Podcasts about Astronomy

Scientific study of celestial objects and phenomena

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Astronomy

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Latest podcast episodes about Astronomy

Cosmic Vertigo - ABC RN
NAME THAT SPACE SOUND: A wheel that is running on metal

Cosmic Vertigo - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 6:11


It's time for Name That Space Sound! Each Friday we're going to drop a mini-episode in which Karlie plays a mysterious space sound and Corey does his best to guess what it is. This week, a wheel that is running on metal. Presenters: Karlie Noon, Corey Tutt Producer: Ivy Shih Executive Producer: Joel Werner Sound engineer: Simon Branthwaite Podcast tile art by Molly Hunt Jupiter Sounds 2001 ByNASA is licensed under (CC BY-NC 3.0)

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
Fast Radio Bursts Tracked Down to Galactic Spiral Arms

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 29:21


For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ Your support is needed...SpaceTime is an independently produced podcast (we are not funded by any government grants, big organisations or companies), and we're working towards becoming a completely listener supported show...meaning we can do away with the commercials and sponsors. We figure the time can be much better spent on researching and producing stories for you, rather than having to chase sponsors to help us pay the bills.That's where you come in....help us reach our first 1,000 subscribers...at that level the show becomes financially viable and bills can be paid without us breaking into a sweat every month. Every little bit helps...even if you could contribute just $1 per month. It all adds up.By signing up and becoming a supporter at the $5 or more level, you get immediate access to over 240 commercial-free, double, and triple episode editions of SpaceTime plus extended interview bonus content. You also receive all new episodes on a Monday rather than having to wait the week out. Subscribe via Patreon or Supercast (you get a month's free trial with Supercast to see if it's really for you or not)....and share in the rewards. Details at Patreon www.patreon.com/spacetimewithstuartgary or Supercast - https://bitesznetwork.supercast.tech/ Details at https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com or www.bitesz.com Sponsor Details:This episode is brought to you with the support of NameCheap…cheap domain names is just the beginning of your own online presence. We use them and we love them. Get our special deal…just visit: https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/namecheap and help support the show.https://bitesz.comhttps://spacetimewithstuartgary.com

AWESOME ASTRONOMY
#111 - September 2021 Part 2

AWESOME ASTRONOMY

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 67:35


The Discussion: Our practical astronomy gathering is back – join us in Wales on 2-5th October Jen is contributing to Andy Oppenheimer's book Stars of Orion Submit your support for Lego to create a clockwork solar system Watch Jen's free online exoplanet talk for the Open University Space Society Emails from our good friends: Casey Ash in Thailand, about the perennial issue of satellite constellations Conor Brian from Texas about the first Martian settlers     The News: Ongoing problems with the James Webb Space Telescope as it nears launch. The first NASA Artemis moon mission suffers a setback The International Space Station's new module is now functional Inspiration4 - the first civilian mission to space Commercial rocket companies Astra & Firefly put on the firework show NASA's Perseverance rover collects its first Mars samples for a return to Earth   The news discussion: Is commercial spaceflight just a billionaires' plaything? Moons of the Solar System: Our show segment exploring the discovery, exploration and our knowledge of the solar system's moons. This month we reach the last major solar system body to have moons: Pluto.  

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast
Episode #215: Indistinguishable from Magic

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021


This episode is a free-form discussion about the topics and information presented by Marty in the UFO episodes, specifically focusing on the previous two episodes, 213 and 214, but also referencing some of the earlier UFO episodes as well.Do these complex rituals actually work? Or are they also a form of deception? Or, are they possibly Quant Suff of an actual science/technology of an earlier age? What is the nature of the things people call the "spirit" realm and the "supernatural"? Are these things accessible to science if it is advanced enough? What is the "simplest hypothesis" for the UFO phenomena?As usual, we have plenty of questions, and no answers.Brothers of the Serpent Episode 215If you cannot see the audio controls, your browser does not support the audio element

Travelers In The Night
146E-158-Know A Star

Travelers In The Night

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 2:01


How would you like to know more about a particular star than anyone else on Earth? 

Cosmic Vertigo - ABC RN
A microwavable mystery

Cosmic Vertigo - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 13:18


A mystery of astronomical proportions! A lonely night… A strange signal… But who -- or what! -- was the culprit? Presenters: Karlie Noon, Corey Tutt Producer: Ivy Shih Executive Producer: Joel Werner Sound engineer: Simon Branthwaite Podcast tile art by Molly Hunt Law, Casey, 2016, "The Sound of Fast Radio Burst FRB 121102",https://doi.org/10.7910/DVN/QSWJE6, Harvard Dataverse, V1 

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
First Evidence for a New Type of Supernova

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 32:07


The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.SpaceTime Series 24 Episode 103*First evidence for a new type of supernovaAstronomers have gathered evidence of what appears to be a new type of supernova.*Cosmic filament discovery supports Lambda Cold Dark Matter hypothesisAstronomers have discovered the longest intergalactic filament ever seen. The discovery strongly supports the Lambda Cold Dark Matter model explaining the evolution of the universe over the past 13.82 billion years since the big bang.*More than a million near Earth objects now detectedThe European Space Agency's Planetary defence office catalogue of asteroids with good orbital information has now surpassed a million.*Virgin Galactic grounded by FAAThe US Federal Aviation Administration -- the FAA -- has grounded Virgin Galactic as it investigates why its last flight to the edge of space deviated from its planned trajectory.*The Science ReportDelta variant of COVID-19 is eight times less sensitive to the antibodies generated by vaccination.A grim picture for Australia's most endangered plants and animals.Bisexuals have more than twice the rates of asthma and other lung diseases as straight people.Skeptic's guide to 9-11For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ Your support is needed...SpaceTime is an independently produced podcast (we are not funded by any government grants, big organisations or companies), and we're working towards becoming a completely listener supported show...meaning we can do away with the commercials and sponsors. We figure the time can be much better spent on researching and producing stories for you, rather than having to chase sponsors to help us pay the bills.That's where you come in....help us reach our first 1,000 subscribers...at that level the show becomes financially viable and bills can be paid without us breaking into a sweat every month. Every little bit helps...even if you could contribute just $1 per month. It all adds up.By signing up and becoming a supporter at the $5 or more level, you get immediate access to over 240 commercial-free, double, and triple episode editions of SpaceTime plus extended interview bonus content. You also receive all new episodes on a Monday rather than having to wait the week out. Subscribe via Patreon or Supercast (you get a month's free trial with Supercast to see if it's really for you or not)....and share in the rewards. Details at Patreon www.patreon.com/spacetimewithstuartgary or Supercast - https://bitesznetwork.supercast.tech/ Details at https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com or www.bitesz.com Sponsor Details:This episode is brought to you with the support of NameCheap…cheap domain names is just the beginning of your own online presence. We use them and we love them. Get our special deal…just visit: https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/namecheap and help support the show.

Cheap Astronomy Podcasts
303. Dear Cheap Astronomy - Episode 81 - 13 September 2021

Cheap Astronomy Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021


Old horizons.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
NOIRLab - The Discovery Of The Fastest Moving Asteroid

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 10:22


Scott Shepperd normally studies objects in the distant solar system. Recently he turned his attention toward the inner solar system and discovered the fastest moving asteroid currently known. In this podcast, Scott tells the fascinating tale of the discovery and what we can learn about our solar system from these objects.   Bio: Rob Sparks is in the Communications, Education and Engagement group at NSF's NOIRLab.  Scott Sheppard received his B.A. in physics from Oberlin College and his M.S. and Ph. D. from the University of Hawaii, where he was also a teaching assistant and a research assistant. Before becoming a staff scientist at the Carnegie Institute For Science in 2007, he was a Carnegie Hubble Fellow.  He studies the dynamical and physical properties of small bodies in our Solar System, such as asteroids, comets, moons and trans-neptunian objects (bodies that orbit beyond Neptune).   https://noirlab.edu/public/news/noirlab2123/ https://www.facebook.com/NOIRLabAstro https://twitter.com/NOIRLabAstro https://www.instagram.com/noirlabastro/ https://www.youtube.com/noirlabastro   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too! Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://astrogear.spreadshirt.com/ for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations. Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Astrosphere New Media. http://www.astrosphere.org/ Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

Travelers In The Night
657-Plant Companionship(407)

Travelers In The Night

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 2:01


On Earth, human life is enabled by plants which provide us with calories, vitamins, fuel, medicines, and oxygen to breathe. In addition, recent scientific studies indicate that plant cultivation reduces anxiety and depression and has a positive influence on diabetes, heart disease, obesity, and longevity. It is likely that when humans travel to Mars they will continue this practice. The plants that Mars explorers take with them will provide a source of fresh fruits and vegetables , fresh air to breathe, and perhaps a psychological benefit that is crucial to the success of their mission.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpunfQb8OVU The race is on to find life in other places in the Solar System, from underground reservoirs on Mars to the subsurface oceans on Europa and Enceladus.   If spacecraft, rovers or even astronauts make the momentous discovery of life on another world, that'll just open up new questions. Did it originate all on its own, completely independently from Earth, or are we somehow related? And if we are related, how long ago did our evolutionary trees branch away from each other.   Even though Mars is millions of kilometers away, it could be possible that we're still related thanks to the concept of Panspermia; the idea that meteor impacts could transfer rocks and maybe even living creatures from world to world.   But could you go one step further? If we find life on another star system, could we discover that we're actually related to them too? Is Galactic Panspermia possible?   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too! Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://astrogear.spreadshirt.com/ for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations. Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Astrosphere New Media. http://www.astrosphere.org/ Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.SpaceTime Series 24 Episode 102*Perseverance collects its first samples of the red planetIt was a case of second time lucky as NASA's Mars Perseverance Rover successfully collected a sample of red planet rock for the first time.*Curiosity celebrates nine years on MarsNASA's Mars Curiosity Rover has just drilled its 32nd hole into the surface of the red planet marking nine years of exploration in Gale Crater.*Will it be safe for humans to fly to Mars?Once you have all the technical issues ironed out – the biggest problem facing humans return to the Moon or for that matter undertaking the far longer journey to the red planet Mars will be radiation.*September SkywatchThe September Equinox, the constellation Capricorn and the Aurigids and Epsilon Perseids meteor showers are among the highlights of the September night skies.For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ Your support is needed...SpaceTime is an independently produced podcast (we are not funded by any government grants, big organisations or companies), and we're working towards becoming a completely listener supported show...meaning we can do away with the commercials and sponsors. We figure the time can be much better spent on researching and producing stories for you, rather than having to chase sponsors to help us pay the bills.That's where you come in....help us reach our first 1,000 subscribers...at that level the show becomes financially viable and bills can be paid without us breaking into a sweat every month. Every little bit helps...even if you could contribute just $1 per month. It all adds up.By signing up and becoming a supporter at the $5 or more level, you get immediate access to over 240 commercial-free, double, and triple episode editions of SpaceTime plus extended interview bonus content. You also receive all new episodes on a Monday rather than having to wait the week out. Subscribe via Patreon or Supercast (you get a month's free trial with Supercast to see if it's really for you or not)....and share in the rewards. Details at Patreon www.patreon.com/spacetimewithstuartgary or Supercast - https://bitesznetwork.supercast.tech/ Details at https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com or www.bitesz.com Sponsor Details:This episode is brought to you with the support of NameCheap…cheap domain names is just the beginning of your own online presence. We use them and we love them. Get our special deal…just visit: https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/namecheap and help support the show.

Classical Et Cetera
What are Geometry and Astronomy? | Discovering the Seven Liberal Arts: Episode 6

Classical Et Cetera

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 17:40


What are geometry and astronomy? How do geometry and astronomy relate to arithmetic and music? Should students study astronomy? In this episode, Shane Saxon and Mitchell Holley answer these questions and more! Join us as we discover the true meaning and importance of the seven liberal arts. To many, the liberal arts are foreign concepts. To those versed in the classics and classical education, the liberal arts are common knowledge. However, both new and veteran must have a nuanced understanding of the liberal arts. Discovering the Seven Liberal Arts aims to uncover the true meaning and place of the Trivium and the Quadrivium. In this six part series, "Discovering the Seven Liberal Arts," we define the terms, explain the means, and highlight the impacts of the seven liberal arts.

Cosmic Vertigo - ABC RN
NAME THAT SPACE SOUND: The Barking Man

Cosmic Vertigo - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 6:39


It's time for Name That Space Sound! Each Friday we're going to drop a mini-episode in which Karlie plays a mysterious space sound and Corey does his best to guess what it is. This week, The Barking Man. Presenters: Karlie Noon, Corey Tutt Producer: Ivy Shih Executive Producer: Joel Werner Sound engineer: Simon Branthwaite Podcast tile art by Molly Hunt Golden Record: Tame Dog By NASA is licensed under (CC BY-NC 3.0) Golden Record: Australia, Aborigine songs, "Morning Star" and "Devil Bird," recorded by Sandra LeBrun Holmes by NASA/ JPL-Caltech

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

https://spacescoop.org/en/scoops/2116/the-usain-bolt-of-asteroids/ On August 13, 2021, astronomers made an amazing discovery. They found an asteroid that is closer to our Sun than any other space rock.  Its closest approach to the Sun is 20 million kilometers or 12 million miles. That's 0.13 au or 13% of the average distance from Earth to the Sun. That's close enough that the surface temperature of this rock is about 500° Celsius or 900° Fahrenheit! Toasty! Hot enough to melt lead! It's now called 2021 PH27.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too! Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://astrogear.spreadshirt.com/ for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations. Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Astrosphere New Media. http://www.astrosphere.org/ Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org. —Written & Record

The Creative Process Podcast
(Highlights) PIERRE SOKOLSKY

The Creative Process Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021


“As an administrator for 15 years, I still tried to do science and it was difficult because being a dean, every day there is a problem. Every day you have to solve some personal issues, so it's difficult to concentrate and what I would do was, whenever there was an opportunity to go to a conference away from the university, particularly in a different country, I would sit in the conference room listening to these lectures. You know how it is with meetings, maybe 10% of the speakers are exciting and interesting. What I found is even when I was not listening because I was in this atmosphere of people talking about physics, my mind was set free and would just start percolating. And all of a sudden ideas would come completely unrelated to what the speaker was talking about, except that they were scientific ideas. And I would jot them down and I found that this was really quite an interesting process because it was kind of an immersion process where you actually are not concentrating on what is exactly in front of you, but it puts you in this mood. The brain turns on a different lode and I think by association other ideas come up.”Pierre Sokolsky is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Physics and Astronomy and Dean Emeritus of the College of Science at the University of Utah. He has been a leader in the field of Particle Astrophysics, with a specific interest in the highest energy particles produced by natural processes in the universe. Born in France, he was educated at the University of Chicago and University of Illinois. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, past Guggenheim Fellow, and recipient of the Panofsky Prize of the American Physical Society.· faculty.utah.edu/u0029107-PIERRE_SOKOLSKY/hm/index.hml · www.creativeprocess.info

The Creative Process Podcast

Pierre Sokolsky is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Physics and Astronomy and Dean Emeritus of the College of Science at the University of Utah. He has been a leader in the field of Particle Astrophysics, with a specific interest in the highest energy particles produced by natural processes in the universe. Born in France, he was educated at the University of Chicago and University of Illinois. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, past Guggenheim Fellow, and recipient of the Panofsky Prize of the American Physical Society.· faculty.utah.edu/u0029107-PIERRE_SOKOLSKY/hm/index.hml · www.creativeprocess.info

Curiosity Daily
Emily Oster on Parenting Decisions, A New Type of Supernova

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 15:40


Learn how parents can get smarter about making big decisions, with author Emily Oster; and electron-capture supernovas.  Additional resources from Emily Oster: Pick up "The Family Firm: A Data-Driven Guide to Better Decision Making in the Early Years" at your local bookstore: https://www.indiebound.org/book/9781984881755?aff=penguinrandom  Website: https://emilyoster.net/  Twitter: https://twitter.com/ProfEmilyOster  Observation of a new type of supernova sheds light on a famous supernova from 1054 AD by Briana Brownell Scientists spotted an electron-capture supernova for the first time. (2021, July). Science News. https://www.sciencenews.org/article/supernova-electron-capture-space-astronomy-physics  ‌A star in a distant galaxy blew up in a powerful explosion, solving an astronomical mystery. (2021). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2021-07/tu-asi071421.php  ‌Hiramatsu, D., Howell, D. A., Van Dyk, S. D., Goldberg, J. A., Maeda, K., Moriya, T. J., Tominaga, N., Nomoto, K., Hosseinzadeh, G., Arcavi, I., McCully, C., Burke, J., Bostroem, K. A., Valenti, S., Dong, Y., Brown, P. J., Andrews, J. E., Bilinski, C., Williams, G. G., & Smith, P. S. (2021). The electron-capture origin of supernova 2018zd. Nature Astronomy. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41550-021-01384-2  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Based on X-ray detections from the Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory, scientists used the Chandra X-ray Observatory and found rings called light echoes moving out from a black hole and its companion star, reflecting off the surrounding dust clouds. Plus, solving the puzzle of the Sun and using glassy nodules to find a meteorite impact.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too! Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://astrogear.spreadshirt.com/ for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations. Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Astrosphere New Media. http://www.astrosphere.org/ Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

Looking Up
Looking Up: True Crime Meets Scientific Research (Featuring Sam Kean)

Looking Up

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 30:48


Astronomy meets true crime as Dean and Anna explore stories of stolen moon rocks and urban legends of precious telescope lenses going missing at their own observatory.

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
A New Study of Stellar Streams in the Milky Way

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 29:59


SpaceTime Series 24 Episode 101*A new study of stellar streams in the Milky WayA new study of 23 stellar streams in the Milky Way galaxy suggest that the vast majority originated in other galaxies.*The weird, metallic star hurtling out of the Milky WayAstronomers have spotted a remnant fragment of a white dwarf star being flung out of the galaxy.*More cracks in the Russian part of the space station There are growing concerns about the safety of the Russian segments of the International Space Station following the discovery of cracks in the Zarya module – one of the orbiting outpost's first components.*Another New Shepard test flightHot on the heels of July's successful first space tourism flight -- Blue Origin has launched New Shepard on its 17th mission -- this time carrying experiments for NASA and various universities.*The Science ReportWarnings that once every century extreme sea level events will soon take place every year.Moderna is about to start Phase I clinical trials a new HIV vaccine candidate. based on mRNA.Pulses of increased rainfall in the Arabian Peninsula helped human migration out of Africa.South Korea takes delivery of its first ballistic-missile submarine.Alex on Tech: the Flubot malware scam.For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ Your support is needed...SpaceTime is an independently produced podcast (we are not funded by any government grants, big organisations or companies), and we're working towards becoming a completely listener supported show...meaning we can do away with the commercials and sponsors. We figure the time can be much better spent on researching and producing stories for you, rather than having to chase sponsors to help us pay the bills.That's where you come in....help us reach our first 1,000 subscribers...at that level the show becomes financially viable and bills can be paid without us breaking into a sweat every month. Every little bit helps...even if you could contribute just $1 per month. It all adds up.By signing up and becoming a supporter at the $5 or more level, you get immediate access to over 240 commercial-free, double, and triple episode editions of SpaceTime plus extended interview bonus content. You also receive all new episodes on a Monday rather than having to wait the week out. Subscribe via Patreon or Supercast (you get a month's free trial with Supercast to see if it's really for you or not)....and share in the rewards. Details at Patreon www.patreon.com/spacetimewithstuartgary or Supercast - https://bitesznetwork.supercast.tech/ Details at https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com or www.bitesz.com Sponsor Details:This episode is brought to you with the support of NameCheap…cheap domain names is just the beginning of your own online presence. We use them and we love them. Get our special deal…just visit: https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/namecheap and help support the show.

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast
Episode #214: UFOs Part 6 - A History of Unlikely Coincidences

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021


This is the second episode in the two part series of episodes titled "A History of Unlikely Coincidences" by Marty Garza. We recorded both of these in one sitting, reading through Marty's prepared material(which will hopefully become a book at some point) and discussing.By the time we finished with this episode all of us were too tired to record more, so there will be follow up to discuss these topics more at some point in the future.In this episode we continue from where we left off in the last episode with Jack Parsons, and continue forward discussing L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology, the Collins Elite, the Philip Experiment, and much more.Brothers of the Serpent Episode 214If you cannot see the audio controls, your browser does not support the audio element

Travelers In The Night
145E-157-Kissing Frogs

Travelers In The Night

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 2:01


An asteroid hunter literally has to sort through millions of objects to find an unknown Earth approaching asteroid.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Ask A Spaceman Ep. 159: Why Should We Geek Out Over Maxwell?

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 42:20


Why is James Clerk Maxwell so dang awesome? How was he able to unify the forces of electricity and magnetism? Why was his work so revolutionary? I discuss these questions and more in today's Ask a Spaceman!   Support the show: http://www.patreon.com/pmsutter All episodes: http://www.AskASpaceman.com Follow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/PaulMattSutter Like on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PaulMattSutter Watch on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/PaulMSutter Read a book: http://www.pmsutter/book Go on an adventure: http://www.AstroTours.co   Keep those questions about space, science, astronomy, astrophysics, physics, and cosmology coming to #AskASpaceman for COMPLETE KNOWLEDGE OF TIME AND SPACE! Big thanks to my top Patreon supporters this month: David B, Frank T, Tim R, Alex P, Tom Van S, Mark R, Alan B, Craig B, Richard K, Steve P, Dave L, Chuck C, Stephen M, Maureen R, Stace J, Neil P, lothian53 , COTFM, Stephen S, Ken L, Debra S, Alberto M, Matt C, Ron S, Joe R, Jeremy K, David P, Norm Z, Ulfert B, Robert B, Fr. Bruce W, Nicolai B, Sean M, Edward K, Callan R, Darren W, Tracy F, Sarah K, Bill H, Steven S, Ryan L, Ella F, Richard S, Sam R, Thomas K, James C, Jorg D, R Larche, Syamkumar M, John S, Fred S, Homer V, Mark D, Brianna V, Colin B, Bruce A, Steven M, Brent B, Bill E, Tim Z, Thomas W, Linda C, Joshua, David W, Aissa F, Tom G, Marc H, Avery P, Scott M, Katelyn, Thomas H, Farshad A, Matthias S, Kenneth D, Maureen R, Michael W, Scott W, David W, Neuterdude, Cha0sKami, Brett, Robert C, and Matthew K! Thanks to Cathy Rinella for editing. Hosted by Paul M. Sutter, astrophysicist and the one and only Agent to the Stars (http://www.pmsutter.com). Video credits: NASA, ESA, Planck, WMAP, Illustris   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too! Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://astrogear.spreadshirt.com/ for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations. Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Astrosphere New Media. http://www.astrosphere.org/ Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

Math & Physics Podcast
Episode #77 - The Life of a Star | Astronomy Part 4

Math & Physics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 64:52


Today we bring back a topic that we haven't spoken about in a long time, astronomy. We dive into the different phases of a star and the different possibilities that are presented once we start to analyze their masses. Enjoy the episode.   Instagram: @math.physics.podcast Tiktok: @math.physics.podcast Email: math.physics.podcast@gmail.com Twitter: @MathPhysPod   HelloFresh: Link: https://hellofresh-ca.o5kg.net/c/2544961/791027/7893 Code: HFAFF80 Offer: $80 Discount ($50 - $20 - $10) Including Free Shipping on First Box!

Obsessed With the Weather
57: Weekly Weather Update for September 6 to September 12, 2021

Obsessed With the Weather

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 7:47


When will it start to feel like fall?  Will the humidity and rain ever break? What amazing astronomical events are happening at the end of this week that everyone can witness?  When is the 'peak' of the leaf-peeping season?  Join me for answers to these questions as well as a preview of the week ahead.  Enjoy! 

Cosmic Vertigo - ABC RN
Seven Sisters

Cosmic Vertigo - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 22:09


For the people of many cultures, including Indigenous Australians, the Pleiades constellation tells the story of the Seven Sisters. This ancient story, thought to be up to 100 00 years old, continues to provide insights to modern day astronomy. Presenters: Karlie Noon, Corey Tutt Producer: Ivy Shih Executive Producer: Joel Werner Sound engineer: Simon Branthwaite Podcast tile art by Molly Hunt

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

http://www.astronomycast.com/archive/ From November 24, 2008. As part of her trip to England, Pamela had a chance to sit down with Oxford astrophysicist Chris Lintott and record an episode of Astronomy Cast. From the first stars to the newest planets, molecules and the chemistry that allows them to form affects all aspects of astronomy. While most astronomers group molecules into three bins of hydrogen, helium and everything else, there are a few who do proper chemistry by studying the sometimes complex molecules that form between the stars.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too! Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://astrogear.spreadshirt.com/ for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations. Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Astrosphere New Media. http://www.astrosphere.org/ Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

Thinking in English
99. Should We Colonize Space? (English Vocabulary Lesson)

Thinking in English

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 21:45


Should we colonize space? Should humans leave Earth and try to make the Moon, or Mars, or another planet our new home? Is this even something worth considering? This episode of Thinking in English will try to answer some of these questions, and will provide an overview of the debate surrounding space colonization! TRANSCRIPT - https://thinkinginenglish.blog/2021/09/06/99-should-we-colonize-space-english-vocabulary-lesson/ You may also like... 52. The Missions to Mars: Why are the USA, China and UAE all heading to the red planet? (English Vocabulary Lesson) 29. China Lands on the Moon: Are we on the Verge of a New Space Race? (English Vocabulary Lesson) CONTACT ME!! INSTAGRAM - thinkinginenglishpodcast (https://www.instagram.com/thinkinginenglishpodcast/) Blog - thinkinginenglish.blog Gmail - thinkinginenglishpod@gmail.com Vocabulary List To thrive (v) - to grow, develop, or be successful His business is thriving in the current economy Propulsion (n) - a force that pushes something forward He modified his car to use jet propulsion To colonize (v) - to send people to live in and govern another country (or place) Peru was colonized by the Spanish in the 16th century Astronomer (n) - someone who studies astronomy. Astronomy is the scientific study of the universe and the objects that exist in space like the moon, the sun, planets, and stars He is an astronomer at a prestigious research university Proponent (n) - a person who speaks publicly in support of a particular idea or plan of action He is one of the leading proponents of leaving the EU Catastrophic (adh) - causing sudden and very great harm or destruction An increase in the use of fossil fuels could have catastrophic results for the planet To terraform (v) - in books, films or games about an imagined future, to change the environment of a planet so that it is more like Earth and could be a place where humans could live Can we terraform Mars? Inhospitable (adj) - not suitable for humans to live in They had to trek for miles through inhospitable countryside --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thinking-english/message

The Phil Ferguson Show
392 Professor Dave Explains, Super Shitty Fund

The Phil Ferguson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 94:13


Interview with Dave of the YouTube Channel "Professor Dave Explains". I learned of his channel because of the Italian grammar videos. You will love all of the Science content. Here are some of the subjects you can find in the more than 1,000 videos: Immunology, Mycology, Botany, Physics, Astronomy, General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry, etc...... There are also 165 videos on Math!Investing Skeptically: Super Shitty fund from BlackRock. One fund to bind several really bad investing ideas.

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
Possible Detection of a New Type of Gravitational Wave

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 34:05


The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.SpaceTime Series 24 Episode 100*Possible detection of a new type of gravitational waveScientists using a ground-breaking new high frequency gravitational wave detector have made two possible detections which are sparking a lot of excitement.*A break discovered in one of the Milky Way's spiral armsAstronomers have discovered what appears to be a break in one of the Milky Way galaxy's majestic spiral arms.*The fastest asteroid ever seenAstronomers have discovered the fastest asteroid ever seen. The kilometre wide space rock named 2021 PH27 – takes just 113 days to complete each orbit of the Sun.*Martian snow is dustyA new study has confirmed that Martian snow is very dusty. The findings reported in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets looked at the grain size of the dust in the red planet's snow cover.*The Science ReportScientists have reported a potential new COVID-19 variant.A new study claims people can change their sexual orientation after finding it's really on a spectrum.Two new species of dinosaurs discovered in the Appalachian mountains.People are swearing less now than what they used to back in the 1990s.Skeptic's guide to the Dunning–Kruger effectFor more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ Your support is needed...SpaceTime is an independently produced podcast (we are not funded by any government grants, big organisations or companies), and we're working towards becoming a completely listener supported show...meaning we can do away with the commercials and sponsors. We figure the time can be much better spent on researching and producing stories for you, rather than having to chase sponsors to help us pay the bills.That's where you come in....help us reach our first 1,000 subscribers...at that level the show becomes financially viable and bills can be paid without us breaking into a sweat every month. Every little bit helps...even if you could contribute just $1 per month. It all adds up.By signing up and becoming a supporter at the $5 or more level, you get immediate access to over 240 commercial-free, double, and triple episode editions of SpaceTime plus extended interview bonus content. You also receive all new episodes on a Monday rather than having to wait the week out. Subscribe via Patreon or Supercast (you get a month's free trial with Supercast to see if it's really for you or not)....and share in the rewards. Details at Patreon www.patreon.com/spacetimewithstuartgary or Supercast - https://bitesznetwork.supercast.tech/ Details at https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com or www.bitesz.com

Cheap Astronomy Podcasts
302.3. Snippet_Mars, not so fast - 6 September 2021

Cheap Astronomy Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021


Still a while away yet.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Travelers in the Night Eps. 587 & 588: Quiet Sun & Encounter With Saturn

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 5:29


Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( @Nmcanopus ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. travelersinthenight.org Today's 2 topics: - Images of the quiet Sun during a solar minimum make it look like a relatively static peaceful place. - Greg Leonard discovered Comet P/2020 F1 (Leonard) which had very close encounter with Saturn on May 8, 1936.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too! Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://astrogear.spreadshirt.com/ for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations. Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Astrosphere New Media. http://www.astrosphere.org/ Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Cheap Astronomy - Dear Cheap Astro Ep. 72: Unsubstantiated Claims

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 13:57


Evidence, schmevidence. - Are there really primordial black holes? - What do you make of the helical drive?   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too! Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://astrogear.spreadshirt.com/ for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations. Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Astrosphere New Media. http://www.astrosphere.org/ Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

Talk Description to Me
Episode 67 - Constellations

Talk Description to Me

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 24:41


Constellations are delightful and magical; a curious mix of astronomy and fantasy.  They are also a cross cultural phenomenon, with groups from around the world using their own stories to construct and name connect-the-dot pictures in the night sky.  This week, Christine and JJ use Astronomer and Data Visualization Designer Nadieh Bremer's innovative "Figures in the Sky" project to explore and describe the look of constellations.For more on Figures in the Sky, visit: https://figuresinthesky.visualcinnamon.com/Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/TalkDescriptionToMe)

RNZ: Saturday Morning
Haritina Mogosanu: growing plants in space

RNZ: Saturday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 15:07


Space science educator and astrobiologist Haritina Mogosanu returns to Saturday Morning to discuss growing plants in space. Her Seeds in Space programme has involved distributing seeds to more than 100 New Zealand schools, working with JAXA, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.

Real Science Radio
*The 360-Day Year on Real Science Radio

Real Science Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021


*Today we present the return of a classic show. * Did the whole world once use a 360-day calendar? If so, why? From our archives, RSR hosts Bob Enyart and Fred Williams look at the Mayans, Egyptians, Aztecs, Indians, Sumerians, Babylonians, Greeks, Romans, Chinese, and the Hebrew Bible to answer the first question: Yes, ancient civilizations used a 360-day calendar. To answer the question why, one must keep in mind the sophistication of ancient astronomers. Nasa reports that in 650 B.C., "Mayan astronomers [made] detailed observations of Venus, leading to a highly accurate calendar." And the Encyclopedia of Time says of the Aztecs that, "they carried on and further developed calendrical traditions that had their roots some 2,000 years before their own time." Real Science Radio investigates the reason why the ancient world used a 360-day calendar and discusses a mechanism for speeding up the rotation of the Earth that in historical times could add 5.24 days to the year. See more at 360dayyear.com. * RSR on YouTube: You're invited to check out RSR's 360-day year program turned into this important YouTube video: * The Calendar is one of the Greatest Monuments of a Culture: Along with language, the calendar is one of the greatest monuments of a culture. Ranke, as quoted by Norman Lockyer (The Origin of the Year, 1982, Nature, p. 487) wrote, "The calendar may be considered the noblest relic of the most ancient times which has influenced the world." And in 1903 Emmeline Plunket judged (Calendars and Constellations of the Ancient World, 1903, p. 188) that interest in ancient calendars is a necessary part of being "interested in the history of the human race". * Would You Consider Purchasing a Rare Research Book for RSR: [See kgov.com/wish-list for the latest status.] Over at Amazon.com, to further our investigation of one of Bob Enyart's favorite topics, the 360 day year, we've created a KGOV Research Amazon Wish List. We hope to procure an important and rare research book, The Cultic Calendars of the Ancient Near East. The text of this book is not available online, and there is a used copy of the book currently available, as of January 2016, that is $600 less expensive than the other copies also for sale. So if you're considering helping RSR continue to press forward on this significant topic, then please consider purchasing that book by clicking on our Wish List link just above. And for shipping, you can use the address at the Wish List. Thanks so very much for considering this! -Bob & Fred * Other RSR 360 Shows and Related Links: - The 360 Day Year on RSR (this show) and then Part 2 of today's program (broadcast in 2016 but not again in 2019) - Astronomer Danny Faulkner on the 360-Day Year with Bob Enyart - Danny's CRSQ paper rejecting the widespread belief among many creationists (including RSR, Henry Morris, Walt Brown, etc.) that God originally created the Earth with a 360-day year and 30-day months - Danny's paper rebutted in CRSQ by Enyart - How the Moon's Orbit Changed from 30 to 29.5 Days by a professor of astronautics at the U.S. Air Force Academy - On the origin of the world's first-known number system (a hybrid decimal/base 60 system)- 24 Hours in a Day -- How Ancient is the 24-hour Measurement? - Seven Days in a Week -- How Ancient is the 7-day Week?- 30 Days in a Month -- How Ancient is the 30-Day Month? - RSR's 360 Day Year show on YouTube - rsr.org/predictions#lunar-libration - The Genius of Ancient Man - 360dayyear.com - rsr.org/300 - rsr.org/3* What Year Is It On These Calendars? As of September 20, 2020, using these calendars, the year is: - 6770 Assyrian - 6024 Ussher - 5781 Hebrew - 5134 Mayan (3114 B.C.) - 4719 Chinese * Lunar Calendar At All Costs: Ancient man had more than sufficient knowledge to know that the year was more than 360 days and that the lunar month was less than 30. Yet his allegiance to a year of twelve 30-day months was intense. Of course, widely, great significance was placed on lunar-based religious feasts, yet these could have been observed within a solar calendar context (for example, the seventh month's New Moon). For a lunar calendar, like a 360-day calendar, unless corrected, would cause the seasons to migrate from winter to fall, and so on to spring. So while a lunar calendar readily supported the "New Moon" and other such religious festivals, and could help the especially astute person anticipate the strength of the tides (as Seneca reported in about 60 A.D.), a solar calendar would better enable mankind to accomplish pretty much everything else. Enormous benefits in implementation and planning in the areas of agriculture, hunting, fishing, civil administration, military planning, commercial agreements, political reigns, and in religious observations, would result from using a solar calendar. (For example, the annual rainy season coinciding with the melting of snow in the Ethiopian highlands led to Egypt's extraordinarily significant recurring flooding of the Nile.) In comparison with all that, the benefit from a lunar or 360-day calendar was minimal. Yet the ancient world adhered to their lunar and 360-day calendars. For millennia. Their loyalty speaks volumes. And if a man is to be a student of history he should listen to their voice. * Minor Note from Assyro-Babylonian Mythology: A text from the Neo-Assyrian Period describes a battle wherein Marduk defeats the Eshumesha gods and takes 360 of them as prisoners of war. Today's Resource: Real Science Radio 2018   Welcome to Real Science Radio: Co-hosts Bob Enyart and Fred Williams talk about science to debunk evolution and to show the evidence for the creator God including from biology, genetics, geology, history, paleontology, archaeology, astronomy, philosophy, cosmology, math, and physics. (For example, mutations will give you bad legs long before you'd get good wings.) We get to debate Darwinists and atheists like Lawrence Krauss, AronRa, and Eugenie Scott. We easily take potshots from popular evolutionists like PZ Myers, Phil Plait, and Jerry Coyne. We're the home of the popular List Shows! And we interview the outstanding scientists who dare to challenge today's accepted creed that nothing created everything. This audio disk features all of the Real Science Radio episodes from 2018.

Travelers In The Night
656-Moons of Florence(399)

Travelers In The Night

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 2:01


The largest asteroid to come near the Earth in 100 years has two moons.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Guide To Space - Catching The Next Interstellar Asteroid Or Comet

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 11:48


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0SMNucXwgo On October 19th, 2017 astronomers detected the first interstellar asteroid (or maybe comet) passing through the Solar System: Oumuamua. It had a brief encounter with the inner Solar System and then hurtled back out into interstellar space.   Once astronomers noticed it, they directed the world's telescopes on the object, but it was too far away to reveal anything more than a faint dot. Until now, we've only been able to study objects in our own Solar System. We have no idea what the rest of the Milky Way is like.   But we were too late to catch it, no spacecraft was ready to make a quick intercept.   Well, scientists aren't going to make that mistake again. The European Space Agency announced their plans to build a comet interceptor. A spacecraft that will lurk out at the Earth-Sun L2 Lagrange point, waiting for a long-period comet or interstellar object to pounce on, and give us the first close up view ever.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too! Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://astrogear.spreadshirt.com/ for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations. Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Astrosphere New Media. http://www.astrosphere.org/ Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.SpaceTime Series 24 Episode 99*Space junk destroys satelliteIt now looks like space junk from a 1996 Russian rocket may be behind the destruction of China's Yunhai 1-02 weather satellite earlier this year.*More delays could push Starliner's launch to next yearThe long awaited second orbital test flight of Boeing's new CST-100 Starliner to the International Space Station may be delayed until next year following discovery of a critical technical issue with the spacecraft while it was on the launch pad preparing to blast off.*New study says Warp drive to remain science fictionThe idea of faster than light travel has been a key feature of science fiction for decades. It's the “Given” needed to make most sci-fi stories work. After all, without warp drive Kirk and Picard could never boldly go where no one has gone before – and the Enterprise would take four and a half years just to reach Alpha Centauri.*Vega's second launch of the yearA Vega rocket has blasted off from the European Space Agency's Kourou Space Port in French Guiana carrying the new Pleiades Neo 4 Earth observation satellite.*The Science ReportNew study shows that 2 to 3 days after first symptoms is when you're most likely to pass on COVID.A new study warns that extreme El Niño and La Niña events will become more common.A new study has identified the 26 species of Australian frogs at greatest risk of extinction.Paleontologists have identified two new species of giant sauropod dinosaurs.*Skeptic's guide to how psychic crimes payFor more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ Your support is needed...SpaceTime is an independently produced podcast (we are not funded by any government grants, big organisations or companies), and we're working towards becoming a completely listener supported show...meaning we can do away with the commercials and sponsors. We figure the time can be much better spent on researching and producing stories for you, rather than having to chase sponsors to help us pay the bills.That's where you come in....help us reach our first 1,000 subscribers...at that level the show becomes financially viable and bills can be paid without us breaking into a sweat every month. Every little bit helps...even if you could contribute just $1 per month. It all adds up.By signing up and becoming a supporter at the $5 or more level, you get immediate access to over 230 commercial-free, double, and triple episode editions of SpaceTime plus extended interview bonus content. You also receive all new episodes on a Monday rather than having to wait the week out. Subscribe via Patreon or Supercast....and share in the rewards. Details at Patreon www.patreon.com/spacetimewithstuartgary or Supercast - https://bitesznetwork.supercast.tech/ Details at https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com or www.bitesz.com Sponsor Details:This episode is brought to you with the support of NameCheap…cheap domain names is just the beginning of your own online presence. We use them and we love them. Get our special deal…just visit: https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/namecheap and help support the show.

Cosmic Vertigo - ABC RN
NAME THAT SPACE SOUND: A 12-year-old playing Frozen on the recorder underwater

Cosmic Vertigo - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 7:57


It's time for Name That Space Sound! Each Friday we're going to drop a mini-episode in which Karlie plays a mysterious space sound and Corey does his best to guess what it is. This week, a 12-year-old playing Frozen on the recorder underwater. Presenters: Karlie Noon, Corey Tutt Producer: Ivy Shih Executive Producer: Joel Werner Sound engineer: Simon Branthwaite Podcast tile art by Molly Hunt Sonification: pillars of creation  NASA/CXC/SAO/K. Arcand, M. Russo & A. Santaguida

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Actual Astronomy - Objects To Observe in the September Night Sky

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 42:43


Hosted by Chris Beckett & Shane Ludtke, two amateur astronomers in Saskatchewan. One target of note is Kemble's Cascade in Camelopardalis. From Wikipedia: “The asterism was named by Walter Scott Houston in honor of Father Lucian Kemble (1922–1999), a Franciscan friar and amateur astronomer who wrote a letter to Houston about the asterism, describing it as "a beautiful cascade of faint stars tumbling from the northwest down to the open cluster NGC 1502" that he had discovered while sweeping the sky with a pair of 7×35 binoculars.”   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too! Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://astrogear.spreadshirt.com/ for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations. Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Astrosphere New Media. http://www.astrosphere.org/ Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Paul Hill, Ralph Wilkins and Dr. Jenifer Millard host. Damien Phillips, John Wildridge and Dustin Ruoff produce. The Discussion: - Jeni nearly joined a cult. - Farewell to Carolyn Shoemaker. - The Room of Doom at Redditch Astronomical Society. - The new updated https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/sky-guide/id576588894 Sky Guide app (that Jen works on). - Listeners' emails on how annoying we are and nebulae.   The News: Rounding up the astronomy news in September, we have: - A new classification of habitable exoplanets. - Astronomers find thousands of new galaxies. - Red Dwarf stars might not be as hostile to life as previously thought. - Have we found a new spiral arm to the Milky Way? - Why last year's Comet ATLAS wasn't the comet of a generation.   The Sky Guide: This month we're taking a look at the constellation of Aquarius with a guide to its history, how to find it, a couple of deep sky objects and a round-up of the solar system views on offer in September.   Q&A: Why is the CMB microwave light still visible if it was first emitted 13billion-ish years ago? From our good friend Graeme Durden of Kent in the UK.   http://www.awesomeastronomy.com   Bio: Awesome Astronomy is a podcast beamed direct from an underground bunker on Mars to promote science, space and astronomy (and enslave Earth if all goes well).   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too! Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://astrogear.spreadshirt.com/ for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations. Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Astrosphere New Media. http://www.astrosphere.org/ Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
Ingenuity Completes its 12th Flight on Mars

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 24:54


For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ Your support is needed...SpaceTime is an independently produced podcast (we are not funded by any government grants, big organisations or companies), and we're working towards becoming a completely listener supported show...meaning we can do away with the commercials and sponsors. We figure the time can be much better spent on researching and producing stories for you, rather than having to chase sponsors to help us pay the bills.That's where you come in....help us reach our first 1,000 subscribers...at that level the show becomes financially viable and bills can be paid without us breaking into a sweat every month. Every little bit helps...even if you could contribute just $1 per month. It all adds up.By signing up and becoming a supporter at the $5 or more level, you get immediate access to over 230 commercial-free, double, and triple episode editions of SpaceTime plus extended interview bonus content. You also receive all new episodes on a Monday rather than having to wait the week out. Subscribe via Patreon or Supercast....and share in the rewards. Details at Patreon www.patreon.com/spacetimewithstuartgary or Supercast - https://bitesznetwork.supercast.tech/ Details at https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com or www.bitesz.com Sponsor Details:This episode is brought to you with the support of NameCheap…cheap domain names is just the beginning of your own online presence. We use them and we love them. Get our special deal…just visit: https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/namecheap and help support the show.

And Podcast For All - Metallica Fans

I've got something to say !  Live from Jeff's garage…literally.Was it a technical issue, glitch, dream come true, had to do an oil change on the truckster, or were they stood up?  Find out as an improvised summer evening finds them in the garage with the $5.98 cassette near by.Topics while the crickets listened on are as follows -Slumber parties -Ross Halfin emails the show -Apple II C -Garage Days listening party -Mike Walsh translating -32oz cups for nature -Live Metallica visuals -Astronomy at 40,000 feet -…And VOTING For All -Multiple guesses for how many times a song has been played live, actually way too many songs were discussed.  You better go wash that mic off, and WD-40 that garage door track!Instagram - andpodcastforallFaceBook - ...And Podcast For AllLiquid Death - Official sponsor of APFA liquiddeath.com -Murder your Thirst, Death To Plasticandpodcastforall@gmail.com for all your wants, wishes, comments, Hate Train mail, needs, desires, or just to say what's up to the guys.  Email us and let us know if you want to be our next guest!  After all, it's a Podcast FOR ALL.

AWESOME ASTRONOMY
#111 - September 2021 Part 1

AWESOME ASTRONOMY

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 65:17


The Discussion: Jeni Nearly joined a cult Farewell to Carolyn Shoemaker The Room of Doom at Redditch Astronomical Society The new updated Sky Guide app (that Jen works on) Listeners' emails on how annoying we are and nebulae   The News: Rounding up the astronomy news in September, we have: A new classification of habitable exoplanets Astronomers find thousands of new galaxies Red Dwarf stars might not be as hostile to life as previously thought Have we found a new spiral arm to the Milky Way? Why last year's Comet ATLAS wasn't the comet of a generation   The Sky Guide: This month we're taking a look at the constellation of Aquarius with a guide to its history, how to find it, a couple of deep sky objects and a round-up of the solar system views on offer in September.   Q&A: Why is the CMB microwave light still visible if it was first emitted 13billion-ish years ago? From our good friend Graeme Durden of Kent in the UK.

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast
Episode #213: UFOs Part 5 - A History of Unlikely Coincidences

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021


Marty Garza returns once again with more of his excellent research and insights into the history of the UFO phenomenon. Marty had so much material prepared that this is the first in a two-part series, the second of which will be released next week as Episode #214. We recorded both episodes in one sitting. Lots of excellent material, as usual, fascinating stuff.  This time we tried something different; Russ did all the reading of Marty's prepared material, like a normal book report, allowing Marty to guide the conversation through both his written material and with further comments and responses to questions from us.As this is the first in a two part series, there isn't actually much mention of "UFOs" in this episode....that will come in the next episode as we reach the conclusions of this part of Marty's research. This episode sets the stage for what we will be exploring next week, as we look at a series of historical accounts and events starting with John Dee and his Enochian Magic, and ending with Jack Parsons, L. Ron Hubbard, and Aleister Crowley and the Babylon Working.Brothers of the Serpent Episode 213If you cannot see the audio controls, your browser does not support the audio element

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
The Daily Space - Evidence for Icy Crust Found at Ceres' Occator Crater

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 17:33


Using a neutron spectrometer onboard the Dawn spacecraft, scientists have found elevated concentrations of hydrogen in Ceres' Occator Crater, which provides evidence of an icy crust. Plus, everything is on fire in the western United States, and we review “The Past is Red” by Catherynne M. Valente.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too! Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://astrogear.spreadshirt.com/ for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations. Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Astrosphere New Media. http://www.astrosphere.org/ Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

StarTalk Radio
Cosmic Queries– Exoplanetary Exploration with Dr. Aomawa Shields

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 59:16


Exoplanets? Low Mass Stars? Goldilocks zones? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Negin Farsad explore the universe of exoplanets, science communication, and acting with astronomer and speaker Dr. Aomawa Shields. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Thanks to our Patrons Jacob D. Fisher, Siosiua Hufanga, Thomas Cochran, Jasmine, Louis Cirigliano, Savanah Bisson, Jason Mahoney, Connor Snitker, Heffron, Lizzie B, and Mark Rodgers for supporting us this week. Image Credit: NASA See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

StarTalk Radio
Starry Starry Night with Roberta Olson, Jay Pasachoff, & Heather Berlin

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 52:32


Can you hear colors? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Chuck Nice explore science through art in Van Gogh's Starry Night with art historian Roberta Olson, astronomer Jay Pasachoff, and neuroscientist Heather Berlin. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/show/starry-starry-night-with-roberta-olson-jay-pasachoff-heather-berlin/ Thanks to our Patrons Rob Carter, Will, Matthew Power, David Born, CARLOS A HERNANDEZ, jon delanoy, and Trisha Donadio for supporting us this week. Photo Credit: Vincent van Gogh, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.