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Artifact that depicts or records visual perception

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  • May 27, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about pictures

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Latest podcast episodes about pictures

C. H. Spurgeon on SermonAudio

A new MP3 sermon from Dr David C. Mackereth is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Part 12 Subtitle: John Ploughman's Pictures Speaker: C. H. Spurgeon Broadcaster: Dr David C. Mackereth Event: Audio Book Date: 5/26/2022 Length: 9 min.

C. H. Spurgeon on SermonAudio

A new MP3 sermon from Dr David C. Mackereth is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Part 11 Subtitle: John Ploughman's Pictures Speaker: C. H. Spurgeon Broadcaster: Dr David C. Mackereth Event: Audio Book Date: 5/25/2022 Length: 17 min.

El sótano
El sótano - Power Pop en EEUU (II) - 25/05/22

El sótano

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 59:48


Picoteamos en el power pop estadounidense, segunda mitad de los años 70 y primera de los 80, recordando algún nombre bien conocido junto a otros extraídos de la parte sumergida del iceberg. Playlist; STIV BATORS “It’s cold outside” (1979) STIV BATORS “Not that way anymore” (1979) STIV BATORS “I’ll be alright” (demo, 1979) DAVID QUINTON “Make up your mind” (1981) DAVID QUINTON “Pictures” (1981) THE MOBERLYS “I want you” (1979) ACTION NOW “Stop pretending” (1984) ACTION NOW “This one chance” (1984) THE EXPLOSIVES “A girl like you” (1980) THE KRAYOLAS “Aw tonight” (1977) THE NADS “You don’t know me” (1980) THE ROCKERS “Don’t leave me tonight” (1980) THE BOYFRIENDS “You’re the one” (1978) THE BOYFRIENDS “I need your love” (demo, 1978) RAMONES “Don’t come close” (1978) TOMMY ROCK “It’s later than you think” (1978) Escuchar audio

The Bert Show
Shady Or Not: She's Posting Pictures Of A House That's Not Hers!

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 5:53


This friend might be bordering creepy, rather than shady. This listener is aware of how well-off she is in life, with a nice house and car and even good looks. She is also a pretty private person that isn't active on social media. After returning to Instagram, she noticed a close friend had taken images of the outside AND inside of her home and pretended the home is their own!Our listener confronted this friend and even confided in a few others and no one seems to think this is a big deal. Is this a total invasion of privacy, or should she just drop it? The antics are still going on... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

C. H. Spurgeon on SermonAudio

A new MP3 sermon from Dr David C. Mackereth is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Part 10 Subtitle: John Ploughman's Pictures Speaker: C. H. Spurgeon Broadcaster: Dr David C. Mackereth Event: Audio Book Date: 5/24/2022 Length: 13 min.

Best of Nolan
Americans in town calling for full implementation of the protocol – but what about the principle of consent?

Best of Nolan

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 77:29


Plus, Pictures emerge of Boris Johnson drinking at a leaving do during lock down.

In the Market with Janet Parshall
Hour 1: Pictures and Protests

In the Market with Janet Parshall

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022


We have a full hour of radio ready for you. We start with some of the stories making headlines and then move to what is happening at NETFLIX and why they are losing so many subscribers while alienating parents. From pictures to protests – our pro-life advocate will discuss the potential for a summer of rage planned this year to bully Supreme Court justices? Will it work? Join us to learn more.

Always Authors
”I Did It All In My Pajamas” with Jean Hanff Korelitz and Emma Straub

Always Authors

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 59:02


Jean Hanff Korelitz is the New York Times bestselling author of nine novels including The Latecomer, The Plot, You Should Have Known (which aired on HBO as The Undoing, starring Nicole Kidman, and Hugh Grant) and Admission (adapted as a film in 2013 starring Tina Fey), The Devil and Webster, The White Rose, and Interference Powder, a novel for children. Her company BOOKTHEWRITER hosts Pop-Up Book Groups in which small groups of readers discuss new books with their authors.  Emma Straub is the New York Times-bestselling author of five novels - This Time Tomorrow, All Adults Here, The Vacationers, Modern Lovers, Laura Lamont's Life in Pictures - and the short story collection Other People We Married. Her books have been published in more than 20 languages, and All Adults Here is currently in development as a television series. She and her husband own Books Are Magic, an independent bookstore in Brooklyn, New York.  These Manhattan natives share their love of all things New York (especially the Museum of Natural History), the pleasure of incorporating childhood nostalgia into their novels and how opening a bookstore may be harder than writing. 

The Bike Shed
339: What About Pictures?

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 45:03


Steph has a baby update and thoughts on movies, plus a question for Chris related to migrating Test Unit tests to RSpec. Chris watched a video from Google I/O where Chrome devs talked about a new feature called Page Transitions. He's also been working with a tool called Customer.io, an omnichannel communication whiz-bang adventure! Page transitions Overview (https://youtu.be/JCJUPJ_zDQ4) Using yield_self for composable ActiveRecord relations (https://thoughtbot.com/blog/using-yieldself-for-composable-activerecord-relations) A Case for Query Objects in Rails (https://thoughtbot.com/blog/a-case-for-query-objects-in-rails) Customer.io (https://customer.io/) Turning the database inside-out with Apache Samza | Confluent (https://www.confluent.io/blog/turning-the-database-inside-out-with-apache-samza/) Datomic (https://www.datomic.com/) About CRDTs • Conflict-free Replicated Data Types (https://crdt.tech/) Apache Kafka (https://kafka.apache.org/) Resilient Management | A book for new managers in tech (https://resilient-management.com/) Mixpanel: Product Analytics for Mobile, Web, & More (https://mixpanel.com/) Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of The Bike Shed! Transcript: CHRIS: Golden roads are golden. Okay, everybody's got golden roads. You have golden roads, yes? That is what we're -- STEPH: Oh, I have golden roads, yes. [laughter] CHRIS: You might should inform that you've got golden roads, yeah. STEPH: Yeah, I don't know if I say might should as much but might could. I have been called out for that one a lot; I might could do that. CHRIS: [laughs] STEPH: That one just feels so natural to me than normal. Anytime someone calls it out, I'm like, yeah, what about it? [laughter] CHRIS: Do you want to fight? STEPH: Yeah, are we going to fight? CHRIS: I might could fight you. STEPH: I might could. I might should. [laughter] CHRIS: Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. So, Steph, what's new in your world? STEPH: Hey, Chris. I have a couple of fun updates. I have a baby Viccari update, so little baby weighs about two pounds now, two pounds. I'm 25 weeks along. So not that I actually know the exact weight, I'm using all those apps that estimate based on how far along you are, so around two pounds, which is novel. Oh, and then the other thing I'm excited to tell you about...I'm not sure how I should feel that I just got more excited about this other thing. I'm very excited about baby Viccari. But the other thing is there's a new Jurassic Park movie coming out, and I'm very excited. I think it's June 10th is when it comes out. And given how much we have sung that theme song to each other and make references to what a clever girl, I needed to share that with you. Maybe you already know, maybe you're already in the loop, but if you don't, it's coming. CHRIS: Yeah, the internet likes to yell things like that. Have you watched all of the most recent ones? There are like two, and I think this will be the third in the revisiting or whatever, the Jurassic World version or something like that. But have you watched the others? STEPH: I haven't seen all of them. So I've, of course, seen the first one. I saw the one that Chris Pratt was in, and now he's in the latest one. But I think I've missed...maybe there's like two in the middle there. I have not watched those. CHRIS: There are three in the original trilogy, and then there are three now in the new trilogy, which now it's ending, and they got everybody. STEPH: Oh, I'm behind. CHRIS: They got people from the first one, and they got the people from the second trilogy. They just got everybody, and that's exciting. You know, it's that thing where they tap into nostalgia, and they take advantage of us via it. But I'm fine. I'm here for it. STEPH: I'm here for it, especially for Jurassic Park. But then there's also a new Top Gun movie coming out, which, I'll be honest, I'm totally going to watch. But I really didn't remember the first one. I don't know that I've really ever watched the first Top Gun. So Tim, my partner, and I watched that recently, and it's such a bad movie. I'm going to say it; [laughs] it's a bad movie. CHRIS: I mean, I don't want to disagree, but the volleyball scene, come on, come on, the volleyball scene. [laughter] STEPH: I mean, I totally had a good time watching the movie. But the one part that I finally kept complaining about is because every time they showed the lead female character, I can't think of her character name or the actress's name, but they kept playing that song, Take My Breath Away. And I was like, can we just get past the song? [laughs] Because if you go back and watch that movie, I swear they play it like six different times. It was a lot. It was too much. So I moved it into bad movie category but bad movie totally worth watching, whatever category that is. CHRIS: Now I kind of want to revisit it. I feel like the drinking game writes itself. But at a minimum, anytime Take My Breath Away plays, yeah. Well, all right, good to know. [laughs] STEPH: Well, if you do that, let me know how many shots or beers you drink because I think it will be a fair amount. I think it will be more than five. CHRIS: Yeah, it involves a delicate calibration to get that right. I don't think it's the sort of thing you just freehand. It writes itself but also, you want someone who's tried it before you so that you're not like, oh no, it's every time they show a jet. That was too many. You can't drink that much while watching this movie. STEPH: Yeah, that would be death by Top Gun. CHRIS: But not the normal way, the different, indirect death by Top Gun. STEPH: I don't know what the normal way is. [laughs] CHRIS: Like getting shot down by a Top Gun pilot. [laughter] STEPH: Yeah, that makes sense. [laughs] CHRIS: You know, the dogfighting in the plane. STEPH: The actual, yeah, going to war away. Just sitting on your couch and you drink too much poison away, yeah, that one. All right, that got weird. Moving on, [laughs] there's a new Jurassic Park movie. We're going to land on that note. And in the more technical world, I've got a couple of things on my mind. One of them is I have a question for you. I'm very excited to run this by you because I could use a friend in helping me decide what to do. So I am still on that journey where I am migrating Test::Unit test over to RSpec. And as I'm going through, it's going pretty well, but it's a little complicated because some of the Test::Unit tests have different setup than, say, the RSpec do. They might run different scripts beforehand where they're loading data. That's perhaps a different topic, but that's happening. And so that has changed a few things. But then overall, I've just been really just porting everything over, like, hey, if it exists in the Test::Unit, let's just bring it to RSpec, and then I'm going to change these asserts to expects and really not make any changes from there. But as I'm doing that, I'm seeing areas that I want to improve and things that I want to clear up, even if it's just extracting a variable name. Or, as I'm moving some of these over in Test::Unit, it's not clear to me exactly what the test is about. Like, it looks more like a method name in the way that the test is being described, but the actual behavior isn't clear to me as if I were writing this in RSpec, I think it would have more of a clear description. Maybe that's not specific to the actual testing framework. That might just be how these tests are set up. But I'm at that point where I'm questioning should I keep going in terms of where I am just copying everything over from Test::Unit and then moving it over to RSpec? Because ultimately, that is the goal, to migrate over. Or should I also include some time to then go back and clean up and try to add some clarity, maybe extract some variable names, see if I can reduce some lets, maybe even reduce some of the test helpers that I'm bringing over? How much cleanup should be involved, zero, lots? I don't know. I don't know what that...[laughs] I'm sure there's a middle ground in there somewhere. But I'm having trouble discerning for myself what's the right amount because this feels like one of those areas where if I don't do any cleanup, I'm not coming back to it, like, that's just the truth. So it's either now, or I have no idea when and maybe never. CHRIS: I'll be honest, the first thing that came to mind in this most recent time that you mentioned this is, did we consider just deleting these tests entirely? Is that on...like, there are very few of them, right? Like, are they even providing enough value? So that was question one, which let me pause to see what your thoughts there were. [chuckles] STEPH: I don't know if we specifically talked about that on the mic, but yes, that has been considered. And the team that owns those tests has said, "No, please don't delete them. We do get value from them." So we can port them over to RSpec, but we don't have time to port them over to RSpec. So we just need to keep letting them go on. But yet, not porting them conflicts with my goal of then trying to speed up CI. And so it'd be nice to collapse these Test::Unit tests over to RSpec because then that would bring our CI build down by several meaningful minutes. And also, it would reduce some of the complexity in the CI setup. CHRIS: Gotcha. Okay, so now, having set that aside, I always ask the first question of like, can you just put Derek Prior's phone number on the webpage and call it an app? Is that the MVP of this app? No? Okay, all right, we have to build more. But yeah, I think to answer it and in a general way of trying to answer a broader set of questions here... I think this falls into a category of like if you find yourself having to move around some code, if that code is just comfortably running and the main thing you need to do is just to get it ported over to RSpec, I would probably do as little other work as possible. With the one consideration that if you find yourself needing to deeply load up the context of these tests like actually understand them in order to do the porting, then I would probably take advantage of that context because it's hard to get your head into a given piece of code, test or otherwise. And so if you're in there and you're like, well, now that I'm here, I can definitely see that we could rearrange some stuff and just definitively make it better, if you get to that place, I would consider it. But if this ends up being mostly a pretty rote transformation like you said, asserts become expects, and lets get switched around, you know, that sort of stuff, if it's a very mechanical process of getting done, I would probably say very minimal. But again, if there is that, like, you know what? I had to understand the test in order to port them anyway, so while I'm here, let me take advantage of that, that's probably the thing that I would consider. But if not that, then I would say even though it's messy and whatnot and your inclination would be to clean it, I would say leave it roughly as is. That's my guess or how I would approach it. STEPH: Yeah, I love that. I love how you pointed out, like, did you build up the context? Because you're right, in a lot of these test cases, I'm not, or I'm trying really hard to not build up context. I'm trying very hard to just move them over and, if I have to, mainly to find test descriptions. That's the main area I'm struggling to...how can I more explicitly state what this test does so the next person reading this will have more comprehension than I do? But otherwise, I'm trying hard to not have any real context around it. And that's such a good point because that's often...when someone else is in the middle of something, and they're deciding whether to include that cleanup or refactor or improvement, one of my suggestions is like, hey, we've got the context now. Let's go with it. But if you've built up very little context, then that's not a really good catalyst or reason to then dig in deeper and apply that cleanup. That's super helpful. Thank you. That will help reinforce what I'm going to do, which is exactly let's migrate RSpec and not worry about cleanup, which feels terrible; I'm just going to say that into the world. But it also feels like the right thing to do. CHRIS: Well, I'm happy to have helped. And I share the like, and it feels terrible. I want to do the right thing, but sometimes you got to pick a battle sort of thing. STEPH: Cool. Well, that's a huge help to me. What's going on in your world? CHRIS: What's going on in my world? I watched a great video the other day from the Google I/O. I think it's an event; I'm not actually sure, conference or something like that. But it was some Google Chrome developers talking about a new feature that's coming to the platform called Page Transitions. And I've kept an eye on this for a while, but it seems like it's more real. Like, I think they put out an RFC or an initial sort of set of ideas a while back. And the web community was like, "Oh, that's not going to work out so well." So they went back to the drawing board, revisited. I've actually implemented in Chrome Canary a version of the API. And then, in the video that I watched, which we'll include a show notes link to, they demoed the functionality of the Page Transitions API and showed what you can do. And it's super cool. It allows for the sort of animations that you see in a lot of native mobile apps where you're looking at a ListView, you click on one of the items, and it grows to fill the whole screen. And now you're on the detail screen for that item that you were looking at. But there was this very continuous animated transition that allows you to keep context in your head and all of those sorts of nice things. And this just really helps to bridge that gap between, like, the web often lags behind the native mobile platforms in terms of the experiences that we can build. So it was really interesting to see what they've been able to pull off. The demo is a pretty short video, but it shows a couple of different variations of what you can build with it. And I was like, yeah, these look like cool native app transitions, really nifty. One thing that's very interesting is the actual implementation of this. So it's like you have one version of the page, and then you transition to a new version of the page, and in doing so, you want to animate between them. And the way that they do it is they have the first version of the page. They take a screenshot of it like the browser engine takes a screenshot of it. And then they put that picture on top of the actual browser page. Then they do the same thing with the next version of the page that they're going to transition to. And then they crossfade, like, change the opacity and size and whatnot between the two different images, and then you're there. And in the back of my mind, I'm like, I'm sorry, what now? You did which? I'm like, is this the genius solution that actually makes this work and is performant? And I wonder if there are trade-offs. Like, do you lose interactivity between those because you've got some images that are just on the screen? And what is that like? But as they were going through it, I was just like, wait, I'm sorry, you did what? This is either the best idea I've ever heard, or I'm not so sure about this. STEPH: That's fascinating. You had me with the first part in terms of they take a screenshot of the page that you're leaving. I'm like, yeah, that's a great idea. And then talking about taking a picture of the other page because then you have to load it but not show it to the user that it's loaded. And then take a picture of it, and then show them the picture of the loaded page. But then actually, like you said, then crossfade and then bring in the real functionality. I am...what am I? [laughter] CHRIS: What am I actually? STEPH: [laughs] What am I? I'm shocked. I'm surprised that that is so performant. Because yeah, I also wouldn't have thought of that, or I would have immediately have thought like, there's no way that's going to be performant enough. But that's fascinating. CHRIS: For me, performance seems more manageable, but it's the like, what are you trading off for that? Because that sounds like a hack. That sounds like the sort of thing I would recommend if we need to get an MVP out next week. And I'm like, what if we just tried this? Listen, it's got some trade-offs. So I'm really interested to see are those trade-offs present? Because it's the browser engine. It's, you know, the low-level platform that's actually managing this. And there are some nice hooks that allow you to control it. And at a CSS level, you can manage it and use keyframe animations to control the transition more directly. There's a JavaScript API to instrument the sequencing of things. And so it's giving you the right primitives and the right hooks. And the fact that the implementation happens to use pictures or screenshots, to use a slightly different word, it's like, okey dokey, that's what we're doing. Sounds fun. So I'm super interested because the functionality is deeply, deeply interesting to me. Svelte actually has a version of this, the crossfade utility, but you have to still really think about how do you sequence between the two pages and how do you do the connective tissue there? And then Svelte will manage it for you if you do all the right stuff. But the wiring up is somewhat complicated. So having this in the browser engine is really interesting to me. But yeah, pictures. STEPH: This is one of those ideas where I can't decide if this was someone who is very new to the team and new to the idea and was like, "Have we considered screenshots? Have we considered pictures?" Or if this is like the uber senior person on the team that was like, "Yeah, this will totally work with screenshots." I can't decide where in that range this idea falls, which I think makes me love it even more. Because it's very straightforward of like, hey, what if we just tried this? And it's working, so cool, cool, cool. CHRIS: There's a fantastic meme that's been making the rounds where it's a bell curve, and it's like, early in your career, middle of your career, late in your career. And so early in your career, you're like, everything in one file, all lines of code that's just where they go. And then in the middle of your career, you're like, no, no, no, we need different concerns, and files, and organizational structures. And then end of your career...and this was coming up in reference to the TypeScript team seems to have just thrown everything into one file. And it's the thing that they've migrated to over time. And so they have this many, many line file that is basically the TypeScript engine all in one file. And so it was a joke of like, they definitely know what they're doing with programming. They're not just starting last week sort of thing. And so it's this funny arc that certain things can go through. So I think that's an excellent summary there [laughs] of like, I think it was folks who have thought about this really hard. But I kind of hope it was someone who was just like, "I'm new here. But have we thought about pictures? What about pictures?" I also am a little worried that I just deeply misunderstood [laughs] the representation but glossed over it in the video, and I'm like, that sounds interesting. So hopefully, I'm not just wildly off base here. [laughs] But nonetheless, the functionality looks very interesting. STEPH: That would be a hilarious tweet. You know, I've been waiting for that moment where I've said something that I understood into the mic and someone on Twitter just being like, well, good try, but... [laughs] CHRIS: We had a couple of minutes where we tried to figure out what the opposite of ranting was, and we came up with pranting and made up a word instead of going with praising or raving. No, that's what it is, raving. [laughs] STEPH: No, raving. I will never forget now, raving. [laughs] CHRIS: So, I mean, we've done this before. STEPH: That's true. Although they were nice, I don't think they tweeted. I think they sent in an email. They were like, "Hey, friends." [laughter] CHRIS: Actually, we got a handful of emails on that. [laughter] STEPH: Did you know the English language? CHRIS: Thank you, kind Bikeshed audience, for not shaming us in public. I mean, feel free if you feel like it. [laughs] But one other thing that came up in this video, though, is the speaker was describing single-page apps are very common, and you want to have animated transitions and this and that. And I was like, single-page app, okay, fine. I don't like the terminology but whatever. I would like us to call it the client-side app or client-side routing or something else. But the fact that it's a single page is just a technical consideration that no user would call it that. Users are like; I go to the web app. I like that it has URLs. Those seem different to me. Anyway, this is my hill. I'm going to die on it. But then the speaker in the video, in contrast to single-page app referenced multi-page app, and I was like, oh, come on, come on. I get it. Like, yes, there are just balls of JavaScript that you can download on the internet and have a dynamic graphics editor. But I think almost all good things on the web should have URLs, and that's what I would call the multiple pages. But again, that's just me griping about some stuff. And to name it, I don't think I'm just griping for griping sake. Like, again, I like to think about things from the user perspective, and the URL being so important. And having worked with plenty of apps that are implemented in JavaScript and don't take the URL or the idea that we can have different routable resources seriously and everything is just one URL, that's a failure mode in my mind. We missed an opportunity here. So I think I'm saying a useful thing here and not just complaining on the internet. But with that, I will stop complaining on the internet and send it back over to you. What else is new in your world, Steph? STEPH: I do remember the first time that you griped about it, and you were griping about URLs. And there was a part of me that was like, what is he talking about? [laughter] And then over time, I was like, oh, I get it now as I started actually working more in that world. But it took me a little bit to really appreciate that gripe and where you're coming from. And I agree; I think you're coming from a reasonable place, not that I'm biased at all as your co-host, but you know. CHRIS: I really like the honest summary that you're giving of, like, honestly, the first time you said this, I let you go for a while, but I did not know what you were talking about. [laughs] And I was like, okay, good data point. I'm going to store that one away and think about it a bunch. But that's fine. I'm glad you're now hanging out with me still. [laughter] STEPH: Don't do that. Don't think about it a bunch. [laughs] Let's see, oh, something else that's going on in my world. I had a really fun pairing session with another thoughtboter where we were digging into query objects and essentially extracting some logic out of an ActiveRecord model and then giving that behavior its own space and elevated namespace in a query object. And one of the questions or one of the things that came up that we needed to incorporate was optional filters. So say if you are searching for a pizza place that's nearby and you provide a city, but you don't provide what's the optional zip code, then we want to make sure that we don't apply the zip code in the where clause because then you would return all the pizza places that have a nil zip code, and that's just not what you want. So we need to respect the fact that not all the filters need to be applied. And there are a couple of ways to go about it. And it was a fun journey to see the different ways that we could structure it. So one of the really good starting points is captured in a blog post by Derek Prior, which we'll include a link to in the show notes, and it's using yield_self for composable ActiveRecord relations. But essentially, it starts out with an example where it shows that you're assigning a value to then the result of an if statement. So it's like, hey, if the zip code is present, then let's filter by zip code; if not, then just give us back the original relation. And then you can just keep building on it from there. And then there's a really nice implementation that Derek built on that then uses yield_self to pass the relation through, which then provides a really nice readability for as you are then stepping through each filter and which one should and shouldn't be applied. And now there's another blog post, and this one's written by Thiago Silva, A Case for Query Objects in Rails. And this one highlighted an approach that I haven't used before. And I initially had some mixed feelings about it. But this approach uses the extending method, which is a method that's on ActiveRecord query methods. And it's used to extend the scope with additional methods. You can either do this by providing the name of a module or by providing a block. It's only going to apply to that instance or to that specific scope when you're using it. So it's not going to be like you're running an include or something like that where all instances are going to now have access to these methods. So by using that method, extending, then you can create a module that says, "Hey, I want to create this by zip code filter that will then check if we have a zip code, let's apply it, if not, return the relation. And it also creates a really pretty chaining experience of like, here's my original class name. Let's extend with these specific scopes, and then we can say by zip code, by pizza topping, whatever else it is that we're looking to filter by. And I was initially...I saw the extending, and it made me nervous because I was like, oh, what all does this apply to? And is it going to impact anything outside of this class? But the more I've looked at it, the more I really like it. So I think you've seen this blog post too. And I'm curious, what are your thoughts about this? CHRIS: I did see this blog post come through. I follow that thoughtbot blog real close because it turns out some of the best writing on the internet is on there. But I saw this...also, as an aside, I like that we've got two Derek Prior references in one episode. Let's see if we can go for three before the end. But one thing that did stand out to me in it is I have historically avoided scopes using scope like ActiveRecord macro thing. It's a class method, but like, it's magic. It does magic. And a while ago, class methods and scopes became roughly equivalent, not exactly equivalent, but close enough. And for me, I want to use methods because I know stuff about methods. I know about default arguments. And I know about all of these different subtleties because they're just methods at the end of the day, whereas scopes are special; they have certain behavior. And I've never really known of the behavior beyond the fact that they get implemented in a different way. And so I was never really sold on them. And they're different enough from methods, and I know methods well. So I'm like, let's use the normal stuff where we can. The one thing that's really interesting, though, is the returning nil that was mentioned in this blog post. If you return nil in a scope, it will handle that for you. Whereas all of my query objects have a like, well, if this thing applies, then scope dot or relation dot where blah, blah, blah, else return relation unchanged. And the fact that that natively exists within scope is interesting enough to make me reconsider my stance on scopes versus class methods. I think I'm still doing class method. But it is an interesting consideration that I was unaware of before. STEPH: Yeah, it's an interesting point. I hadn't really considered as much whether I'm defining a class-level method versus a scope in this particular case. And I also didn't realize that scopes handle that nil case for you. That was one of the other things that I learned by reading through this blog post. I was like, oh, that is a nicety. Like, that is something that I get for free. So I agree. I think this is one of those things that I like enough that I'd really like to try it out more and then see how it goes and start to incorporate it into my process. Because this feels like one of those common areas of where I get to it, and I'm like, how do I do this again? And yield_self was just complicated enough in terms of then using the fancy method method to then be able to call the method that I want that I was like, I don't remember how to do this. I had to look it up each time. But including this module with extending and then being able to use scopes that way feels like something that would be intuitive for me that then I could just pick up and run with each time. CHRIS: If it helps, you can use then instead of yield_self because we did upgrade our Ruby a while back to have that change. But I don't think that actually solves the thing that you're describing. I'd have liked the ampersand method and then simple method name magic incantation that is part of the thing that Derek wrote up. I do use it when I write query objects, but I have to think about it or look it up each time and be like, how do I do that? All right, that's how I do that. STEPH: Yeah, that's one of the things that I really appreciate is how often folks will go back and update blog posts, or they will add an addition to them to say, "Hey, there's something new that came out that then is still relevant to this topic." So then you can read through it and see the latest and the greatest. It's a really nice touch to a number of our blog posts. But yeah, that's what was on my mind regarding query objects. What else is going on in your world? CHRIS: I have this growing feeling that I don't quite know what to do with. I think I've talked about it across some of our conversations in the world of observability. But broadly, I'm starting to like...I feel like my brain has shifted, and I now see the world slightly differently, and I can't go back. But I also don't know how to stick the landing and complete this transition in my brain. So it's basically everything's an event stream; this feels true. That's life. The arrow of time goes in one direction as far as I understand it. And I'm now starting to see it manifest in the code that we're writing. Like, we have code to log things, and we have places where we want to log more intentionally. Then occasionally, we send stuff off to Sentry. And Sentry tells us when there are errors, that's great. But in a lot of places, we have both. Like, we will warn about something happening, and we'll send that to the logs because we want to have that in the logs, which is basically the whole history of what's happened. But we also have it in Sentry, but Sentry's version is just this expanded version that has a bunch more data about the user, and things, and the browser that they were in. But they're two variations on the same event. And then similarly, analytics is this, like, third leg of well, this thing happened, and we want to know about it in the context. And what's been really interesting is we're working with a tool called Customer.io, which is an omnichannel communication whiz-bang adventure. For us, it does email, SMS, and push notifications. And it's integrated into our segment pipeline, so events flow in, events and users essentially. So we have those two different primitives within it. And then within it, we can say like, when a user does X, then send them an email with this copy. As an aside, Customer.io is a fantastic platform. I'm super-duper impressed. We went through a search for a tool like it, and we ended up on a lot of sales demos with folks that were like, hey, so yeah, starting point is $25,000 per year. And, you know, we can talk about it, but it's only going to go up from there when we talk about it, just to be clear. And it's a year minimum contract, and you're going to love it. And we're like, you do have impressive platforms, but okay, that's a bunch. And then, we found Customer.io, and it's month-by-month pricing. And it had a surprisingly complete feature set. So overall, I've been super impressed with Customer.io and everything that they've afforded. But now that I'm seeing it, I kind of want to move everything into that world where like, Customer.io allows non-engineer team members to interact with that event stream and then make things happen. And that's what we're doing all the time. But I'm at that point where I think I see the thing that I want, but I have no idea how to get there. And it might not even be tractable either. There's the wonderful Turning the Database Inside Out talk, which describes how everything is an event stream. And what if we actually were to structure things that way and do materialized views on top of it? And the actual UI that you're looking at is a materialized view on top of the database, which is a materialized view on top of that event stream. So I'm mostly in this, like, I want to figure this out. I want to start to unify all this stuff. And analytics pipes to one tool that gets a version of this event stream, and our logs are just another, and our error system is another variation on it. But they're all sort of sampling from that one event stream. But I have no idea how to do that. And then when you have a database, then you're like, well, that's also just a static representation of a point in time, which is the opposite of an event stream. So what do you do there? So there are folks out there that are doing good thinking on this. So I'm going to keep my ear to the ground and try and see what's everybody thinking on this front? But I can't shake the feeling that there's something here that I'm missing that I want to stitch together. STEPH: I'm intrigued on how to take this further because everything you're saying resonates in terms of having these event streams that you're working with. But yet, I can't mentally replace that with the existing model that I have in my mind of where there are still certain ideas of records or things that exist in the world. And I want to encapsulate the data and store that in the database. And maybe I look it up based on when it happens; maybe I don't. Maybe I'm looking it up by something completely different. So yeah, I'm also intrigued by your thoughts, but I'm also not sure where to take it. Who are some of the folks that are doing some of the thinking in this area that you're interested in, or where might you look next? CHRIS: There's the Kafka world of we have an event log, and then we're processing on top of that, and we're building stream processing engines as the core. They seem to be closest to the Turning the Database Inside Out talk that I was thinking or that I mentioned earlier. There's also the idea of CRDTs, which are Conflict-free Replicated Data Types, which are really interesting. I see them used particularly in real-time application. So it's this other tool, but they are basically event logs. And then you can communicate them well and have two different people working on something collaboratively. And these event logs then have a natural way to come together and produce a common version of the document on either end. That's at least my loose understanding of it, but it seems like a variation on this theme. So I've been looking at that a little bit. But again, I can't see how to map that to like, but I know how to make a Rails app with a Postgres database. And I think I'm reasonably capable at it, or at least I've been able to produce things that are useful to humans using it. And so it feels like there is this pretty large gap. Because what makes sense in my head is if you follow this all the way, it fundamentally re-architects everything. And so that's A, scary, and B; I have no idea how to get there, but I am intrigued. Like, I feel like there's something there. There's also Datomic is the other thing that comes to mind, which is a database engine in the Clojure world that stores the versions of things over time; that idea of the user is active. It's like, well, yeah, but when were they not? That's an event. That transition is an event that Postgres does not maintain at this point. And so, all I know is that the user is active. Maybe I store a timestamp because I'm thinking proactively about this. But Datomic is like no, no, fundamentally, as a primitive in this database; that's how we organize and think about stuff. And I know I've talked about Datomic on here before. So I've circled around these ideas before. And I'm pretty sure I'm just going to spend a couple of minutes circling and then stop because I have no idea how to connect the dots. [laughs] But I want to figure this out. STEPH: I have not worked with Kafka. But one of the main benefits I understand with Kafka is that by storing everything as a stream, you're never going to lose like a message. So if you are sending a message to another system and then that message gets lost in transit, you don't actually know if it got acknowledged or what happened with it, and replaying is really hard. Where do you pick up again? While using something like Kafka, you know exactly what you sent last, and then you're not going to have that uncertainty as to what messages went through and which ones didn't. And then the ability to replay is so important. I'm curious, as you continue to explore this, do you have a particular pain point in mind that you'd like to see improve? Or is it more just like, this seems like a really cool, novel idea; how can I incorporate more of this into my world? CHRIS: I think it's the latter. But I think the thing that I keep feeling is we keep going back and re-instrumenting versions of this. We're adding more logging or more analytics events over the wire or other things. But then, as I send these analytics events over the wire, we have Mixpanel downstream as an analytics visualization and workflow tool or Customer.io. At this point, those applications, I think, have a richer understanding of our users than our core Rails app. And something about that feels wrong to me. We're also streaming everything that goes through segment to S3 because I had a realization of this a while back. I'm like, that event stream is very interesting. I don't want to lose it. I'm going to put it somewhere that I get to keep it. So even if we move off of either Mixpanel or Customer.io or any of those other platforms, we still have our data. That's our data, and we're going to hold on to it. But interestingly, Customer.io, when it sends a message, will push an event back into segments. So it's like doubly connected to segment, which is managing this sort of event bus of data. And so Mixpanel then gets an even richer set there, and the Rails app is like, I'm cool. I'm still hanging out, and I'm doing stuff; it's fine. But the fact that the Rails app is fundamentally less aware of the things that have happened is really interesting to me. And I am not running into issues with it, but I do feel odd about it. STEPH: That touched on a theme that is interesting to me, the idea that I hadn't really considered it in those terms. But yeah, our application provides the tool in which people can interact with. But then we outsource the behavior analysis of our users and understanding what that flow is and what they're going through. I hadn't really thought about those concrete terms and where someone else owns the behavior of our users, but yet we own all the interaction points. And then we really need both to then make decisions about features and things that we're building next. But that also feels like building a whole new product, that behavior analysis portion of it, so it's interesting. My consulting brain is going wild at the moment between like, yeah, it would be great to own that. But that the other time if there's this other service that has already built that product and they're doing it super well, then let's keep letting them manage that portion of our business until we really need to bring it in-house. Because then we need to incorporate it more into our application itself so then we can surface things to the user. That's the part where then I get really interested, or that's the pain point that I could see is if we wanted more of that behavior analysis, that then we want to surface that in the app, then always having to go to a third-party would start to feel tedious or could feel more brittle. CHRIS: Yeah, I'm definitely 100% on not rebuilding Mixpanel in our app and being okay with the fact that we're sending that. Again, the thing that I did to make myself feel better about this is stream the data to S3 so that I have a version of it. And if we want to rebuild the data warehouse down the road to build some sort of machine learning data pipeline thing, we've got some raw data to work with. But I'm noticing lots of places where we're transforming a side effect, a behavior that we have in the system to dispatching an event. And so right now, we have a bunch of stuff that we pipe over to Slack to inform our admin team, hey, this thing happened. You should probably intervene. But I'm looking at that, and we're doing it directly because we can control the message in Slack a little bit better. But I had this thought in the back of my mind; it's like, could we just send that as an event, and then some downstream tool can configure messages and alerts into Slack? Because then the admin team could actually instrument this themselves. And they could be like; we are no longer interested in this event. Users seem fine on that front. But we do care about this new event. And all we need to do as the engineering team is properly instrument all of that event stream tapping. Every event just needs to get piped over. And then lots of powerful tools downstream from that that can allow different consumers of that data to do things, and broadly, that dispatch events, consume them on the other side, do fun stuff. That's the story. That's the dream. But I don't know; I can't connect all the dots. It's probably going to take me a couple of weeks to connect all these dots, or maybe years, or maybe my entire career, something like that. But, I don't know, I'm going to keep trying. STEPH: This feels like a fun startup narrative, though, where you start by building the thing that people can interact with. As more people start to interact with it, how do we start giving more of our team the ability to then manage the product that then all of these users are interacting with? And then that's the part that you start optimizing for. So there are always different interesting bits when you talk about the different stages of Sagewell, and like, what's the thing you're optimizing for? And I'm sure it's still heavily users. But now there's also this addition of we are also optimizing for our team to now manage the product. CHRIS: Yes, you're 100%. You're spot on there. We have definitely joked internally about spinning out a small company to build this analytics alerting tool [laughs] but obviously not going to do that because that's a distraction. And it is interesting, like, we want to build for the users the best thing that we can and where the admin team fits within that. To me, they're very much customers of engineering. Our job is to build the thing for the users but also, to be honest, we have to build a thing for the admins to support the users and exactly where that falls. Like, you and I have talked a handful of times about maybe the admin isn't as polished in design as other things. But it's definitely tested because that's a critical part of how this application works. Maybe not directly for a user but one step removed for a user, so it matters. Absolutely we're writing tests to cover that behavior. And so yeah, those trade-offs are always interesting to me and exploring that space. But 100%: our admin team are core customers of the work that we're doing in engineering. And we try and stay very close and very friendly with them. STEPH: Yeah, I really appreciate how you're framing that. And I very much agree and believe with you that our admin users are incredibly important. CHRIS: Well, thank you. Yeah, we're trying over here. But yeah, I think I can wrap up that segment of me rambling about ideas that are half-formed in my mind but hopefully are directionally important. Anyway, what else is up with you? STEPH: So, not that long ago, I asked you a question around how the heck to manage themes that I have going on. So we've talked about lots of fun productivity things around managing to-dos, and emails, and all that stuff. And my latest one is thinking about, like, I have a theme that I want to focus on, maybe it's this week, maybe it's for a couple of months. And how do I capture that and surface it to myself and see that I'm making progress on that? And I don't have an answer to that. But I do have a theme that I wanted to share. And the one that I'm currently focused on is building up management skills and team lead skills. That is something that I'm focused on at the moment and partially because I was inspired to read the book Resilient Management written by Lara Hogan. And so I think that is what has really set the idea. But as I picked up the book, I was like, this is a really great book, and I'd really like to share some of this. And then so that grew into like, well, let's just go ahead and make this a theme where I'm learning this, and I'm sharing this with everyone else. So along that note, I figured I would share that here. So we use Basecamp at thoughtbot. And so, I've been sharing some Basecamp posts around what I'm learning in each chapter. But to bring some of that knowledge here as well, some of the cool stuff that I have learned so far...and this is just still very early on in the book. There are a couple of different topics that Laura covers in the first chapter, and one of them is humans' core needs at work. And then there's also the concept of meeting your team, some really good questions that you can ask during your first one-on-one to get to know the person that then you're going to be managing. The part that really resonated with me and something that I would like to then coach myself to try is helping the team get to know you. So as a manager, not only are you going out of your way to really get to know that person, but how are you then helping them get to know you as well? Because then that's really going to help set that relationship in regards of they know what kind of things that you're optimizing for. Maybe you're optimizing for a deadline, or for business goals, or maybe it's for transparency, or maybe it would be helpful to communicate to someone that you're managing to say, "Hey, I'm trying some new management techniques. Let me know how this goes." [chuckles] So there's a healthier relationship of not only are you learning them, but they're also learning you. So some of the questions that Laura includes as examples as something that you can share with your team is what do you optimize for in your role? So is it that you're optimizing for specific financial goals or building up teammates? Or maybe it's collaboration, so you're really looking for opportunities for people to pair together. What do you want your teammates to lean on you for? I really liked that question. Like, what are some of the areas that bring you joy or something that you feel really skilled in that then you want people to come to you for? Because that's something that before I was a manager...but it's just as you are growing as a developer, that's such a great question of like, what do you want to be known for? What do you want to be that thing that when people think of, they're like, oh, you should go see Chris about this, or you should go see Steph about this? And two other good questions include what are your work styles and preferences? And what management skills are you currently working on learning or improving? So I really like this concept of how can I share more of myself? And the great thing about this book that I'm learning too is while it is geared towards people that are managers, I think it's so wonderful for people who are non-managers or aspiring managers to read this as well because then it can help you manage whoever's managing you. So then that way, you can have some upward management. So we had recent conversations around when you are new to a team and getting used to a manager, or maybe if you're a junior, you have to take a lot of self-advocacy into your role to make sure things are going well. And I think this book does a really good job for people that are looking to not only manage others but also manage themselves and manage upward. So that's some of the journeys from the first chapter. I'll keep you posted on the other chapters as I'm learning more. And yeah, if anybody hasn't read this book or if you're interested, I highly recommend it. I'll make sure to include a link in the show notes. CHRIS: That was just the first chapter? STEPH: Yeah, that was just the first chapter. CHRIS: My goodness. STEPH: And I shortened it drastically. [laughs] CHRIS: Okay. All right, off to the races. But I think the summary that you gave there, particularly these are true when you're managing folks but also to manage yourself and to manage up, like, this is relevant to everyone in some capacity in some shape or form. And so that feels very true. STEPH: I will include one more fun aspect from the book, and that's circling back to the humans' core needs at work. And she references Paloma Medina, a coach, and trainer who came up with this acronym. The acronym is BICEPS, and it stands for belonging, improvement, choice, equality, predictability, and significance. And then details how each of those are important to us in our work and how when one of those feels threatened, then that can lead to some problems at work or just even in our personal life. But the fun example that she gave was not when there's a huge restructuring of the organization and things like that are going on as being the most concerning in terms of how many of these needs are going to be threatened or become vulnerable. But changing where someone sits at work can actually hit all of these, and it can threaten each of these needs. And it made me think, oh, cool, plus-one for being remote because we can sit wherever we want. [laughs] But that was a really fun example of how someone's needs at work, I mean, just moving their desk, which resonates, too, because I've heard that from other people. Some of the friends that I have that work in more of a People Ops role talk about when they had to shift people around how that caused so much grief. And they were just shocked that it caused so much grief. And this explains why that can be such a big deal. So that was a fun example to read through. CHRIS: I'm now having flashbacks to times where I was like, oh, I love my spot in the office. I love the people I'm sitting with. And then there was that day, and I had to move. Yeah, no, those were days. This is true. STEPH: It triggered all the core BICEPS, all the things that you need to work. It threatened all of them. Or it could have improved them; who knows? CHRIS: There were definitely those as well, yeah. Although I think it's harder to know that it's going to be great on the way in, so it's mostly negative. I think it has that weird bias because you're like, this was a thing, I knew it. I at least understood it. And then you're in a new space, and you're like, I don't know, is this going to be terrible or great? I mean, hopefully, it's only great because you work with great people, and it's a great office. [laughs] But, like, the unknown, you're moving into the unknown, and so I think it has an inherent at least questioning bias to it. STEPH: Agreed. On that note, shall we wrap up? CHRIS: Let's wrap up. The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review on iTunes, as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey. STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. ALL: Byeeeeeee!!!!!!! ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

C. H. Spurgeon on SermonAudio

A new MP3 sermon from Dr David C. Mackereth is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Part 9 Subtitle: John Ploughman's Pictures Speaker: C. H. Spurgeon Broadcaster: Dr David C. Mackereth Event: Audio Book Date: 5/23/2022 Length: 17 min.

Spit & Polish Presents
Pictures Powwow - Bus Stop review

Spit & Polish Presents

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 51:25


Pictures Powwow is the show in which we discuss a film that has been recommended whether it by us or you the listening people! In this episode, we covered "Bus Stop" (1956) which came highly recommended from the listening people.  Bartek's recommendation for next episode is “20th Century Women” (2016), so make sure to check that out. If you have any feedback, questions, comments, recommendations or interested in having your podcast promoted on the show make sure to email us at spitandpolished@gmail.com  FOLLOW US: Twitter: @SpitPolishPre Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/spitandpolishpresents/ LISTEN ON: Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/spit-polish-presents/id1059224536 Spotify:https://open.spotify.com/show/5ycjMXxAbhlcSEEpihSax0 Podbean: http://spitandpolish.podbean.com/ RadioPublic: https://radiopublic.com/spit-polish-presents-6VQzVW TuneIn: https://tunein.com/podcasts/Comedy-Podcasts/Spit--Polish-Presents-p1087434/ iHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-spit-polish-presen-29693268/ Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/spit-polish-presents

Extreme Genes - America's Family History and Genealogy Radio Show & Podcast
Episode 181: Classic Rewind - Of Creoles, Slaves, Spaniards, and French / Tom Perry On Separating Stuck Pictures

Extreme Genes - America's Family History and Genealogy Radio Show & Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 44:16


Originally aired in 2017 Host Scott Fisher opens the show with David Allen Lambert, Chief Genealogist for the New England Historic Genealogical Society and AmericanAncestors.org. David is on the road in Louisville, Kentucky. The guys start by discussing Fisher's bizarre find of an 1807 church record where all of his ancestors and their relatives seem to be marked with a cross! David then begins Family Histoire News with the story of a woman whose 122-year-old house is getting some very unique treatment from the government of St. Louis. Next, it's the story of a 99-year-old Dutch woman who just checked something off her bucket list that most of us would never think of. Find out why. Then, a Santa Barbara couple planned their wedding and then learned something very unique… concerning them… about this ancient venue. Next, Fisher begins his two-part visit with Michael Henderson of Atlanta, Georgia. As an African-American Creole from New Orleans, Michael took an early interest in his family history, taking his lines back to numerous Revolutionary soldiers and branches to several Europeans countries. Wait til you hear about the two century old document concerning his ancestor he found and was able to hold. In the second segment with Michael Henderson, he talks about the experience of becoming Georgia's first African-American member of the Sons of the American Revolution. It's a terrific wrap up to Black History Month! Then, it's Tom Perry from TMCPlace.com, back to talk preservation. Tom answers a question about what to do if you have pictures that are stuck together. Yes, they are salvageable! Hear what Tom has to say.

Pictures of the End
Episode 168. Mark: The Time of the Second Coming

Pictures of the End

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 28:31


Mark 9 records Jesus Christ's transfiguration on the mountain. Why did Moses and Elijah appear beside Him? Who do they represent, and what do they represent? Why did Jesus wait six days after predicting this event to actually take His disciples up into the mountain with Him? What does this entire experience mean for us today? Discover the answers in this episode of "Pictures of the End."

C. H. Spurgeon on SermonAudio

A new MP3 sermon from Dr David C. Mackereth is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Part 8 Subtitle: John Ploughman's Pictures Speaker: C. H. Spurgeon Broadcaster: Dr David C. Mackereth Event: Audio Book Date: 5/22/2022 Length: 11 min.

Poisoned Pen Podcast
Jason Rekulak discusses Hidden Pictures

Poisoned Pen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 66:11


Barbara Peters in conversation with Jason Rekulak and Grady Hendrix

Learn Italian with Luisa
Ep. 82 - Grammatik: il verbo piacere

Learn Italian with Luisa

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 9:50


Un po di grammatica: il verbo piacere. - Spendieren Sie einen Cafè (1€)? Donate a coffee (1€)? https://ko-fi.com/italiano Livello A1/A2Come usare il verbo piacere nella lingua italiana Buongiorno cari amici e amanti dell'italiano e benvenuti al podcasti numero 82.Oggi parliamo del verbo piacere che significa in tedesco „gefallen/schmecken“, in inglese „to like“ e in spagnolo „gustar“.Vediamo prima di tutto come si coniuga il verbo „piacere“ al presente indicativo: io piaccio (ich gefalle, somebody likes me, yo gusto)...The full transcript of this Maxi-Episode with Pictures of the described works of art is available via "Luisa's learn Italian Premium" - das komplette Transcript / die Show-Notes mit Abbildung der besprochenen Werke sind über Luisa's Podcast Premium verfügbar. Den Shop mit allen Materialien zum Podcast finden Sie unter https://premium.il-tedesco.itLuisa's Podcast Premium ist kein Abo - sie erhalten das jeweilige Transscript/die Shownotes sowie Übungen indem Sie "pro Stück" bezahlen. https://premium.il-tedesco.itMehr info unter www.il-tedesco.it bzw. https://www.il-tedesco.it/premium

C. H. Spurgeon on SermonAudio

A new MP3 sermon from Dr David C. Mackereth is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Part 7 Subtitle: John Ploughman's Pictures Speaker: C. H. Spurgeon Broadcaster: Dr David C. Mackereth Event: Audio Book Date: 5/21/2022 Length: 10 min.

Spectrum | Deutsche Welle
Weekly roundup — Look at that face

Spectrum | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 30:00


An unusual experiment has cats staring at cat faces, while Dutch researchers go full sci-fi and "brain scan" an image out of the heads of humans and monkeys.

Sound Chaser Progressive Rock Podcast
Episode 51: Sound Chaser 219

Sound Chaser Progressive Rock Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 205:56


The Sound Chaser Progressive Rock Podcast is in the ether again. This time the show returns to its usual format of tripping through the years to pluck out prog gems. I have four pieces of new music from Rosalie Cunningham, The Flower Kings, Art Griffin's Sound Chaser, and Lobate Scarp. The Symphonic Zone includes a long suite from long ago. All that, plus news of tours and releases on Sound Chaser. Playlist1. Argent - Be Free, from Argent2. Deep Purple - Smoke on the Water, from Machine Head3. Samla Mammas Manna - Manna Jamma, from Samla Mammas Manna4. Rosalie Cunningham - Donovan Ellington, from Two Piece Puzzle5. Trans-Millenia Consort - Organized Confusion, from Plot Zero6. Steve Roach - Energy Well, from Holding the Space: Fever Dreams II7. Travis & Fripp - The Unspoken, from Thread8. Art Griffin's Sound Chaser - Total Eclipse, from The Seven Ages of Starlight9. Kit & Coco - Over the Andes, from In Time10. Dwiki Dharmawan - Pasar Klewer, from Pasar KlewerTHE SYMPHONIC ZONE11. Kevin Gilbert's Giraffe - The Musical Box, from The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway12. Exodus - Spacer Z Psem (Metal Mind label cd bonus track), from The Most Beautiful Day13. Lobate Scarp - You Have It All, from You Have It All14. The Flower Kings - Funeral Pyres, from By Royal Decree15. Cast - Dialect for the 21st Century, from Power and Outcome16. Emerson, Lake & Palmer - Pictures at an Exhibition, from Pictures at an ExhibitionLEAVING THE SYMPHONIC ZONE17. Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe - Teakbois, from Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe18. David Lanz & Paul Speer - Mountain, from Natural States19. Lensflare - La Grotta delle Sirene, from La Valle dell'Inferno20. Pentangle - The Toss of Golden Hair, from Think of Tomorrow21. Irene Papas (with Vangelis) - Neranzoula (Le Petit Oranger), from Odes22. Penguin Café - The Life of an Emperor, from Handfuls of Night23. Isotope - Frog, from Illusion24. David Sylvian - Taking the Veil, from Gone to Earth25. Tangerine Dream - Zeit, from Zeit26. Roxy Music - A Song for Europe, from Stranded

C. H. Spurgeon on SermonAudio

A new MP3 sermon from Dr David C. Mackereth is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Part 6 Subtitle: John Ploughman's Pictures Speaker: C. H. Spurgeon Broadcaster: Dr David C. Mackereth Event: Audio Book Date: 5/20/2022 Length: 14 min.

Professionally Silly
CHRIS WTF ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT!?!

Professionally Silly

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 43:25


Chris returns as “Mello!” We discuss a few things that make us feel old as hell. We got some rapid fire questions and more! We had fun y'all! Pictures pertaining to this episode can be found on the podcast Instagram @itsprosilly. Call/text my google voice number call/text 805-664-1828 and hear yourself on a podcast episode! -PARANORMAL BLACKTIVITY PLAYLIST for this channel https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PL97hCXP8Z-0IzENkb7loHNyhha4pW1qjW -NEW PARANORMAL BLACKTIVITY CHANNEL https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZsX2P3ol_RkCQL2ZCyQzNg -LINKTREE https://linktr.ee/Ambersmilesjones -VANCE GLOBAL https://vance-global.com/?rfsn=6143622.e2df34c *Use coupon code “SMILES” to get 20% OFF* -Join my Professionally Silly YouTube channel membership to get access to perks: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEabIsoT5wrN5hRSgY7wnYQ/join ******************* Amber “Smiles” Jones PO BOX 533 Lovejoy, GA 30250 *************************** Podcast Twitter/IG:@itsprosilly Personal Twitter/IG:@trusmilesjones Email me: itsprofessionallysilly@gmail.com Be sure to SUBSCRIBE/FAVORITE/REVIEW❤️ CALL ME 805-664-1828 ************************************ PAYPAL https://www.paypal.me/ambersmilesjones STEREO https://stereo.com/trusmilesjones INSTAGRAM http://instagram.com/itsprosilly TWITTER https://twitter.com/Itsprosilly --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/amber-smiles-jones/message

Observe the Word: Pentateuch with Michael Brent
Isaiah 41:1-20 Three Pictures of Consolation

Observe the Word: Pentateuch with Michael Brent

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 42:34


In Isaiah 41:1-320, Isaiah concludes the initial consolation of Israel, with a powerful, compact description of God as sovereign over world events and with three descriptive pictures of the transformation he will bring about when Israel's exile is complete.

The ABMP Podcast | Speaking With the Massage & Bodywork Profession
Ep 233 – Psoriasis: “I Have a Client Who . . .” Pathology Conversations with Ruth Werner

The ABMP Podcast | Speaking With the Massage & Bodywork Profession

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 13:42


In my last call out asking for I Have a Client Who . . . stories, several people asked about working with people with psoriasis. There's no specific story for this one, but this is a challenging condition, and the people living with it deserve all the support they can get. Will massage cure psoriasis? No. Will massage improve the quality of life for people who have this condition? You bet. What does that look like? Listen in for more.   Sponsors:     Books of Discovery: www.booksofdiscovery.com     Anatomy Trains: www.anatomytrains.com     Host Bio:                    Ruth Werner is a former massage therapist, a writer, and an NCBTMB-approved continuing education provider. She wrote A Massage Therapist's Guide to Pathology, now in its seventh edition, which is used in massage schools worldwide. Werner is also a long-time Massage & Bodywork columnist, most notably of the Pathology Perspectives column. Werner is also ABMP's partner on Pocket Pathology, a web-based app and quick reference program that puts key information for nearly 200 common pathologies at your fingertips. Werner's books are available at www.booksofdiscovery.com. And more information about her is available at www.ruthwerner.com.                                      Recent Articles by Ruth:          “Unpacking the Long Haul,” Massage & Bodywork magazine, January/February 2022, page 35, www.massageandbodyworkdigital.com/i/1439667-january-february-2022/36. “Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy and Massage Therapy,” Massage & Bodywork magazine, September/October 2021, page 33, http://www.massageandbodyworkdigital.com/i/1402696-september-october-2021/34.           “Pharmacology Basics for Massage Therapists,” Massage & Bodywork magazine, July/August 2021, page 32, www.massageandbodyworkdigital.com/i/1384577-july-august-2021/34.       Resources:    Pocket Pathology: https://www.abmp.com/abmp-pocket-pathology-app   Get the facts about psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (no date). Available at: https://www.psoriasis.org/psoriasis-statistics/ (Accessed: 6 May 2022).   ‘Plaque Psoriasis: Practice Essentials, Background, Pathophysiology' (2021). Available at: https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1108072-overview (Accessed: 6 May 2022).   Psoriasis on black skin: Pictures, symptoms, and treatment (2019). Available at: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/325068 (Accessed: 6 May 2022).   I Have a Client Who: Psoriatic Arthritis (episode 36)   Including People of Color in Pathology Images   About Anatomy Trains:   Anatomy Trains is a global leader in online anatomy education and also provides in-classroom certification programs for structural integration in the US, Canada, Australia, Europe, Japan, and China, as well as fresh-tissue cadaver dissection labs and weekend courses. The work of Anatomy Trains originated with founder Tom Myers, who mapped the human body into 13 myofascial meridians in his original book, currently in its fourth edition and translated into 12 languages. The principles of Anatomy Trains are used by osteopaths, physical therapists, bodyworkers, massage therapists, personal trainers, yoga, Pilates, Gyrotonics, and other body-minded manual therapists and movement professionals. Anatomy Trains inspires these practitioners to work with holistic anatomy in treating system-wide patterns to provide improved client outcomes in terms of structure and function.       Website: anatomytrains.com       Email: info@anatomytrains.com            Facebook: facebook.com/AnatomyTrains    Instagram: www.instagram.com/anatomytrainsofficial   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2g6TOEFrX4b-CigknssKHA    

The Writer Files: Writing, Productivity, Creativity, and Neuroscience
How NY Times Bestselling Novelist Emma Straub Writes

The Writer Files: Writing, Productivity, Creativity, and Neuroscience

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 34:22


#PodcastersForJustice New York Times bestselling author, Emma Straub, spoke to me about why everything in life is timing, how to write a book for yourself, time travel, and her latest "This Time Tomorrow." Emma is the bestselling author of five novels — including All Adults Here, The Vacationers, Modern Lovers, and Laura Lamont's Life in Pictures — the short story collection Other People We Married. Her books have been published in 20 countries.  Her latest, This Time Tomorrow, has been named One of the Most Anticipated Books of 2022 by Vogue, Oprah, Entertainment Weekly, Glamour, Good Housekeeping, Marie Claire, Harper's Bazaar, Reader's Digest, Today, Parade, Thrillist, Pop Sugar, Lithub and more. Described as "...a moving father-daughter story and a playful twist on the idea of time travel," author Michael Chabon called the book "...a beautifully made, elegant music box of a novel that sets in motion its clever clockwork of delight—then breaks your heart with its bittersweet, lingering song.” Emma and her husband also own Books Are Magic, a popular independent bookstore in Brooklyn, New York.  In this file Emma Straub and I discussed: Why getting an MFA helped her slow down her writing How she met everyone in publishing at an indie bookshop  The unique perspective of Xennials How to find confidence and pages while being off-balance  Why she'd drink less Olde English if she could go back  And a lot more! Stay calm and write on ... emmastraub.net This Time Tomorrow a Novel by Emma Straub 'This Time Tomorrow' is the time travel book millennials need - USA Today Emma Straub on Facebook Emma Straub on Instagram Emma Straub on Twitter Kelton Reid on Twitter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

C. H. Spurgeon on SermonAudio

A new MP3 sermon from Dr David C. Mackereth is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Part 5 Subtitle: John Ploughman's Pictures Speaker: C. H. Spurgeon Broadcaster: Dr David C. Mackereth Event: Audio Book Date: 5/19/2022 Length: 14 min.

Audio Book on SermonAudio

A new MP3 sermon from Dr David C. Mackereth is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Part 5 Subtitle: John Ploughman's Pictures Speaker: C. H. Spurgeon Broadcaster: Dr David C. Mackereth Event: Audio Book Date: 5/19/2022 Length: 14 min.

The Brian Lehrer Show
#BLTrees: A Year in the Life (May)

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 19:14


We check in on our year-long project #BLTrees, following the seasons through the trees around us with Marielle Anzelone, urban botanist and ecologist and the founder of NYC Wildflower Week. This month, with peak bird migration in process, Desiree Narango, a conservation scientist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst working in collaboration with the U.S. Forest Service, explains the important link between native trees to caterpillars to birds. Hello, gorgeous! The leaves on my pin oak are finally out, but still bright green & not at full size. But before leaves came the flowers. These pendulous strands are male🌸- no petals means improved wind pollination. Female flwrs become acorns. Itchy eyes? Thank an oak #BLTrees https://t.co/bUjRydoqQL pic.twitter.com/mLjoOwbRvv — Marielle🌳Anzelone (@nycbotanist) May 19, 2022 Yes!! So excited for the opportunity to chat about the importance of #nativetrees for insects and birds! Tune into @BrianLehrer @WNYC today at ~11:40am ET to learn about what birds eat & what you can do to support #migratorybird conservation at home. #plantsforwildlife #BLtrees https://t.co/MBJcEiMAI8 pic.twitter.com/IzMXmJYAxg — Desiree L. Narango, PhD (@DLNarango) May 19, 2022 Take a closer 👀 #BLTrees pic.twitter.com/qoOLcmrbAN — 100KSteps (@100KSteps1) May 18, 2022 #bltrees pic.twitter.com/g8giNrLvJI — Tom (@altridem) May 19, 2022 .⁦@BrianLehrer⁩ Another shot of my tree. American Elm at West 129 and Saint Nicholas Terrace.#bltrees #bltree pic.twitter.com/gS4OlVsAcw — Tulis McCall (@TulisMcCall) May 19, 2022 🌧 💦 keep falling on my head #BLTrees pic.twitter.com/Ya42Zxyii4 — 100KSteps (@100KSteps1) May 19, 2022 I think I missed a month, but here's my May entry for #BLtrees We're really starting to leaf out! pic.twitter.com/6Kkj7YAAvx — Alexander (@alexandertlane) May 19, 2022 I think I missed a month, but here's my May entry for #BLtrees We're really starting to leaf out! pic.twitter.com/6Kkj7YAAvx — Alexander (@alexandertlane) May 19, 2022 #BLtrees - Month 7Fully green - wish I'd snapped the pic yesterday, in the sunshine.cc @BrianLehrer @NYCbotanist pic.twitter.com/DUoSmmvm01 — Josh Weinberger (@kitson) May 19, 2022 #BLTrees the Hackberry has finally leafed out. The one next to it, just barely. Pictures from yesterday: pic.twitter.com/ui5rzjUYSu — Against forced-birth (@backyardbeyond) May 19, 2022 #BLTrees the Hackberry has finally leafed out. The one next to it, just barely. Pictures from yesterday: pic.twitter.com/ui5rzjUYSu — Against forced-birth (@backyardbeyond) May 19, 2022 #BLTrees the Hackberry has finally leafed out. The one next to it, just barely. Pictures from yesterday: pic.twitter.com/ui5rzjUYSu — Against forced-birth (@backyardbeyond) May 19, 2022 #bltrees this is my glorious sweetie now!!! It was very sparse and wayyyy behind its lush neighbors until like last week. I was going to ask why- but now she's good!!! pic.twitter.com/xpOYxyxTvy — jerielle (@jerielle) May 19, 2022

PhotoWork with Sasha Wolf
Alec Soth - Episode 43

PhotoWork with Sasha Wolf

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 53:24


In this episode of PhotoWork with Sasha Wolf, Sasha and photographer, Alec Soth talk about his new book, A Pound of Pictures published by MACK. Alec and Sasha dig deep into a process heavy conversation about working within a tradition and finding your voice. Alec also announces a new Aperture project near the end of the show. https://alecsoth.com/photography/ https://www.mackbooks.us/products/a-pound-of-pictures-br-alec-soth Alec Soth is a photographer born and based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He has published over twenty-five books including Sleeping by the Mississippi (2004), NIAGARA (2006), Broken Manual (2010), Songbook (2015), I Know How Furiously Your Heart is Beating (2019), and A Pound of Pictures (2022). Soth has had over fifty solo exhibitions including survey shows organized by Jeu de Paume in Paris (2008), the Walker Art Center in Minnesota (2010) and Media Space in London (2015). Soth has been the recipient of numerous fellowships and awards, including the Guggenheim Fellowship (2013). In 2008, Soth created Little Brown Mushroom, a multi-media enterprise focused on visual storytelling. Soth is represented by Sean Kelly in New York, Weinstein Hammons Gallery in Minneapolis, Fraenkel Gallery in San Francisco, Loock Galerie in Berlin, and is a member of Magnum Photos. Find out more at https://photowork.pinecast.co

Poured Over
Emma Straub on THIS TIME TOMORROW

Poured Over

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 44:18


“That was really what I wanted to get at. The relationships that you have with the people who you love so much, and who you're so close with that you don't have to talk to them all the time.” All of Emma Straub's novels have big beating hearts, no matter who or what or where or when she's writing about. This Time Tomorrow is her “autobiographical time travel novel” and it's an absolute delight. Emma joins us on the show to talk about why she writes, giving herself permission to try something new, how she set her rules for time travel (and how she stays grounded), her horrifying teenage diaries, bookselling and much more with Poured Over's host, Miwa Messer. And we end this episode with TBR Topoff book recommendations from Marc and bookseller guest Becky.   Featured Books: This Time Tomorrow by Emma Straub Laura Lamont's Life in Pictures by Emma Straub The Colossus of New York by Colson Whitehead Desperate Characters by Paula Fox   Poured Over is produced and hosted by Miwa Messer and mixed by Harry Liang. Follow us here for new episodes Tuesdays and Thursdays (with occasional Saturdays).   A full transcript of this episode is available here.

Learn Vietnamese | VietnamesePod101.com
Learn with Pictures S1 #7 - Cooking in the Kitchen

Learn Vietnamese | VietnamesePod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 3:20


Learn Cantonese | CantoneseClass101.com
Learn with Pictures S1 #11 - In the Classroom

Learn Cantonese | CantoneseClass101.com

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 3:20


learn the words for all sorts of objects you find in a school

Free Library Podcast
Jason Rekulak | Hidden Pictures

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 56:34


In conversation with Liz Moore Jason Rekulak's Edgar Award–nominated debut novel The Impossible Fortress tells a coming-of-age story of first love, old school computer programming, and the heist of a Playboy magazine that features Vanna White. Rekulak is the former publisher of Philadelphia-based Quirk Books, where he managed the acquisition of a number of, well, very quirky books, including the #1 New York Times bestseller Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, the Edgar Award–winning novel The Last Policeman, and the literary mashup Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, among many others. A spin on the supernatural thriller, Hidden Pictures follows a nanny who becomes increasingly disturbed by the drawings created by her five-year-old charge. Liz Moore is the bestselling author of Long Bright River, The Words of Every Song, Heft, and The Unseen World. A creative writing professor in the M.F.A. program at Temple University, her fiction and nonfiction have been published in Tin House and The New York Times, among other publications. (recorded 5/18/2022)

Audio Book on SermonAudio

A new MP3 sermon from Dr David C. Mackereth is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Part 4 Subtitle: John Ploughman's Pictures Speaker: C. H. Spurgeon Broadcaster: Dr David C. Mackereth Event: Audio Book Date: 5/18/2022 Length: 11 min.

C. H. Spurgeon on SermonAudio

A new MP3 sermon from Dr David C. Mackereth is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Part 4 Subtitle: John Ploughman's Pictures Speaker: C. H. Spurgeon Broadcaster: Dr David C. Mackereth Event: Audio Book Date: 5/18/2022 Length: 11 min.

Nerd It Through The Grapevine
94 - Get Me Pictures of Spider-Goat!

Nerd It Through The Grapevine

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 61:45


This week, we pull a podcast out of a hat, spiders and goats are about to have more in common than you think, our show gets attacked by a bizaro entity, and just how much will nerds pay for something they saw on TV once!Come join the Backyard Bonanza in our Discord!https://discord.gg/QND8pNasHAWe have merch now?! Come get some!https://best-friends-tiny-inc.creator-spring.com/Malcolm's Cream (Guest Podcast Promo):Malcolm was on vacation this week, but he sure does love Homicide Worldwide, Pick Me!, Haunt Her? I Barely Know Her!, NightmareTown, Anime Talk!, and The Grapevine Cowboy, Kevin Busby!Theme Music:Jeremy Blake - Powerup!Gameshow Music:Kevin Macleod - Casa Bossa NovaNerd stuff and farts this episode:magic, occult, Spider-Man, goats, synthetic biology, bizaro genre, gameshow, Todd Mcfarlane, Support the show

C. H. Spurgeon on SermonAudio

A new MP3 sermon from Dr David C. Mackereth is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Part 3 Subtitle: John Ploughman's Pictures Speaker: C. H. Spurgeon Broadcaster: Dr David C. Mackereth Event: Audio Book Date: 5/17/2022 Length: 11 min.

Spectrum | Deutsche Welle
Inside the Dutch machine that can read people's minds

Spectrum | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 18:24


By scanning someone's brain, it really is possible to know what they're seeing — with uncanny accuracy. The implications are... pretty big.

Steve Allen - The Whole Show
Words and Pictures

Steve Allen - The Whole Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 134:26


No one is safe from this man's tongue - Steve Allen takes to the airwaves on LBC every Monday to Friday morning from 4am. Hear all of Steve's show with the news & travel taken out.

Meet the Mentor with Dr. Bill Dorfman
Meet the Mentor® Series Podcast Rewind with Samantha Nisenboim

Meet the Mentor with Dr. Bill Dorfman

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 23:33


Samantha Nisenboim is a film producer and co-founder of Giant Wildcat, the film production company she and Chris McKay started in 2014. Alongside partnering with Chris on all of his directorial endeavors, she also spearheads production and development for the company.  Samantha is best known for her work on the LEGO franchise, including THE LEGO BATMAN MOVIE, and THE LEGO NINJAGO MOVIE. She also consulted on Robert Downey Jr.'s DOLITTLE.  Samantha produced THE TOMORROW WAR, starring Chris Pratt, for Amazon Studios, which premiered in July 2021, & upcoming she has produced REBORN, starring Sandra Bullock for Netflix, and JONNY QUEST for Warner Bros. Pictures.  She is currently producing RENFIELD for Universal Studios. Samantha grew up in the suburbs of Chicago. She is a proud USC Trojan and will always save room for dessert.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

C. H. Spurgeon on SermonAudio

A new MP3 sermon from Dr David C. Mackereth is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Part 2 Subtitle: John Ploughman's Pictures Speaker: C. H. Spurgeon Broadcaster: Dr David C. Mackereth Event: Audio Book Date: 5/16/2022 Length: 14 min.

Spit & Polish Presents
Pictures Powwow - Space Sweepers review

Spit & Polish Presents

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 66:29


Pictures Powwow is the show in which we discuss a film that has been recommended whether it by us or you the listening people! In this episode, we covered "Space Sweepers" (2021) which came highly recommended from Ryan.  Listening People's recommendation for next episode is “Bus Stop” (1956), so make sure to check that out. If you have any feedback, questions, comments, recommendations or interested in having your podcast promoted on the show make sure to email us at spitandpolished@gmail.com  FOLLOW US: Twitter: @SpitPolishPre Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/spitandpolishpresents/ LISTEN ON: Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/spit-polish-presents/id1059224536 Spotify:https://open.spotify.com/show/5ycjMXxAbhlcSEEpihSax0 Podbean: http://spitandpolish.podbean.com/ RadioPublic: https://radiopublic.com/spit-polish-presents-6VQzVW TuneIn: https://tunein.com/podcasts/Comedy-Podcasts/Spit--Polish-Presents-p1087434/ iHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-spit-polish-presen-29693268/ Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/spit-polish-presents

Glow Girl Podcast
Sigils - Episode 121

Glow Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022


Pictures and symbols hold meaning and can be powerful additions to our workings.  Throughout time, every civilization has used special symbols and codes to convey a message.  Today, April talks about sigil magick and how you can incorporate it into your practice. SPONSORS: Right now Ritual is offering my listeners 10% off your first three months. Visit ritual.com/glowgirl and turn healthy habits into a Ritual. You can check out our diverse selection at bodyartforms.com. Just enter the Coupon Code GLOWGIRL at checkout for 15% off any purchase. 

Robots From Tomorrow!
[Rebroadcast] Episode 761: Talking Fandom with RushCon's Jillian Maryonovich, Part 1

Robots From Tomorrow!

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 71:03


In preparation for the second half of this interview later this week, we present Part 1, originally broadcast on July 29, 2021. Robots is a show built on being a fan of something. While the fandom in question is usually comics, today's episode deviates from the norm a bit as Greg kicks off a 2-part chat with Jillian Maryonovich about fandom in general and their shared passion for the Canadian rock trio Rush. in particular. Jillian was not only in the front row for Rush's final show ever, but has appeared in two documentaries about the band. In her capacity as Creative Director for RushCon, she has spent years helping fans make memories and new connections over a shared love of the group and its music. She is also not a stranger to tours of a different sort, having been on staff for the political campaigns of Pete Buttigeig and one Barack Hussein Obama, including four years as the White House Creative Director during President Obama's second term. She may not have come up with the title "Rush Fan in Chief" but we think it's as apt a description as any. Robots From Tomorrow is a twice-weekly comics podcast recorded deep beneath the Earth's surface. You can subscribe to it via iTunes or through the RSS feed at RobotsFromTomorrow.com. You can also follow Mike and Greg on Twitter. Stay safe and enjoy your funny books.

Pictures of the End
Episode 167. Matthew: Parables of the Judgment

Pictures of the End

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 28:31


During the final days of Christ's life He taught every day in the temple. What did He teach about? Why does it matter to us today? Discover the explosive truths Jesus explained in the final hours of His life in this episode of "Pictures of the End."

C. H. Spurgeon on SermonAudio

A new MP3 sermon from Dr David C. Mackereth is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Part 1 Subtitle: John Ploughman's Pictures Speaker: C. H. Spurgeon Broadcaster: Dr David C. Mackereth Event: Audio Book Date: 5/15/2022 Length: 12 min.

The Powell Movement Action Sports Podcast
TPM Episode 278: Marko Shapiro, Legendary Photographer

The Powell Movement Action Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 70:23


Marko Shapiro is one of the most legendary action sports photographers of our time. Marko was the captain of Team Clambin, and for 50 years, Marko has called Verbier home and has shot all of the ski legends there. On the podcast, we talk about how he created a timeless style of photography through skiing powder and reading light, shooting with Dick Barrymore, Wayne Wong, Glen Plake, Scot Schmidt, John Faulkner, Ace Kvale, and more. It's a true history lesson with a guy who really owns his nickname “Grumpy” Marko Shapiro Show Notes: 3:30:  The story behind the most iconic shot, the world he lives in, growing up in Canada, and his first camera 10:00:  Getting into skiing, what does he do after school, going to Verbier, learning the art of photography, and deciding to stay in Verbier 20:00:  Stanley:  Get 30% off sitewide with the code drinkfast Peter Glenn Ski and Sports:  Over 60 years of getting you out there 10 Barrel Brewery:  Buy their beers; they support action sports more than anyone 22:00:  Hot Doggers, Dick Barrymore, Stanley Larsen, and Marko getting his intro to K2 with Assignment K2 33:00:  Selling images, crashing while shooting, his skill level, Ace Kvale moves to town and the screamer 40:00:  Rollerblade: Ski season may be over, but that feeling lasts all year with inline skating Elan Skis:  Over 75 years of innovation that makes you better 41:30:  The trouble with hooking up with models, his work ethic and being a stickler, and the craziest story ever told on the podcast 46:00:  Quitting all his side jobs and focusing on being a pro photographer, Hattrup, Plake and Schmidt 54:00:  Slide show parties, money, sharing the wealth, what he thinks of print these days, and having no filter   72:00:  Inappropriate Questions with Stanley Larsen

The Seen and the Unseen - hosted by Amit Varma
Ep 277: The Rooted Cosmopolitanism of Sugata Srinivasaraju

The Seen and the Unseen - hosted by Amit Varma

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 318:26


He grew up breathing Kannada literature -- and he also embraced the globalised world. Sugata Srinivasaraju joins Amit Varma in episode 277 of The Seen and the Unseen to discuss this confluence of the old and the new, the near and the far, his society and the world.  Also check out: 1. Sugata Srinivasaraju in Outlook, ToI/Mumbai Mirror, New Indian Express, The Wire, Mint, Twitter and his own website. 2. Furrows in a Field -- Sugata Srinivasaraju. 3. Pickles from Home: The Worlds of a Bilingual -- Sugata Srinivasaraju. 4. Keeping Faith with the Mother Tongue -- Sugata Srinivasaraju. 5. Sugata Srinivasaraju on his father, Chi Srinivasaraju: 1, 2, 3. 6. Maharashtra Politics Unscrambled -- Episode 151 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Sujata Anandan). 7. Dodda Alada Mara (Big Banyan Tree). 8. GP Rajarathnam, AR Krishnashastry, P Lankesh and KS Nissar Ahmed on Wikipedia. 9. The Tell Me Why series of encyclopedias -- Arkady Leokum. 10. Stendhal, Honoré de Balzac, Victor Hugo and Charles Baudelaire on Amazon. 11. Rayaru Bandaru Mavana Manege -- The KS Narasimhaswamy poem Sugata translated. 12. Phoenix and Four Other Mime Plays -- Chi Srinivasaraju (translated by Sugata Srinivasaraju, who tweeted about it here.). 13. Ahobala Shankara, V Seetharamaiah, Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, KV Narayana, Noam Chomsky, DR Nagaraj, Jorge Luis Borges and Tejaswini Niranjana. 14. Lawrence Weschler on how Akumal Ramachander discovered Harold Shapinsky. 15. AK Ramanujan and Gopalakrishna Adiga. 16. The Penguin Book of Socialist Verse -- Edited by Alan Bold. 17. Gandhi as Mahatma: Gorakhpur District, Eastern UP, 1921-22 -- Shahid Amin. 18. Kraurya -- Girish Kasaravalli. 19. Deconstructing Derrida -- Sugata Srinivasaraju. 20. Yaava Mohana Murali -- Gopalakrishna Adiga's poem turned into a song. 21. Ram Guha Reflects on His Life -- Episode 266 of The Seen and the Unseen. 22. Understanding Gandhi. Part 1: Mohandas — Episode 104 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Ram Guha). 23. Understanding Gandhi. Part 2: Mahatma — Episode 105 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Ram Guha). 24. Modern South India: A History from the 17th Century to our Times -- Rajmohan Gandhi. 25. Ki Ram Nagaraja at Book Brahma. 26. A Map of Misreading -- Harold Bloom. 27. The Singer of Tales -- Albert Lord and David Elmer. 28. ಪಂಪ ಭಾರತ ದೀಪಿಕೆ: Pampa Bharatha Deepike -- DL Narasimhachar. 29. The Open Eyes: A Journey Through Karnakata -- Dom Moraes. 30. Dom Moraes on DR Bendre's love for numbers. 31. DR Bendre, Kuvempu, Shamba Joshi, MM Kalburgi, Shivaram Karanth, VK Gokak and Chandrashekhar Patil. 32. Da Baa Kulkarni, Sriranga, Nabaneeta Dev Sen, Bhisham Sahni, Kartar Singh Duggal and HY Sharada Prasad. 33. His Will Was His God -- Sugata Srinivasaraju on HY Sharada Prasad. 34. Jeremy Seabrook on Amazon. 35. Aakar Patel Is Full of Hope -- Episode 270 of The Seen and the Unseen. 36. The Rise and Fall of the Bilingual Intellectual — Ramachandra Guha. 37. The Life and Times of Mrinal Pande -- Episode 263 of The Seen and the Unseen. 38. Sara Rai Inhales Literature -- Episode 255 of The Seen and the Unseen. 39. The Art of Translation -- Episode 168 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Arunava Sinha). 40. Negotiating Two Worlds, Bilingualism As A Cultural Idea -- Sugata Srinivasaraju delivers the HY Sharada Prasad Memorial Lecture. 41. Karunaalu Baa Belake -- A Kannada version of 'Lead, Kindly Light'. 42. Liberal impulses of our regional languages -- Sugata Srinivasaraju. 43. Why Resisting Hindi is No Longer Enough -- Sugata Srinivasaraju. 44, The Indianness of Indian Food -- Episode 95 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Vikram Doctor). 45. Steven Van Zandt: Springsteen, the death of rock and Van Morrison on Covid — Richard Purden. 46. Roam Research and Zettelkasten. 47. Sixteen Stormy Days — Tripurdaman Singh. 48. The First Assault on Our Constitution — Episode 194 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Tripurdaman Singh). 49. Nehru's Debates -- Episode 262 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Tripurdaman Singh and Adeel Hussain). 50. Speaking of Siva -- Ak Ramanujan's translations of the Vacanas. 51. Not Waving but Drowning -- Stevie Smith. 52. Pictures on a Page -- Harold Evans. 53. Notes From Another India -- Jeremy Seabrook. 54. Good Times, Bad Times -- Harold Evans. 55. John Pilger on Amazon. 56. Sugata Srinivasaraju's pieces in Outlook in 2005 on the Infosys land scam: 1, 2. 57. ‘Bellary Is Mine' -- Sugata Srinivasaraju. 58. Deca Log: 1995-2005. A history in ten-and-a-half chapters, through the eyes of Outlook -- Sugata Srinivasaraju. 59. The Sanjay Story: From Anand Bhavan To Amethi -- Vinod Mehta. 60. Lucknow Boy: A Memoir -- Vinod Mehta. 61. Remembering Mr. Shawn's New Yorker -- Ved Mehta. 62. Off the Record: Untold Stories from a Reporter's Diary -- Ajith Pillai. 63. A Town Offers Its Shoulder -- Sugata Srinivasaraju. 64. Superforecasting: The Art and Science of Prediction -- Philip Tetlock and Dan Gardner. 65. Dhanya Rajendran Fights the Gaze -- Episode 267 of The Seen and the Unseen. 66. The Story of an Income Tax Search — Dhanya Rajendran on Instagram. 67. George Plimpton, 76; 'Paper Lion' author, longtime literary editor, amateur athlete -- David Mehegan. 68. Does The Paris Review Get a Second Act? -- Charles McGrath on literary magazines as "showcases of idealism." 69. My Father's Suitcase -- Orhan Pamuk's Nobel Prize lecture. 70. Gandhi's Assassin: The Making of Nathuram Godse and His Idea of India -- Dhirendra K Jha. 71. Harmony in the Boudoir -- Mark Strand. 72. Of Human Bondage -- W Somerset Maugham. 73. Man's Worldly Goods -- Leo Huberman. 74. Autobiography -- Bertrand Russell. 75. Graham Greene, Joseph Conrad, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Jorge Luis Borges, Honoré de Balzac, Gustave Flaubert, Victor Hugo, Charles Dickens and George Orwell on Amazon. 76. Madame Bovary -- Gustave Flaubert. 77. Reflections on Gandhi -- George Orwell. 78. The Tyranny of Merit -- Michael Sandel. 79. Home in the World: A Memoir -- Amartya Sen. 80. Living to Tell the Tale -- Gabriel Garcia Marquez. 81. Ayodhya - The Dark Night and Ascetic Games by Dhirendra Jha. 82. Team of Rivals -- Doris Kearns Goodwin. 83. My Last Sigh -- Luis Bunuel. 84. Interview with History -- Oriana Fallaci. 85. Ryszard Kapuscinski on Amazon. 86. Journalism as Literature -- Salman Rushdie on Ryszard Kapuscinski. 87. Mallikarjun Mansur, Bhimsen Joshi and Kumar Gandharva on Spotify. 88. Vachanas sung by Mallikarjun Mansur and Basavaraja Rajguru. 89. Outlander, Knightfall and Money Heist on Netflix. 90. Sugata Srinivasaraju's Twitter thread on the songs of DR Bendre. This episode is sponsored by The Desi Crime Podcast. You'll find them on all podcast apps. Check out Amit's online course, The Art of Clear Writing. And subscribe to The India Uncut Newsletter. It's free! The illustration for this episode is by Nishant Jain aka Sneaky Artist. Check out his work on Twitter, Instagram and Substack.

Radio Labyrinth
S7 Ep19: Steph's Perfect Pictures

Radio Labyrinth

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 55:54


This weekend the gang's all here and we are back in the Labyrinth. We look at some upcoming tribute shows for some recently lost comedy legends. Tim & Steph wax poetic on popcorn. And we each explain our four perfect films in Steph's Perfect Pictures. And what kind of weekend would it be without some Views or Snooze? Thanks for listening/watching and always remember to Keep It Canon! #TheGodfather #Fargo #PulpFiction #HotFuzz #GenX #PopcastwithTimAndrews #Atlanta #Radio#RadioLabyrinthPodcast #PopCulture #Depp #quentintarantino ________________________________________________________ YouTube version of the Podcast: https://youtu.be/W9J70Jk9U4o ________________________________________________________ Host: Tim Andrews Co-Hosts: Jeff Leiboff, Steph Swain and Dustin Lollar Intro song performed by John Marc Lundell Atlanta Drone Photos courtesy of Featherstone Photography Video & Audio edited and produced by Dustin Lollar _________________________________________________________ Leave us a Comment and a Like! Follow our Audio Podcast: Radio Labyrinth Podcast on Spotify, iTunes, Audible or any podcatcher! Follow our YouTube page! https://www.youtube.com/radiolabyrinthpodcast Become a Radio Labyrinth Patron! https://www.patreon.com/Timandrews Our website! https://radiolabyrinthpodcast.com/ Social Media: Twitter - https://twitter.com/radio_labyrinth Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/radiolabyrinth/ Instagram - @RadioLabyrinthPresents and @RadioLabyrinth TikTok - @RLPodcast _________________________________________________________ *Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT INTENDED. All rights belong to their respective owners. _________________________________________________________ We love our sponsors! Atlanta Pizza & Gyro http://www.atlantapizzagyro.com/ https://www.facebook.com/atlpizza/ Our Friends! The Power Pod with WSB's, Jared Yamamoto, et. al. https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-power-pod/id1459204880 One Topic with our very own, Autumn Fischer & Greg Russ https://onetopic.podbean.com/ The Wilder Ride with Alan Sanders and Walt Murray https://thewilderride.com/ WKRPCast Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/wkrp-cast/id1528859625 Bryan Silverbax Show https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/bryan-silverbax-show/id1451504886 The Regular Guys Review with Larry Wachs https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/lawrence-wachs/the-regular-guys-review What Happened When Podcast http://www.mlwradio.com/what-happened-when-.html _________________________________________________________ THANK YOU SO MUCH TO ALL OF OUR RADIO PRODUCERS & PATRONS! Thanks to our Radio Labyrinth Producers: Marty Johnson, Tim Slaton, Brett Perkins, Mike Hall, Shawn Hall, Chad Shepperd, Andrew Hopkins, Todd Ellis, Melissa Knowles, Bryan Smith,, Mike D, Matt Carter, Erick Malmstron & Keith Tait. And thank you to all of our awesome Patreon Patrons: Hemp Huntress, Tracy McCoy, Emily Warren, Buck Monterey, Randy Reeves, Robey Neeley, Robert Kerns, Wayne Blair, Sherrie Dougherty, Rusty Weinberg, Michael Einhaus, Mark Weilandt, Leslie Haynie, Kevin Stokes, Jesse Rusinski, Jeremy Truman, Jeff Peterson, Herb Lamb, Gwynne Ketcham, Denise Reynolds, David C Funk, Collin Omen, Christopher Doerr, Chris Weilandt, Chris Cosentino, Brian Jackson, Brennon Price, Andrew Mulazzi, Andrew Harbin, Amber Gilpatrick, Alan Barker, Aaron Roberts, Walt Murray PI, Sam Wells, Ryan Wilson, Lou Coniglio, Kevin Schwartz, Gus Turner, Jonathan Wilson.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 3: The Baby Formula Shortage

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 39:08


 The Monologue: House of Representatives to give staff free Peloton memberships, costing taxpayers // The Interview: State Rep. Jessie Young (R Gig Harbor) reacts to the news that Bellingham City Council is canceling the Pledge of Allegiance at their meetings //  The Monologue: Rep. Cammack on Pictures of Piles of Baby Formula at the Border: ‘This Is Exactly What America Last Looks Like' // The Interview: Ben Garcia (WA 4 Candidate) explains how he hopes to stand out in a crowded race //  LongForm: Matt Larkin discusses how Roe v Wade will impact the WA 08 Race //The Quick Hit:  More churches step up, offer to sponsor Tiny House Villages to help homeless // The Last Rantz: See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Daily Zeitgeist
Black Hole, Son! Lights On At The Crypto Dive Bar 05.13.22

The Daily Zeitgeist

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 60:54


In episode 1247, Jack and guest co-host DJ Danl Goodman are joined by hosts of Just Between Us, Gabby Dunn and Allison Raskin to discuss… Great Resignation is getting older…, Crypto Plunge Continues, The Cause Is The Problem Everyone's Been Pointing Out For A Year?, First Pictures of Super-Massive Black Hole at center of Milky Way and more! Great Resignation is getting older… Crypto Plunge Continues, The Cause Is The Problem Everyone's Been Pointing Out For A Year? First Pictures of Super-Massive Black Hole at center of Milky Way SUBSCRIBE: Emotional Support Lady with Allison Raskin | Bad With Money with Gabby Dunn BUY: Overthinking About You: Navigating Romantic Relationships When You Have Anxiety, OCD, and/or Depression by Allison Raskin LISTEN: Absolute / Misha's Peak by Promnite See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.