Podcasts about second street

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Best podcasts about second street

Latest podcast episodes about second street

Post Bulletin Minute
Today's Headlines: Luke Bryan Farm Tour stop acts as fundraiser for Dover-Eyota students

Post Bulletin Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 5:47


Stories in this episode: Day in History: 1947: New lighted football field at Lake City dedicated Luke Bryan Farm Tour stop acts as fundraiser for Dover-Eyota students Almost six months after Taopi tornado, recovery has progressed 'so quickly and so well' 83-year-old building on Rochester's Second Street sold for $900,000 Mayo smashes past JM to keep Addington Jug, set up battle of unbeatens The Post Bulletin is proud to be a part of the Trust Project. Learn more at thetrustproject.org.

Back Porch Stories
Second Street

Back Porch Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 31:44


Meet the family on Second Street which might well have been called "Stead Street" given that virtually everyone who lived there was a member of the Stead extended family. Listen in on the porch to porch conversation that was life on Second Street, Hillburn, NY in 1956.If you'd like to order a copy of "Back Porch Stories", please click here:https://www.bkstr.com/ramapostore/product/back-porch-stories-159491-1Please Subscribe, Follow, Like and join us each Friday morning for the next Back Porch Story... and if the spirit moves you, give us a rating and tell us how the story relates to your life experiences.

Hudson Mohawk Magazine
July books & activity ideas for adults

Hudson Mohawk Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 10:15


Stephanie Dudek of Troy Public Library suggests two summer reads and notes on July activities. "Wild Life: Dispatches from a Childhood of Baboons and Buttondowns" (Keena Roberts, 2019) is a nonfiction book about growing up with parents who studied primates, and the challenges of then adjusting to American schools. "The Maid: A Novel" (Nita Prose, 2022)is a recent locked-room mystery set in a hotel. July activities include a discussion with Dr. David Borton about his 1400-mile adventure in a solar boat (7/18, 6 pm), "Shorts Out Loud" readings and music on Thursday evenings, and computer classes on Wednesdays. Plus, a lively event on 7/29 to celebrate the 125th anniversary of the Hart Memorial Building, the main location at 100 Second Street in Troy. Check the calendar at thetroylibrary.org for details. Produced by Brea Barthel. For Meghan Marohn's many segments with David Borton about his boat, visit mediasanctuary.org.

Wilson County News
POLICE BLOTTER

Wilson County News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 5:05


Area law-enforcement agencies have reported the following recent activity: Elmendorf police •July 3, Michael Robinson, 32, of San Antonio was arrested at a convenience store in the 15500 block U.S. 181 and charged with unauthorized use of a motor vehicle, as well as an outstanding warrant for assault in family violence with a previous conviction. Floresville police •June 27, Manuel J. Rodriguez, 23, of Floresville was arrested near Second Street and charged with possession of less than 2 ounces of marijuana and unlawful carrying of a weapon. •June 30, Dominic Ramirez, 19, of Floresville was arrested near the intersection of...Article Link

The Pipeline
Triggered with Cory Morgan. Calgary' addict laden transit emergency won't go away

The Pipeline

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 74:44


Cory rants on Calgary's city council and its refusal to take the transit crisis seriously.  WS BC reporter Reid Small on BC news issues.  Colin Craig of Second Street on municipal climate hypocrisy and survivors of socialism. 

Hal Anderson
James Skinner - Author, New Second Street Report

Hal Anderson

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 7:00


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Great.com Talks With...
#327 Great.com Talks With... Second Street

Great.com Talks With...

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 21:58


Canada has one of the worst healthcare policies. Although free, Canadian public healthcare works in a way that hundreds of thousands of Canadians wait in long lines each year. This results in wasting hours of your day just to get a checkup. Canadian policymakers make it difficult for people to access private healthcare. Second Street explores how government policies affect everyday Canadians. They research each government policy and explain these effects in the simplest way possible - through storytelling. Want to support Second Street? https://www.secondstreet.org/ Find the episode on Great.com: https://great.com/great-talks-with/second-street/ 

Tuned In
030: Building The Perfect 7-SECOND Street Car.

Tuned In

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022 69:59


On this week's episode of the High Performance Academy Tuned In podcast, Andre is joined by an absolute legend of the import scene. John Shepherd has been around since the very early days of import drag racing. Through campaigning his AWD Eagle Talon, John lead the first charge and pushed the boundaries of just what was possible with a Japanese performance car.Use ‘PODCAST75' for $75 off your first HPA course here: https://hpcdmy.co/hpa-tuned-in John talks about his early days and the many workarounds and bodges that were necessary during the sport's infancy. The Ohio-based racer and car builder was squeezing record-setting high-ten-second quarter miles out of his 4G63-powered Talon, and as the game progressed, so did the car. Andre and John track the development of the Eagle through to its retirement, at which point it was running 7.7-second quarters — all still in a time well before billet blocks, proper race transmissions, and modern turbo technology.John has since moved on to Nissan GT-Rs and Audi R8s, and lays down his recipe for what he considers to be the "perfect" street car when working with these platforms. Easy to live with, perfectly fine to take on long road trips,... and capable of mid-seven-second quartermiles. Finally, the guys dive into the world of dual clutch transmissions. These DCTs have become ShepTrans' bread and butter in recent years, and John goes into detail on how the clever gearboxes work and how we can make them far stronger in order to put up with the massive torque figures modern performance engines provide. There's plenty of nostalgia to be found in this episode, and if acronyms like DCT and TCM have always left you scratching your head, you definitely don't want to miss this one. Learn more about Performance Engine Building by coming along to the next FREE lesson: hpcdmy.co/enginebuildingf

Tuned In
030: Building The Perfect 7-SECOND Street Car.

Tuned In

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022 69:59


On this week's episode of the High Performance Academy Tuned In podcast, Andre is joined by an absolute legend of the import scene. John Shepherd has been around since the very early days of import drag racing. Through campaigning his AWD Eagle Talon, John lead the first charge and pushed the boundaries of just what was possible with a Japanese performance car.Use ‘PODCAST75' for $75 off your first HPA course here: https://hpcdmy.co/hpa-tuned-in John talks about his early days and the many workarounds and bodges that were necessary during the sport's infancy. The Ohio-based racer and car builder was squeezing record-setting high-ten-second quarter miles out of his 4G63-powered Talon, and as the game progressed, so did the car. Andre and John track the development of the Eagle through to its retirement, at which point it was running 7.7-second quarters — all still in a time well before billet blocks, proper race transmissions, and modern turbo technology.John has since moved on to Nissan GT-Rs and Audi R8s, and lays down his recipe for what he considers to be the "perfect" street car when working with these platforms. Easy to live with, perfectly fine to take on long road trips,... and capable of mid-seven-second quartermiles. Finally, the guys dive into the world of dual clutch transmissions. These DCTs have become ShepTrans' bread and butter in recent years, and John goes into detail on how the clever gearboxes work and how we can make them far stronger in order to put up with the massive torque figures modern performance engines provide. There's plenty of nostalgia to be found in this episode, and if acronyms like DCT and TCM have always left you scratching your head, you definitely don't want to miss this one. Learn more about Performance Engine Building by coming along to the next FREE lesson: hpcdmy.co/enginebuildingf

Hecho Corpus Christi
1EP22 Aadi Home Health & Hospice

Hecho Corpus Christi

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2022 80:07


Welcome to Episode 22 of the Hecho Corpus Christi Podcast, the podcast featuring Corpus Christi's creators, makers, doers, and builders. On this episode, we visit with Kimberly, Oscar, and Clint from Aadi Home Health & Hospice. Clint and I met a couple years ago at Brewster Street after church one Sunday. We met as parents of special needs kiddos are wont to do. The things that make us unique among the population at large, bring us together. Clint and his family moved down here after investing in Aadi, and have become part of the Aadi family, as evidenced by Kimberly's and Oscar's willingness to stay on under the new management to help Aadi grow into the future. As you'll hear in this episode, one of the special things Aadi was able to do during the lockdown and early stages of the pandemic was to help other agencies with supplies and other needs. Aadi's efforts are truly a reflection of the people who live here in Corpus and in the Coastal Bend. Aadi recently moved into a beautifully-restored office on Second Street on the edge of downtown behind First Methodist Church's community garden. You can find Aadi online at www.aadihomehalth.com, and should you or a loved one ever have a need, I'm sure that after this conversation, you'll call Aadi! Thank you for taking time to listen! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hechocorpus/message

Takin' It To The Streets
Single Men Second Line Parade

Takin' It To The Streets

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022


Mandell Carter at the Single Men Second Line in 2018 [Photo by Jamell Tate] START Team Woody at The Other Place Lounge (3601 S. Saratoga Street, corner of Foucher Street). Out FOucher street to The Pelican Bar picking up Single Men. Continue out Saratoga to Dryades Street. LEFT on Dryades to Sixth Street. STOP Ladies of Unity SAPC. Pick up Single Men Queen (10-15 minute wait). Continue out Dryades to Second Street. STOP Sportsman's Bar Sportsman Annex Ladies. Continue out Dryades to Phillip. Quick LEFT then RIGHT to O.C. Haley Blvd. Jackson Ave. STOP CIA Ladies Social Club. Continue out O.C. Haley Blvd. to Erato Street. LEFT on Erato Street to S. Saratoga Street. STOP Gladys Birthday Club (stop is on the corner). Continue out Erato to Simon Bolivar, LEFT on Simon Bolivar to MLK. RIGHT on MLK to 231 MLK Blvd. STOP Single Ladies SAPC (Tribute to the late Mrs. Josie Anderson) 15 minutes. Continue out MLK to S. Galvez Street. STOP Dumaine Gang SAPC. Tribute to our deceased members (Nathaniel, Greg, Roosevelt, Joe Joe, Robert, Bobbie, Elaine) (15 min). LEFT on S. Galvez to Washington Ave. RIGHT on Washington to S. Rocheblave Street. DISBAND Tapp's II Bar   Below, hear our interview with Single Men's Richard Anderson as he discusses how excited they are to parade for the first time in two years, the club's 25th anniversary coming and going, how the city enforcement regarding the number of elements allowed in the second line is impacting their parade, their queen's winning battle with cancer, and much more:

The Chris Top Program
Write Far Away

The Chris Top Program

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 7:59


"Things are not looking good for the mighty Musketeers with thirty seconds left in the game and fifty yards. It looks like they've called a time-out. I want to take this opportunity to remind all of the fine folks who listen to WJKM that you can get your film developed over at Mr. Ken's Pharmaceuticals. That's right! Ken guarantees those pictures in one hour or less. It's not 1970 anymore, so step into 1978 and enjoy faster, more convenient film developing at Ken's Pharmaceuticals on Second Street right beside Frank's Diner. Pick up Grammy's meds and grab your photos from tonight's game in one easy stop. WJKM is the voice of Clarkstown, and I'm Chuck 'The Duck' Williams." "Small towns are notorious for their enthusiastic hometown football fans. Anyone interested in the game is at the game, and that's everyone except for the old codger, Huffy McWhorter, who lives alone out by Byers Creek and hands out shoestrings for Halloween. Duck is a fine commentator, but the reality is that the only folks listening to the broadcast are Duck and the three people sitting behind him. Ken first opened the pharmacy in 1937, and all he talks about these days is how he spent more on that one-hour photo lab than he did on the entire shop back in the day. It takes all kinds to make up a little community like Clarkstown," says Tommy from his steel-framed single bed as his friend Stuart listens intently. Stuart sits comfortably in Tommy's second-hand wheelchair by the bed as our storyteller takes a brief break. "Tommy, dude, why did you stop? It was just getting good, man." "You are not a surfer Stuart. And you're getting crumbs in my chair." Tommy swipes the Pringles from his friend and crunches on a couple of them." "Yeah, well, you owe me two chips. You can't go and steal a fat kid's food without paying the consequences, ya know." "Well, if you don't stop trying to do wheelies in my chair, you are gonna break it. Then you'll be carrying me to school." The two boys laugh at each other, and Tommy continues with his story. "We're back, folks, and just in time. It looks like the quarterback is about to go down, which will end the game. No. Wait! He manages to release the ball, but unfortunately, the pass will be incomplete. I stand corrected! Little Tommy comes out of nowhere! Either I'm crazy, or that kid must have leaped seven feet into the air to make the catch! Boy, oh boy, this boy sure can run. Look at him go. Twenty, fifteen, ten, five, and TOUCHDOWN! The Musketeers win their homecoming game twenty-eight to twenty-four! What a catch, and man, no one even got close to that kid. I've never seen anyone run like that. The cheerleaders will line up to dance with the star of the game tonight." Stuart leaps from his seat, "Wow, Tommy! That was the best story I've ever heard." He then reclaims his chips. "Thanks, Stuart. I made it up just now." "Dude, that's your superpower." "Superpower? I've been in a wheelchair my whole life. Freaks like me do not have superpowers." "Um, Tony Stark. He's in a wheelchair doofus. Oh, I forget, you don't like to read like us intelligents." "I believe you are trying to say intellectuals doofus." "I don't get it. You have the best imagination of anyone I know, but you always cheat your book reports. You'd make one hell of a writer. It's weird because you don't like to read. I just figured a good writer must be a good reader." "Yeah, I don't know. Books are boring, to be honest. I have more fun making my own stuff up. I've never tried writing either. I doubt I'm that good anyway. You're the only slob that'll sit long enough with me to listen." Stuart wipes the grease from his Pringles onto his shirt and says, "I may be a slob, but I have taste, and you are good. Those jerks who pick on us at school don't have your gift. Most of the guys who graduate class of 1979 will end up working at the factory by the summer. It would help if you got out of this town, Tommy. You need to forget everyone here and run away. For real. All of that extra detail about the radio guy and Ken. Who else thinks to do that crap?" "How am I going to run anywhere, hotshot? Look at me." "You can be so dumb for a smart kid. Okay then, you should write away. I mean, write far away from here." "Wait, what? What did you say?" "I know that sounded dumb, Tommy, so you don't have to pick on me about it." "No, I kind of liked it, write far away. I like the way it sounds." "Really? Cool! Anyway, all those jocks will have bad backs between getting hit so much and working on the assembly line. Their superpowers are gone as soon as they grab that diploma. But your powers will keep growing and improving forever, Tommy. All you need is a pen and notebook paper." "I don't know, Stuart. Maybe." "Well, whatever it is you are afraid of, you need to forget it. Tony was probably scared of the suit the first time he put it on, but he did it anyway, and BAM! Iron Man. I'm guessing he'd be more afraid of my mom, who will beat me if I'm late for supper, so I have to go. Think about it. Don't forget me when you build your fortress somewhere in the Alps. I can be your sidekick—later nerd face." Stuart lets himself out through the window and closes it behind him. Tommy sighs and ponders for a moment before reaching into his nightstand to pull out some paper and a pencil. He stares at the crumb-covered wheelchair beside the bed. The contraption has felt like a prison his entire life. At this moment, he realized Stuart never saw the handicap. Instead, his friend only noticed the super-human abilities of his lifelong companion. Tommy's mind has always been free to explore and navigate far beyond the borders of his small town for as long as he can remember. He was the first man on Mars once, and the next day, he took advantage of an endless supply of oxygen as he rode dolphins beneath the sea. Recently he scored the winning touchdown and, before that, saved the prettiest girl in school from a burning building. We're all trapped by something. Fear often holds each of us firmly and strongly suggests that routine is best. A pattern is safe, and we all deserve to live life stuck in some foreordained groove that's impossible to escape. Sometimes a pal like Stuart comes along to give us a slight nudge unknowingly. A push was all Tommy needed, after all, because he'd always known the intensity was there but ignored the feelings. "I guess Stuart is my radioactive spider," Tommy thinks to himself before laughing out loud. The pencil rolls between Tommy's fingers as his vision builds velocity and vivid images assemble within his mind. A whole world materializes within his reflections like it has a myriad of times. Before, his expressions were seized by the cosmos and thrown into a cell for an audience of one. A lost story is a tragedy, so today, he'll step from his boundaries and escape along with his words. The pencil glides over the paper as if it takes on its own personality and forgets it's an instrument guided by Tommy. Sentences evolve, and paragraphs unfold while our hero uses his newfound ability to rework his perspective. Tommy reads the first few lines aloud, "Write Far Away by Thomas Browning. The more my friend spoke, the further away my wheelchair appeared. It was almost like God's way of telling me that I didn't need it anymore. That piece of equipment has always defined me but not now because today, I learned that I have a superpower thanks to my best friend. My words will catapult me from Clarkstown one day, but until then, I'll use them to wander anywhere, and the only limitations are the ones I allow. Stuart breaks my concentration, 'I know that sounded dumb, Tommy, so you don't have to pick on me about it.' No, I kind of liked it; write far away. I like the way it sounds."

The Chris Top Program
Second Street

The Chris Top Program

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 6:52


Kathleen is getting older but not old enough to call old. The Price Is Right has always been her claim to fame, but she didn't win back in 73' and now, in 78' she sits in Frank's Diner on Second Street. Some things seem like they happened yesterday, while others were surely two lifetimes ago. She fancies pretty dresses adorned with pink flowers and bows, but she's most comfortable in her worn bell-bottoms even though they're going out of style. Donald is barely past his prime, but men tend to age well. His buddies all call him Donnie, even when he was the boss a few years back. Since they cut the ribbon, Frank's has been his early lunch break stop, at first because of the world's best coffee but now for another reason. Those worn hands have held many hammers, but not for several seasons now. You can still see the imperfection from the time the nail went all the way through. He was back to work the next day. Kathleen takes her break at 10:30, and in the beginning, it was to avoid the crowd. Frank lets her sit in the corner booth by herself because he knows she'll be gone before the rush. Kathy brings along her worn copy of Reader's Digest every visit, but she never reads it. The magazine is only a prop, a part of the show. Sometimes she'll turn a page or two, but most words are impossible to read behind the world's best coffee stains covering the literature. She'll often spend time thinking about how her nature is to hide her own story. It's kind of like a self-imposed wound whose purpose is to conceal any beauty. Donald brings his newspaper from home but rarely reads it at lunch. He saves the articles for bedtime because it helps him sleep most nights, but it doesn't always work. Most days, he'll catch himself daydreaming about running through the forest. He's never run a day in his life, but the thought of sprinting as quickly as he can through the woods and never losing his breath gives him peace. It's the sort of serenity we all accomplish in our fantasies, but it leaves us hollow when we wake up. Donnie's chest is like an auditorium filled with ghosts he isn't ready to let go of anytime soon. It's not as easy as you'd think. Apparitions linger longer than an old broken power drill we'd discard and replace. Kathleen's tears cascade in reverse, washing down the inside of her cheeks, hidden from you and me. Houdini probably crafted her mask because all we're allowed to see is what Kathy is comfortable showing us. And it isn't much. She married the devil soon after her five minutes of fame. He spoke the perfect words and gave her the universe before confining her on a small island. The demon dictated every move and thought, and she did her best to comply. At sunset, he came home and rewarded her efforts with bruises and broken bones. She ran away to heal her body, but no distance ever repaired the destruction, picking and pinching and ripping inside her spirit. Donald can hardly walk after the accident at work left him crippled perpetually. His broken back earned him enough money to get by, but currency is no better than a wet Band-Aid when it comes to repairing the true tragedy. His life is as charged as a brand new Duracell, but a battery is useless without something to power. Donnie has the impulse of a younger man but the body of an old-timer frittering away, waiting on fate. Memories of youth inspire most, but yesterday's photos leave Donald frustrated with the desire to live again. He'd love to climb a ladder to stand on a rooftop where he felt most at home. Despair recognizes misery when it's hidden beneath a bed of roses like a trained eye senses the body under the lawn of a serial killer. Don caught Kat's eye the day she strolled into Frank's for the world's best coffee. She spent the first day spying on him, the second feeling his emotion, and every day since loving the man, she'd never approach. Kat knows why he brings the paper but never opens it and why he hardly drinks a drop from his mug. Sometimes, he'll order a muffin on Wednesday, and Kat knows if Don will add butter or eat it plain before he even decides. Like anyone else, she can see the physical torment in his face when he stands. Like no other, she discloses the overwhelming sorrow that haunts him. Love burst through the diner door for Don the first time Kat walked in and had a seat. Her confidence fooled everyone, even Benny, who sits on a barstool every Friday complaining about his marriage. The masquerade failed within moments when Don took a more intimate gaze because he knows tragedy like the back of his scarred hand. Whenever he'd catch Kat scrolling the greasy menu, he knew it was because she felt the need to hide. Sometimes she'd drink a second cup with two lumps of sugar instead of one like the first round. "If we could only sweeten life as easily," he would contemplate as she stirred. He imagines she finds comfort in at least having control over her coffee. The two meet six days a week, right on time on Second Street. Sundays must be unbearable for both of them. Then again, the separation undoubtedly intensifies the magnificence of the daily encounters. They've never shared a hello or a goodbye, but what they do share is something Benny has clearly never experienced. The comfort of being close to a person who understands and ensures you aren't alone is a gift many never find. Kat and Don depend on one another, and they never break the plans they never made together. Unfortunately, that's more than most obtain when they compromise. Kat and Don's eyes have met a time or two, and it's enough when you aren't ready for anything more. Perhaps the world's best coffee isn't as great as the sign may suggest, but it gave our two misfits an excuse to find each other. Thirty minutes, six days a week turns into one hundred and fifty-six hours a year that these two forget and feel complete. If Benny gave that much time to his wife, he wouldn't plan on leaving her. Maybe the passion between Kat and Don is indeed unique, and it's doubtful it'll ever move any further than Second Street. Sometimes that kind of love is enough—a love that demands attention from across the room and is admired forever from a distance.

The Richard Syrett Show
The Richard Syrett Show - December 13, 2021 - Waiting List Deaths Surging, Earth Healthier due to Global Warming, & Remembering Mel Lastman

The Richard Syrett Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 83:31


Catch up on what you missed on an episode of The Richard Syrett Show. President of Second Street.Org, Colin Craig talks about how Waiting List Deaths Surged in 2020-21. Play by Play for the Mississauga Steelheads, Matt Cullen gives a hockey update. Small town physician & Freedom-Lover, Dr. Patrick Phillips. Epoch Times Columnist & Executive Director of Energy Probe, Lawrence Solomon discusses his article: “Planet Earth Is Healthier Than Ever, Thanks to Global Warming.” True North News Contributor & Author of “Underdog: Confessions of a Right-Wing, Gay Jewish Muckraker” Sue-Ann Levy remembers Mel Lastman.

Second Street PCA
John 1:1-18 "The Word Made Flesh: Light has Come"

Second Street PCA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 37:02


Bob Hammond brings the Word from Second Street's pulpit this morning. God is light, Jesus is the light. The light has come into the world, this is good news. All are called to receive Him and live by and in His light.

SA Today with Jennie Lenman
1455: More Mental Health Support for Young People in Murraylands

SA Today with Jennie Lenman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 7:09


Mental Health support has improved for young people in Murray Bridge and surrounds, with the relocation of headspace from a small office at the Station to a larger, multi-office space at Second Street. The clinic has been able to significantly reduce the wait list for clinical support and offers new programs that provide holistic wellbeing and mental health supports for young people aged 12-25. Pia Gratham (pictured), the centre's Community Engagement Team Leader, joins Jennie Lenman in this podcast to discuss. For support, contact the headspace National Office: (03) 9027 0100 If you need to speak to someone urgently, call:  Lifeline -13 11 14 Kids Helpline- 1800 55 1800 Emergency Services - 000

Mall Talk with Paige Weldon and Emily Faye
francesca's w/ Rachele Friedland

Mall Talk with Paige Weldon and Emily Faye

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 106:03


Rachele Friedland joins us to talk trash cans and blackout curtains at Bed Bath & Beyond, talking trees at South Coast Plaza, her time working on Second Street in Belmont Shore, and of course, all things francesca's from chunky plastic necklaces to bachelorette party flasks to mugs for your mom. Also, Malloween month continues with another round of The Price is No Object: Roger's Gardens edition. JOIN THE MALL TALK PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/malltalkpod/ BUY MALL TALK MERCH: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/malltalkpodcast FOLLOW RACHELE: https://twitter.com/Rachele_F  https://www.instagram.com/rachelefriedland/  FOLLOW MALL TALK: https://www.instagram.com/malltalkpod  https://twitter.com/malltalkpod 

Savage Minds Podcast
Michael Hudson

Savage Minds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 64:18


Michael Hudson, American economist and author of Super Imperialism: The Economic Strategy of American Empire (1972) discusses the rentier economy that accounts for the growing disparity in wealth due to finance capitalism. Giving a history of the the polarisation of the US economy since the 1960s through the present, Hudson discusses how the high costs of education and housing have led to a growing problem of student debt, higher costs of living and increasing austerity. Noting how 80% of bank loans are made for real estate in the US, Hudson expounds upon how loans and exponentially growing debts outstrip profits from the economy proving disastrous for both the government and the people who are paying increasing amounts on housing with little to no money left to spend on goods and services. Hudson contends that finance capitalism is a “self-terminating” oligarchical system leaving workers traumatised, afraid to strike or react to working conditions, while they are pushed towards serfdom as US and Europe are heading towards a debt crisis on par with that of Argentina and Greece.TranscriptIntroduction: Welcome to Savage Minds. I'm your host, Julian Vigo. Today's show marks the launch of our second season with a very special guest: Michael Hudson. Michael Hudson is a financial analyst and president of the Institute for the Study of long term economic trends. He is a distinguished research professor of economics at the University of Missouri Kansas City, and the professor at the School of Marx studies, Peking University in China. He's also a research fellow at the Levy Institute of Bard College, and he has served as an economic adviser to the US Canadian, Mexican, and Latvian governments. He's also been a consultant to UNITAR, the Institute for Research on Public Policy and the Canadian Science Council, among other organisations. He holds a BA from the University of Chicago and an MA and PhD in economics from New York University. Professor Hudson is the author of Killing the Host: How Financial Parasites and Debt Bondage Destroy the Global Economy (2015), and most recently, J is for junk economics, a guide to reality in an age of deception. His super imperialism, the economic strategy of the American Empire has just been translated into German after its appearance in Chinese, Japanese and Spanish. He sits on the editorial board of lap times quarterly and has written for the Journal of International Affairs, Commonweal, International Economy, Financial Times, and Harper's, and he's a regular contributor to CounterPunch. I welcome Michael Hudson, to Savage Minds.Julian Vigo: Class analysis in the United States is rather subterfuge amidst all these other narratives of the American dream as it's framed—that being the right to own one's home. In the UK, that became part of the Trojan horse, that Thatcher built to win her election. It was a very smart move. She won that election—she won her elections—by the reforms in the “right to buy” scheme as I'm sure you know. I t was really clever and disastrous for human rights in the country. I've spent quite a bit of my life in the UK and to see that in 1979 was, I believe, 49% of all residential housing was council housing. And when I wrote a piece on this for the Morning Star about eight, nine years ago, that rate was reduced to under 11%. So we're seeing the haves- and have-nots. And this is where your work really struck a chord for me. And let's kick into the show at this point. I have written over the years, about rentier capitalism, a term that is increasingly used to describe economies dominated by rentier, rents and rent-generating assets. And you discuss this quite a bit in your work, more recently, your article from July, “Finance Capitalism versus Industrial Capitalism: The Rentier Resurgence and Takeover.” And in this article, you discuss how today the finance, insurance and real estate sectors have regained control of government creating a “neo-rentier” economy as you put it, while you note—and I quote you: “The aim of this postindustrial finance capitalism is the opposite of industrial capitalism as known to nineteenth-century economists: it seeks wealth primarily through the extraction of economic rent, not industrial capital formation.” Unquote. I was wondering if we might begin our talk by branching out from this piece you wrote in July. And if you could explain for our listeners why discerning rentier capitalism is essential for understanding the global push to privatise and financialise those sectors that formerly existed in the public domain such as—and we see this everywhere, including in the EU—transportation, health care, prisons, policing, education, the post office, etc.Michael Hudson: Well, most textbooks depict a sort of happy world that almost seems to exist in the 1950s. And this “happy world” is when wealthy people get money, they build factories and buy machinery and hire workers to produce more goods and services. But that's not what the credits created for today, it's the textbooks that pick the banks that take in people's deposits and lend them out to people who build industrial production, and you'll have a picture of workers with lunchboxes working in. But actually, banks only lend money against assets. And the main assets do not make a profit by employing people to produce things there. They simply are opportunities to extract rent, like real estate 80% of bank loans are made for real estate. And that means they're made against primarily buildings that are in land that are already there. And the effective more and more bank credit is to raise the price of real estate. And in the United States, in the last year, housing prices have gone up 20%. And typically, in America, if you go to a bank and take out a loan, the government is going to guarantee the bank that you will pay the loan up to the point where it absorbs 43% of your income.So here's a big chunk of American income going to pay simply for housing, those price increases, not because there's more housing, or better housing. But in fact, the housing is built worse and worse every year, by lowering the standards, but simply inflation. There are other forms of rent, other people pay, for instance, 18% of America's GDP is healthcare, much higher than the percentage in any other country for much lower quality of service. So you know, that's sort of taken out of people's budgets. If you're a worker in the United States, right away, you get your paycheque 15%—a little more, maybe 16% now—is deducted for Social Security and medical care for when you're older. They also need up to maybe 30%, for income tax, federal, state and local income tax before you have anything to spend. And then you have to spend for housing, you have to pay for transportation, you have to pay for your own medical insurance contributions, your own pension contributions. So there's very, very little that is left over in people's budgets to buy goods and services. Not only have real wages in the United States, gone down now for three decades, but the disposable income that people and families get after they meet their sort of monthly “nut,” what they can spend on goods and services is shrunk even more. So while they're getting squeezed, all this money is paid to rentiers as at the top. And because of the miracle of compound interest, the amount that the 1% of the economy has grows exponentially. Any rate of interest is a doubling time. And even though people know that there's only a 0.1% rate of interest, now for the banks, and for large wall firms, it's about 3% if you want to buy a mortgage. and so this, the 0.1% is lent out to large companies like Blackstone that are now buying up almost all of the housing that comes onto the market in the United States. So in 2008, 69% of homeowners of Americans own their own homes. Now it's fallen by more than 10%. It's fallen to about 51%. All this difference has been basically the financial sector funding a transformation away from home ownership into landlordship—into absentee ownership. And so the if you're part of the 1%, the way that you make money is by buying stocks or bonds, or corporate takeovers, or buying real estate and not building factories. And that's why the factories and the industry have been shifting outside of the United States over to China, and other countries. So, what we're having is a kind of…I won’t say its post-industrial capitalism, because people thought that the what was going to follow industrial capitalism was going to be socialism. They thought that there will be more and more government spending on providing basic needs that people had. And instead of socialism, and a more, egalitarian distribution of wealth and income, you've had a polarization of wealth and income, you've had the wealthy people making money financially, and by real estate, and by rent seeking, and by creating monopolies, but not by building factories, not by producing goods and services. And that is why the economy's polarizing, and so many people are unhappy with their conditions. Now, they're going further and further into debt and their student debt. Instead of education here being a public utility that's provided freely, it's become privatised at NYU, it's now $50,000 or $60,000 a year. There is no way in which the United States can compete industrially with other countries when they've loaded down new entrants into the labor force with huge housing costs, student debt, huge taxes have been shifted off the 1% onto the 99%. So in the United States, finance capitalism basically is self-terminating. It leads to a polarised economy, it leads to austerity. And it leaves countries looking like Greece looked after 2015, after its debt crisis, it looks like Argentina is trying to struggle to pay its foreign debts. And that seems to be the future in which the US and Europe are moving towards.Julian Vigo: I posted on my Facebook wall about this about maybe five weeks ago, that the rentier class, I'm not just including the likes of Blackstone, but the middle class that are multiple home dwellers. I noted that during the lockdown, I was reading through accounts on social media of people who were being threatened by landlords, landlords, who actually had no mortgage to pay. And I had to wonder at that point, what is the input of the rentier class by the landowning class who are not necessarily part of the 1%. These are people who, as some of these people came on my wall and said, “I worked hard to buy my second and third houses!” And I thought, “Well, let me pull out my violins.” One thing that really alerted me during lockdown was the lack of sympathy for renters. And I don't just mean in the US, in fact, I think the US had a kinder response to renting in some sectors such as New York state where there has been—and still—is a massive pushback against any form of relaxation of rent forgiveness, since lockdown in the EU and Italy and France. It's appalling the kind of treatment that renters received here. I spoke to people in Bologna, who were doing a rent strike, but fearful of having their name mentioned. I ended up not being able to run the piece because of that. And there are so many people who don't have money to pay their rent in the EU, in the UK, and yet, we're somehow focusing oftentimes on these meta-critical analyses of the bigger corporations, the 1%. But where does the middle class fit into this, Michael, because I do have to wonder if maybe we should be heading towards the model I hold in my mind and heart is St. Ives in Cornwall, which about eight years ago set a moratorium saying no second homes in this city. Now, they didn't do it because of any allegiance to Marxism or socialism. They did it in part because of that, and because of a left-leaning politics, but mostly because they didn't want to have a ghost town that when the summer was over, you had very few people living in town. What are the answers to the rentier class that is also composed of people who consider themselves hard-working people who just want someone else to pay for their house, as one person on Twitter, put it.Michael Hudson: This is exactly the problem that is plaguing left wing politics, from Europe to America in the last fifty years.Julian Vigo: Exactly. It's astounding because there was a lot of debate on Twitter around last summer, when one woman wrote, I just did the math, I'm almost 29 years old, and I paid and she listed the amount in rent, I have just bought my landlord a second house. And people are adding it up that we are back to understanding. And I think in terms of the medieval period, remember in high school in the US when you study history, and you learn about feudalism, and the serfs coming in from far afield having to tend to the Masters terrain. And I think, are we heading back to a kind of feudalism under a new name? Because what's dividing those who can afford rents and those who can, it's not only your eligibility to receive a bank loan in this climate, which is quite toxic in London. I know many architects, lawyers, physicians who cannot get bank loans. Ironically, the bar is being raised so high that more and more people in London are moving on to the canal system—they're renting or buying narrowboats. The same is happening in other parts of the world where people are being barred out of home ownership for one reason or another and at the same time, there's a class of people often who got loans in a period when it was quite easy in the 80s and early 90s, let's say and they hold a certain control over who's paying—43% of income of Americans goes on housing. And as you know, in New York City that can be even higher. How can we arrive at a society where there's more equality between these haves and have-nots? Because it seems that the middle class is playing a role in this. They're trying to come off as being the hard-working schmoes, who have just earned their right to own their second or third homes, and then the others who will never have a foot on that ladder, especially given the crash?Michael Hudson: Well, I think you've put your finger on it. Most people think of economies being all about industry. But as you've just pointed out, for most people, the economy is real estate. And if you want to understand how modern economies work, you really should begin by looking at real estate, which is symbiotic with with banking, because as you pointed out that in a house is worth whatever a bank will lend. And in order to buy a house, unless you have an enormous amount of savings, which hardly anyone has, you'll borrow from a bank and buy the house. And the idea is to use the rent to pay the interest to the bank. And then you end up hoping late hoping with a capital gain, which is really land price gain. You borrow from the bank hoping that the Federal Reserve and the central bank or the Bank of England is going to inflate the economy and inflate asset prices and bank credit is going to push prices further and further up. As the rich get richer, they recycle the money in the banks and banks lend it to real estate. So, the more the economy is polarised between the 1% and the 99%, the more expensive houses get the more absentee landlords are able to buy the houses and outbid the homebuyers, who as you pointed out, can't get loans because they're already loaned up. If they can't get loans in England to buy a house, it's because they already owe so much money for other things. In America, it would be because they own student debt or because they own other bank loans, and they're all loaned up. So the key is people are being squeezed more than anywhere else on housing. In America, it rents care too and on related sort of monopoly goods that yield rent. Now the problem is why isn't this at the centre of politics?Is it because— and it's ironic that although most people in every country, Europe and America are still homeowners, or so they only own their own home—they would like to be rocky as a miniature? They would like to live like the billionaires live off the rents. They would like to be able to have enough money without working to get a free lunch and the economy of getting a free lunch. And so somehow, they don't vote for what's good for the wage earners. They vote for well, if I were to get richer, then I would want to own a house and I would want to get rent. So I'm going to vote in favour of the landlord class. I'm going to vote in favour of banks lending money to increase housing prices. Because I'd like to borrow money from a bank to get on this treadmill, that's going to be an automatic free lunch. Now, I not only get rent, but I'll get the rising price of the houses that prices continue to rise. So somehow, the idea of class interest, they don't think of themselves as wave generators, they think of themselves as somehow wouldn't be rentiers in miniature without reaising that you can't do it in miniature. You really have to have an enormous amount of money to be successful rentier.So no class consciousness means that the large real estate owners, the big corporations like Blackstone, that own huge amounts can sort of trot out a strapped, homeowner and individual, and they will sort of hide behind it and say, “Look at this, poor family, they use their money to buy a house, the sort of rise in the world, and now the tenants have COVID, and they can't pay the rent. Let's not bail out these, these landlords.” So even though they're not getting rent, we have to aid them. And think of them as little people, but they're not little people. They're a trillion dollar, money managers. They're huge companies that are taking over. And people somehow personify the billionaires and the trillion dollar real estate management companies as being small people just like themselves. There's a confusion about the economic identity.Julian Vigo: Well, certainly in the United States, we are known to have what's called the “American dream.” And it's, it's quite interesting when you start to analyse what that dream has morphed into, from the 1960s to the present, and I even think through popular culture. Remember Alexis, in Dynasty, this was the go-to model for success. So we've got this idea that the super rich are Dallas and Dynasty in the 80s. But 20 years after that, we were facing economic downfalls. We had American graduates having to go to graduate school because they couldn't get a job as anything but a barista. And the model of getting scholarships or fellowships, any kind of bursary to do the Masters and PhD. When I was doing my graduate work, I was lucky enough to have this, but that was quickly disappearing. A lot of my colleagues didn't have it. And I imagine when you went to school, most of your colleagues had it. And today, and in recent years, when I was teaching in academia, most of my students doing advanced degrees had zero funding. So, we've got on the one hand, the student debt, hamster wheel rolling, we have what is, to me one of the biggest human rights issues of the domestic sphere in countries like the US or Great Britain, frankly, everywhere is the ability to live without having to be exploited for the payment of rent. And then we have this class of people, whether they're Blackstone, and huge corporations, making billions, or the middle class saying, “But I'm just living out the American dream.” How do we square the “American dream,” and an era where class consciousness is more invisible than ever has it been?Michael Hudson: I think the only way you can explain that is to show how different life was back in the 1960s, 1950s. When I went to school, and the college, NYU cost $500 a semester, instead of 50,000, that the price of college has gone up 100 times since I went to college—100 times. I rented a house in a block from NYU at $35 a month on Sullivan Street. And now that same small apartment would go for 100 times that much, $3,500 a month, which is a little below the average rent in Manhattan these days. So, you've had these enormous increases in the cost of getting an education, they cost of rent, and in a society where housing was a public utility, and education was a public utility, education would be provided freely. If the economy wanted to keep down housing prices, as they do in China for instance, then you would be able to work if the kind of wages that Americans are paid today and be able to save. The ideal of China or countries that want to compete industrially is to lower the cost of living so that you don't have to pay a very high wages to cover the inflated cost of housing, the cost of education.If you privatise education in America, and if you increase the housing prices, then either you're going to have to pay labor, much higher rates that will price it out of world markets, at least for industrial goods, or you'll have to squeeze budgets. So yes, people can pay for housing, and education, but they're not going to buy the goods and services they produce. And so and that's one of the reasons why America is not producing industrial manufacturers. It's importing it all abroad. So the result of this finance capitalism that we have the result of the rent squeeze, that you depict, and the result of voters not realising that this is economic suicide for them is that the economy is shrinking and leaving people basically out in the street. And of course, all of this is exacerbated by the COVID crisis right now. Where, right now you have, especially in New York City, many people are laid off, as in Europe, they're not getting an income. Well, if your job has been closed down as a result of COVID, in Germany, for instance, you're still given something like 80% of your normal salary, because they realise that they have to keep you solvent and living. In the United States, there's been a moratorium on rents, they realise that, well, if you've lost your job, you can't pay the rent. There's a moratorium on evictions, there's a moratorium on bank foreclosures on landlords that can't pay their mortgage to the bank, because their tenants are not paying rent. All of that is going to expire in February, that’s just in a few months.  So they're saying, “OK, in New York City, 50,000 tenants are going to be thrown out onto the street, thousands of homes are going to be foreclosed on.” All over the country, millions of Americans are going to be subject now to be evicted. You can see all of the Wall Street companies are raising private capital funds to say, “We're going to be waiting for all this housing to come onto the market. We're going to be waiting for all of these renovations to take place. We're going to swoop in and pick it up.” This is going to be the big grab bag that is going to shape the whole coming generation and do to America really what Margaret Thatcher did to England when she got rid of—when she shifted from housing, the council housing that you mentioned, was about half the population now dow to about 1/10 of the population today.Julian Vigo: This is what I wonder is not being circulated within the media more frequently. We know that major media is not...[laughts] They like to call themselves left-of-centre but they're neoliberal which I don't look at anything in the liberal, the neoliberal sphere, as “left.” I look at it as a sort of strain of conservatism, frankly. But when you were speaking about paying $35 a month for an apartment on Sullivan Street, get me a time machine! What year was that? Michael?Michael Hudson: That was 1962.Julian Vigo: 1962 And roughly, the minimum wage in New York was just over $1 an hour if I'm not mistaken.Michael Hudson: I don't remember. I was making I think my first job on Wall Street was 50 to $100. A year $100 a week.Julian Vigo: So yes, I looked it up because I was curious when you said 100 times certainly we see that. If the tuition at New York when and New York University when I left was $50,000 a year you were paying $500 a semester. This is incredible inflation.Michael Hudson: And I took out a student loan from the state because I wanted to buy economic books. I was studying the history of economic thought and so I borrowed, you know, I was able to take out a loan that I repaid in three years as I sort of moved up the ladder and got better paying jobs. But that was the Golden Age, the 1960s because in that generation there was the baby boom that just came online. There were jobs for everybody. There was a labor shortage. And everybody was trying to hire—anyone could get a job. I got to New York and I had $15 in my pocket in 1960. I'd shared a ride with someone, [I] didn't know what to do. We stayed in a sort of fleabag hotel on Bleecker Street that was torn down by the time you got there. But I,  took a walk around and who should I run into that Gerde's Folk City, but a friend of mine had stayed at my house in Chicago once and he let me stay at his apartment for a few weeks till I can look around, find a place to live and got the place for $35 a month,Julian Vigo: When there was that debate on Twitter—there were many debates actually about renting on Twitter—and there were a few landlords who took to Twitter angry that they learned that their renters had received subsidies in various countries to pay their rent. And instead of paying their rent, the people use this to up and buy a downpayment on a home. And they got very upset. And there was a bit of shadow on Friday there with people saying, “Well, it's exactly what you've done.” And I find this quite fascinating, because I've always said that the age of COVID has made a huge Xray of our society economically speaking. And it's also telling to me that in countries that I would assume to be more socialist leaning, if not socialist absolutely, in the EU, we saw very few movements against rent. Very few people or groups were calling for a moratorium on rent. It's ironic, but it was in the US where we saw more moratoria happen. What is happening where—and this reaches to larger issues, even outside of your specialty of economics and finance—but why on earth has it come to be that the left is looking a lot more like the right? And, don't shoot me, but you know, I've been watching some of Tucker Carlson over the past few years, someone who I could not stand after 9/11. And he has had more concern and more investigations of the poor and the working class than MSBC or Rachel Maddow in the biggest of hissy fits. What is going on politically that the valences of economic concern are shifting—and radically so?Michael Hudson: Well, the political situation in America is very different from every other country. In the Democratic Party, in order to run for a position, you have to spend most of your time raising money, and the party will support whatever candidates can raise the most money. And whoever raises the largest amount of money gets to be head of a congressional committee dealing with whatever it is their campaign donors give. So basically, the nomination of candidates in the United States, certainly in the Democratic Party, is based on how much money you can raise to finance your election campaign, because you're supposed to turn half of what you raised over to the party apparatus. Well, if you have to run for an office, and someone explained to me in in the sixties, if I wanted to go into politics, I had to find someone to back up my campaign. And they said, “Well, you have to go to the oil industry or the tobacco industry.”And you go to these people and say, “Will you back my campaign?” And they say, Well, sure, what's your position going to be on on smoking on oil and the the tax position on oil, go to the real estate interest, because all local politics and basically real estate promotion projects run by the local landlords and you go to the real estate people and you say, “Okay, I'm going to make sure that we have public improvements that will make your land more valuable, but you won't have to pay taxes on them.” So, if you have people running for office, proportional to the money they can make by the special interests, that means that all the politicians here are representing the special interests that pay them and their job as politicians is to deliver a constituency to their campaign contributors. And so the campaign contributors are going to say, “Well, here's somebody who could make it appear as if they're supporting their particular constituency.” And so ever since the 60s, certainly in America, the parties divided Americans into Irish Americans, Italian Americans, black Americans, Hispanic Americans. They will have all sorts of identity politics that they will run politicians on. But there's one identity that they don't have—and that's the identity of being a wage earner. That's the common identity that all these hyphenated Americans have in common. They all have to work for a living and get wages, they're all subject to, they have to get housing, they have to get more and more bank credit, if they want to buy housing so that all of the added income they get is paid to the banks as mortgage interest to get a home that used to be much less expensive for them. So basically, all of the increase in national income ends up being paid to the campaign contributors, the real estate contributors, the oil industry, the tobacco industry, the pharmaceuticals industry, that back the politicians. And essentially, you have politics for sale in the United States. So we're really not in a democracy anymore—we're in an oligarchy. And people don't realise that without changing this, this consciousness, you're not going to have anything like the left-wing party.And so you have most Americans out wanting to be friendly with other Americans, you know, why can't everybody just compromise and be in the centre? Well, there's no such thing as a centrist. Because you'll have an economy that's polarising, you have the 1% getting richer and richer and richer by getting the 99% further and further in debt. So the 99% are getting poorer and poor after paying their debts. And to be in the centre to say, and to be say, only changes should be marginal, that means—a centrist is someone who lets this continue. With that we're not going to make a structural change, that's radical, we're not going to change the dynamic that is polarising the economy, between creditors at the top and debtors is at the bottom, between landlords at the top and renters at the bottom between monopolists and the top and the consumers who have to pay monopoly prices for pharmaceuticals, for cable TV, for almost everything they get. And none of this is taught in the economics courses. Because you take an  economics course, they say, “There's no such thing as unearned income. Everybody earns whatever they can get.” And the American consciousness is shaped by this failure to distinguish between earned income and unearned income and a failure to see that dynamic is impoverishing them. It's like the proverbial frog that's been boiled slowly in water. So, with this false consciousness people have—if only they can save enough and borrow from a bank—they can become a rentier in Miniature. They're just tricked into a false dream.Intermission: You're listening to savage minds, and we hope you're enjoying the show. Please consider subscribing. We don't accept any money from corporate or commercial sponsors. And we depend upon listeners and readers just like you. Now back to our show.Julian Vigo: I don't know if you saw the movie called Queen of Versailles. It was about this very bizarre effort to construct a very ugly Las Vegas-style type of Versailles by a couple that was economically failing. And it spoke to me a lot about the failings of the quote unquote, “American dream.” And I don't mean that dream, per se. I mean, the aspiration to have the dream, because that is, as you just pointed out, unearned income, that is the elephant in the room. And it almost seems to be the elephant maybe to keep using that metaphor, that the blind Sufi tale: everyone's feeling a different part of it, but no one is naming it. And I find this really shocking, that we can't speak of unearned income and look at the differences as to which country's tax inheritance and which do not—this idea that one is entitled to wealth. Meanwhile, a lot of US institutions are academically, now formally, being captured by the identity lobbies and there are many lobbies out there—it's a gift to them. They don't have to work on the minimum wage, they don't have to work on public housing, they don't have to work on housing.They can just worry about, “Do we have enough pronoun badges printed out?” And I find this really daunting as someone who is firmly of the left and who has seen some kind of recognition have this problem bizarrely, from the right. We seem to have a blind spot where we're more caught up in how people see us, rather than the material reality upon which unearned and earned income is based. Why is it that today people are living far worse than their grandparents and parents especially?Michael Hudson: Well, I think we've been talking about that, because they have to pay expenses as their parents and grandparents didn't have to pay, they have to pay much higher rent. Everybody used to be able to afford to buy a house, that was the definition of “middle class” in America was to be a homeowner. And when I was growing up in the 50s and 60s, everybody on the salary they were getting could afford to buy their house. And that's why so many people bought the houses with working class sell rates. As I told you, I was getting $100 a week. At least if you were quiet you could do it. If you were black, you couldn't do it. The blacks were redlined. But the white people could buy the houses. And that's why today, the white population has so much more wealth than the black population, because the white families would leave the house to the children and housing prices have gone up 100 times. And because they've gone up 100 times, this is endowed with a whole white hereditary class of kids whose family own their own homes, send them to schools. But America was redlined. Now Chicago was redlined, blacks were redlined. In New York City, the banks would not lend money to black neighbourhoods or to black borrowers. I was at Chase Manhattan and they made it very clear: they will not make a loan to a mortgage if they're black people living in my block. And they told me that when I was on Second Street and Avenue B. I won't repeat the epithet racist epithets they used. But what has caused the racial disparity today is what we've been talking about: the fact that whites could buy their own homes, blacks could not.And the reason I'm bringing this up is that if—we're working toward a society where white people are now going to be reduced to the position that black people are in today: of not having their own homes, of not being able to get bank credit. One friend of mine at the Hudson Institute, a black economist, wanted to—we were thinking of cowriting a book, The Blackening of America. The state of, well, the future of the whites, is to become blacks if you don't solve this situation. And I've been unable to convince many black leaders about reparations—that the reparations, very hard to get reparations for slavery, which was to their grandparents, their reparations are due to the blacks today who do not have housing, their own homes, because of the redlining that they have been experiencing right down to today.So, you have this, you do have a separation in this country. But this is not the kind of hyphenated politics that the politicians talk about. Not even the black politicians, the fact that if you're going to hyphenated American, how did this hyphenisation affect the real opportunities for real estate, for homeownership, for education, and all of these other things. I think maybe if people begin to think as to how there is a convergence of what was diverging before—now you're having the middle class pushed down into its real identity which was a dependent wage-earning class all along—you're going to have a change of consciousness. But we're still not to that. People don't realise this difference.And at the top of the pyramid, at New York University, for instance, where we both went to school, I have professor friends there and there was recently an argument about getting more salaries for professors, because they're hiring adjunct professors at very low prices instead of appointing them full time. And one professor turned to my friend and said, “They’re treating us like wage earners.” And my friend said, “Yes, you are a wage earner. You’re dependent on the wage you get from New York University.” And he said, “But I’m a professor,” as if somehow being a professor doesn't mean that you're not a wage earner, you're not dependent on salary, you're not being exploited by your employer who's in it to make money at your expense.Julian Vigo: Oh, absolutely. We've got the push from NYU in the 1990s by adjunct professors to get health insurance, and to have a certain modicum of earnings that would allow them to pay rent in an extremely expensive city. I find it amazing how many of my students at the time had no idea how much I was being exploited at the time, I was at lunch after the graduation of two of my students, they invited me to lunch, and they were having a discussion about how well we must be paid. And I laughed. I didn't go into the details of my salary. But later in later years, they came to understand from other sources, how exploitation functions within the university where they were paying almost quarter of a million to go to school, and graduate school, and so forth. So it's quite shocking that even though we have the internet and all the information is there, anyone can see precisely how much NYU or Columbia cost today, or how much the cost of living is, as opposed to 1961, for instance, that people are still not putting together that when you have housing, that is like income. For most of us, if housing is affordable, the way one lives, the efficiency to live, the ease, the mental health, and physical health improves. And it's fascinating to me that during lockdown, people were told, just to bite the bullet, stay inside, and how many publications, how much of the media went out to discover the many people being locked down in extremely small hovels? Multiple families living in three bedroom houses, even smaller. And I just kept thinking throughout these past 20 months or so that the media has become complicit in everything you've discussed, we've seen an extra tack added on where the media is another arm of industry and the 1% they are able sell lockdown stories: stars singing, Spaniards singing, accordionists from Neapolitan balconies, everyone's happy. But that was a lie. And that was a lie being sold conveniently.I regularly post stories from CNN, where their recent yacht story—they love yachts—their recent yacht story from about five or six days ago was how the super-rich are “saving” the world's ecology. And it was a paid advertisement of a very expensive yacht that uses nuclear power, what you and I hope: that all the rich people are running around with little mini nuclear reactors on the seas. And I keep thinking: what has happened that you mentioned campaign financing? Remember what happened to Hillary Clinton when she suggested campaign finance reform? That went over like a lead balloon. And then we've got CNN, Forbes, all these major publications that run paid sponsored news articles as news. It's all paid for, they legally have to see it as but you have to find the fine print. And we're being sold the 1% as the class that's going to save the planet with this very bizarre looking yacht with a big ball on it. And another another CNN article about yacht owners was about how it's hard for them to pay for maintenance or something and  we're pulling out our tiny violins.And I keep wondering, why is the media pushing on this? We can see where MSNBC and CNN and USA today are heading in a lot of their coverage over class issues. They would much rather cover Felicity Huffman, and all those other stars’ children's cheating to get into a California University scandal which is itself its own scandal, of course. That gets so covered, but you rarely see class issues in any of these publications unless it refers to the favelas of Brazil or the shanty towns of Delhi. So, we're sold: poverty isn't here, it's over there. And over here, mask mandates, lock up, shut your doors stay inside do your part clap for the cares and class has been cleared. Cut out. Even in the UK, where class consciousness has a much more deeply ingrained fermentation, let's say within the culture, it's gone. Now the BBC. Similarly, nightly videos at the initial part of lockdown with people clapping for the cares. Little was said about the salaries that some of these carriers were getting, I don't mean just junior doctors there, but the people who are cleaning the hallways. So, our attention has been pushed by the media away from class, not just the politicians doing the dirty work, or not just the nasty finance campaign funding that is well known in the US. What are some of the responses to this, Michael, that we might advance some solutions here? Because my worry, as a person living on this planet is enough is enough: Why can't we just try a new system? Is it that the fall of the Berlin Wall left a permanent divide in terms of what we can experiment with? Or is there something else at play?Michael Hudson: Well, recently, Ukraine passed a law about oligarchs, and they define an oligarchy as not only owning a big company, but also owning one of the big media outlets. And the oligarchy in every country owns the media. So, of course, CNN, and The New York Times and The Washington Post, are owned by the billionaire class representing the real estate interests and the rentier interests. They're essentially the indoctrination agencies. And so of course, in the media, what you get is a combination of a fantasy world and Schadenfreude—Schadenfreude, when something goes wrong with people you don't like, like the scandal. But apart from that, it's promoting a fantasy, about a kind of parallel universe about how a nice world would work, if everybody earned the money that they had, and the wealth they had by being productive and helping society. All of a sudden, that's reversed and [they] say, “Well, they made a lot of fortune, they must have made it by being productive and helping society.” So, everybody deserves the celebrity, deserves the wealth they have. And if you don't have wealth, you're undeserving and you haven't made a productivity contribution. And all you need is to be more educated, managerial and intelligent, and you can do it. And it doesn't have anything to do with intelligence. As soon as you inherit a lot of money, your intelligence, your IQ drops 10%. As soon as you don't have to work for a living and just clip coupons, you write us down another 30%. The stupidest people I've met in my life are millionaires who don't want to think about how they get their money. They just, they're just greedy. And I was told 50 years ago, “You don't need to go to business school to learn how to do business. All you need is greed.” So what are all these business schools for? All they're doing is saying greed is good and giving you a patter talk to say, “Well, yeah, sure, I'm greedy. But that's why I'm productive.” And somehow they conflate all of these ideas.So, you have the media, and the educational system, all sort of combined into a fantasy, a fantasy world that is to displace your own consciousness about what's happening right around you. The idea of the media is that you don't look at your own position, you imagine other people's position in another world and see that you're somehow left out. So, you can say that the working class in America are very much like the teenage girls using Facebook, who use it and they have a bad self image once they use Facebook and think everybody else is doing better. That's the story in Congress this week. Well, you can say that the whole wage earning class once they actually see how awful the situation is they think, “Well, gee, other people are getting rich. Other people have yard spots, why don't I have my own house? Why am I struggling?” And they think that they're only struggling alone, and that everybody else is somehow surviving when other people are struggling just the way they are. That's what we call losing class consciousness.Julian Vigo: Yes, well, we're back to Crystal and Alexis wrestling and Dynasty’s fountain. Everyone wants to be like them. Everyone wants a car. You know, I'll never forget when I lived in Mexico City. One of the first things I learned when you jumped into one of those taxis were Volkswagen beetles,  Mexicans would call their driver “Jaime.” And I said to them, why are you guys calling the taxi drivers here “Jaime”? And they said, “We get it from you.” And I said, “What do you mean you get it from us? We don't call our taxi drivers Jaime.”And then I thought and I paused, I said,  “James!” Remember the Grey Poupon commercials? That's what we do—we have James as the driver in a lot of these films that we produced in the 1970s and 80s. And the idea became co-opted within Mexico as if everyone has a British driver named James.Now, what we have turned into from this serialised, filmic version of ourselves to the present is dystopic. Again, you talked about the percentage of rent that people are paying in the US, the way in which people are living quite worse than their parents. And this is related to student debt, bank debt, credit card debt, we've had scandals directly related to the housing market. We saw that when there were people to be bailed out, they had to be of the wealthy class and companies to be bailed out. There was no bailout for the poor, of course. I was in London during the Occupy Wall Street. In London, it was “occupy the London Stock Exchange” (Occupy LSX) right outside of not even the London Stock Exchange. It was outside of St. Paul's Cathedral. And there was a tent city, and people were fighting ideological warfare from within their tents. There wasn't much organising on the ground. It was disassembled months later. But I wonder why Americans, even with what is called Obamacare, are still not pushing for further measures, why Hillary Clinton's push for or suggestion merely of finance reform within the campaigning system, all of this has sort of been pushed aside.Are there actors who are able to advance these issues within our current political system in the United States? Or will it take people getting on the streets protesting, to get housing lowered to maybe have national rent controls, not just of the form that we have in New York, which, before I got to New York in the late 80s, everyone was telling me how great rent control was. Now it's all but disappeared? What is the answer? Is it the expropriation of houses? Is it the Cornwall style, no owning more than one house type of moratorium on homeownership? What are the solutions to this, Michael?Michael Hudson: There is no practical solution that I can suggest. Because the, you're not going to have universal medical care, as long as you have the pharmaceuticals. funding the campaign's of the leading politicians, as long as you have a political system that is funded by campaign contributors, you're going to have the wealthiest classes, and decide who gets nominated and who gets promoted. So, I don't see any line of reform, given the dysfunctional political system that the United States is in. If this were Europe, we could have a third party. And if we had an actual third party, the democratic party would sort of be like the social democratic parties in Europe, it would fall about 8% of the electorate, and a third party would completely take over. But in America, it's a two-party system, which is really one party with different constituencies for each wing of that party, and that one party, the same campaign contributors funds, both the Republicans and the Democrats. So it's possible that you can think of America as a failed state, as a failed economy. I don't see any means of practical going forward, just as you're seeing in the Congress today, when they're unwilling to pass an infrastructure act, there's a paralysis of change. I don't see any way in which a structural change can take place. And if you're having the dynamics that are polarising, only a structural change can reverse this trend. And nobody that I know, no politician that I know, sees any way of the trends being reversed.Julian Vigo: The funny thing is that scandal, quote-unquote, scandal over Ocasio Cortez's dress at the Met Gala was quite performative to me. It's typical that the media does. “Tax the rich,” as she sits at a function that I believe cost $35,000 to enter. And she socialised the entire night even if she allegedly did not pay either for her dress nor for the entrance. And I'm thinking, isn't this part of the problem: that we have so much of our socio-cultural discourse wrapped up in politics in the same way that Clinton's suggestion that campaign finance reform disappeared quite quickly? Is there any hope of getting campaign finance reform passed in the States?Michael Hudson: No. Because if you had campaign finance reform, that's how the wealthy people control politics. If you didn't, if you didn't have the wealthy, wealthy people deciding who gets nominated, you would have people get nominated by who wanted to do what the public ones, Bernie Sanders says, “Look, most of them are all the polls show that what democracy, if this were a democracy, we would have socialised medicine, we'd have public health care, we would have free education, we would have progressive taxation.” And yet no party is representing what the bulk of people have. So by definition, we're not a democracy. We're an oligarchy, and the oligarchy controls. I mean, you could say that the media play the role today that the church and religion played in the past to divert attention away from worldly issues towards other worldly issues. That's part of the problem.But not only the pharmaceutical industries are against public health care, but the whole corporate sector, the employer sector, are against socialised medicine, because right now workers are dependent for their health insurance on their employers. That means Alan Greenspan, the Federal Reserve Chairman said, this is causing a traumatised workers syndrome, the workers are afraid to quit, they're afraid to go on strike. They're afraid of getting fired because if they get fired, first of all, if they're a homeowner they lose their home because they can't pay their mortgage, but most importantly, they lose their health care. And if they get sick, it wipes them out. And they go broke and they lose their home and all the assets.Making workers depend on the employer, instead of on the government means you're locked into their job. They have to work for a living for an employer, just in order to survive in terms of health care alone. So the idea of the system is to degrade a dependent, wage-earning class and keeping privatising health care, privatising education, and moving towards absentee landlordship is the way to traumatise and keep a population on the road to serfdom. Get full access to Savage Minds at savageminds.substack.com/subscribe

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 2 – Moving from Diversity to Inclusion

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 59:49


Every day we read and talk about Diversity. We hear how our population is diverse and how we must work to understand and accept our diversity. As we discuss our diverse population, we consistently leave out persons with disabilities. We talk about different racial and ethnic groups, people with a variety of different sexual orientations and we discuss the need for equality of women. However, persons with disabilities are left out of the conversation. In this podcast, Mike Hingson, a thought leader on the inclusion of people with disabilities, takes up the topic of inclusion. You will discover just how often the rights of persons with disabilities are subverted throughout society. Some directories do not show full show notes. For the complete transcription please visit: https://michaelhingson.com/podcast About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog. Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards. https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/ accessibe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/ Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below! Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app. Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts. Transcription Notes Michael Hingson 00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast we're inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us. Michael Hingson 01:19 Welcome to Episode Two of unstoppable mindset. Thanks for joining us. I hope that you were able to listen to last week's episode. And if you weren't, please go to www.michaelhingson.com/podcast where you can listen to that episode as well as just signing up for information about any of the podcast shows that we will be providing and all things podcast for unstoppable mindset. Today we're going to talk about the concept of moving from diversity to inclusion. So why do I talk about that? Why do I bring that particular title into it? Well, it is the title of a speech that I gave in 2019. And you will be hearing that speech in just a few moments. But if you think back to last year's presidential campaigns, if you look at the news today, and the discussions about various groups who are being disenfranchised, in one way or another, you hear about all this diversity in all these diverse groups, but you don't hear about disabilities, we who are blind, who happened to be in wheelchairs, who happened to have any other so called disability are not generally included in those topics of discussion. And there's no reason for that, except people still fear disability. I don't like the term disability By the way, but I haven't come up with something better, differently abled, and other kinds of things like that are just hiding the reality. And I'm not differently abled, I'm just as able in the same way as everyone else. I may not do tasks the same way. But I'm not differently abled, I have what society tends to call a disability. And until someone comes up with a term that doesn't strike hearts, or I shouldn't say doesn't strike fear into the hearts of people, then I'm going to accept and use the term disability. And I'm going to use that term to try to get the fear out of being stricken into the hearts of people. The reality is, just because I happen to be different in the way that I have some sort of so called disability, that doesn't really matter. I still can do the same things that most people do. I don't do them the same way. But we don't talk about that we're afraid of it. Michael Hingson 03:49 Our president, our Vice President, don't talk about disabilities regularly. We see so much of a discussion about other kinds of minority groups. But we're not included. And we should change that. I was at a conference this week where we talked about accessibility and disability. So it was all about dealing with the whole concept of accessibility, about websites about universal design, about how artificial intelligence is helping to create better access, so many different topics, all about disabilities. And no one was afraid to talk about it. They're one of the speakers was actually from the administration. And and he talked a little bit about the fact that we need to have more of a conversation about disabilities and everything that we do. And when it came time for questions and answers, I asked him what the administration was going to do about that, and how the administration was going to step up the level of conversation. Well, the answer really was kind of innocuous, and he didn't really Make any commitments as to how the administration would be able to do it. And that's so very frustrating because my response to that would be, why isn't President Biden or vice president Harris or anyone else, just including disabilities in the conversations, when they talk about some of the different disenfranchised groups, we hear a lot about what's happening with race, we hear about LG, bt Q, and so on, but we don't hear about disabilities, why it's easy to include us in the conversation. It's easy to raise the level of awareness or at least start to raise the level of awareness by putting us in the conversations and including us regularly, Then, and only then, when we start to see some people like our president and vice president, Attorney General and others, normally, including us in the conversation, then and only then are we going to really see a change in how we're included. Well, enough about that. Let me let you listen to the speech and then we'll come back and again, the title of the speech, as you will hear is moving from diversity to inclusion. MC 06:16 Okay, we're going to go ahead and get started. Thank you all for coming today. We do have a little housekeeping to do first, I know they're not here, but I would like to apologize to the other presenters during this hour for having to be pitted up against our speaker today. I would like to introduce to you a scholar, comedian, a gentleman. And I don't have all the facts, but I hear he's blind. When are you introducing Michael Hingson? Michael Hingson 06:52 Well, with all those things, he said, I was wondering when he was going to introduce me and said but Okay, so I want to welcome you to our class on quantum mechanics this afternoon. Today we are going to discuss the Heisenberg uncertainty principle and its impact on the relative behavior of cats in the 21st century. I'm really honored that all of you came and we'll try to make this interesting for you. I want to start with a video. Some of you may have seen this before. But let's start with it. And then we will get into our discussion. And it will be a discussion of moving from diversity to inclusion. So here's a video for you to watch. Video Narrator 07:36 There's trouble brewing at smart world coffee in Morristown, New Jersey. These two women are trying to apply for a job opening in the kitchen. Coffee Shop Owner 07:46 Are you here for coffee, or Applicant #1 07:48 no, Job application? Video Narrator 07:50 Only to find out it's not open to everyone. Coffee Shop Owner 07:54 I noticed you were signing. Applicant #1 07:55 Yeah. That's right. We're deaf. Video Narrator 07:59 And because of that the manager rejects the application. Video Narrator 08:07 what he's doing isn't just unfair, it could be illegal. Coffee Shop Owner 08:12 I'm not gonna hire a deaf person. I'll just let you know now. So we'll save you some time. I mean, your deaf. It's gonna be really hard here to work here. Video Narrator 08:21 It's the kind of thing that usually happens in secret behind closed doors. But we're putting this discrimination setters stage right out in the open. To answer the question, what would you do? Video Narrator 08:36 The bias barista, and the deaf applicants are all actors. Hannah Warrick and Maya erielle. Attend the National Technical Institute for the death in Rochester, New York. With more than 1500 students. It's the second largest college for the deaf and hard of hearing in the country. The school helped us develop this idea for the scenario. Students there say finding equal opportunity in the workplace is a big challenge. Hannah Warrick 09:06 Let me count on my really fantastic Botha to have a really keen understanding of what it means to be a deaf person how to work with deaf people, but at the same time, there are others who should not want to thin or open themselves up to that. Maya Arielle 09:24 It would be nice for them to think about what what is it like to be a deaf person? I mean, how would they like to go into a place and want to apply for a job and then be discriminated against just because of who you are. Video Narrator 09:35 Jerry Buckley is the president of MTI D. Jerry Buckley 09:40 When the President Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act, many of us hope that would be the last barrier. What we found out though is that attitude, no barriers were still there, that we have much work to do to educate people. Video Narrator 09:57 Back at the coffee shop, our cold hearted Manager is busy building his own barriers. Coffee Shop Owner 10:03 I know I fill out the application, but I'm going to be honest with you, I'm probably not going to hire you. Video Narrator 10:11 Remember, it's not a question of communicating with customers. This is a kitchen job. Coffee Shop Owner 10:18 Sure you want to work here? Applicant #1 10:19 Yeah, it's a kitchen job. Right, Coffee Shop Owner 10:21 right. Can you hear me? Applicant #1 10:24 I can't really hear. But I read lips. Video 10:26 You read lips? Applicant #1 10:27 Yeah, Video Narrator 10:28 it's easy to read the look on Kristen gobies face as she watches and growing disbelief. Coffee Shop Owner 10:34 I just don't think this is the right place. Like if I yell something to the kitchen. You can't hear me. Video Narrator 10:42 But the manager ignores all those daggers. Christian shoots his way, Applicant #1 10:47 so I shouldn't even bother with this. Coffee Shop Owner 10:49 I'm not saying that. I'm just saying I'm not gonna hire you. I can fill it out now. Sorry. Sorry. Is this yours? Ma'am? Video Narrator 10:57 Coffee isn't the only thing steaming as Christians storms out. The manager played by both male and female actors continues serving up the discrimination. Shop Owner #2 11:08 We can't hire you. Video Narrator 11:10 Many customers are right next to the action. Coffee Shop Owner 11:13 Yeah. But if you can't hear me, how are we going to communicate? Applicant #1 11:16 You can write stuff down, like make a list there. Coffee Shop Owner 11:18 But what if I need something done right away. Video Narrator 11:20 But most don't openly object. A few do stand up to the discriminating manager. But the most surprising reactions come from three customers with something in common. They work in recruiting and human resources, HR Patron 11:46 human resources, let me give you a piece of advice. Coffee Shop Owner 11:48 Yeah, HR Patron 11:48 I probably wouldn't have done that. HR Patron #2 11:50 you cannot say that. Coffee Shop Owner 11:52 I want to be honest with HR Patron #2 11:53 you can't say that. And we can't handle it like that you can come after you can't discriminate. Coffee Shop Owner 12:00 If only they had stopped right there, these hiring and firing experts would have been heroes, but they didn't listen to the rest of our hidden camera recording. And you'll see why we're not showing you their faces. 12:15 I probably wouldn't have done that. Only because because when you think about it, everybody has rights. Coffee Shop Owner 12:23 So let her fill it out. 12:25 I just probably would have let her fill it out in your writing note on the back and say not a fit. Video Narrator 12:31 That's right, the outrageous advice from human resources. write a note on the back of the application that the deaf girl is not a fit. Now listen carefully to this recruiter, HR Patron #2 12:43 I mean recruiting you can handle it like that you can come after you can't discriminate, just accept it and don't call handicapped people they have no rights and anybody that you have to just accept your application. Just don't call. Video Narrator 12:59 Just don't call as they continue talking to the managers. Some might wonder if it's discrimination these employment experts disapprove of, or only open discrimination. Coffee Shop Owner 13:17 So it's not a problem to not hire her because she's deaf is just saying it out loud to her. Video Narrator 13:26 He did tell the manager that the owner might want to try out the deaf applicant. Still, in the end, it's not a recruiter or someone from human resources. Who takes the strongest stand of all, it's a guy just taking a coffee break. A man who's heard enough, Coffee Shop Owner 13:44 because you can fill out the application. Feel free to fill it out. I can't stop you from doing that. But I'm just trying to be honest with you. Coffee Shop Patron 13:51 That's absolutely discriminatory. Coffee Shop Owner 13:53 If she can't hear me, though, she's Coffee Shop Patron 13:55 really shocked. And if this is the case, I'm not bringing my business back here. I'm telling you, Coffee Shop Owner 14:00 I, I understand Coffee Shop Patron 14:02 You basically said I am not hiring a deaf person. You're not saying I'm not hiring a person that's not qualified. Coffee Shop Owner 14:08 I'm just trying to be honest with you. Coffee Shop Patron 14:10 I can appreciate that, sir. But I don't see how you expect things to change in the country, when no one will give anybody a chance. It's an affront, it's an affront to America, or you Coffee Shop Owner 14:21 can't she can't hear. Coffee Shop Patron 14:22 So what? Video Narrator 14:23 Hannah and Maya catch up with him outside. Maya Arielle 14:27 I really felt so great when you jumped in and tried to help. Thank you so much just for your willingness to do that. Video Narrator 14:38 You wanted to hug him? Maya Arielle 14:39 Yeah. Video Narrator 14:40 What message do you have for people who didn't say anything? Maya Arielle 14:44 What I would say to those people, is that if you feel that you want to say something, please say something Video Narrator 14:51 that would be giving you a voice. Maya Arielle 14:55 Absolutely. That's right. Video Narrator 15:00 And so as they continue their struggle for equality at work, this reminder to all of us in American Sign Language from students at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf, what would you do? Michael Hingson 15:17 And there you go. I deliberately call this presentation moving from diversity to inclusion, because as I mentioned this morning, diversity tends not to include anybody with disabilities, it doesn't happen. Over the past year and a half or two years, we have seen any number of situations where there has been discussions of discrimination against women against different races, and so on. And all of that is appropriate to discuss, and all of those battles are absolutely appropriate to fight. But what we never see in all of those discussions, is how anyone with a disability is included in those same battles. If you watch the television show in the dark, which is a new show that I think wb is putting out, it's not a blind person playing the, the woman in the show, it's a sighted person, all they have a blind consultant, but they couldn't find any blind people they say, who could be an actor in the show. I know that, for example, they did not consult with the major consumer organizations of blind people. I have had conversations with people in the movie industry about blind people acting in films. And the comment that is made is well, but the problem is that they're not necessarily qualified to do it. And my question, when I hear that is why have you, for example, tried to find someone, have you included blind people and I'm going to talk about blindness specifically, although it could apply to other disabilities, but I think there is more of a track record of by blind people being excluded in the movie industry. Then in other persons with disabilities. There are people in wheelchairs who have played all in films and so on, although a number of those parts have been played by people not in wheelchairs, they play people wheelchair, quote, bound people. One of the ones I think of most is Raymond bird playing and Ironside's years and years ago, and others and sometimes it happens with deaf people. There is a deaf actress that I know of, and I'm sure there's well there are more than one but Marlee Matlin is, is certainly death, but you don't hear about blind people being included. And the reality is, it won't change until society recognizes that the disability isn't the problem. It's their attitudes. I want to read to you something and again, this is from Dr. Tim brick I mentioned earlier and it is something that is about blind people. This is from an address given by Dr. Tim brick, are we equal to the challenge, and it was delivered at the 1967 convention of the National Federation of the Blind one year before he died of cancer. And Dr. Tim Brooks says, the blind have a right to live in the world. What a concept, the right to live in the world. That right is as deep as human nature as pervasive as the need for social existence, as ubiquitous as the human race, as invincible as the human spirit. As their souls are their own. So their destiny must be their own. their salvation or failure lies within their own choice and responsibility. That choice cannot be precluded, or pre judged. Those lives cannot be pre determined or controlled. Michael Hingson 19:36 And Dr. Tambora made those comments to talk about the fact that we have the same as blind people or any person with a disability, the same right to live in the world as anyone else. And that was what those three HR people I told some of the HR people outside I was gonna probably be in Trouble, sorry. But that is what those HR people were challenging and what they were really saying, they don't truly believe we have the same right to live in the world. They were saying ultimately, that we don't really have equal status with everyone else. If they truly believed that we did, they would never have given the advice that they did to the actor barista. And that is what inclusion is all about. Diversity has already moved on and not included us. So it is time that we really talk about the concept of inclusion. And as I said to all of you this morning, you are on the front lines, because you are in schools, teaching children, teaching other adults, and hopefully taking this stand to say, we truly believe in inclusion. And it is true that not everyone has the same capabilities as everyone else. But if we're going to talk about developmental disabilities, for example, let's talk about every politician in Washington somehow they take dumb pills, I'm not sure what it is. But when they go to Washington, they do something to dumb down. That has to be the case. But the bottom line is that we have to demand higher criteria and higher expectations. For every person with a disability, it doesn't necessarily mean that every person with a disability is going to be able to do every single job. Just like every sighted person or every so called person with it and who is not one with a disability can do every job. Most people wouldn't even have the first clue about what Schrodinger equation and Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle are all about. I do. But I got that training. Michael Hingson 22:01 Many people don't have the courage to step out of of their own comfort zone in their own environment. When I lived in New Jersey, I knew people who live within 10 miles of New York City, who were adults, and had never ever been to the city and never wanted to go because they didn't want to be in that environment. They were afraid to go. My wife on the other hand, growing up in California, being in a wheelchair driving all over the place one day had to drive me into New York. It wasn't her first time. But it was one of the first times that she drove us into the city. We came through the tunnel and came out at 40 a street turn left to go north. And I said you realize that we have to turn on 41st Street. And she slammed on the brakes, turned all the way across five lanes of traffic and made it right onto 41st Street and is very proud of the fact that she did it with a single person honking their horn at her. She arrived with a far as a driver. My wife had the courage and has the courage to take those steps. My wife was very much involved in as I was the International Year of the disabled year many many years ago in terms of helping to celebrate it, helping to assist people and celebrating and, and so on. We both in various ways we're involved in a variety of efforts to deal with various issues regarding persons with disabilities. And not everyone can do that. I've spent time in Washington debating with congressional types, and others about issues concerning persons with disabilities. One of the more recent issues regards the fact that under the Fair Labor Standards Act in this country today, section 14 C, which created sheltered workshops, says that you can pay a person with a disability if you can prove that they can't work as competitively as anyone else, you can pay them less than minimum wage. When that act was formed in 1938. The rule was you could pay no more no less than 75% of minimum wage because workshops were set up to be training institutions. All over the years since 1938. Workshops organized themselves loosely together and got the law changed originally so that the floor dropped from 75% to 50%. Then it went down lower to the point where today, the floor is at zero. And there are people who have disabilities including some blind people who get zero. And they work at the sheltered workshops. I know of college graduates who are blind who couldn't find a job and their departments of rehabilitation, put them into sheltered workshops, where they're getting paid to $2.50 $3 an hour to do the work that other people get paid much higher salaries outside of the workshop environment and Of course, the workshop owners say but, you know, we don't want them to lose their SSI. These workshop people are the same ones who created their workshops as 501 c three nonprofit organizations and solicit donations to help fund the workshops. They get special subsidized contracts under the the federal government programs, including what is allowed under Section 14 C, and they have developed ways to make sure that their workers can't possibly do the job so that they can get the exemptions to pay people less than minimum wage. And they get guaranteed contracts, they have ways of triple dipping these owners or managers of these workshops to get six and seven figures, while their employees may get 20 cents an hour. It happens today. It happens because people with disabilities are not included in society. And and it are not viewed as having the same rights as everyone else. It won't change until all of us take a stand and say, yes, it doesn't matter whether someone has a so called disability. I don't like the term disability. But you know what, it doesn't really matter. It's just a word. And it doesn't necessarily mean in competence or a lack of capability. It is just one way that people describe a subset of society, just like people who are left handed are called left handed and it describes a certain segment of society. And in the past, there were times that people who were left handed were viewed as less competent, or certainly had problems that normal people in society don't have. Michael Hingson 26:46 The fact is that we collectively have to make that change. And I'm challenging you and putting the pressure on you to say you are part of what that change has to be. Jimmy Carter, former President Carter once said, We must adjust to changing times while holding to unwavering principles. And if the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution mean anything, then those principles must include all persons. All of us have the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. And as the Declaration of Independence says, I'm not trying to be sexist, all men are created equal. But we really know that that means all persons are created equal in today's society. We have to change it. And it won't change unless we take some stands and make those changes occur. I know it's a tough job. I told you all this morning about my parents who took some stands regarding me and being blind. But I also there are a lot of parents who won't do that. I don't dare let my child go out on their own. They're blind. After all, how could they ride a bike, I rode a bike when I was growing up. I wrote it all over the neighborhood. Let me tell you a story about riding my bike one day. So there I was out riding my 20 inch bike I was seven years old right now all around the neighborhood having a good old time, right? going anywhere I wanted to go going up Stan Ridge Avenue, going over to Third Street East going, going west to Glen Raven, and two Second Street and all that riding all over the place. In many days, I would ride my bike to school to yukka school, but I was in the first second and third grade. Well, second third grade because I didn't have my bike when I was in the first grade, but riding my bike to school along with my brother riding his bike, and we had a good time doing that while I was out riding my bike one day. And I came home after being out for a couple hours having fun and just doing what I did. And as I walked in the door after putting the bike in the garage, the phone rang. My father picked up the phone. By the way, if you bought Thunder dog, you'll see this story in there. It's still one of my favorite stories. My father picked up the phone said hello. And here's the way the conversation when I picked up from his side and what he told me later. So he answers again and he says hello. And this guy says I'm calling about your kid riding his bike out on the street. And my dad said, Okay, what about it was out riding his bike? And my dad said, Well, yeah, all the time. What's the problem? No, no, I'm not talking about the older kid. The one that can see I'm talking about the blind kid. He was out riding his bike. And my dad said, Well, yeah, what about it? Well, but he's blind. Yeah, he's out riding his bike. Yeah. What about it? bass blind? My dad said, Did he hit anyone? Well, no. Did anyone hit him? No. Did he? Did he pass cars? Or did cars come down the street? And did he have any problems with any of them? Well, no. Did he hit any Park cars? No. Did he get hurt in any way? Well, no. Well, then what's the problem? The guy hung up. He could not deal With the fact that there was a blind child riding a bike out on his Street, I was in 1957. Let's fast forward to 2000 well to 1997. My wife and I moved to New Jersey. And we joined the Cranford United Methodist Church. And we went to the first yearly meeting of the church with the essentially the meeting of the corporation. And during the meeting, they talked about one thing and another. And they finally got to the fact that they were very interested in making accessible restrooms available at the church. Right now. They had a very steep ramp, it had a slope of probably about 45 degrees. So it was certainly not something that was truly accessible, you had to fold it down, and then go down the three steps on this ramp to get to the fellowship hall unless you walked all the way around, outside and in which didn't work well and snow. And there really wasn't an accessible restroom down there, there was something that kind of served as one but there wasn't. And they were very concerned about wanting to make accessibility possible in the church. And they were proud of the fact that in the last 10 years, they had raised $10,000, toward making accessibility possible 10 years to get $10,000, which wouldn't even be enough to probably get functioning legitimate, approved architectural drawings. However, they were very excited about that. And my wife spoke up and said, What are you guys doing? Michael Hingson 31:38 Well, we want accessibility. We want accessible restrooms, not with $10,000. You know, what are you going to do about that? Well, we're working on it. And my wife said, Look, you guys, we need to get true accessibility in the church. Let's start a fundraising campaign. Well, they wanted to put her in charge of it, of course, churches, and everybody always wants to do that. So they, they discussed it one side up and down the other and so on, and my wife agreed that she would be part of it, but only if some of the other leadership in the church would be involved. Within three months, they raised over $100,000 in pledges, and they actually started getting the money in and they began work on the accessible process. It included making elevators that would go from the congregational. Well, from the main church, the synagogue, that not synagogue, but from the main church down to fellowship hall where they wanted to put the accessible restrooms, and they started, the first thing they did was to make some accessible pews in the church. And the way they did that was they cut a couple of sections out of a couple of the pews in the middle of the church so that people in wheelchairs would have a place not off to one side, but right in the middle of the place to sit with everyone else. As that process started some of the old guard in this Cranford United Methodist Church that was nearly 150 years old, started taking exception to cutting up their pews a little bit. And they called the fire marshal. They call it the fire chief in Cranford. And they said, they're messing up our church, they're cutting up the pews. They're putting the possibility of people in wheelchairs sitting in the middle of the church. And if there's a fire, how are they going to get out? Well, there was one accessible way to get out. But to go out the front of the church, you couldn't because it was down steps. And the fire marshal said, well, sounds pretty serious to me. You know, we need to deal with that. The pastor wouldn't confront the fire chief. Some of the other people on the committee's wouldn't confront the fire chief. So finally, my wife decided if you guys aren't going to do it, I will. And she called up the fire chief said, I understand you've had some complaints, can we talk about it? And he said, Sure. Here's the problem. If you want to get out of the church, you're in your wheelchair, how you going to get out if the exits blocked? And my wife said, Well, if you're going to shut the church down and stop our efforts for doing that, are you going to go to the local Pathmark grocery store that has only one accessible exit and you're going to close it down? Well, no, we've approved it. Yeah, exactly. Right. And the fire marshal said, but you know, how? How are you making sure that you're obeying all the architectural rules? Do you have an architect drawing up all the drawings? Do you know the name Ron Meeks, sir? Yeah, he's the architect for the city. Yeah, he's also the guy that's doing our drawings Hello. The people couldn't tolerate a person in a chair being in their church. It got worse. The church had a Boy Scout troop. And as the elevators started to go in some of the exits that people would normally use to go into fellowship hall directly from the church were blocked. So they had to go outside and walk around just like people in wheelchairs. had to do. And one day my wife was confronted by one of these people saying you are messing up our church, and he and we have a scout dinner coming up, you better have this cleaned up by the time our scout dinner comes. Where's the priority? Where is their true belief in God, much less Anything else? Folks, it happens today. There are constantly blind couples who have children who are challenged by departments of family and social services. And there are attempts and sometimes successful ones, at least for a while, take take children away, because the presumption is blind couples cannot possibly raise children. It takes battles in the courts to change it. And they go on today, I'm only telling you all this, and I'm only talking about this because I want you to see that this is an ongoing problem. And it isn't going to change. Until we start having discussions. I'm looking forward to getting home. And watching the view we watched the view every every day or most days, a lot of fun will be is is a hoot. And all those people are last month Ace celebrated Spanish Heritage Month, gonna be interested to see if they're doing anything about the fact that this is blindness Awareness Month meet the blind month and nationally built national disabilities Awareness Month. Michael Hingson 36:28 Are they talking about successful persons with all sorts of disabilities? I wonder they haven't in past years, I hope they are this year. But if they're not, we'll just have to see we can write on Facebook about it. And I urge you, if you have the opportunity to watch the show, record it and see and if they're not call them on it. Put it out on Facebook, why aren't you celebrating the fact that we have a rich heritage of persons who don't have the same abilities as some of us who may have senior or super abilities compared to some of us? But why aren't you celebrating those people like you do other parts of society, we have African American Awareness Month, black, our Black History Month in February, we have all sorts of different things. So I'll be interested to see when I go home, if in fact, they're doing anything with disabilities, we'll see. But all of you, I recognize also have a challenge. Because if you start talking about some of these things, and really start encouraging your students, and your parents aren't ready to step out. They're going to challenge you. But I go back to Jimmy Carter, somewhere along the line, we have to hold to unwavering principles and blindness or other disabilities are not really the issue. It's attitudes. blind children ought to be able to come to school, there are blind kids in this country who are in high school who have guide dogs, and school administration has tried to keep the guide dog out of the school. Well, we don't know we can't be responsible, excuse me, chair here, the Americans with Disabilities Act. Do you know what a guide dog is? Do you know what a trained service animal is? And do you understand that under the law, people can bring those dogs to school. So it is a challenge in a lot of ways. And I've seen parents mightily fight back when teachers want to teach Braille, and teach Sally to read Braille, not just print, because Sally will never be a good reader of just reading print. And Sally might in fact, at some point go blind, totally blind in her life. And are you going to give her the training in advance? Or is she going to have to go back and psychologically readjust, not recognizing that blindness is just as normal as everything else. And that's the kind of thing that we need to look at. And we need to address. I could go on and give you other examples. But I think I'd like to stop, because I'd like to hear some of your thoughts. I'd like to see if you have questions and open this up for discussion a little bit. And I don't know that we have a roving mic. So I'll repeat questions. But if any of you have a question, why don't you speak up? And or if you want to say something, speak up or come up here and use the mic or whatever, just don't raise your hands because we know that doesn't work, right. Anyone? MC 39:22 And I do have a roving mic. 39:24 Oh, you've got a roving mic. All right. So we have the man with the microphone who'd like to start this off. Audience Member #1 39:30 I just wanted to say that I really appreciate you giving me a different perspective of looking at challenges that everybody has. We talk a lot about emotional challenges. We talk about physical challenges, but I love the way that you bring humor to it. And the real the real way that you talk about it, not making it politically correct. Not trying to appease everybody, but your perspective and your strength and doing that. So thanks Michael Hingson 40:00 Thank you, I believe that I will sell say that I believe that my perspective is one that is evolved over time, one with which many persons with disabilities, blind people, for example, have go to nfb.org website of the National Federation of the Blind, you'll read a lot there, you'll read about the Fair Labor Standards Act, we could talk, we just don't have time about the fact that until the mid 1980s, no person with a disability could buy life insurance, because insurance companies said that we were a higher risk. That's a longer story than we have time to tell. But, you know, invite me to your districts, and I'll be glad to tell that story. It's a great story. Today, we can buy life insurance. And it's because people who were blind with other disabilities prove to the insurance industry that they were simply prejudice, and that they in fact, weren't even obeying their own precepts and criteria for providing insurance. Another story, though, next. He's walking, so we must have someone Audience Member #2 41:03 Hi, thank you. I'm a low incidence disability specialist. And oftentimes, we have challenges. I'll use the word challenges with Jenna teachers. You know, they'll say, Well, you know, according to Union, I only have to plan like a week in advance. And oftentimes, it's shorter than that. And that doesn't give our Braille technician a whole lot of time to Braille. What are included blind students need in the gen ed classroom? Do you have suggestions for bringing humor to the conversation, so that the gen ed teacher can come a little bit more to our side and and meet in the middle. Michael Hingson 41:50 Under the law today, textbooks are required to be stored in a repository at the state and the federal level, and made available to anyone who needs them, and they're in electronic form. And point being that if you have access to a Braille embosser, the books are already available, I got news in Boston, you don't have to spend a lot of time transcribing them. They are available today, that law has been passed. Here's an ironic story talking about people with disabilities and some of the myopic views that even they have a former commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration, Dr. Fred Schroeder, back in 1997, went to the National Association of persons with disabilities meeting in San Diego. And he said, we are trying to get legislation passed at the federal level and so on dealing with requiring that Braille be taught to all blind children while they're in school using the definition of blindness that I mentioned earlier. And we would like your help in supporting that legislation. The organization said, No, we can't do that. That's a blindness thing. It doesn't deal with people with disabilities in general. So you got to take it to blind people. It isn't just outside of the system. Yet those same people want support when we're dealing with ramps and other kinds of things. But you know, it's and and all should be supported. But I would, I would say that it's an excuse, because the law already requires. And there are already facilities that have all those books in electronic format. And those teachers should know how to access those. So that all you got to do is awesome. It's not magic. And you know what the other side of it is? That isn't even an excuse. What are you talking about? Do you want our children to learn or not? Why are you coming up with the excuse? I would also say, why is it that we only have to have a week, you know, when I was in college, I would go to my college professors a quarter or more in advance, and say, I need to know what textbooks you're going to use in this class, so that I can get them put in Braille. And you know, professors don't want to give you that information. It's not time yet I haven't even made a decision. And it took a lot of effort to get some of those professors to recognize that I wasn't going to have access to the books, if they didn't give me the information up front. And it wasn't, we didn't have the ADA back in 1968 through 76 when I was going through college, and in fact, one instructor gave us a title of a book. That wasn't the title of the book that they ended up using. So I didn't even have the textbook for the first two thirds of the quarter we were studying it. I did get an A in the class. But in spite of what the professor did, I don't think it was deliberate. But, you know, at the college level, even now, in the college level, we're working to get similar legislation passed so that college texts are made available in electronic form and stored in a repository. But that does exist today. So there's no excuse for them doing that. And, you know, I don't know how best to do it with a lot of humor other than to say, you know, well, you know, I'll tell you what we'll we'll start preparing TV shows for you to watch when, you know when we get around to it, and you know, you may miss mom, or you may miss Grey's Anatomy or any other shows, because we're just not going to have them ready in time. And we're not going to let your VCR turn on until we're ready, and we have it ready for you to take. So there's, there's no easy way to do it. Because it's inexcusable. And it's a number of those same teachers who really don't want to teach blind kids Braille, because you don't need them. You don't need to do that you can get the book in electronic form. That's right, so can you and you could put it in Braille. But you can get an electronic form so the students can just listen to it. You ever tried to do a graduate or even undergraduate physics course and study mathematical equations from a recording? It is not trivial to do? It, it isn't the way to do it. Blind people need to learn to read and write and spell and do grammar and math just like anyone else. And teachers have no right to prevent that, or discourage that from happening. And in fact, they should embrace it. And I don't know how else to say it, which isn't necessarily funny. But nevertheless, that's what needs to happen. Does that help? Audience Member #2 46:28 Yeah, I think sometimes. The issue also is, as we're moving into, like a one to one district, Chromebook, a lot of teachers are pulling stuff for Google classroom, and of not textbooks anymore. So right, I mean, we go through and get all the textbooks, and they're available in Braille to the students. But teachers are pulling stuff off the fly. And, you know, it's all I can do to keep up sometimes to get, Michael Hingson 46:56 oh, I hear you to get Audience Member #2 46:57 someone in real time Braille in it as they're reading or, you know, for that student that needs Braille or doing like the, the text to speech. I mean, it's like, I just want to make it accessible. That's all. Michael Hingson 47:10 So let me ask you this teacher. Do you believe in obeying the law? Yes. Great. Glad to hear it. Do you know what the Americans know? I'm, I'm asking you to role model not be yourself. But do you know what the Americans with Disabilities Act? Is? You ever heard of it? You think you've heard of it? Let me tell you about the ADA. It says that, that companies, schools, organizations, and so on, are required under the law to make reasonable accommodations to make material available and to make jobs available and schools available to persons who happen to have a disability, in this case being blind. And the reality is, if you're pulling all this stuff up, and you're using inaccessible material, you are breaking the law. Do you really want to do that? Because if you do, maybe we need to have another discussion. Yes, I know what the teachers are doing. And we have battles with Google and work and are working with Google to make sure that their material is accessible. And a lot of it is and the teachers either have the obligation to pull the accessible material off, or work with you in an appropriate timeframe to find that material, because a lot of it is accessible. And if the teachers aren't going to the right place, then they are doing a disservice to people in their classroom, they cannot discriminate against certain segments of the population. You know, if we're gonna do that, let's turn the lights off. So none of the kids have to worry about wasting electricity. You know, you can't have it both ways teachers, and I hear what you're saying. But they need to do proper lesson planning. That's what it's about. And that's what I learned as a teacher. And if that means I've got to deal with certain things for students who may not use the same material in the same way, if I'm going to be a real teacher in society, I'm obligated to make sure that I work on that. They don't like that, necessarily. But that's what they're supposed to do. Because that's what the law says. And I and I, that may or may not be the answer that you want, that may not be an easy answer to give. But that's what the law says, right? And so push that and educate your principal. And if you need help, I'll find you people who can help with that. But they are breaking the law when they're not making their material available in an accessible form. And most of the time, it probably is available somewhere in an accessible form. So if they can't do it, or they don't want to do it, and you're the expert, they need to give you the time, and give you the information far enough in advance that you can find it or find someone who can help you find it and I can certainly connect you with people who can most likely help you find it if you can't, and I'm glad to do that. Michael Hingson 50:00 Next. Who have we taken such a hard line no one else has anything to say. MC 50:08 We have one over here. Audience Member #3 50:09 This is probably not them. But anyways, when I was about 1718 years of age, my mother worked for a chiropractor who happened to be blind. To be a chiropractor, you have to go med school and everything else. And for a female that's very hard to do. And she was born blind. And my mother said, you want a job? And I said, Oh, sure, I'll make some extra money. You can take her up. This was an Oak Park, Illinois, Chicago native. And I took her up into Barrington because she was horseback rider. She was getting pay me money, I relate to do that. At that point, I was I loved horses, I said, Forget the money, I'll just take a ride a lesson while you're doing yours. She was a fanatic rider. It was amazing. I was just like, I couldn't believe it. She was better than me. And temper that, that capability to be able to do that. It just at that age, at that point, I had a communication with someone with a disability that I had to help, you know, every weekend. And from there, it was just like, now when people you'll everyone hears this, and I hate correcting people. And I just heard Mike say this. And you'll hear many people say, Oh, yeah, I see what you're saying. No, you don't see what you're saying. You can hear what they're saying. You don't see what they're saying. And bring it back. Listen for that. You can listen to the most intelligent person. And then they start saying, Yeah, I see what you're saying. I'm like, Oh, my God. I respect Yeah, I was just like, Whoa, No, you can't. And you're like, catch him on it. But it's true. Yes, you can hear what you're saying. And we have all these senses about us, not just her sight. And we're going to use as many as we can to make us the better person. So thank you, Mike, for bringing that to our attention. Michael Hingson 51:56 I know we're about out of time. Thank you. I've got one more story. One another story. sirius xm 167. Canada talks radio. Gentlemen contacted me, Ari Silva, who has a show, I think his last name was silver on Canada talks every Tuesday afternoon 4pm to 5pm pacific time. And he wanted to interview me about the World Trade Center and on my story, and so on. So I was on for the last 15 minutes of the show. The first part of the show, they were talking about all the problems that Justin Trudeau the Prime Minister is having because he appeared once in blackface. And now people are blasting him for that, which is totally ridiculous. It has nothing to do with his political qualifications. It has nothing to do with anything other than the fact that 20 some odd years ago, he did that. So he did, right. What does it have to do today? Anyway, so the time came for me to be interviewed. And we started chatting, and already started talking all about blindness and blind people and all that we had a great discussion about all sorts of stuff, never did get to the World Trade Center. But we had a long conversation about a lot of the issues concerning blindness. And one of the things that we talked about was the fact that he had the opportunity to participate in a dining and the dark function. y'all heard of dining in the dark, one of the worst concepts in society regarding blind people today. So Ari, starts talking about it. And he said, I walked into this place. And he said, I've got a friend who's blind, a lawyer that I know, he's a young man, and I've been mentoring him some in some areas. And I walked into this dining in the dark thing, and I became totally petrified, I walked out, and ice. And so I said to him, what did you learn? He said, that is a real scary thing to have to do. And I said, wrong answer. But let me ask you this. Why is it scary? Well, because it's not easy to do. I said, wrong answer. The answer really is, you didn't have training, you didn't learn how to function as a blind person. And you're not going to learn it in that environment. And that's the problem with dining in the dark. People go in, and they if they can eat their food, without creating much of a mess, they think they're really successful, but they haven't learned anything about blindness. I told Ari, go get yourself a white cane and a pair of dark glasses, put the glasses on, and walk up and down the streets in Toronto, where he lived. And look at how people observe you and the expressions and the things that they do. And the way they look at you, then you're going to see something about how we're viewed. The reality is dining in the dark is disgusting. It teaches you nothing because you don't have the training, you don't have the background. You don't have the basis for an understanding of what blindness is. And the result of that is you're not going to have a good experience. And all it's going to do is reinforce a lot of poor attitudes and misconceptions about blindness. It isn't going to change anything. We shouldn't have that. And unfortunately, there are so many blindness agencies that think it's the greatest thing since sliced bread because people come and they donate and all that. But all they're doing is an incredible disservice to blind people who want to live in the world, and who have the same right to do that, as anyone else. I think we've run out of time. And so we're going to have to stop. So thank you very much. I'd love to come and work with any of you at your districts. And if you haven't gotten our card yet, come up, I've got a, I've got some business cards, I'd love to speak in your districts. And I hope that we can work together. But thank you again for inviting us to come and be a part of this today. Michael Hingson 55:44 And there we are. I want to thank you again, for listening to unstoppable mindset today. And I hope that you found this presentation pretty interesting, and that you maybe come away with a little bit of a different view about not only disabilities, but how we can and should be included in the conversation. You know, one of the things that I love to do a lot is to ask the question, what is it you think a blind person cannot do? And when I asked that question, one of the common responses is drive a car. And as we discuss on a regular basis, you think so go visit WWW.blinddriverchallenge.org. That's WWW.blinddriverchallenge.org. And watch the video of Mark riccobono, who is now the president of the National Federation of the Blind, driving a Ford Escape completely independently, without any assistance from any sighted person or any autonomous vehicle technology. He drives a car, a Ford Escape around the Daytona Speedway right before the 2011 Rolex 24 race, you'll see it all at blind driver challenge. Next week, we're going to do something a little bit different. And that is that I'm going to be interviewed and we're going to talk a lot about accessibility. We're going to talk about some of the reasons that I got into doing podcasts and other sorts of things. And then after next week's show, will not only have me making remarks from time to time, but we're going to start interviewing other people. So you don't get to listen to me all the time. Or maybe I should say you don't have to listen to me all the time. You'll get to hear other people, but we'll get there. Anyway, thanks for listening. Thanks for joining us on episode two of unstoppable mindset. Michael Hingson 57:51 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week

Wilson County News
Floresville Peanut Festival announces street closures

Wilson County News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 0:58


•D Street from Fourth Street to Second Street; Wednesday, Oct. 6, starting at 2 p.m., through Sunday, Oct. 10, at midnight •Third Street from D Street to B Street; Friday, Oct. 8, 7 a.m., through Sunday, Oct. 10, at 7 a.m. •C Street from Fourth Street to Second Street; Friday, Oct. 8, 2 p.m., through Sunday, Oct. 10, at noon •C Street and Fourth Street intersection; Saturday, Oct. 9, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. •Second Street from B Street to C Street, C Street from Second Street to Third Street; Friday, Oct. 8, starting at 3 p.m. for the...Article Link

The Gazette Daily News Podcast
Gazette Daily News Briefing, September 15

The Gazette Daily News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 3:24


This is Stephen Schmidt from the Gazette digital news desk and I'm here with your update for Wednesday, September 15th. Wednesday's weather will be both pleasant and uneventful. According to the National Weather Service there will be a high of 79 degrees in the Cedar Rapids area with sunny skies. The wind will even calm down to a gentle 5 mph. On Wednesday night it will be mostly clear, with a low around 54 degrees. Several urban school districts in Iowa have already jumped at the chance to institute mask mandates. A day after a federal judge's ruling temporarily blocked a law passed by the Iowa Legislature banning mask mandates, mask mandates have been instituted in the school districts in Des Moines, Cedar Rapids, and Iowa City. The Cedar Rapids Community School District announced Tuesday it is reinstating a mandate that all students, staff and visitors starting Wednesday wear face coverings in its schools to mitigate the surging spread of COVID-19. In Iowa City schools, masks will be required in the buildings and outdoors on school property if social distancing is not possible. Students actively participating in athletic competition — whether indoors or outdoors — are not required to wear a mask. Students on the sidelines or bench, however, are required to wear a mask.  An Iowa prisoner charged with bludgeoning to death an Anamosa prison guard and nurse as part of an escape attempt plans to plead guilty to the charges Wednesday 28-year-old Michael A. Dutcher had https://www.thegazette.com/crime-courts/inmate-charged-with-killing-anamosa-prison-officer-nurse-will-claim-self-defense/ (said previously) he would claim at trial the slayings were in self-defense or defense of others. But court filings Monday show Dutcher now plans to plead guilty Wednesday to the charges in the trial information, which are two counts of first-degree murder, second-degree kidnapping and attempted murder. The plea hearing is scheduled for 9 a.m. at the Jones County Courthouse in Anamosa. Fellow prisoner Thomas Woodard pleaded guilty as charged for his role in the killings and was https://www.thegazette.com/crime-courts/watch-live-inmate-thomas-woodards-sentencing-for-killing-anamosa-prison-workers-robert-mcfarland-a/ (sentenced last month) to life in prison without the possibility of parole. University of Iowa Health Care, at the same time its moving swiftly to erect a $395 million 469,000-square-foot campus on a 60-acre site in North Liberty, is looking to expand its footprint in Coralville near its popular Iowa River Landing clinic. The university on Wednesday will ask for Board of Regents permission to spend nearly $1 million on a 29,971-square-foot plot of land within the IRL district along east Second Street. The hospital told the Regents in its request that it wants the additional land for both additional services and the potential for more parking. With the Iowa Supreme Court's blessing, state lawmakers will meet Oct. 5 to begin their part of creating new congressional and legislative election districts to reflect population changes shown in the latest 2020 census that arrived too late to meet constitutional deadlines. The state constitution calls for the Iowa Legislature to approve a redistricting plan by Sept. 1 and for the plan to be enacted by Sept. 15. If the deadlines are not met, the constitution shifts redistricting responsibilities to the Iowa Supreme Court. But with the ruling, the court gave lawmakers some room to work with. Be sure to subscribe to The Gazette Daily news podcast, or just tell your Amazon https://www.thegazette.com/topic?eid=121774&ename=Alexa&lang=en (Alexa) enabled device to “enable The Gazette Daily News skill" so you can get your daily briefing by simply saying “Alexa, what's the news? If you prefer podcasts, you can also find us on iTunes or wherever else you find your Podcasts. Support this podcast

Billy Joel A to Z
Fifty Second Street

Billy Joel A to Z

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 28:19


After last week's episode, fascinatingly another Final track on an album, this one on the album of the same name - 52nd Street. 52nd Street, the song, was only released as a B-Side to the classic song My Life on October 28, 1978. The final song off of the album that won it all in 1980 by beating out Donna Summer and Supertramp. Based on this song, it may not have been a classic year.

Wilson County News
POLICE BLOTTER

Wilson County News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 2:49


Area law-enforcement agencies have reported the following recent activity: Floresville police •June 28, a Floresville city employee reported that a taillight was stolen off the driver's side of a truck parked in the city yard in the 1100 block of First Street. •July 7, Filberto Sanchez, 29, of Floresville was arrested in the 1300 block of Second Street on warrants charging him with assault by impeding breath or circulation and continuous sexual abuse of a young child or children. •July 7, Nicholas Carvajal, 29, of Floresville was arrested in the 1800 block of Sunnyside Drive on an Atascosa County warrant...Article Link

Humboldt Holding Up
Marnie Atkins on the Wiyot Tribe's New Old Town Cultural Center, Preserving the Soulatluk Language, and Educating the Community About Our Shared History

Humboldt Holding Up

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2021


If things stay on schedule, the Wiyot Tribe plans to open its brand new, shiny cultural center in Old Town Eureka — in the old Restoration Hardware space on Second Street — around the end of September to coincide with California Native American Day. It's been a longer road than expected. Cultural center manager and Wiyot tribal member Marnie Atkins has worked through numerous unforeseen COVID-related setbacks, but when she spoke with the Outpost for this week's episode of Humboldt Holding Up, she was brimming with excitement about all the ways her new facility might be able to further understanding between the larger community and her people. “Not only can people come in and learn about the tribe, about our beautiful baskets and regalia, and our language,” Atkins said. “You can also learn about our shared history and we can talk about that.”

The Gazette Daily News Podcast
Gazette Daily News Briefing, June 7

The Gazette Daily News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 2:06


This is John McGlothlen with the Gazette digital news desk and I'm here with your update for Monday, June 7th. Today in the Cedar Rapids area, we'll have a 30% chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly after 4 p.m. It will be partly sunny, with a high near 85. Winds from the south 5 to 15 mph, with gusts as high as 20 mph. Tonight we have a 10% chance of showers and thunderstorms before 7 p.m. The low should be around 69. A Coralville street was closed for about two hours Sunday morning after a shooting victim was found on the street and while police investigated the incident, according to the Coralville Police Department. Shortly after 1 a.m., police responded to a report of an injured person in the roadway in the 300 block of Second Street. The first officer to arrive found two apparent gunshot wounds on the victim, who was taken by ambulance to the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics with what were believed to be non-life-threatening injuries. Police said the shooter had been identified and the investigation into an altercation before the shooting is continuing. A Cedar Rapids woman was sentenced Friday to life in prison without parole for kidnapping and repeatedly beating a 15-year-old girl for more than nine months in 2019 until the girl, having suicidal thoughts, reached out to police. Mary Jane Jackson Thomas, age 47, was found guilty by a Linn County jury in March of first-degree kidnapping, second-degree kidnapping and two counts each of willful injury causing serious injury, willful injury causing bodily injury and going armed with intent. The jury deliberated about two hours before returning a guilty verdict, following a three-and-a-half-day trial. According to testimony, a doctor described the girl's extensive injuries all over her body as “torture.” Jackson Thomas, originally from Micronesia, admitted in a videotaped police interview played for jurors Thursday that she repeatedly slapped, scratched, bit and struck the teen with a hammer and extension cord, but she didn't admit to kidnapping — confining the teen against her will. The woman, in the police interview, blamed the teen for being 'bad” and causing Jackson Thomas to punish her. She said the teen wouldn't listen to her and lied, which is why she punished her. Support this podcast

Fantastical History of Waco

From the mind of Ashley Bean Thornton and the actors of Wild Imaginings comes Fantastical History of Waco! 1910 to 1920 were years of turmoil in Mexico. Revolutionaries fought to overthrow the regime of Porfirio Diaz and then fought among themselves to establish a new government. Thousands of Mexicans immigrated to Texas fleeing the war. Most of the immigrants had almost no money and often had no choice but to settle in what some would call disreputable neighborhoods. And a great many of these immigrants found themselves in none other than little Waco-town. In Waco, the so-called disreputable neighborhood where they ended up settling was the neighborhood between Second Street and the Brazos River. Once known as “The Reservation” or “Two Street,” it was the former location of Waco's notorious legalized red-light district. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Wilson County News
Flames devastate Floresville home

Wilson County News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 0:47


A residence on Muñiz Lane — off Second Street between Railroad and A streets in Floresville — suffered substantial fire damage May 28, despite prompt response from three firefighting entities. According to Wilson County Emergency Services District (ESD) 5 fire Chief Adam Strzelczyk, firefighters prevented the structure from burning to the ground, but he estimated that 80 to 90 percent of the house was lost. No one was home when the fire started. Wilson County District 2 Emergency Services, District 1 Fire & Rescue, and Floresville police also responded to assist.Article Link

City of Champaign
Champaign City Council 5/18/21

City of Champaign

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2021 126:12


ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS CB2021-057: A Resolution Appointing a Council Member as Deputy Mayor CB2021-058: A Resolution Approving an Intergovernmental Agreement for the LIFT Champaign Program CB2021-059: A Resolution Designating a Portion of West Clark Street as Honorary Harry Breen Way CB2021-060: A Resolution Accepting a Bid for the 2021 Sewer Rehabilitation Project CB2021-061/62: A Resolution Accepting a Bid and Authorizing the City Manager to Execute an Agreement for the 2021 Pavement Marking Project; A Resolution Approving a Change Order with Varsity Striping and Construction Company for the 2021 Pavement Marking Project CB2021-063/64/65: A Resolution Accepting a Bid and Authorizing the City Manager to Execute an Agreement for the 2021 Infrastructure Maintenance Project; A Resolution Approving a Change Order with ESCA Consultants, Inc. for the 2020 Infrastructure Maintenance Project; A Resolution Approving a Cost Share Agreement with R Rentals Series LLC for the Reconstruction of a Parking Lot at the Intersection of Second Street and University Avenue STUDY SESSION Proposed Capital Improvement Plan

Cosplay and Cocktails
Secondy Second Street

Cosplay and Cocktails

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2021 45:29


On this episode of Cosplay and Cocktails, Jessi and Paige talk about their recent weekend trip to Denver, Colorado and what it was like traveling in the times of Covid.

Wilson County News
Weekend street work will affect downtown Floresville traffic

Wilson County News

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2021 1:04


Portions of several streets in downtown Floresville will close to traffic the weekend of May 8 and 9 for sealing and re-striping. The affected streets include: C Street between Second and Fourth streets Third Street between B and D streets. Work crews also will be working on small sections of: Second Street near C Street Fourth Street near B Street B Street near Third Street D Street near Library Lane. The street sections are scheduled to close Saturday at 10 p.m. and reopen Monday at 5 a.m. Crews plan to begin work Saturday night and continue through Sunday. Sidewalks will...Article Link

Driven - Coast to Coast Car Talk
8 Second Street Driven Import

Driven - Coast to Coast Car Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021 4:57


Trevor has built a winning show car and most recently an 8 Second Street Driven R35. Throughout it, faced criticism from Import show guys and Domestic track guys. Huh right? In the end, just enjoying what he's doing. Please join us this Wednesday as we chat with Trevor. LIVE BROADCAST (Every Wednesday at 630 PM PST / 9:30 PM EST) : https://www.facebook.com/drivenshow/live FOR FULL AUDIO PODCAST (APPLE/SPOTIFY/GOOGLE): https://anchor.fm/drivencartalk FULL VIDEO PODCAST: https://www.instagram.com/drivenshow SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/drivenshow​​ WEBSITES: https://drivenshow.ca​​ FOLLOW OUR INSTAGRAMS: https://www.instagram.com/gojira1 https://www.instagram.com/drivenshow​​ https://www.instagram.com/setorepmedia

Our Town Reno
Laundry to the People, a New Initiative for Neighbors in Need

Our Town Reno

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2021 18:05


Laundry to the People is composed of Ilya Arbatman, Rosie Zuckerman, and Alex Muñoz. The three were connected by Blaize Abuntori of the Reno Burrito Project. While there have been a handful of groups stepping up and providing nutritious food and hygiene kits to the houseless community locally, less attention has been given to other necessities. Seeing this, Laundry to the People stepped in and began helping people living along the Truckee River get their laundry to the laundromat, cleaned, and dried. “We basically go down to tent city in a big van,” said Ilya Arbatman, one of the founding members “get people who need their laundry done. They load up their laundry in the van, we meet them at the laundromat and we help them do their laundry.” A simple action can go a long way if it’s done consistently and with compassion. Run by three community members, Rosie Zuckerman, Alex Muñoz, and Arbatman, the group came together after Blaize Abuntori of the Reno Burrito Project put them in touch. For nine weeks now they have been helping the houseless community wash their clothes. Recently, Our Town Reno reporter Richard Bednarski met them at the Mr. Bubbles Launderland on Second Street and Wells Avenue, not too far from the encampment where people are being helped. The sun was shining and people were busy shuffling in and out of the laundromat as the large white van pulled in. Moments later, members of the houseless community walked up and began helping Arbatman and Muñoz unload the van, each person carrying a bag full of dirty laundry.

City and County of San Francisco: Mayor's Press Conference Audio Podcast
Completion of the Second Street Improvements Project - Mar 25, 2021

City and County of San Francisco: Mayor's Press Conference Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2021


Converge Coffee
Episode 87: Create Great Experience By Focusing on Your Passions and Community

Converge Coffee

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2021 25:05


In this episode, I sit down with Ryan Hunley, owner and art director at Second Street Creative (https://2ndcreative.com/). We dive into why Ryan started Second Street and how that led to establishing Creative Mornings Indianapolis Chapter (https://creativemornings.com/cities/ind). We go deeper into how Ryan builds community through storytelling. Ryan shares insights on how to develop your concept of identity and how develop that entrepreneurial drive. Ryan's chill, fresh vibe shows in his tone and is represented in his passions and focuses. Special Guest: Ryan Hunley.

Beach Weekly
Beach Weekly S5E16 — Logging off 

Beach Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2020 7:39


beachCU.com In the last Beach Weekly episode of the semester, editor-in-chief Madalyn Amato reads her letter from the editor, and news editor Julia Terbeche discusses the regional stay-at-home order affecting Southern California, updates the commencement ceremony for the classes of 2020 and 2021 and Wednesday’s march on Second Street to protest stricter coronavirus regulations. On air: Julia Terbeche, Madalyn Amato Edited by Cameron Johnston Listen on your favorite platform! Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/beach-weekly/id1488484518?uo=4 Google Podcasts https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy9kMzEwMjEwL3BvZGNhc3QvcnNz Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/4HJaqJep02kHeIQy8op1n1 Overcast https://overcast.fm/itunes1488484518/beach-weekly Soundcloud https://soundcloud.com/daily49er

Fashion Crimes Podcast
Best Week Ever.com

Fashion Crimes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2020 32:23


It was the best week ever.com! On our way to Buffalo Exchange, we saw a vintage/second hand store that wasn’t on our speed dial.  Whhaatt??? We had to conquer immediately. Needless to say, we declared Second Street one of the greatest resale stores. (Locations in New York and Japan!) Racks so packed you can’t even move the hangers. In the designer section, Holly found a sheer MSGM top (who doesn’t love a shirt that’s completely sheer), and the most spectacular dress picked out practically blindfolded by our next BFD guest, Devin.      After finishing Second Street we trek into Buffalo Exchange. With all of the designer pieces hanging on the wall, Nolan spotted a Sonia Rykiel leather and felt coat that he demanded Holly try on. Needless to say, she wore it out of the store. it was 95% off with the tags still on! Later, we got dinner at The Mark Hotel as Nolan’s favorite thing on the planet is to watch the old Russian women and other fabulous Upper East Side ladies walk into the hotel.     Later in the week Holly decided to get her hair done. As she picks a color that is NOT approved, it turns out, of course, Nolan’s friend owns a salon, It was an amazing gals and gays day as Holly was down for a new fall hairstyle. Now the grey is gone, she has a new fall color and it looks delicious. Mani and hair trim for Nolan. Holly DOES miss her weave though; it’s #unbeweavable. It was something Nolan couldn't unsee.   Tune in as we talk about Lizzie Tisch’s Holiday Pop-Up Shop! It was spectacular and amazing customer service. Shout out to Lizzie Tisch and Gigi Burris Millinery!  This is a MUST see if you come the New York City!    Time Stamp   [ 1:20 ] About the best week ever   [ 12:40 ] Holly’s brand new hairdo   [ 17:45 ] We found the coolest popup   [ 24:40 ] Nolan is heading to Maine     Resources    MSGM  The Mark Hotel  Woodbury Common  Spruce Up Your Wardrobe At Lizzie Tisch's Holiday Pop-Up Shop   

East and Wes
S2-E6: Missions, with Glenn Jakes

East and Wes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2020 43:09


Today's episode looks at missions: the movement and desire of the Church to reach out. Our pastor interviewee is Rev. Glenn Jakes of Perry Presbyterian Church in Perry, GA. Find them online at perrypres.com, on Facebook @pcaperrygeorgia, and on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyhG9VAZhSje-xy6ajTidRg. Their physical address is 1111 Second Street, Perry, GA 31069.

Contra Costa Today
A Chat with Manny Soliz, District 1 Antioch City Council Candidate

Contra Costa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2020 65:03


In this episode, I chat with Manny Soliz Jr. who is a candidate for Antioch City Council is District 1. We talk about a variety of issues from what he is seeing on the planning commission, homeless, the police department and the divisiveness currently going on. We talk about economic development and what needs to be changed for a better Antioch. 01:20 – Soliz talks about being on the Antioch Planning Commission and talks about the homeless trailers and why a site was never selected. 06:30 – We talk about Soliz talking about “poor leadership” and “divisiveness” in the City of Antioch. We get into economic development and back to homeless. 13:45 – We talk about how divisive the City of Antioch has become. 16:35 – We get into the treatment of Mayor Sean Wright and the rhetoric against him from protesters. 20:47 – Soliz talks about Defund the Police and Police Reform. We talk about 2012 and the impact of laying off Antioch Police Officers. 29:00 – we get into economic development on E 18th.  We also get into the rental program and fees. We then move into Antioch’s perception even with a PIO and Opportunity Campaign. 33:40 – Soliz talks about how he would represent the entire city, not just District 1, but we discuss the idea of Sycamore Corridor Rivertown along with E 18th to KMART. Aside from Rivertown, the rest of the area in District 1 has been ignored.  Soliz gives his vision of where District 1 is headed.   39:20 – We get into the fact Antioch City Council brought in an economic development director and never gave him a budget.  We talk about what stops investors from coming into Antioch. 45:47 – How do we get the City of Antioch and Antioch Unified School District to work together and “get along” versus just pointing the finger at one another. 51:45 – Blight in District 1 52:50 – Beede Lumber Yard and what the real story is. 55:40 – We get into this idea of “C” level business owners downtown versus bringing in “A” business players which would draw people downtown and to the City of Antioch. 57:25 – Thoughts on the concept of shutting down Second Street in order to open it up to more outside dinning and walking/bicycles. 60:00 – Manny gives his reason why voters should consider voting for him.

Front To Back
Front To Back Episode 2 Featuring Jim Basnight

Front To Back

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2020 59:00


1 Code to Live By 2 Not Changing 3 Big Bang 4 Avenue of the Star5 Making Love for a Living 6 Suicide Evening 7 Best Lover in the World 8 Kurt Cobain 9 Never Get Lost 10 Second Street 11 Saturday Dream 12 You Never Cease to Amaze13 Having Fun 14 Living the Way I Want

Louisiana Anthology Podcast
380. Kit Wohl, part 2

Louisiana Anthology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2020


380. Part 2 of our interview with Kit Wohl. This week we talk about her book Iron Lace, author Kit Wohl’s passionate guided tour to the city’s most historic, celebrated, ornate, imaginative and even mysterious iron works that adorn, beautify and protect so many of New Orleans’ most treasured physical properties. Since the very founding of the city, blacksmiths and iron workers established themselves as essential craftsmen of New Orleans’ most romantic and iconic architectural details. The grape vines, rose clusters, ivy and fleur-de-lis dance along balcony railings and climb our galleries. Whimsical faces of nature peer out from gateposts. Fences take the form of rows of cornstalks in a field. Latticework, filigree, architectural detail and decorative ornamentation. A personal touch or conformist requirement. The prideful flourish of an owner’s initials. An extravagant indulgence or vital security measure. It goes by many names and interpretations, but what the work of the iron foundry men, blacksmiths, craftsmen and artisans has created for the city over three hundred years is, at its essence, a drapery of iron lace meticulously laid out over the fabric of life in this most unique and unusual city.This week in Louisiana history. August 30, 1893. Gov. Huey P. "the Kingfish" Long born in Winnfield. This week in New Orleans history. Monday, August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made its second landfall as a strong Category 3 hurricane near Buras-Triumph, Louisiana, with sustained winds of more than 125 mph (205 km/h), although Category 4 winds may have briefly affected the area. Katrina also made landfall in St. Bernard parish and St. Tammany parish as a Category 3 hurricane for a total of three landfalls in Louisiana This week in Louisiana. 84th Louisiana Shrimp & Petroleum Festival September 3rd, 2020 - September 7th, 20208:00 am - 11:00 pmDowntown Morgan City305 Everett St., 715 Second Street, Morgan City, LA 70380 985-385-0703 | Fax Website | Email Tap your toes & tempt your tastebuds at Louisiana's oldest state-chartered harvest festival. The four-day extravaganza of family entertainment includes continuous live music by local & national acts, a huge arts & crafts show and sale, a Children's Village, the Cajun Culinary Classic, the traditional Blessing of the Fleet and water parade . . . all with no gate fee! Postcards from Louisiana. Maude Caillat and the Afrodiziacs at the Pythian Market, New Orleans.Listen on iTunesListen on StitcherListen on Google Play.Listen on Google Podcasts.Listen on Spotify.Listen on TuneIn.The Louisiana Anthology Home Page.Like us on Facebook.

The NAB Podcast
Building Effective Contests, Promotions and Email Campaigns during the Pandemic

The NAB Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2020 22:30


Liz Crider Huff, director of Affiliate Success, Second Street, explains the most effective ways for stations to reach and engage audiences over the summer using contests, promotions and email campaigns. Also, learn about the various operational resources at your fingertips in NAB's Coronavirus Response Toolkit for Broadcasters.

Daily Local News – WFHB
WFHB Local News – June 17, 2020

Daily Local News – WFHB

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2020 34:11


Good afternoon. This is the WFHB Local News for Wednesday, June 17, 2020 Later in the program, WFHB News Correspondent Aaron Comforty reports on the future of the 24-acre Bloomington Hospital site on Second Street. He talked to Deputy Mayor Mick Renneissen. Also coming up in the next half hour, your weekly consumer-watchdog segment, Better Beware. …

Editor and Publisher Reports
38 Second Street Summit Moves Online, Open to All!

Editor and Publisher Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2020 34:00


Second Street, an audience engagement software platform used by more than 4,000 media companies, is moving their 7th annual summit from a two-day conference in St. Louis to a free, month-long virtual series in June that anyone can attend. More than 15 speakers from a wide range of traditional and digital media are scheduled to present on topics covering lead generation, recurring revenue, database growth and email.   E&P publisher Mike Blinder chats with Second Street president and co-founder Matt Coen about the summit and why they decided to provide the content free of charge.

Game Of Tones
Second Street (Disco Ball Records)

Game Of Tones

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2020 5:02


All releases, future and past, as well as some unreleased tracks I'm shopping.

Second Street PCA
Mark 10:35-45 Rev. Rick Clayton

Second Street PCA

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2020 47:36


Rev. Clayton fills Second Street's pulpit this week! His sermon is on James and John's (sons of Zebedee) request to sit at the right hand of Christ in His kingdom. It is a sermon about discipleship and humility.

Roy Green Show
Colin Craig, on the total cost of stalled and cancelled natural resource projects

Roy Green Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2020 6:53


Second Street is a new Alberta-based think tank which has totalled the cost to Canada and Canadians of major stalled or cancelled natural resources projects over the past six years. The number is staggering. Guest: Colin Craig, President of SecondStreet.org See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Oakley Show
Colin Craig of Second Street on missed natural resource projects

The John Oakley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2020 13:20


Colin Craig, President, Second Street.org talks about all the missed natural resource development opportunities in Canada since 2014 

Scott Thompson Show
Scott Thompson Podcast - Rally at Tim Hortons field, meetings with government and hereditary chiefs, and putting a dollar amount on the protests

Scott Thompson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2020 44:25


The Arkells have a new single out this week and they just announced today that there will be another Rally at Tim Horton's Field! Guest: Max Kerman, The Arkells Federal, provincial and indigenous leaders were optimistic after their first meeting, though no solution was found.Guest: Ellis Ross, MLA for Skeena, official opposition critic for LNG and Resource Opportunities Continued... Guest: Tim Powers, Vice-Chairman, Summa Strategies (has served as an advisor to a national party leader and federal cabinet ministers). Research by the group Second Street shows that the value of all the canceled or stalled resource projects is now over $213 billion.Guest: Colin Craig, President – SecondStreet.org

Haunted Places
Lizzie Borden B&B

Haunted Places

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 13, 2020 50:33


Lizzie Borden’s story has inspired everything from nursery rhymes to a Lifetime television series. The site where her parents were murdered in 1892, a three-story house at what was then 92 Second Street, is now a bed and breakfast.

Dennis & Barbara's Top 25 All-Time Interviews
Lessons From a Father That Was Always There (Part 2) - Crawford Loritts

Dennis & Barbara's Top 25 All-Time Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2020 29:46


Lessons From a Father That Was Always There (Part 1) - Crawford LorittsLessons From a Father That Was Always There (Part 2) - Crawford LorittsFamilyLife Today® Radio Transcript  References to conferences, resources, or other special promotions may be obsolete. The Most Important Things Guest:                         Crawford Loritts                    From the series:       Lessons from a Father Who Was Always There (Day 2 of 2)  Bob: What's the right balance, as a parent, between protecting your children and letting them experience enough of life that they wind up with a few scars? Here's Dr. Crawford Loritts. Crawford: I understand the need to protect them from the evils, and the sin, and the hellishness that's in our culture; but I have to tell you—protection is not development. I'm terribly concerned about this movement among some of us that wants to hover over our kids—and pull them back and sanitize and sterilize their environments—in such a way that they don't interact with the evil world/a dark world, in which they were born to redeem, and impact, and be salt and light in! Bob: This is FamilyLife Today for Tuesday, March 13th. Our host is Dennis Rainey, and I'm Bob Lepine. Where does protection fit into our priorities, as parents; and how much freedom should we give our children? We'll hear from Crawford Loritts on that today. Stay with us. 1:00 And welcome to FamilyLife Today. Thanks for joining us on the Tuesday edition. When I was in high school, our choir sang a song that was based on the final instructions that King David gave to his son as David was dying and as Solomon was taking over. I don't know if choirs are allowed to sing songs that biblical in our day, but our high school choir sang this when I was growing up. It's stuck with me all these years—David's counsel to his son—from a father, who's dying. He had wise words to share with his son.  In fact, we're going to hear today from Crawford Loritts about how important and how powerful it is for a father to instruct, and coach, and model for his son what really matters. Dennis: Crawford is the pastor at Fellowship Bible Church in Roswell, Georgia.  2:00 He is the father of four children / he's the husband of Karen, and they have ten grandchildren. As you listen to Crawford share this story from the Scriptures, I want you to think about what you're charging your kids with today. Are you challenging them with a high enough standard? Are you challenging them with the right goal? Are you challenging them with an eternal goal? I think, Bob, we need to be putting before our children a biblical standard for how they should live throughout their lives; and I think we ought to allow a story like this, from 1 Kings, Chapter 2, to be like the song that you said you remembered all the way back to your childhood—just that it might stick in our hearts and we carry the burden of realizing we need to shape and direct the next generation. Bob: I think we'll get some good coaching from Crawford, as moms and dads, to know: “What are the important things we should be focusing on as we pass on a legacy to our sons and our daughters?”   3:00 Here's Part Two of a message from Dr. Crawford Loritts on “Lessons on Integrity from a Father Who Lived It.” [Recorded Message] Crawford: In 1 Kings, Chapter 2, verses 1-4, David is dying / David is leaving—the legendary David. As he's dying, he calls his son, Solomon, in to make a grand handoff. David was consciously aware of the fact that legacies are not guaranteed—they are not guaranteed. And yet, Solomon was being tapped as next in line. David was about to go be in the very presence of God. It's almost as if, as you read the text, the emotional context is really compelling. It's as if David is reaching out and grabbing his son, Solomon, by the lapels and pulling him close. [Emotion in voice]  4:00 In these four verses, it's almost as if David is saying: “Son, this is what I've lived for. These are the footprints in the sand, and I need you to embrace what you were born for.” And parenthetically, as we raise our children—from the time they're little somethings / from the time they're tiny—we need to be whispering in their ears that they were born for the glory of God and for the plan and the purposes of God: “This is what you were born for, and everything in your life has to be lined up for your moment in history—that you're just passing through here. You're going to be very dead one day. One day, God's going to say, ‘Give Me back My breath.'  5:00 “What were you born for? What are you living for? What are you doing?”  It's amazing, when people are dying, how essence they are—all the other garbage, and all the other frills, and all the other stuff—it doesn't make any difference anymore. David is dying. As he dies, he charges Solomon with these three things—he charges Solomon to live courageously; he charges Solomon to live obediently; and he charges Solomon to live faithfully. I'll say a few words, and then I'll be done. First of all, he charges Solomon: “I want you to live, Solomon. I want you to live. I want you to live courageously.” Verse 1 says, “When David's time to die drew near, he commanded Solomon his son, saying, ‘I am about to go the way of all the earth.'”  6:00 Now, notice this line: “‘Be strong; show yourself a man,'”—“My time is up; it's coming to a close. The ball is being placed in your hands. Solomon, I am challenging you to press through the challenges and the opportunities of your responsibilities. I need you, Solomon, to step up.” In fact, in the Hebrew, the expression, “show yourself a man,” literally is, “become a man.” I think what David was saying to Solomon was: “Solomon, Solomon, Solomon—I need you to rise up to what you were born for.” Solomon was to become what being the king of Israel required—required.  I could get off into this, but I don't have time to do this. I actually think we coddle this generation a little bit too much— 7:00  —I actually think we soften them a little bit too much. We don't give them what they need. I believe the text doesn't say that perhaps David sensed some weakness in Solomon. Solomon was not like his daddy. David ran for 16 years, hiding out in caves from Saul. David was a tough dude, and David experienced some hard stuff—he didn't silver spoon it. Solomon grew up with a little bit more cotton around him, and a little more cushion around him, and a little more options, and a little more resources—he had stuff to choose from. David probably sensed in him: “Solomon, I—I don't know that you have the grit and the resilience that you need to do what needs to be done. You have to show yourself a man. Show yourself a man,”— 8:00 —conviction versus compliance.  I am concerned about how we are raising some of our kids. I understand the need to protect them from the evils, and the sin, and the hellishness that's in our culture—don't get me wrong—the margins are almost erased right now. I get that / I get that. We pray for our 11 grandkids and what they're going through; I mean, there are just too many opportunities for evil. But I have to tell you—protection is not development. I'm terribly concerned about this movement among some of us that wants to hover over our kids—and pull them back and sanitize and sterilize their environments in such a way—that they don't interact with the evil world/a dark world, in which they were born to redeem, and impact, and be salt and light in! David says: “Solomon; hey buddy, you have to step into some stuff. Live courageously—don't run from the challenges; but run to God to get what you need to face the challenges, Solomon.”  9:00 Secondly, he says, “Solomon, live obediently.” Tender words, here, in verse 3, “And keep the charge of the Lord your God, walking in His ways and keeping His statutes, His commandments, His rules, and His testimonies, as it is written in the Law of Moses.” When you do exposition, you always have to pay attention to the emotional context. I think this is biographical—I think David was saying to Solomon, in so many words: “Solomon”—it was not just about the Davidic covenant / not just about the promises of David—I think he had that in mind, because the text says so; but I think there's something else going on here. I think David wanted his son to love God's Word the way he did! He wanted him to cherish it the way he did: “Solomon, you need to bring your life in line with the truth of God's Word.  10:00 “You need to live it—not just speak it, not just quote it, not just argue your paradigms and all that stuff about it—but you need to live this stuff. You need to live it. You need to live it. You need to live it. You need to live it.” This is what David was saying to Solomon: “Solomon, listen to me, buddy; you can't do it, man. You can't do it. I need you to cherish this book. If you're going to be successful / if you're going to make it, you're going to have to walk with God; you're going to have to love this book; you're going to have to listen to this book.” David was telling Solomon: “Hey, buddy; don't get cute. Don't get cute. Don't think that because I'm your daddy, you're on the throne, and you've inherited this throne at a very important time—and I'll become a living legend, and this stuff is being passed off to you— 11:00 “—don't think that this is sustainable—that somehow or another, vicariously, my background you can broker and that will make you a good person. You need to walk with this, son—you need to love it.” We need to raise our kids to say: “You don't have to do me proud,” “You don't have to be anything that you think I want you to be,”—take that off the table—“But you do have to obey God.” But then he says, thirdly, “You have to live faithfully.” I suppose, technically, faithfulness is a subset of obedience—that's probably accurate—but I want to parse it out a bit here; because he says, here in verse 4, “…that the Lord may establish His Word that He spoke concerning me, saying, ‘If your sons pay close attention to their way, to walk before Me in faithfulness with all their hearts…'”— 12:00 —what is he saying? David is saying: “Hey look. You know the mess in my life; okay?” David ended well, but he had some major “oops.” I believe he's saying: “You know the mess between me and your mama; okay—it's well-documented. [Laughter] It wasn't cool—you know about Nathan; you know about my brokenness; you know about my repentance. By the grace of God, I've gotten back on the right track, boy; and you have got to be faithful!”  13:00 In other words, “You have to remember where you came from and what's been placed in your hands.” You see, faithfulness means to obey God in the little things. It is a daily commitment to do the right, honorable things, and often the difficult things—often the difficult things. You see, to me, greatness is not notoriety / greatness is not recognition.  You know, I was being interviewed several years ago. Somebody said something / they heard something—and they used the words, “Boy, you're approaching greatness…” or something like that—first of all, they need to get out more; [Laughter] but when they said that, I said: “No, no, no, no; no. Greatness is buried, side by side, in Old Dominion Cemetery in Roanoke, Virginia—Crawford and Sylvia Loritts—because they were faithful/faithful.” 14:00 And David was telling his boy: “Every single day—in the small things / the big things; the things that people don't see, behind closed doors—get after it, Solomon. Get after it.” One of the greatest things you can do—rather than trying to raise your kids to be a great speaker, or a great athlete, or this kind of thing / this kind of thing—teach them how to just be consistent in following through on the noble, right things: “You hurt my heart, son. Why?—because: “Loritts, we don't steal,” / “You show up, boy. I heard you were late for that little job you had. Show up.” 15:00 Some time ago, my oldest son, Bryan, and I—we were speaking at—this was a few years ago—we were speaking at the Billy Graham Center at the Cove in Asheville, North Carolina. While we were there, I said to Bryan: “We have a break in the afternoon.” I said: “You know, do you want to go back down to Conover, North Carolina? It's less than an hour away. That's the old homestead—that's where Peter held forth, and my grandfather, Milton, and where my dad was born.” Bryan was excited, because he hadn't been there since he was a little guy. We went on down I-40 there, and got off at the Newton Conover exit, and snaked over the railroad tracks—I hadn't been there in years—back to Second Street. I was surprised I could find my way over there. As soon as you cross on Second Street, on the right-hand side is a little tiny church called Thomas Chapel AME Zion Church.  16:00 Interestingly enough, my grandfather had given the land for that little church to be built on. Behind the church, there's a cemetery. The cemetery, interestingly enough, was there before the church was there—there's a cemetery. About a half to almost two-thirds of the bodies in that cemetery are related to Lorittses.  As Bryan and I were walking around the cemetery, I was reminding him who some of these people were—you know: “That's Pop's brother, your Great-uncle Ordell,” and “That's Uncle Hayes, right there,” “Here's Uncle Emery,” and “There's Aunt Annie, right there,” “There's your Great-grandfather—my grandfather, Milton / Pop's dad,” and “There's his wife, Anna, right here.”  17:00 As I began to just tell him about these people, I was ambushed by emotion. I began to weep; and I said to Bryan—I said: “Son, these people paid your tuition. They paid your tuition.” I guess the charge I want to make to you today—as you look at your children, and you look at the future and look at a time that you cannot see, and you're making the investments in their lives—you're doing the drudgery, day in and day out—and you're correcting them, and disciplining them, and you're laughing with them, and you're going through the struggles / “Are they ever going to get out of my house?”—or all this stuff that's going on—keep in mind: “You're paying their tuition. What are you investing in them? 18:00 “Will they be able to live courageously? Will they live obediently, and will they live faithfully?” Holy Father, thank You for Your Spirit; thank You for Your power; thank You for Your grace. Thank You for what You mean to us.  Lord, the most intimidating thing we do, as a parent—You've entrusted with us those precious lives that bear the image of our great God. There's a devil out there; there are all kinds of mess. They have their own temptations and issues; but Spirit of the living God, we pray that You'll help us to roll up our sleeves so that we can look each one in the eye, when that moment comes, and say, “By the grace of God, I did the best I could.”  We love You, Lord Jesus.  19:00 Thank You for what You will do. In Jesus' name, Amen. [Studio] Bob: Again, today, we've been listening to the second part of a message from our friend, Crawford Loritts, the pastor at Fellowship Bible Church in Roswell, Georgia—a message that Crawford shared at the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, their conference on parenting that was held, back last fall. It's a timely message; and one that we felt is important for our listeners as we try to live intentionally, as moms and dads, raising the next generation. Dennis: And Bob, as you know, Barbara and I have been working on a book called The Art of Parenting. It's going to be a part of, really, the largest resource launch in FamilyLife®'s 41-year history—that'll occur in May and, also, next summer—where we're going to be setting our sights on equipping one million parents to raise their children to fulfill God's design and blueprints for their lives. 20:00 I just want our listeners to get ready to maybe be a recipient of some of that training or to be a messenger. That's a part of what Crawford was talking about here—you've raised your children, intentionally; but you're also thinking about the next generation: “How can you send a living message to a time that you will not see?” Crawford spoke powerfully about that in his message, Bob, where he's really challenging us to outlive ourselves—live through our children / live through the generation to come—to make an impact upon their culture and the people they influence. Bob: If you missed any part of the message, you can go back and listen, online, at FamilyLifeToday.com. Let me also mention—there's information available there about a new resource that FamilyLife has been working on for more than a year now. It's an eight-session video series called FamilyLife's Art of Parenting™. It's going to be available for small groups; it's also going to be available, online, for moms and dads to go through—just the two of you working through it, if you'd like. 21:00 Crawford's son, Bryan, and his daughter-in-law, Korie, are one of the contributors to FamilyLife's Art of Parenting—so is Alistair Begg, and Kevin DeYoung, and Dr. Meg Meeker—there's a great list of folks who join you and Barbara on this video series. Again, you can get more information / you can watch a preview of The Art of Parenting when you go to FamilyLifeToday.com and find out more about how you can order the material or how you can access it as soon as it's available in early May. We're kicking all of this off with a movie that we've created called Like Arrows. It's a movie that stars Alan Powell and Micah Lynn Hanson. Alex Kendrick has a role, as well; and Alex and Stephen helped us with the production of this film. It's in theaters two nights only, and we're hoping that our FamilyLife Today family—many of you—will make plans to join us on a Tuesday night/Thursday night. Bring your friends / pack the theaters, and come out to see Like Arrows.  22:00 Tickets are on sale now. You can find out more / you can see a trailer for the movie when you go to FamilyLifeToday.com. If you have any questions, give us a call at 1-800-358-6329.  Finally, let me mention that we have copies of the book that Crawford Loritts has written, called Never Walk Away: Lessons on Integrity from a Father Who Lived It. It's available in our FamilyLife Today Resource Center. You can order Crawford's book, where he reflects on things he learned from his own father. Again, go to FamilyLifeToday.com to order; or call 1-800-FL-TODAY. You know, I mentioned this new parenting emphasis for FamilyLife. Our goal is to begin a movement of intentional parenting, not just in the church, but we want to take this content and deliver it to people, who aren't listening to FamilyLife Today / folks who may not be going to church currently.  23:00 We're developing strategies to help us put this content in the hands of people, who are right now far from God and far from the church, but people who are open to hearing what the Bible has to say about parenting. In the process, they'll get a chance to hear the gospel; and who knows how God might use this series in their lives? If you'd like to help us reach more people with this content—we're calculating it's going to take about $10 per home to be able to get this material in the hands of folks, who are far from God and far from the church. Go to FamilyLifeToday.com, and you can make a donation to help support our efforts; or call 1-800-FL-TODAY. Of course, every donation you give helps advance the mission of FamilyLife. You help us reach more people more regularly with God's design for marriage and family—that's what we're all about here. So, again, you can give, online, at FamilyLifeToday.com; or call 1-800-FL-TODAY to donate. When you do, we'll say, “Thank you,” by sending you a set of seven prayer cards designed for moms and dads or for grandparents to be praying more intentionally for your children or your grandchildren.  24:00 The prayer cards are our gift to you when you help support the work. We appreciate your partnership with us in the work we're doing, here, at FamilyLife Today. And we hope you'll join us back tomorrow, when we're going to hear from another man about the impact his father had on his life. Rick Rigsby joins us tomorrow. I hope you can be back with us as well. I want to thank our engineer today, Keith Lynch, along with our entire broadcast production team. On behalf of our host, Dennis Rainey, I'm Bob Lepine. We will see you back next time for another edition of FamilyLife Today.  FamilyLife Today is a production of FamilyLife of Little Rock, Arkansas; a Cru® Ministry. Help for today. Hope for tomorrow.  We are so happy to provide these transcripts to you. However, there is a cost to produce them for our website. If you've benefited from the broadcast transcripts, would you consider donating today to help defray the costs?   Copyright © 2018 FamilyLife. All rights reserved. www.FamilyLife.com  

Where R.A. Now?
Season 2; Episode 17. John Sanchez '09 - '11 (Second Street) with cohost Paola Beristain (Palladium)

Where R.A. Now?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2019 34:34


John Sanchez is a lifelong Bronx resident and currently the District Manager for Bronx Community Board 6, which includes the neighborhoods of Belmont, East Tremont, and West Farms in the Central Bronx. He is responsible for resolving community concerns with city government, advocating for budget requests to elected officials and city agencies, and planning community events. In his first year, he successfully advocated to bring a Youth Court to The Bronx and worked with the Department of Small Business Services to receive more than $200,000 in grants for storefront facade improvements on East Tremont Ave. He has also sponsored and organized free financial literacy workshops, youth sports programming, a college scholarship competition, and an annual Holiday toy giveaway for children living in shelters. John previously served as New York City Advocacy Manager for the Northeast Charter Schools Network helping advocate for increased charter school funding and also served in the New York State Assembly as Deputy Chief of Staff for a Bronx Assembly member where he was responsible for managing the district office, resolving constituent issues, and community outreach . John serves on the nonprofit boards of Housing Rights Initiative, Legacy College Prep Charter School, and Immaculate Conception School. John is a graduate of New York University’s Stern School of Business.

The John Oakley Show
Colin Craig, President Second Street talks about carbon tax polling

The John Oakley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2019 9:08


Colin Craig, President Second Street talks about carbon tax polling Key highlights:

A Submarine That's Yellow
NEW MUSIC FROM PAUL