, I said, waiting for the phone to ring and started making the calls.1 (35m 45s):Yeah. And also what I'm hearing is you stopped just blindly participating in the myth that everything can only work a certain way, which I feel like is something that we can all relate. I mean, it's something that boss and I talk a lot on this podcast about like just making so many assumptions about what, what we're definitely not entitled to have and what we're, you know, let's definitely for other people and not for us without ever once actually saying that out loud or asking for what we want. And actually yesterday chiefs have said the exact same thing. She said she, she was trying to be humble and say it's because she doesn't know how the system works. So she didn't know, she couldn't ask which you know. Okay. Maybe, but it's very inspiring to hear that.1 (36m 29s):Now you could just decide what you want to do with your life and your career. You could decide that you want to have a work-life balance and then have it.3 (36m 37s):Yeah. And you know, I think actors have this too. We are always waiting for the phone to ring. And at a certain point, I think that's a really tough way to be a mom because you can't count on anything and you're spread so thin. And I'm just kinda like, no, I'm going to generate, I'm going to generate this. And I can't really define the moment, but I will say for me it was emotional. I, I stopped, I stopped letting theater. Tell me how to feel about myself a little bit theater. I mean, it's a little bit like the terrible boyfriend that you just can't leave. Right. Like I would be like, I would be like, here's my new play. Do you love it? And they'd be like, maybe, you know, maybe we'll do a reading of it.3 (37m 19s):And I'd be like, let's my full heart. And I love you. And then, you know, and I finally like kind of broke up with that boyfriend in the sense that like, no, I'm really good at this. And like, I'm going to go where the love is. And I'm going to figure out how to pay my bills doing this and maybe you'll miss me and come back. You know, you know, it's hard as an artist, you can't let someone else tell you what your worth is. And theater is very conducive to that.1 (37m 40s):Yeah. Oh my God. That's so true. And that's, by the way, like a big part of the character of Alex, she does that too. I mean, she, with not that much to leverage did still find a way to just be very active about asking for what she wants. And I can see what you're saying about how, how having a kid makes that very clear. Whereas maybe you don't feel so I'm entitled to ask for what you want when it's just you, but when you know that it's somebody else who's depending on you, then it's that it doesn't feel like you're asking for yourself. It feels like you're asking for your family.3 (38m 15s):Yeah. And you see injustice with fresh eyes when you have a child, you know, because I don't know. I feel, I feel like certainly in my case, I w I would, I was so focused on being a good collaborator, being polite, being like, you know, you know, being grateful for the breadcrumbs that I got, you know, in my life. And I mean, honestly, it was a professional change, but it was primarily an emotional change. I was like, yeah, I don't want breadcrumbs anymore because my daughter deserves better than breadcrumbs. And so it just sort of filtered across all the fields, but yeah, another had does that.1 (38m 50s):Yeah, it does. It does well. So I don't know if I ever told you this, the reason I was looking through our emails earlier, as I wanted to see if I, I was sure I had said this thing to you, that I can not find in my email. So I'm going to say it to you now, which is that when I was directing your play, I wrote to you just about some things that I wondered if we could change. And you gave me the most thoughtful responses, which was, is to say you didn't invalidate that I was asking you, but you still stood up for what you, for the integrity of the play. I feel like I'm going to cry. I never saw anybody do that before.1 (39m 36s):And it was a really great, I wish I wasn't crying as I started to say this to you, but it was a great thing to, it was a, you were a great role model for me in that moment. And I always appreciate that. So thank you.3 (39m 52s):Oh, Tina, thank you. Well, you know what, thank you for wanting to have a conversation with me about it. Cause like I also think that's the sign of a fantastic director that you let me into your process and your thoughts about it. And I know you did a fantastic job with the play cause I had Scouts in that area who saw it and you know, so whatever you were, whatever you were working with, you artistically, you certainly landed that ship for you. You know, landed that plan beautifully.1 (40m 15s):Thank you. I had, and I had so much fun doing it. So tell me about some of your mentors. We had a nice discussion the other day about the power of mentors and some people go kind of through their whole training and never really feel like they connect with a mentor. Did you have mentors along the way?3 (40m 35s):Yes. I'm very lucky. Actually. I'm very lucky. I'm sure most people who go to Julliard and say this, but I, in my case, it's, it's really, really true that Marsha Norman was a wonderful mentor to me. I met her at Tisch and Tisha's a funny place because it's a larger program. You know, you don't have that. One-on-one with your professors that you do with Juilliard where there's just a handful of you, but, and I didn't stand out at Tisch. I sort of, my husband was, you know, my husband's sort of the star over player at, in class and I hadn't found my voice and I was sort of, I just wasn't like the star student and she was, she saw something in me and I don't think she saw like a Polish playwright yet, but she saw, I think there's just, she saw a way to help me find my voice.3 (41m 18s):And she hired me as her assistant coming out of that MFA program. And I always think like it was sort of charity work because she didn't need an assistant. She was so on top of her life. But I think she wanted to let me hang out with her and see how she conducted her business. So she was working on law and criminal intent. Yeah. Yeah. And so I was on set with her. I get to do research with her, for the scripts. She was doing the color purple and I got to go to rehearsal usually just to bring a coffee that I could watch. And it was, you know, she's also a mother and I don't know it was really, it, it was so generous of her because I got, I just got to see that you, what a woman in power looks like and, and a woman on her voice.3 (41m 59s):And she also says no a lot. And I grew to really respect that. Especially later when I became a mom, but you don't F with Marsha. I mean, she'll shut stuff down. She's really, I mean, she's such a generous person here. She did this thing for me, I'm a total stranger, but she's also like she knows her worth. So I was very grateful. It's been those years with her. And then, and then she invited me to Julliard. And then when I was ready really gave me, I mean, Juilliard is so much pressure. And the thing about Julia is you have to know what your voice is to go there. And so it's almost like she was helping me find my voice. And then when I found it gave me this incredible opportunity to go to Julliard. So sh honestly like very, very good to me in such a mentor in a very lucky.3 (42m 41s):And then on the west coast, I've had a wonderful mentor in John Wells because he, he's just one of the most terrific showrunners and producers, but it's funny cause I, everybody knows that that's not a secret in LA, but to work for him as a writer and to be in his writer's room. I learned so much from him about how to empower the people around you. How did it become like, you know, there's so many toxic writing rooms and toxic jobs with my friends, tell me, and it sounds terrible, but everyone at a John Wells show is thrilled to be there and very lucky to have that job. And they know it and like just that there's a way to do things gracefully. So he, and, and then he got this book and handed it to me and gave me my first chance to be a show runner.3 (43m 23s):So I had a, I've been very lucky to have him as a mentor on this coast1 (43m 28s):And the toxic. I've heard a lot of stories too, about toxic writers' rooms. And maybe that's also something that's going to get phased out because like so many of these things, you just, you just need more samples. You need, you know, you need more samples in your dataset so that, you know, I mean, if 99% of everything is run in one certain way, then there's little, there's little chance that it's going to change. But when, when the tide starts to shift, maybe there's a little, few more samples in your dataset that show, well, you can just be a regular nice person and still get the same, you know, get the same job done. That's that's nice to hear.3 (44m 9s):Yeah. Yeah.1 (44m 12s):So dah, dah, dah, oh, one, another favorite line from made is when Alex is talking to her dad about, I think this is, might be at the last episode or near then. And she says, she's trying to tell him that her or her, whatever boyfriend abused her and her, father's not taking it in. And she says, do you hear the words that are coming out of my mouth right now? That was another thing that really hit me because, you know, denial is really not a passive thing. Like you have to work pretty hard at defending your denial on something.1 (44m 56s):And I'm really familiar with saying something that feels, you know, that's a truth for me to people who, I mean, act as if you're, you know, like you're invisible and that turns out to be a really shaping force in a lot of people's lives. And you know, so anyway, I'm just curious about your own relationship and experience with denial.3 (45m 22s):Well, I love that you love that moment because I remember with that scene feeling like something was missing. And I remember, you know, I know a lot of it denial, but what I really know a lot about is gaslighting and denial is a form of gaslighting where you're just like, I'm, I'm not going to acknowledge a reality. And you know, I learned this tool a few years ago from a fantastic therapist that like, it's okay to just pause and be like, but you actually are hearing me, right? Like this is English. And you understand these words like, and I've, I've actually tried that tool in my life and steal at someone, not, not like, not be able to confirm that they're hearing the words.3 (46m 3s):And so it was when I, and then when I put it in the scene that it felt like, oh, that's what was missing is just this, like, how far are you going to take this denial? And he still can't write. I mean, I think Billy might nod, but he doesn't say anything. Like, I think gaslighting in denial and emotional abuse, I mean, I could write 40 Marsha was about this. I am fascinated by it. And the thing we don't talk about it as a form of abuse. And we should, it's like weirdly I think as well as violent, if not more violent than physical abuse, because you don't realize it's happening like Alex in the pilot, she doesn't know she's a victim of abuse and she is such an, a victim of abuse, which I hope we demonstrate in the show that you have to go on that ride with her, but you know, it's so corrosive and there's nothing worse than having someone tell you what what's real is not real day after day, year after year.3 (46m 56s):Like this is an area that I know a lot about I sent you do to1 (47m 1s):Yes. And actually my kind of where I put my energy in terms of recovery is with codependency and denial and codependency, or just, I mean, that's, that's the it's denial is the perfume of codependency. It's just, it's everywhere. And what I think really gets triggered for people who want to keep pretending, like they hear the words you're saying is because I find this in my family, like the way that denial really shows up in my family is if I acknowledge a truth, that's too true. I think what happens to other people is they feel that if they even just validate that that's my truth, that that somehow means that they have to acknowledge it for their own selves and their own lives.1 (47m 51s):And that's really like the forbidden thing that, you know, that people who don't want to go there can't do, they can't, it's like the Pandora's box. If I start to look at, you know, if I acknowledge that, what you're saying about this is true, then I can't help, but start to acknowledge all of the other things as well.3 (48m 9s):I think what you just said is, is brilliant because I think people think denial is just inactive, but it's aggressive. It's so aggressive. It's really violent, you know, intense denial that gaslighting of like, I will not even acknowledge. I hear the words you're saying it's, it's, it's so active. It's I mean, it's so aggressive. What you said was really, really smart really. Right. Yeah. And I love the people. I love the people are flipping out about Hank with me. Like how does he just sit there and let Sean treat her like that? And like, you know, and that's what I mean, I think she's mistreated throughout the show, but I think what Hank does to her in that moment with the denial is, is I think a lot of us recognize that.1 (48m 49s):Yeah. And I really appreciate the w the way you rolled out this whole concept of emotional abuse, because even I who feel like I've spent so much time working on this stuff, and I was a therapist, even I was found myself being like, oh, he didn't hit her. You know, she left, he didn't hit her. Hmm. I really had to check that in myself. And I was because one of the things that denial, I mean, in the absence of act, you know, saying you're wrong or whatever, and it's just, I don't hear you. You just assume that what you're saying, isn't valid, it's it becomes this thing that you do to yourself where you, you know, if somebody invalidates you enough, you start to invalidate yourself.1 (49m 38s):So I loved how you rolled that out in the series that are people talking to you a lot about that.3 (49m 45s):Yes they are. And how about in episode eight, where you are like, oh, Sean's changed and he's turned around and he's going to be a carpenter, you know? And like you it's in you, you find yourself. Or at least I did. And I assume it seems like audiences to just kind of like, oh, maybe this is a happy, love story. Like maybe he like, you know, and, and that, you know, that is all by calculated manipulative writing that I like my secret agenda with me. It was, you know, and I claimed 10 hours cause I wanted, I wanted the audience to go on the actual experience of that cycle and to get thrown off by it and caught up in it like, oh my gosh, I'm back, I'm back. And I'm in the pit, how did this happen?3 (50m 26s):And I wanted to show you how it happened. I also was like, I dare you to wash made and tell me that that's not domestic violence because it is emotional abuse is violent. It, what happens to her is violent. So that was like my secret mustache totally goal with the show.1 (50m 43s):Yeah, no, it, it hit, it totally played. And, and I think the other thing that's great about that is that when we have seen depictions of violence against women in film, I mean the best we could entail television, the best we could have hoped for is some woman who's abused who isn't a total idiot, because mostly what it is, how it's portrayed is some dumb person who doesn't, who's too dumb to know she's being abused. So therefore she goes back and also the various, the subtle, wow. I don't know if it's settled, but the, the subplot with the first roommate that she has when she goes to the, not roommate, but you know, the woman who lives in the shelter with her who introduces her to, you know, how, how to do life there.1 (51m 31s):I love I, that was heartbreaking her story of, because it is that you, you, you, yes, in the audience were saying, yeah, maybe sh maybe Sean is a good guy. Maybe, maybe all he really needed was to sober up and become the good person he was meant to team.3 (51m 50s):Yep. I mean, it's funny. I did an interview yesterday where this gentleman was like, is Sean okay? Like, does he end up okay. In life? And, and I, and I found myself sort of being like, I've never really thought of that cause he, you know, he's fictional, but I, I don't know. I'm not sure that that guy is ever going to make it out of that trailer, you know? And I'm not sure that he's going to get sober and be a great dad. I'm not. But I do feel like when he says at the end, I'm going to get sober and come see her all the time. I don't believe him. And, and I think that's his TV show, right? That's his cycle that he has to break. But my goal was to show that he's caught in his own cycle too.3 (52m 29s):Like, we are all kind of caught in our own cycles and it's so hard to break, you know, an Alex barely makes it out. And most women and men in her situation, the show ends in episode eight under the, in the pit. Most people don't get out of the pit and she is so smart and driven that she can, but she's the exception and not, she's a great exception. Yeah.1 (52m 53s):Yeah. Yeah. So we're, I want to be honoring your time. I told you we're only going to talk for an hour, but, but before we begin to wrap up, I just want to ask you, so since we've spent a lot of time talking about your success, let's hear about some of your failures. What have been some mistakes that you've made, maybe, maybe you maybe even like when you, when you made first, the transition from playwriting to writing and Hollywood, what were some of the mistakes that you made along the way?3 (53m 23s):Well, I, I think the, one of the great learning opportunities I've had as a human being, not just as a writer, was my first big production as a playwright in New York. And it was, you know, I was barely out of school and I felt I'm just so grateful for the opportunity. You know, it was a big production with stars in it and fancy director and everyone there was fancy except me and the process I have to say kind of went that way, like, like, huh, there's this element of it's actually, it's when I play close up space is about a dad and a daughter. It's about grief and pain and there's a lot of magical realism and I'm sure it's far from the perfect play, but it got obliterated by the press and squarely blamed on me the most inexperienced person in the production.3 (54m 11s):But what I learned from it is that I knew things about it were wrong. I knew immediately things about the production were wrong and I didn't use my voice. I didn't, you know, what happened with the play is my fault. I didn't, I didn't ring the bell. I didn't say, well, I didn't refuse the rewrites. Like I, you know, and everybody there had good intentions. Everybody wants to have a hit play, but people saw it a different way than I did. And, and it was wonderful people. There was no reason why I couldn't have said, Hey, yo, this isn't what I wrote. And I really, it was a crushing blow to have that play go so badly and to, to get such her, I mean, if you went for that and just Google it, it's the worst reviews. It's like, one of the, one of the reviews was like, is she sleeping with the director?3 (54m 53s):Like, why did she even get this product? You know, it's just straight on misogyny. I mean, it was, it was so mean, but what it taught me was I, since that moment I've really listened to my gut. And if my gut says this isn't right, I say it, and I don't worry about how it's going to come across. It sounds like I did that with you, but I have my sense of like, no, and, and it, and I learned the hard way in that moment that nothing is more important than your own gut. And so, and, you know, kind of re I had like a, kind of, a lot of momentum as a playwright really stop that momentum. It sent me into a deep depression. I mean, the, I lost so much because I didn't listen to my voice.3 (55m 36s):So that was my big theater lesson, which is applied to everything. But the big mistake I've made in TV to film, I've actually been really, really, really lucky and worked with fantastic people. But I think that stuff can go sideways here. It's a, it's a funny town, you know, and I've worked with wonderful people, but once in a while, you know, something's happening and then it just disappears. And so, you know, like that, you're gonna, you know, I, right before me and I came so close to having another job that I really wanted and was passionate about, it would have been my first time kosher running something, show running something, and, you know, we were all but celebrating.3 (56m 21s):And then the whole thing fell apart because the actress wanted her friend to write it and like bull, bull, crap. Like that happens all the time in LA. And so it's a hard time. It's a hard lesson the first time, you know, where I was like, oh, people don't, you know, like my agent sent me champagne. Like it was, it was happening. And then it very suddenly wasn't. And so I think it made me realize that don't pop the champagne until the contract is signed1 (56m 51s):And put that on a t-shirt.3 (56m 57s):That was a tough lesson to learn though, because I was like, wait, oh my God. Like, I went from like sky high to, and you know, nobody really, nobody apart, it was just very sobering. So,1 (57m 7s):And writing is so personal that it's really hard not to take both the criticisms to heart and then the, the opposite of the criticisms. And, you know, it's, it's hard not to make it. It's hard to stop making it about personal validation. You know, when, when somebody likes or doesn't like your stuff. Yeah. That's the journey I'm on right now. Not making it about, you know, like if somebody didn't like my play doesn't mean they don't, it doesn't have anything to do with whether or not they like me.3 (57m 40s):Yeah. You know, that's, I'm glad you're learning that because I also can tell you, I just staffed a writing room for the first time. And so that experience was really opening because I read unbelievably fantastic things and I didn't meet with them because, you know, you're designing a dinner party with five people and you kind of have to, and like you, the truth is, like I said, I passed on a lot of wonderful writers whose work I freaking loved. And like, can't wait to read for the next thing and have mentioned and recommended to other people. And that's part of it is like, you don't know how people are experiencing your work and the fans that you're building along the way. And I think we quickly assume the worst. Right? I know I do. But like, but the fact is like, you don't, you don't know how close you got it.3 (58m 24s):My guess is you're getting close to stuff and you don't know. And aren't able to know that1 (58m 29s):At the end of the day, the only thing you have control over is whether or not you go back to your computer later that day and just keep writing.3 (58m 36s):Yeah. You got to run, run your own race, which is so hard to do. I mean, listen, it really, really is. But yeah. The only thing you, the only thing you can control is your output true. Which is horrible. I mean, I, I, for the first time, in two years that don't have anyone calling me today to be like, where are the pages? You know? Like, I mean, part of it too is it's, it's helpful when you have deadlines and pressure. That's why I love to grad school because I'm the second Monday of October, I was reading my play out loud. And so I had to go right. You know, make sure I write it. So I also feel like that's, without that, it's also, that's a hard thing about feeling like you're not moving forward too, is that lack of deadlines.3 (59m 19s):But again, you don't, you don't, you don't know how far your work is going and how who's reading it and what it will lead to the next time. And I mean, I've gotten, I've gotten rejected on so many things that have led to a meeting later, you know, like so many things that, so many jobs I wanted that I didn't get, but then later someone's like, oh, we read her for that. We should meet her for this. And I didn't get that job either, but, but it's like, it's just funny. So yeah,1 (59m 48s):Like leaving a whole blanket of your career and you never know, you know, w where this, where the threads are going to end up.3 (59m 55s):Absolutely. And every time I get bummed out, which is a lot, because I'm a writer, all writers gets on debt. I, I try to think about and visualize the stack of things. I'm going to write in my life. And when I get terrible notes or when I get clobbered with notes and I feel depressed, I also think about the stack of work that I'm going to do in my life and how this piece that I'm writing right now is just one of them, you know? And that, that's my, that's my real tombstone like that pile, you know?1 (1h 0m 22s):Oh, I love that. What a great image and what a great note to end on.4 (1h 0m 37s):If you liked what you heard today, please give us a positive five star review and subscribe and tell your friends. I survived. Theater school is an undeniable Inc production. Jen Bosworth, Ramirez, and Gina plegia are the co-hosts. This episode was produced, edited, and sound mixed by Gina for more information about this podcast or other goings on of undeniable, Inc. Please visit our website@undeniablewriters.com. You can also follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Thank you.

The Quad M Show - Quad M Productions
#248 - Henry Ruggs III, The MCU Has Jumped The Shark, & Name The Backwards Tune

The Quad M Show - Quad M Productions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 113:22


Hosts: TJ, Jason, & Brett This week on the show: Segment One: Happy Time Change to everyone! Brett cancels an amazing dinner due to tummy issues but manages to get his hunt on… until he hit a deer. Jason's not impressed with the new Dune film. TJ has a miserable week highlighted by a severe thumping at bowling. Segment Two: FGS brings us the tale of a special team's coach's stripper girlfriend and her monkey (we can't make this up, folks…). HOT TAKES looks at the tragedy involving former Raiders wide receiver Henry Ruggs III. Based on early review of The Eternals, the MCU needs to hang it up, and a new game comes around ans the guys play Name That Backwards Tune. Segment Three: It's truth in advertising as REDDIT FUN asks “If brands told the truth, what would there slogans be?” Plus, PICKS O' THE WEEK. Summoning powers beyond our control… It's THE QUAD M SHOW!

Son of Smiley
EPISODE 248: BACKWARDS

Son of Smiley

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 11:13


An accident potentially saved my life. What a universe we are in.

Confidently Confused Podcast
Episode 3 - The Backwards Brain Bicycle

Confidently Confused Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 16:04


Have you ever wondered why changing your habits TAKES SO LONG!? Listen to this episode to shed some light on the topic and to give yourselves a break from the belief that we always need to be productive in our chaotic world!    ----more---- Email your stories over to: confidentlyconfusedpodcast@gmail.com   ----more---- Please Share, Rate and Review to pull in our Confidently Confused Community!   Love you sisters & brothers -jo

Todd N Tyler Radio Empire
11/4 4-2 The BACKWARDS Beer Mile?

Todd N Tyler Radio Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 21:37


We mighta stumbled onto something here!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

K92 Mornin' Thang
Backwards Backwards Game: Adele Singalong

K92 Mornin' Thang

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 9:35


It's a backwards singalong you'll NEVER forget!

Modern Classrooms Project Podcast
Episode 61: Backwards Planning in a Modern Classroom

Modern Classrooms Project Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 43:11


This week, Toni Rose is joined by Lindsay Armbruster to talk about planning units with the end in mind, beginning with standards and learning targets, and working down to mastery checks and activities before planning lessons and videos, as well as managing student (and teacher) pacing and workload via the planning process. Show Notes Distinguished Modern Classroom Educators - More Information (https://www.modernclassrooms.org/distinguished-educators) Lindsay's Planning Process (https://docs.google.com/document/d/1blYYz_WO_yv3GKaW3dxwujuAFGPwfUo3IPlq_cETD9s/edit?usp=sharing) Stephen Covey - The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (https://www.amazon.com/Habits-Highly-Effective-People-Powerful/dp/1982137274/ref=asc_df_1982137274/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=509245866633&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=8952319624260916956&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9007807&hvtargid=pla-908915591470&psc=1) Adding Captions to Instructional Videos (https://sites.google.com/modernclassrooms.org/subtitles/home) The Noun Project (https://thenounproject.com/) Follow us online and learn more: Modern Classrooms: @modernclassproj (https://twitter.com/modernclassproj) on Twitter and facebook.com/modernclassproj (https://www.facebook.com/modernclassproj) Kareem: @kareemfarah23 (https://twitter.com/kareemfarah23) on Twitter Kate: @gaskill_teacher (https://twitter.com/gaskill_teacher) on Twitter Toni rose: @classroomflex (https://twitter.com/classroomflex) on Twitter and Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/classroomflex/?hl=en) The Modern Classroom Project (https://www.modernclassrooms.org) Modern Classrooms Online Course (https://www.learn.modernclassrooms.org) Take our free online course, or sign up for our mentorship program to receive personalized guidance from a Modern Classrooms mentor as you implement your own modern classroom! The Modern Classrooms Podcast is edited by Zach Diamond: @zpdiamond (https://twitter.com/zpdiamond) on Twitter and Learning to Teach (https://www.learningtoteach.co/)

That Happiness Show
#523 The Backwards World

That Happiness Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 17:46


Feeling bad in any form of emotion is a true indication that you are experiencing a world that is not in alignment with your truth. Any attempt to realign in the world will be a backward expression of who you are. Sending you much love! Jemma Questions, Comments, Texts, Calls, 1-401-699-6142 JemmaFassett.com

The Herd with Colin Cowherd
Colin Cowherd Podcast - NFL Week 8 Picks and Betting Breakdown, "Fake Q's, Real Answers" on Brady's Backwards Hat

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 53:47


Colin does Fake Questions, Real Answers on Brady's backwards hat, inside info on the USC head coach search, and why James Harden can't complain about the NBA rule changes (3:00). Then, The Action Network CCO Chad Millman tells Colin whether his NFL Week 8 picks are sharp or square. They give their picks for Cowboys/Vikings (14:00), Patriots/Chargers (21:00), Jaguars/Seahawks (23:00), Steelers/Browns (25:00), Titans/Colts (27:00), Giants/Chiefs (30:00), Buccaneers/Saints (33:00). They also discuss the question Colin personally asked Tom Brady (37:00), and why Colin's NFL picks have been so brutal this year. Make sure you follow Colin and The Volume on Twitter for the latest content and updates and check out FanDuel for the best wagering and daily fantasy action! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Colin Cowherd Podcast
154. NFL Week 8 Picks and Betting Breakdown, "Fake Q's, Real Answers" on Brady's Backwards Hat

The Colin Cowherd Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 53:47


Colin does Fake Questions, Real Answers on Brady's backwards hat, inside info on the USC head coach search, and why James Harden can't complain about the NBA rule changes (3:00). Then, The Action Network CCO Chad Millman tells Colin whether his NFL Week 8 picks are sharp or square. They give their picks for Cowboys/Vikings (14:00), Patriots/Chargers (21:00), Jaguars/Seahawks (23:00), Steelers/Browns (25:00), Titans/Colts (27:00), Giants/Chiefs (30:00), Buccaneers/Saints (33:00). They also discuss the question Colin personally asked Tom Brady (37:00), and why Colin's NFL picks have been so brutal this year. Make sure you follow Colin and The Volume on Twitter for the latest content and updates and check out FanDuel for the best wagering and daily fantasy action! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Pete's Points
Pete‘s Points Flash Briefing Episode 163 - Decision Errors - Not Looking Backwards

Pete's Points

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 1:59


Sometimes, we make decisions that are not the best.  In this five-part series, Pete Blank shares five mistakes or "errors" that leaders can make when they are faced with making a decision. Plunging In Overconfidence Shortcuts Group Failure Not Looking Backwards

Leadership Is Changing
217: Ask Denis: Standing Still - Going Backwards

Leadership Is Changing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 13:24


Some of the most dangerous words you can hear a leader say is, ‘We've always done it this way.' The thing is, change is constant, whether you're in it or not. It's time to break out of complacency, because the hard truth that we all need to face, in leadership, is that there is no such thing as standing still; if you are standing still, you're already going backwards. So what can we do? Dive into today's episode as I share some actionable steps on how you can keep moving forward and avoid being left behind. On this episode: If there's anything the pandemic has taught us, it's that change can happen at any time and it happens fast. It's a business' responsibility to adapt or risk getting left behind by innovation So what can we do to ensure that you don't get left behind? Here are the five steps I believe will help you move forward. Keep in mind things are easier said than done, so keep these in your back pocket and keep working at them daily Key Takeaways: Businesses need to change with its surroundings Keep a positive attitude  Schedule and take time out to think  Keep up with industry trends  Massive Action! - discipline, focus, consistency Surround yourself with the right people   Tweetable Quotes: “It's already changed, and if businesses haven't changed with it, then they're probably already been left behind.” - Denis Gianoutsos “If we can understand where you're going then you're going to be able to adapt and be part of [the future].” - Denis Gianoutsos Reach out to Denis: Email: denis@leadingchangepartners.com Website: http://www.leadingchangepartners.com/ (http://www.leadingchangepartners.com/)  Leadership Is Changing Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/LeadershipIsChanging/ (https://www.facebook.com/groups/LeadershipIsChanging/) Leadership is Changing LinkedIn Page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadership-is-changing-podcast/ (https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadership-is-changing-podcast/)

K92 Mornin' Thang
Backwards Backwards: Spooky Singalong

K92 Mornin' Thang

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 7:11


It's a backwards spooky singalong!

Millionaire Loan Officer
EP 19: 2 Steps Backwards and 10 Steps Forward Closing In On 100 Million with Brad Brondt

Millionaire Loan Officer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 30:46


"Oh crap, I forgot to call [insert name]!" How many times has that happened to you in your business? Many people from all industries forget to make follow up phone calls. But not making those calls can cost tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands or even millions of dollars. Having a process in place that takes that off your plate is worth the price alone. Millionaire Loan Officer Brad Brondt designed a form and process that helps you with follow up phone calls. Implementing that process could increase your business by the millions. In this episode, discover how you use the form to follow up with more clients and skyrocket your business. Show highlights include: Why having a client relations manager increases your business (10:15) The "Wufu Form" that masters the follow up process to net you millions (13:32) Why sending a text message every Thursday collects endless referral clients for you (19:31) How eating half of a watermelon finds more buyers for you (25:47) Want to get your questions answered live? Head to MLOlive.com and discover how you could become a Millionaire Loan Officer!

Another Episode Podcast
Episode 171 - The Shining w/ Stu McCallister

Another Episode Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 74:14


Howdy Epi-Hoes! This week we bring you the finale to our Spooky Spectacular. We take a deep dive into The Shining with Grand Rapids, Michigan comedian and podcaster from the LMNOPodcast, Stu McCallister. After we worked our way through some technical issues we caught up with Stu and his football jersey obsession, we reviewed some clips, played some games and we had some laughs. Please be sure to check out our previous episodes (many of which include Stu as a guest or fill-in host). Email the shows at AnotherEpisodePodcast@gmail.com Instagram - www.instagram.com/AnotherEpisodePodcast Twitter - www.twitter.com/AnotherEpPod Facebook - www.facebook.com/anotherepisodepodcast Follow Matt's Twitch channel at www.twitch.tv/mattopoly83 Please rate, review and share with your friends! Thanks for listening... THANKS MORE for Subscribing! Theme Songs "Chop This Synopsis" by www.twitter.com/Bob_Fred_Rick "Guess the Age" by www.twitter.com/brandonalberda "Box Office Theme Song" by www.twitter.com/StuMcCallister "Did You Hear That Sound" by www.twitter.com/hibbzilla "Backwards 4 Words" by Listener Stacy

The Drunken Peasants Podcast
KingCobraJFS Delivers Backwards Hadouken During Livestream Scuffle - Joe RETURNS | DP # 947

The Drunken Peasants Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 255:49


Tonight, Ben & Billy will be joined by Joe! We'll be discussing the scuffle between KingCobraJFS and Warlord, Alec Baldwin's movie set tragedy, AND MORE! DP On Demand: https://vimeo.com/ondemand/drunkenpeasantsondemand/ Save $2 on your first month: https://vimeo.com/r/3m55/LkVZVW41Rn Become a $25+ Patron to get all Patreon content & On-Demand Included: http://www.patreon.com/dp ExpressVPN: https://www.expressvpn.com/drunkenpeasants Support the show by signing up! Get 3 free months with an annual subscription! Help Us Reach the Goal: https://streamlabs.com/drunkenpeasants/tip Teespring Store: https://the-drunken-peasants-podcast.creator-spring.com/ *Google Calendar* https://calendar.google.com/calendar/embed?src=sund2qrenq20a2d5802cpp9i6k%40group.calendar.google.com&ctz=America%2FLos_Angeles *iCal* https://calendar.google.com/calendar/ical/sund2qrenq20a2d5802cpp9i6k%40group.calendar.google.com/public/basic.ics SUPPORT US: https://patreon.com/DP https://bit.ly/BraveAppDP https://bit.ly/BenBillyMerch https://streamlabs.com/drunkenpeasants https://youtube.com/DrunkenPeasants/join https://subscribestar.com/DrunkenPeasants PODSURVEY: https://podsurvey.com/peasants SOCIAL MEDIA: https://discord.gg/2fnWTbE https://fb.com/DrunkenPeasants https://twitch.tv/DrunkenPeasants https://twitter.com/DrunkenPeasants https://soundcloud.com/DrunkenPeasants https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-drunken-peasants-podcast/id1013248653 https://open.spotify.com/show/6eulbMV0APnJ5yNR8Jc3IM https://bit.ly/SticherDrunkenPeasants https://bit.ly/DPUnderground http://bit.ly/DPTAPCalendar drunkenpeasantsinbox@gmail.com BENPAI: https://bit.ly/BenpaiYT https://twitter.com/DrunkenBenpai https://fb.com/DrunkenBenpai BILLY THE FRIDGE: https://youtube.com/Overweight https://twitter.com/BillyTheFridge https://instagram.com/BillyTheFridge PO BOX: The Drunken Peasants 1100 Bellevue Way NE Ste 8A # 422 Bellevue, WA 98004 Be sure to put the name on the package you send as "The Drunken Peasants". If you would like to send something to a certain peasant, include a note inside the package with what goes to who. SPECIAL THANKS: https://twitter.com/GFIX_ https://twitter.com/SYNJE_Grafx https://twitter.com/MarshalManson https://berserkyd.bandcamp.com https://youtube.com/channel/UC9BV1g_9Iq67_yCyj5AX_4Q DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed on our show by hosts, guests, or viewers, are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of Drunken Peasants. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Boilers and Beyond
Purdue steps backwards in loss, looks to rebound at Nebraska

Boilers and Beyond

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 40:19


A week after knocking off No. 2 Iowa, Purdue took a big step backward in a non-competitive 30-13 loss at home against Wisconsin, extending the 18-year drought without a win vs. the Badgers. Now, Brohm and Company look to rebound as they travel to Lincoln to face off with a middling Nebraska program. We break down the loss, look at Purdue's big picture with five games remaining, and preview what Purdue needs to do to pull off another road upset. Additionally, basketball season is coming soon and the annual basketball preview episode is coming soon. Send me questions for a preseason basketball mailbag! If you enjoyed this week's episode, give us a five star review and tell a friend! Give the show a follow on Twitter @BoilersBeyond and send me your feedback on this week's episode. Let me know your thoughts! You can also email the show at boilersandbeyondpod@gmail.com. New episodes are released weekly, so be sure to subscribe wherever you get your podcasts!

The Make Money Your Honey Podcast
How to Uplevel Your Business by Using Your Goals and Working Backwards with Johanna Voss

The Make Money Your Honey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 66:43


Johanna Voss and I talk about how to streamline and delegate your business and the importance of building relationships by planting that seed. Johanna is a Pisces who lives in Denver and has been working for herself for over a decade. "And like every good entrepreneur, I've had a bunch of seemingly random pivots." For example, as a nutrition coach for women doing half marathons, she pivoted to doing strategy and operations for solo female business owners when they had become successful and established. They were looking for their next phase of growth and understanding. Meet Johanna Voss Johanna B. Voss is a talent manager trusted by social media influencers who want clarity on building their brands, growing their businesses, earning their worth, and planning strategically for the future. On behalf of her clients, she's closed close to three million dollars of brand deals, partnerships, and speaking engagements. Her clients have partnered with Kroger, Walmart, AARP, Little Northern Bakehouse, H&R Block, and ALDI. Negotiation is something she thoroughly enjoys, be it for her clients, friends, or strangers. Entering her 10th year of working for herself, she understands the necessary pivots entrepreneurs take along their journey. Before her work in the talent management space, Johanna worked on the Presidential campaigns of Hillary Clinton and John Kerry for more than seven years. Johanna is a world traveler who has lived in Spain three times and can often be found cycling Colorado's mountain ranges or asking, "What if you...?" Follow her on Instagram @johannavoss. Listen in to find out how to delegate and streamline your business. You'll also learn: How to sell through word-of-mouth referrals Why you don't have a cap on your business income The importance of building relationships and following up How to plant the seeds of sales Balancing out your CEO power For more information, visit the show notes at https://amandaabella.com/how-to-up-level-your-business-by-using-your-goals-and-working-backwards-with-johanna-voss

Spear Gored Radio
24 October 2021

Spear Gored Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 63:34


SUSPIRIACOIL "ARE YOU SHIVERING?"ABSURDNECROT "SINISTER WILL"LURKER OF CHALICE "THIS BLOOD FALLS AS MORTAL PART III"THE BLOOD ON SATAN'S CLAWGRAVETEMPLE "A SZARKA"KING DIAMOND "BLACK HORSEMEN"

The Just Enough Trope Podcast
434: Mood Spelled Backwards is Dune

The Just Enough Trope Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 93:49


Crysknifes out 'cause this week we're sandwalking the dreamy depths of Dune!I shaved my head for this?Check out the new show on the JET Network, Sailor Noob!http://www.twitter.com/noob_sailorCelebrate guilty pleasure movies with Kal on Craft Disservices!http://www.craftdisservices.comBond with us on Facebook and Twitter and on our Discord!http://www.facebook.com/justenoughtropehttp://www.twitter.com/justenoughtropehttps://discord.gg/WVvCHVWqzfFollow our live stream adventures on YouTube!https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCv_yQ1TlPULKRSrlZa6JgtA/videosBuy us a planet on Patreon and Ko-Fi!http://www.patreon.com/justenoughtropehttps://ko-fi.com/E1E01M2UA

Awakening Clarity Now Podcasting
Backwards Pointing!

Awakening Clarity Now Podcasting

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 5:16


You need to DO THIS little "exercise." More than once.

Secrets From The Saddle: All things Cycling PODCAST
140. Part 3/4: WORKING BACKWARDS Planning Your Training Season: with Sylvie D'Aoust

Secrets From The Saddle: All things Cycling PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 26:45


In this episode, you will learn: Getting a clear picture of what a full Season of Cycling Program looks like and how to work backward from the BIG EVENT.

The Very Best Podcast In The World - Personal Supremacy Through Health, Wealth, Happiness

Life is about moving forward, and yet a lot of us dwell in the past, looking to relive the good old times. Yet reliving the past isn't categorically wrong, as we definitely need to take the "lessons learned" with us to the future to avoid mistakes. SO this exercise is about doing one without sacrificing the other. #selfimprovement #motivation #selflove #selfcare #selfdevelopment #inspiration #success #personaldevelopment #mindset #love #selfhelp #loveyourself #awareness #personalgrowth #mentalhealth #happiness #positivevibes #life #goals #selfconfidence #selfawareness #mindfulness #positivity #growth #growthmindset #selfworth #photooftheday #podcast #happy #followme Web: www.theverybestpodcastintheworld.com / Email theverybestpodcastintheworld@gmail.com / Instagram http://instagram.com/bestpodcastintheworld/ / Twitter http://twitter.com/BestPodcastInT1 / Minds https://www.minds.com/theverybestpodcastintheworld/ / Youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRDtwAguIAQ_g5TQOMtnpkA

The Wrestle Special
Wrestling Theme Satanic Message Backwards Bonanza

The Wrestle Special

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 35:55


Travis explores the concept of backmasking in music and how it applies to the entrance themes of wrestlers throughout history. Will Travis expose the satanic cabal behind the composers of wrestling's greatest themes or will he just listen to way too many themes backwards and find nothing? 

K92 Mornin' Thang
Backwards Backwards: Goofy Pennywise the Clown 10/21/21

K92 Mornin' Thang

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 9:51


It's the goofy Pennywise the Clown tribute edition of the game!

Another Episode Podcast
Episode 170 - Arachnophobia w/ Travis Spotts

Another Episode Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 74:27


Howdy Epi-Hoes! This week we bring you the Jeff Daniels classic Arachnophobia! Our guest this week was Chicago comedian Travis Spotts. We had a great time breaking down the film, playing games and laughing along the way. Email the shows at AnotherEpisodePodcast@gmail.com Instagram - www.instagram.com/AnotherEpisodePodcast Twitter - www.twitter.com/AnotherEpPod Facebook - www.facebook.com/anotherepisodepodcast Follow Matt's Twitch channel at www.twitch.tv/mattopoly83 Please rate, review and share with your friends! Thanks for listening... THANKS MORE for Subscribing! Theme Songs "Chop This Synopsis" by www.twitter.com/Bob_Fred_Rick "Guess the Age" by www.twitter.com/brandonalberda "Box Office Theme Song" by www.twitter.com/StuMcCallister "Did You Hear That Sound" by www.twitter.com/hibbzilla "Backwards 4 Words" by Listener Stacy

Podcast About List
Ep. 166 - The Backwards Universe

Podcast About List

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 61:21


caleb is having head problem www.patreon.com/podcastaboutlist

Escaping Reality
Netflix‘s The Circle: Season 3 (Ep. 9-13) --Using ‘Backwards Math‘ to figure out what happened

Escaping Reality

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 73:29


We're wrapping up our coverage & commentary on season 3 of Netflix's The Circle with our podcast on the last batch of episodes! Agie, Stacey, Anna (and kind of also Nick) are here to talk through what we loved about the season & what we think could still use some improvement. We're talking about last-minute players, the latest new twists to the game, and the absolutely gag-worthy reveals when the players finally get to meet. In addition to our usual segments, we're giving our takes on the final rankings (and the math involved), the overall strategizing of the players, and the heartwarming moments that made us love this season so much.  If you're looking for a specific segment, here's a break down: One Minute Thoughts (1:23 - 6:37) Season 3 Part 3 Recap (6:37 - 52:42) Honorable Mention (52:42 - 58:18) Vibe Checks (58:18 - 1:01:28) Rapid Fire (1:01:28 - end) Be sure to give us a follow as well on Instagram @EscapingRealityPod and on Twitter @EscRealityPod --  If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe & leave us a rating/review on Apple Podcasts and/or follow us on Spotify! Make sure to tell your friends about the pod and have them join you (and us) on our journey through reality competition shows. As always, thanks for listening & thanks for Escaping Reality with us!

Richard Ellis Talks on Oneplace.com

To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/640/29 While the world tells us to hate our enemies, hold grudges, and sin in this way or that way, Jesus tells us to live backwards according to the world's standards. The only way we can do this is when He is living in us, and when we live this way we realize that we are really living forwards in the way He designed us to live.

Richard Ellis Talks
Lived Backwards

Richard Ellis Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021


Jesus challenges us to live in a way that seems backwards to the rest of the world. While culture tells us to hate our enemies, hold grudges, and sin as long as it makes us feel good, Jesus commands us to go against the grain and do the opposite. And when we live how He intended, we realize that His way was never "living backwards", but "living forwards" all along!

K92 Mornin' Thang
Backwards Backwards: Spooky Halloween Edition

K92 Mornin' Thang

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 9:09


Today we get creepy with it in the Backwards Backwards Game!

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker
10/13/2021 - Hour 1 - Kyrie Can't Expect Folks to Bend Over Backwards for Him + FOX Sports Radio NFL insider Adam Caplan

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 47:44


Chris and Rob explain why they have no issue with Steve Nash and James Harden publicly stating that they're moving past the Kyrie Irving vaccination soap opera, tell us why the Brooklyn Nets were wise to pull Kyrie's contract extension offer off the table, and applaud the University of Oklahoma journalism students who broke the news that the Sooners were likely benching preseason Heisman favorite Spencer Rattler. Plus, FOX Sports Radio NFL insider Adam Caplan swings by to discuss Adam Schefter's journalistic integrity, the fallout from the Jon Gruden-Washington Football Team scandal, and much more! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Optimal Finance Daily
1672: Money Saving Hacks for Non Cheapskates by Renee of The Fun Sized Life on Creating Goals and working Backwards

Optimal Finance Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 8:21


Renee Benes of The Fun Sized Life shares money-saving hacks for people who aren't cheapskates Episode 1672: Money Saving Hacks for Non Cheapskates by Renee Benes of The Fun Sized Life on Creating Goals and working Backwards Renee is a minimalist mom, blogger, & coach. She and her husband downsized their house, paid off debt, started making money online, and now travel part-time with their kids. Her blog and online coaching is centered around helping other women to create this same lifestyle for themselves, both in their day to day living and in how they manage their money. The original post is located here: https://www.thefunsizedlife.com/saving-hacks/  Please Rate & Review the Show!  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com Interested in advertising on the show? https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalFinanceDaily

Optimal Finance Daily
1672: Money Saving Hacks for Non Cheapskates by Renee of The Fun Sized Life on Creating Goals and working Backwards

Optimal Finance Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 8:51


Renee Benes of The Fun Sized Life shares money-saving hacks for people who aren't cheapskates Episode 1672: Money Saving Hacks for Non Cheapskates by Renee Benes of The Fun Sized Life on Creating Goals and working Backwards Renee is a minimalist mom, blogger, & coach. She and her husband downsized their house, paid off debt, started making money online, and now travel part-time with their kids. Her blog and online coaching is centered around helping other women to create this same lifestyle for themselves, both in their day to day living and in how they manage their money. The original post is located here: https://www.thefunsizedlife.com/saving-hacks/ Please Rate & Review the Show! Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com Interested in advertising on the show? https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalFinanceDaily