Podcasts about San Francisco State University

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Best podcasts about San Francisco State University

Latest podcast episodes about San Francisco State University

The Erotic Philosopher
Soma Cultural Liberation with Dr Roger Kuhn

The Erotic Philosopher

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 58:31


This week's guest Dr Roger Kuhn is a Poarch Creek Two-Spirit Indigequeer soma-cultural activist, artist, sex therapist, and sexuality educator.  Roger's work explores the concepts of decolonizing and unsettling sexuality and focuses on the way culture impacts and informs our bodily experiences.   In addition to his work as a licensed psychotherapist, Roger is a faculty lecturer of American Indian Studies at San Francisco State University.  He is a board member of the American Indian Cultural Center of San Francisco, a community organizer of the Bay Area American Indian Two-Spirit powwow, and a member of the LGBTQ+ Advisory Committee of the San Francisco Human Rights Commission.   In 2022, Roger was featured in the Levi's Pride campaign.  He is currently writing his first book, Soma-Cultural Liberation, which will be published by North Atlantic books in 2024. In this episode we dig into the impact of the body and culture and it's impact ion how we process sensation, emotion and so much more. Roger unpacks some soma cultural narratives in North American life and  offers his knowledge on the impact of soma-cultural liberation in sex, therapy and relationships. Follow him on Instagram  Watch on You Tube  Find Cyndi www.cyndidarnell.com  and on Instagram   and Facebook and Twitter Follow The Erotic Philosopher on Instagram and Twitter 

New Books in Film
Joseph McBride, "Billy Wilder: Dancing on the Edge" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in Film

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 87:11


The director and cowriter of some of the world's most iconic films―including Double Indemnity, Sunset Blvd., Some Like It Hot, and The Apartment―Billy Wilder earned acclaim as American cinema's greatest social satirist. Though an influential fixture in Hollywood, Wilder always saw himself as an outsider. His worldview was shaped by his background in the Austro-Hungarian Empire and work as a journalist in Berlin during Hitler's rise to power, and his perspective as a Jewish refugee from Nazism lent his films a sense of the peril that could engulf any society. In this critical study, Joseph McBride offers new ways to understand Wilder's work, stretching from his days as a reporter and screenwriter in Europe to his distinguished as well as forgotten films as a Hollywood writer and his celebrated work as a writer-director. In contrast to the widespread view of Wilder as a hardened cynic, McBride reveals him to be a disappointed romantic. Wilder's experiences as an exile led him to mask his sensitivity beneath a veneer of wisecracking that made him a celebrated caustic wit. Amid the satirical barbs and exposure of social hypocrisies, Wilder's films are marked by intense compassion and a profound understanding of the human condition. Mixing biographical insight with in-depth analysis of films from throughout Wilder's career as a screenwriter and director of comedy and drama, and drawing on McBride's interviews with the director and his collaborators, this book casts new light on the full range of Wilder's rich, complex, and distinctive vision. Joseph McBride is a film historian and professor in the School of Cinema at San Francisco State University. His many books include the critical study How Did Lubitsch Do It? (Columbia, 2018) as well as acclaimed biographies of Frank Capra, John Ford, and Steven Spielberg and three books on Orson Welles. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/film

New Books in Dance
Joseph McBride, "Billy Wilder: Dancing on the Edge" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in Dance

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 87:11


The director and cowriter of some of the world's most iconic films―including Double Indemnity, Sunset Blvd., Some Like It Hot, and The Apartment―Billy Wilder earned acclaim as American cinema's greatest social satirist. Though an influential fixture in Hollywood, Wilder always saw himself as an outsider. His worldview was shaped by his background in the Austro-Hungarian Empire and work as a journalist in Berlin during Hitler's rise to power, and his perspective as a Jewish refugee from Nazism lent his films a sense of the peril that could engulf any society. In this critical study, Joseph McBride offers new ways to understand Wilder's work, stretching from his days as a reporter and screenwriter in Europe to his distinguished as well as forgotten films as a Hollywood writer and his celebrated work as a writer-director. In contrast to the widespread view of Wilder as a hardened cynic, McBride reveals him to be a disappointed romantic. Wilder's experiences as an exile led him to mask his sensitivity beneath a veneer of wisecracking that made him a celebrated caustic wit. Amid the satirical barbs and exposure of social hypocrisies, Wilder's films are marked by intense compassion and a profound understanding of the human condition. Mixing biographical insight with in-depth analysis of films from throughout Wilder's career as a screenwriter and director of comedy and drama, and drawing on McBride's interviews with the director and his collaborators, this book casts new light on the full range of Wilder's rich, complex, and distinctive vision. Joseph McBride is a film historian and professor in the School of Cinema at San Francisco State University. His many books include the critical study How Did Lubitsch Do It? (Columbia, 2018) as well as acclaimed biographies of Frank Capra, John Ford, and Steven Spielberg and three books on Orson Welles. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/performing-arts

New Books in History
Joseph McBride, "Billy Wilder: Dancing on the Edge" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 87:11


The director and cowriter of some of the world's most iconic films―including Double Indemnity, Sunset Blvd., Some Like It Hot, and The Apartment―Billy Wilder earned acclaim as American cinema's greatest social satirist. Though an influential fixture in Hollywood, Wilder always saw himself as an outsider. His worldview was shaped by his background in the Austro-Hungarian Empire and work as a journalist in Berlin during Hitler's rise to power, and his perspective as a Jewish refugee from Nazism lent his films a sense of the peril that could engulf any society. In this critical study, Joseph McBride offers new ways to understand Wilder's work, stretching from his days as a reporter and screenwriter in Europe to his distinguished as well as forgotten films as a Hollywood writer and his celebrated work as a writer-director. In contrast to the widespread view of Wilder as a hardened cynic, McBride reveals him to be a disappointed romantic. Wilder's experiences as an exile led him to mask his sensitivity beneath a veneer of wisecracking that made him a celebrated caustic wit. Amid the satirical barbs and exposure of social hypocrisies, Wilder's films are marked by intense compassion and a profound understanding of the human condition. Mixing biographical insight with in-depth analysis of films from throughout Wilder's career as a screenwriter and director of comedy and drama, and drawing on McBride's interviews with the director and his collaborators, this book casts new light on the full range of Wilder's rich, complex, and distinctive vision. Joseph McBride is a film historian and professor in the School of Cinema at San Francisco State University. His many books include the critical study How Did Lubitsch Do It? (Columbia, 2018) as well as acclaimed biographies of Frank Capra, John Ford, and Steven Spielberg and three books on Orson Welles. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in German Studies
Joseph McBride, "Billy Wilder: Dancing on the Edge" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in German Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 87:11


The director and cowriter of some of the world's most iconic films―including Double Indemnity, Sunset Blvd., Some Like It Hot, and The Apartment―Billy Wilder earned acclaim as American cinema's greatest social satirist. Though an influential fixture in Hollywood, Wilder always saw himself as an outsider. His worldview was shaped by his background in the Austro-Hungarian Empire and work as a journalist in Berlin during Hitler's rise to power, and his perspective as a Jewish refugee from Nazism lent his films a sense of the peril that could engulf any society. In this critical study, Joseph McBride offers new ways to understand Wilder's work, stretching from his days as a reporter and screenwriter in Europe to his distinguished as well as forgotten films as a Hollywood writer and his celebrated work as a writer-director. In contrast to the widespread view of Wilder as a hardened cynic, McBride reveals him to be a disappointed romantic. Wilder's experiences as an exile led him to mask his sensitivity beneath a veneer of wisecracking that made him a celebrated caustic wit. Amid the satirical barbs and exposure of social hypocrisies, Wilder's films are marked by intense compassion and a profound understanding of the human condition. Mixing biographical insight with in-depth analysis of films from throughout Wilder's career as a screenwriter and director of comedy and drama, and drawing on McBride's interviews with the director and his collaborators, this book casts new light on the full range of Wilder's rich, complex, and distinctive vision. Joseph McBride is a film historian and professor in the School of Cinema at San Francisco State University. His many books include the critical study How Did Lubitsch Do It? (Columbia, 2018) as well as acclaimed biographies of Frank Capra, John Ford, and Steven Spielberg and three books on Orson Welles. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/german-studies

New Books in Biography
Joseph McBride, "Billy Wilder: Dancing on the Edge" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 87:11


The director and cowriter of some of the world's most iconic films―including Double Indemnity, Sunset Blvd., Some Like It Hot, and The Apartment―Billy Wilder earned acclaim as American cinema's greatest social satirist. Though an influential fixture in Hollywood, Wilder always saw himself as an outsider. His worldview was shaped by his background in the Austro-Hungarian Empire and work as a journalist in Berlin during Hitler's rise to power, and his perspective as a Jewish refugee from Nazism lent his films a sense of the peril that could engulf any society. In this critical study, Joseph McBride offers new ways to understand Wilder's work, stretching from his days as a reporter and screenwriter in Europe to his distinguished as well as forgotten films as a Hollywood writer and his celebrated work as a writer-director. In contrast to the widespread view of Wilder as a hardened cynic, McBride reveals him to be a disappointed romantic. Wilder's experiences as an exile led him to mask his sensitivity beneath a veneer of wisecracking that made him a celebrated caustic wit. Amid the satirical barbs and exposure of social hypocrisies, Wilder's films are marked by intense compassion and a profound understanding of the human condition. Mixing biographical insight with in-depth analysis of films from throughout Wilder's career as a screenwriter and director of comedy and drama, and drawing on McBride's interviews with the director and his collaborators, this book casts new light on the full range of Wilder's rich, complex, and distinctive vision. Joseph McBride is a film historian and professor in the School of Cinema at San Francisco State University. His many books include the critical study How Did Lubitsch Do It? (Columbia, 2018) as well as acclaimed biographies of Frank Capra, John Ford, and Steven Spielberg and three books on Orson Welles. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books in American Studies
Joseph McBride, "Billy Wilder: Dancing on the Edge" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 87:11


The director and cowriter of some of the world's most iconic films―including Double Indemnity, Sunset Blvd., Some Like It Hot, and The Apartment―Billy Wilder earned acclaim as American cinema's greatest social satirist. Though an influential fixture in Hollywood, Wilder always saw himself as an outsider. His worldview was shaped by his background in the Austro-Hungarian Empire and work as a journalist in Berlin during Hitler's rise to power, and his perspective as a Jewish refugee from Nazism lent his films a sense of the peril that could engulf any society. In this critical study, Joseph McBride offers new ways to understand Wilder's work, stretching from his days as a reporter and screenwriter in Europe to his distinguished as well as forgotten films as a Hollywood writer and his celebrated work as a writer-director. In contrast to the widespread view of Wilder as a hardened cynic, McBride reveals him to be a disappointed romantic. Wilder's experiences as an exile led him to mask his sensitivity beneath a veneer of wisecracking that made him a celebrated caustic wit. Amid the satirical barbs and exposure of social hypocrisies, Wilder's films are marked by intense compassion and a profound understanding of the human condition. Mixing biographical insight with in-depth analysis of films from throughout Wilder's career as a screenwriter and director of comedy and drama, and drawing on McBride's interviews with the director and his collaborators, this book casts new light on the full range of Wilder's rich, complex, and distinctive vision. Joseph McBride is a film historian and professor in the School of Cinema at San Francisco State University. His many books include the critical study How Did Lubitsch Do It? (Columbia, 2018) as well as acclaimed biographies of Frank Capra, John Ford, and Steven Spielberg and three books on Orson Welles. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Jewish Studies
Joseph McBride, "Billy Wilder: Dancing on the Edge" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 87:11


The director and cowriter of some of the world's most iconic films―including Double Indemnity, Sunset Blvd., Some Like It Hot, and The Apartment―Billy Wilder earned acclaim as American cinema's greatest social satirist. Though an influential fixture in Hollywood, Wilder always saw himself as an outsider. His worldview was shaped by his background in the Austro-Hungarian Empire and work as a journalist in Berlin during Hitler's rise to power, and his perspective as a Jewish refugee from Nazism lent his films a sense of the peril that could engulf any society. In this critical study, Joseph McBride offers new ways to understand Wilder's work, stretching from his days as a reporter and screenwriter in Europe to his distinguished as well as forgotten films as a Hollywood writer and his celebrated work as a writer-director. In contrast to the widespread view of Wilder as a hardened cynic, McBride reveals him to be a disappointed romantic. Wilder's experiences as an exile led him to mask his sensitivity beneath a veneer of wisecracking that made him a celebrated caustic wit. Amid the satirical barbs and exposure of social hypocrisies, Wilder's films are marked by intense compassion and a profound understanding of the human condition. Mixing biographical insight with in-depth analysis of films from throughout Wilder's career as a screenwriter and director of comedy and drama, and drawing on McBride's interviews with the director and his collaborators, this book casts new light on the full range of Wilder's rich, complex, and distinctive vision. Joseph McBride is a film historian and professor in the School of Cinema at San Francisco State University. His many books include the critical study How Did Lubitsch Do It? (Columbia, 2018) as well as acclaimed biographies of Frank Capra, John Ford, and Steven Spielberg and three books on Orson Welles. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books Network
Joseph McBride, "Billy Wilder: Dancing on the Edge" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 87:11


The director and cowriter of some of the world's most iconic films―including Double Indemnity, Sunset Blvd., Some Like It Hot, and The Apartment―Billy Wilder earned acclaim as American cinema's greatest social satirist. Though an influential fixture in Hollywood, Wilder always saw himself as an outsider. His worldview was shaped by his background in the Austro-Hungarian Empire and work as a journalist in Berlin during Hitler's rise to power, and his perspective as a Jewish refugee from Nazism lent his films a sense of the peril that could engulf any society. In this critical study, Joseph McBride offers new ways to understand Wilder's work, stretching from his days as a reporter and screenwriter in Europe to his distinguished as well as forgotten films as a Hollywood writer and his celebrated work as a writer-director. In contrast to the widespread view of Wilder as a hardened cynic, McBride reveals him to be a disappointed romantic. Wilder's experiences as an exile led him to mask his sensitivity beneath a veneer of wisecracking that made him a celebrated caustic wit. Amid the satirical barbs and exposure of social hypocrisies, Wilder's films are marked by intense compassion and a profound understanding of the human condition. Mixing biographical insight with in-depth analysis of films from throughout Wilder's career as a screenwriter and director of comedy and drama, and drawing on McBride's interviews with the director and his collaborators, this book casts new light on the full range of Wilder's rich, complex, and distinctive vision. Joseph McBride is a film historian and professor in the School of Cinema at San Francisco State University. His many books include the critical study How Did Lubitsch Do It? (Columbia, 2018) as well as acclaimed biographies of Frank Capra, John Ford, and Steven Spielberg and three books on Orson Welles. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

CEO Blindspots
In Crisis? Know Thy User! (Jay More, President of the Americas and Europe at HFI) - 13 min

CEO Blindspots

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 13:28


Discover why Jay More (President of the Americas and Europe at HFI) claims you must "know thy user, for they're not you", which question helped him become an effective leader, and how he learned the importance of identifying blind spots and super powers (13 minute episode). CEO BLINDSPOTS® PODCAST GUEST: Jay More is the President of the Americas and Europe at Human Factors International. HFI is a global consulting firm focused on highly complex CX/UX challenges and was among the first brands specializing in this area. Since 1981, HFI has delivered over $ 250,000,000 in CX/UX work for Fortune 500 clients as well as growing technology companies, including enterprise software, industrial applications medical software, telecom, banking, retail and education. They provide seed ‘Instant On' UX teams with all the infrastructure to help companies focus on ‘building the right thing'. Solving highly complex UX design challenges both at the strategic level as well as at the detailed design level is HFI's focus. Jay graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering at University of California, Berkeley, and completed his MBA at San Francisco State University. He has been with HFI since 1987 and has helped grow a world-class brand. For more information about Jay More and HFI, visit https://humanfactors.com/ To ask questions about this episode (or one of the 175+ other CEO Blindspots® Podcast episodes), send an email to birgit@ceoblindspots.com CEO Blindspots® Podcast Host: Birgit Kamps. Birgit was speaking five languages by the age of 10, and lived in five countries with her Dutch parents prior to becoming an American citizen. Birgit's professional experience includes starting and selling an “Inc. 500 Fastest Growing Private Company” and a “Best Company to Work for in Texas”, and serving as a Board Member with various companies. In addition, Birgit is the President of Hire Universe LLC, and the host of the CEO Blindspots® Podcast which was recognized by Spotify for having the “biggest listener growth” in the USA by 733%;https://www.ceoblindspots.com/

Politics in Question
How do the politics of race impact the American presidency?

Politics in Question

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 36:55


In this week's episode of Politics In Question, Robert C. Smith joins Julia to discuss race and the American presidency. Smith is a professor emeritus of political science at San Francisco State University. He is a nationally-recognized expert on African American politics. His research has examined comparisons between President Barack Obama and President John F. Kennedy and the relationship between conservatism and racism in the United States. Smith is the author of numerous articles and books on national and African American politics, the presidency, and Congress, including Polarization and the Presidency: From FDR to Barack Obama and John F. Kennedy, Barack Obama, and the Politics of Ethnic Incorporation and Avoidance. His most recent article is “Presidential Responsiveness to Black Interests From Grant to Biden: The Power of the Vote, the Power of Protest” in Presidential Studies Quarterly.Are recent presidents hostile or complacent about the needs of African Americans? Is their record on these issues reflective of broader forces in the political system? How enduring is white racial liberalism in the modern Democratic Party? And what is Obama's racial legacy? These are some of the questions Robert and Julia ask in this week's episode.

Maxwell's Kitchen
Episode 95 - Lisa Sardinia

Maxwell's Kitchen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 108:46


Lisa Sardinia grew up in California, Nevada and Washington, moving nine times before graduating from high school. She attended Whitworth University in Spokane and received a B.S. in Biology with a minor in Chemistry. Then she moved to Bozeman, Montana, where she skied cross-country, climbed mountains, and rafted many rivers. And she also earned a Ph.D. in Microbiology, with a minor in Biochemistry, from Montana State University, studying the replication of coronaviruses. Following graduate school, she was awarded a National Cancer Institute research fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco studying molecular genetics. Then she began a teaching career, first at San Francisco State University, then at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota. The west coast called, though, and she moved back to the Bay Area and enrolled at the University of California, Hastings College of the Law, where she earned a J.D. She clerked for a federal district court judge in San Francisco and worked in a patent law office in Palo Alto before coming to Pacific University. At Pacific, she taught a variety of classes in three colleges, from Microbiology to Companion Animal Science in the College of Arts and Sciences, Biochemistry and Genetics in the College of Optometry, and Human Genetics in the Physician Assistant Studies program. Her research with students has spanned a number fields, including the effect of essential oils and plant extracts on the growth of pathogenic bacteria, gene expression in paddlefish, microbiological analysis of freshwater streams in Chehalem Ridge Natural Area and wetlands at Fernhill Wetlands, and identification of native yeasts in samples collected throughout the fermentation process from a local winery. She was co-primary investigator for a $257,000 NIH grant—Faith Forum on Genetics: An ELSI Educational Intervention for Religious Communities. Her public scholarship activities include numerous Science Pub and Science on Tap presentations, as well as presentations to various professional and community groups on stem cell research and ethics, genetic testing, epigenetics, gut microbiota, and the biology of sex and gender. She served as Pacific's Faculty Athletics Representative for 20 years, including several years as a member of two national NCAA committees. She has been the Pre-Optometry Club advisor, the College of Arts & Sciences faculty chair, and the University Faculty Secretary. She enrolled in two Computer Science classes to prepare for a sabbatical leave spent developing a Bioinformatics major (and taking three Bioinformatics courses at OHSU). She has been the recipient of the Thomas J. and Joyce Holce Endowed Professorship in Science and the S.S. Johnson Foundation Award for Excellence in Teaching. She lives on a small farm with her partner, John, her overly exuberant German Shepherd-Husky dog, Shasta, and her absurdly fluffy cat, Arlo. She spends her time on the farm trying to put into practice the principles she learned while earning a certificate in Permaculture Design through Pacific. All production by Cody Maxwell. Artwork by Cody Maxwell. Opening graphic assets by UlyanaStudio and Grandphic.sharkfyn.com maxwellskitchenpodcast.com

Soul Stories
Soul Stories - "Healthiest Cancer Patient" Brian Ahern

Soul Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 45:42


This episode features Brian Ahern, author of the amazingThe Adventures of Kozmos Lovejoy, Exp.Brian Ahern attended San Francisco State University and experienced the psychedelic revolution of the 1960s with a deepening of spiritual understanding and a new awareness of transcendence. During this period he had a dream, a vivid lucid dream, that came true in the jungles of Mexico launching him on a spiritual journey for the rest of his life. In the 1970s he lived on a yoga ashram in the desert outside of Santa Fe, New Mexico where he practiced kundalini yoga, mediation, organic gardening, massage and nutrition before moving to Denver where he founded another yoga ashram and organic food restaurant before traveling to Europe where he studied with the Sufis in the French Alps as described in his memoir The Adventures of Kozmos Lovejoy, Exp.In 2010 he was diagnosed with stage four colorectal cancer and his spiritual learning and natural lifestyle was put to the test. He declined chemotherapy and radiation opting for surgery, meditation, herbs, monoatomic gold and a number of alternative medical and emotional modalities. After five years he was released from oncology supervision as “the healthiest cancer patient we've ever released."Another fabulous episode of Soul Stories featuring the one and only Dr Randall!

KPFA - APEX Express
APEX Express – 11.3.22 – A Tale of 2 Professors

KPFA - APEX Express

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 59:58


A weekly magazine-style radio show featuring the voices and stories of Asians and Pacific Islanders from all corners of our community. The show is produced by a collective of media makers, deejays, and activists. Host Miko Lee speaks with two women professors Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu and Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez about their approach to education, activism, motherhood and moving forward.   Show Transcript A Tale of Two Professors Story [00:00:00] Swati: Tonight on APEX Express, we have a piece highlighting the work of two professors with a lot in common, both Filipino scholar, activists, and grieving mothers who are approaching their work in similar and different ways. Listen in on Miko's interview, exploring both of their amazing backstories, their current work and where they see their futures. Also editorial side note Miko and Robyn's audio got a little funky at times. So it might be a little bumpy. [00:00:59] Miko Lee: Welcome Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu and Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez to APEX express. Dr. Robyn is the first Filipino American to serve as chair of the UC Davis Asian American Studies Department, the first one in 50 years. She also became the founding director of the Bulosan Center for Filipino studies and has authored so many books. Dr. Celine scholar filmmaker, and the new Dean of the Division of Arts at UC Santa Cruz. You worked at my Alma mater San Francisco State University in the School of Cinema. You were a professor of Asian-American feminist film and media studies at UC Santa Barbara. I mean, you've, you've been like through the whole California system. We are so happy to have you on APEX express. I believe you were the first Asian-American Dean in this position. And how does this feel for you to be at UC Santa Cruz during this work? [00:01:51] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: As the first woman of color Dean at UC Santa Cruz, as well as the first Asian American woman. Of course, it feels weighty, to hear that the lived experience of it is very much about prioritizing subjugated knowledges, making sure that we have an abundance of voices and abundance of traditions and knowledges that we are teaching so that students can really have access to you know what they want to study as well as be situated, and a long tradition of inquiry and method. It's really wonderful to be at the helm of a division that really takes seriously, people who want to practice art, people who want to study art historically, critically theoretically and we all have defined. Our role, and helping to make this world A place where everyone has a role, [00:02:48] Miko Lee: and art is just being part of who you are that it's just part of being human. Um, Robyn, I want to go way back and talk with you about when you first became politically active. [00:02:59] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: I would say that the beginnings of my political activism started when I was in either my freshman or sophomore year of high school. And it started with a letter. I was concerned about what we now call racial profiling of young Filipino American men in my neighborhood. I grew up in Union City, California in the east bay. And there was a supposed kind of gang problem in Union City and I recall young boys really in our neighborhood at school, who I thought were being unfairly targeted, not only by police, but also mistreatment really from other authority figures at school, I felt really concerned about that and wrote a letter. I was encouraged by my mom to express my opinions or my kind of concern about how my peers are being treated by writing a letter. And so I wrote the letter and I addressed it to the mayor of Union City, the chief of police, and the superintendent of the school district. And in the letter, I expressed how I felt that my peers were being unfair ly treated and proposed that they introduce what I was calling, multicultural education. The idea I thought was that if our teachers and authority figures really understood us better, and at the same time, if we encountered a stories and histories of our community that somehow this so-called gang problem could be somewhat addressed. So that was my first, I think, kind of a political act or act of activism. And I would then go from there really getting involved in electoral politics. And then after that when I'm in college is really when I started to get more involved in other kinds of organizing work community organizing work. [00:05:10] Miko Lee: I love that. What do you think, was it your parents' upbringing or your peers? What do you think rose up your feisty nature to be able to write back to the school board at such a young age? [00:05:22] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: I think it was a couple of things. I think one was actually my mother modeling a modeling sort of letter writing in particular as a mode of calling out issues of inequity or injustice and what had happened and I remember this very clearly. I think it probably was my earliest observation or experience of racism and it was at church. I just remember I grew up Catholic and somehow I just remember sitting in the pew and fidgeting and sort of halfway listening to the priest's sermon and I recall the priest saying something about how Filipinos were not contributing sufficiently enough to the parish. And I remember that very clearly. And I remember feeling that tension rise because there's so many people in mass who are Filipino and I could feel, my mother bristling at that. My father, I just, the tension was just so palpable. My mother was feeling after mass talking about how insensitive the priest had been. Didn't quite say racist, that it was just really wrong and a mis-characterization of the Filipino community. And she was going to write a letter and address it. And I remember observing that and that had a real impact on me. I think the influence again, via my mother is the fact that my middle name, which actually translates into ‘to be angry' comes from an ancestor on a maternal ancestor. It was a made up name by one of my ancestors who decided to change his name to Magalit it as an expression of defiance against the Spanish colonial rule in the Philippines and actually ended up joining the anti-colonial revolutionary cause himself. And so that was that's an important story that is passed on through my mom's, through my mom's family. We're very proud of that revolutionary history. I was always very proud of it always insist on using my middle name everywhere and anywhere. And so I think there's also that, that, that feeling, or I think I was encouraged to, we were encouraged to really be those people who would be critical of any circumstances where people are oppressed, exploited, marginalized. Even my father. Growing up he would tell me, you're so fortunate that I left the day before martial law was declared in the Philippines, because otherwise I would have been, I would have stayed and I would have been part of the movement to topple the dictatorship. And I wouldn't be able to be here and be your dad. And I recall to, with my father he drew really a hard and fast lines between himself and people in the community, even friendships would think, he walked away from friendships if he felt a friend was sympathetic to the dictatorship. So there's just all of these ways that might. Both, exhibited as anti-authoritarian kind of, the sort of critique of structures of power that I grew up with and I observed and was inspired by. So I think that's what explains why I would end up doing what I did as a freshman in high school. [00:08:39] Miko Lee: Wow. The power of being angry, built into your DNA and your name and your love it. We love to hear that. Dr. Celine What do you think Drove you into ethnic studies [00:08:54] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: I came to the United States with my family, in the early to mid eighties and I moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts. I was one of three Filipino Americans in my high school of 3000 people. And the others were my siblings, and education for me was really sanctuary, like being at school because there was food because we were so poor and, we were the center of our worlds, my multicultural set of friends and I loved, learning about my new country, and when I moved to Berkeley as an undergrad, there were many questions that I had, like, why is it that, my parents, even though they were hyper educated in a way, had to work low wage jobs, as immigrants and they had to work two jobs and they were never around then why was I, and my sister, we were 14, 13 years old. We were already working, in order to help put food on the table for our large immigrant family. So I had so many questions. What was this about, why are we here? And. I loved ethnic studies at UC Berkeley, it was a way to really understand subjugated knowledges, and it was really understanding why we no longer ate together as a family because my parents had to work. At UC Berkeley, ethnic studies was such a wonderful place because it was an interdisciplinary approach to history, to cinema, to literature. It was the time where so many amazing people were there. Not only was it Trinh Min-ha, June Jordan, Cherrié Moraga. I learned in their classrooms and also created my own classrooms by becoming an activist, because there was so much in our experiences that I needed to see on paper. Like what it means to walk around with a large Asian American family, what it means to, grow up with a white mom, but be seen as a woman of color, like your closest intimate as this white woman who may or may not see you. So these were stories that my classmates were telling me. We did a lot of organizing, you know, a woman of color magazine named, ‘Smell This', a woman of color film festival, a woman of color retreat. We were really trying to figure out how can we be effective advocates in a world, using our education, using the power and weapons of our education in order to, make significant, impactful cultural contributions that will change the world. And I realized I wanted to really capture the historical moment of how there were so many women of color writing professors there, Maxine Hong Kingston, June Jordan, Cherrié Moraga. Were all there and we were all doing spoken word and poetry slams, and the tradition of women of color literature, with ‘This Bridge Called My Back' Audrey Lorde, Chrystos, Pat Parker and more, this was a vibrant, legacy growing all of us, all of these books were seeds, and I came up with the name, ‘Smell This' in the hallways of the co-op in which I lived in at the time. I think I didn't even really think about it sexually, even though, I'm a sexuality scholar and I'm a porn study scholar, I really didn't. I really thought of it as a multisensorial experience that you enter when you are exposed to writing. That's so truthful, that's so brutal and it's confrontation with, what it means to be a multiply subjugated person, just walking down the street, for me at the time you're growing up as a young adult and you're blossoming, your interests are blossoming, your sexuality is blossoming, and so it was for me, just this multi-dimensional kind of growth, and I wanted this name to assert that multisensorial experience of what it means to grow up in a world. And at the time, give yourself the permission to say my voice is important, my perspective is important, and that's why I called it that. I think somewhat innocently. And I remember just being on Sproul Plaza, blasting, hip hop music, and just roping in as many women of color as we could, to contribute to the magazine. And we had these gigantic parties and we had the band Yeasty Girls perform. And so we had these legendary epic parties that were all about validating the cultural production of a women of color. [00:13:13] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: I suppose you know, that early act of defiance or that act of resistance writing that letter was the beginnings of my journey towards ethnic studies .I think intuitively I knew that there was something problematic about the fact that I grew up in a predominantly community of color and that there was and most of the students, most of my peers were people of color. And yet most of the figures of authority, teachers, administrators were not people of color. And that the books that we were reading typically had scant mention of our community. So there's some, I think intuitively I knew that that could not be right. When I. First took an ethnic studies course after I transferred to Santa Barbara, my third year after a stint at community college. We're actually, I first encountered sort of women of color writers. But it was a class where I was introduced to This Bridge Called My Back, very important anthology by a co-edited by Cherrié Moraga. So that, was sort of my initial foray into kind of women's studies and ethics studies and then by my junior year at UC Santa Barbara, I had this opportunity to take all these classes to class and Chicano studies, a class in Black studies, but the class that really set me on this path toward academia was a class by Dr. Diane Fujino, it was her very first quarter teaching at UC Santa Barbara and Asian-American studies as an assistant professor. It was really the first time I had encountered a Asian American woman professor who also was unapologetically an activist. And that class seeing her just really changed my life. I was so inspired by Diane by what she was doing in the classroom, which she was inviting us to do students, I felt really challenged and really important in good ways by her and I thought, I think that's the way that I want to that, that's what I want to do. I knew I wanted to choose a career of service, I wasn't quite sure what that was going to be. I thought being a lawyer might be it then I changed my mind, then I thought, oh, maybe I should work as a lobbyist for some of these progressive causes. And then I changed my mind thought I even wanted to be an elected. Maybe then changed my mind. And then professor seemed like something that I could get into. I love learning, I love reading, I love research, I also got introduced to other options that could have been a possibility of me being a labor organizer, so yeah, professor felt like a potential way to actually be at the university lectern, but also to be able to write books that students might be able to encounter in other university classrooms and, Diane embodied this very real possibility for me and I chose to follow that path. She represented and continues to represent to me an approach to Asian-American studies that I want to see more of, I think that As much as Asian-American studies was born out of these movements for liberation, the Ethic Studies movement, the Third World Liberation Front, the Asian-American movement, Black Power movement. I think there is a way that I feel as if Asian American studies and Ethics Studies more broadly has become so institutionalized. And I understand that, some of the reasons for this hyper, this institutionalization of Asian-American studies or Ethnic Studies had everything to do with just the backlash against it and just survival. I think that to survive different kinds of decisions were made such that Asian-American studies are at the end, even ethics studies as a field, had to look and feel more the other disciplinary and interdisciplinary formations in the university and less this insurgent site for knowledge production and dissemination that it it had started off as, and Diane for me, always felt like, still feels like one of the few scholars who continues to see Asian-American studies and Ethnic Studies as the site for insurgent knowledge production and dissemination, as the site where we as scholars use our platforms use our training use the kinds of resources we have access to, to amplify the issues of our communities and to also work in partnership with the community in trying to reimagine everything as Grace Lee Boggs invites us to do, to do the critical work of the thinking and the dreaming and strategizing to achieve a better world for all of us. We created a scholar activist affinity group or section is what we call it. And then we'd, frequently organized panels where we would invite activists to come and engage our colleagues because, we recognize that activists and organizers are also thinkers and theoreticians who have really important frameworks and analysis of the world. And that we as scholars could benefit just as much as we as scholars are, doing full-time work and kind of thinking and teaching that we can also extend different kinds of insights to our organizer colleagues. [00:18:42] Miko Lee: For folks that want to hear more about this. There's actually an entire APEX express episode that covers a reading done by both Robin and Diane at Eastwind Books. Last year you both received a mentorship award. Can you share about how important it is to be a mentor and how you combine being both a mentor, an activist. And a scholar. How do you combine those elements? [00:19:12] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: you know, Mentorship is so important to me, I think on one hand, I benefited from mentorship clearly, I wouldn't have even been able to pursue this path, this career path if I hadn't had a mentor like Diane, Dr. Fujino to not just exist, but actually to see who cultivated a relationship with me who was willing to take the time to help me understand the world of academia which was a world that was completely foreign to me. Dr. Fujino, along with other mentors that I had as an undergraduate really helped guide me. On one hand I got research experience. So they both, they all helped me gain a real understanding of what an academic life actually feels like. I knew I wanted to be a professor, but I didn't quite know what getting a PhD would require and getting a PhD requires research and I needed the research experience and they guided me through that process by giving it to me helping me to cultivate my own research questions and carry out my own research project. And all of that not only exposed me to this world to confirm for me that yeah, absolutely that is a path I want to pursue. And they were very frank and honest about what kinds of challenges I might face. I don't know that I fully understood some of their kind of cautionary kind of tales about academia. It took having to actually get into a program and go through it for me to fully understand what I think they were trying to advise me about, and namely that is just, the elitism of academia the ways in which, you know, academia can be limited especially if you're a kind of an activist or committed to social justice and that there are ways that, academia isn't always necessarily the place for that sort of work. Mentorship was so valuable for me individually, and then as I finished my doctorate the mentors I had, helped me just provide that emotional support. Even sometimes it's not even about the nuts and bolts of how do you do research and how do you finish a dissertation? It's simply just supporting you and making you feel like you belong in a space that makes you feel like you don't more often than not. And so just having that community of support was important from mentors. But, there are still too few people of color as more senior professors, a lot of my mentors were my peers who were just a couple of years ahead of me, and I vowed that, as soon as I was in a position that I would be that person who would throw the gate open and keep it open and and support people. But I also approach mentorship in in my own sort of way. I think, I have always tried to be just very transparent with my students about what, the challenges of academia can feel like for a woman of color, for a person of color. I also, I had a child when I was in grad school. So that also created other challenges that other people didn't necessarily have to have. And I, I wanted to be able to, again, to support women who might make choices in graduate school, around, having families or, all of that so mentorship is so vital I think to ensuring that academia continues to be open to alternative voices and particularly folks of color like academia sometimes it's like a long hazing process. I feel like this isn't any different than being in a fraternity or sorority, I feel like, it's all just this huge hazing process. It's not fully transparent about what goes on and nobody really wants to let on. And , that prevents us from moving forward. You get stuck in grad school, you end up not finishing your doctorate and, dropping out or you get a job, but then you can't get tenure. And there's just so much that I feel like is so shrouded in secrecy sometimes about academia and I wanted to be able to be that person if I got through that, I would keep the gate wide open and give folks, as much information as possible and support in, moving forward and through through academia and all of the hoops that, you have to jump to get to a place where I am now. [00:23:24] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: Mentorship and activism to me are all so interrelated. When I went to UC Berkeley as an undergrad, and I think you can say this about the UC system as a whole, it's usually an experience of disorientation when you get different kinds of pressures around you saying that your history is unimportant. Your voice is unimportant. Your perspective is unimportant, and this is why ethnic studies exists. And this is why programs like the minority summer research program and various other programs are designed. So as to lift up people who otherwise feel like they don't belong and they don't deserve to study, and they don't deserve the time that is the gift of mentorship. And so I was given the gift of mentorship by so many faculty members who really looked me in the eye and said, what did you make of this material that you read? And to say that, my perspective based on, the knowledge I was learning, the methods I was learning mattered really meant that we could have important places in the world as cultural thinkers, as people who can make an intervention in how we interpret things that we experience. That's what criticism is about. I think a lot about how 88% of critics are white. It means that even the material that we looked at are dissected from such a limited demographic, what a rip off. What would it mean if cultural critics were more diverse, what a robust enriching debate that would be more, and so when a student walks into my office, for the past 20 plus years of teaching, I wanted to share that gift of mentorship to let them know that the university needs their perspective in order for it to do its job. Because if we hear from too few people, then we don't know as much as we should. If it's true that over 90% of the most popular films are made by white men. And it is true, according to the Annenberg Studies at USC and UCLA, then what we know about love, marriage, sexuality, immigration, families more, comes from such a limited place. And it takes away from our understanding of each other. It becomes such a limited imprisoning understanding of each other. If we don't hear from more people, and people who are really critical people who say that, what we shouldn't know, we should know, and the university is a place to dig up those stories. And so for me as a Dean, it's not only about the mentorship I give, but the structures of mentorship that we implement. I think we all need mentors, even for me as a Dean, I have mentors who are Presidents, mentors who are Provosts, so that I have a better understanding of the institution. And I think about this a lot for my, for the faculty in my division. I hope that everyone has a network where you run your ideas by, because you only become stronger for it. You, you have a larger perspective of how institutions work and what your strengths are and then you realize, oh my goodness, all those people who gave me that time. What a big deal that was, that they recognized that you were worth the time that you were worth, the space and the knowledge, and I recognized how good it felt, to be the recipient of that. And then once you start doing it, you realize that. Oh, it's so amazing to be able to give it back, because you're really shaping the next generation. I learned so much from them. That's really the goal for me, not only am I a Dean, but I'm also a grieving mother. And I think a lot about that, about how. All of us are going to confront inevitably, the death of a loved one and so I think about. What our students are doing is really, preparing to have a role in the world that a significant, that really takes advantage of their passion, their strength, their commitment, so that they can, find a purpose that will enable them to get through, this inevitable pain. [00:27:24] Miko Lee: Thank you for sharing that. That really makes me think about your latest film, the Celine Archive, which is such a beautiful personal documentary that, combined so much of your pain and also just uncovering this history of Filipina American. I wonder if you can talk more about what inspired your film. [00:27:45] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: So in the mid nineties, 1994, through 1996, I believe around that time the community historian Alex Fabros was teaching a Filipino American history class, Filipino American experience class. There were about 200 students who were going through that curriculum and they found the story that he had grown up with about a Filipino American immigrant woman who was buried alive by her community in the 1930s Stockton Jersey island area. I myself was discovering the story at the Bancroft Library at UC Berkeley. And I made this film, in the era of the Me Too and Time's Up movements and really wanted to dig deeply into our capacity to suppress the violent experiences that women undergo in our communities. There's so little known and studied about Filipino American history in our curriculum K through 12. And when we do hear about it, we primarily hear men's stories, the late great historian, Dawn Mabalon and talks quite a lot about this and like her and like many other historians and community organizers, cultural workers and the Filipino American community. I wanted to amplify her story. So as to invite us to think about our female past and how Asian American women continue to endure violent silencing we see this, especially, today, not only in the Atlanta shootings, but in the murder of Christina Yuna Lee in New York. [00:29:32] Miko Lee: Can you share a little bit more about how you decided to weave both. Adding this Filipino woman's story into our broader awareness but also weaving in your personal story, sharing a name with the woman who was murdered and your personal story of your tragedy in your family. How did you decide to weave those stories together? [00:29:54] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: You know, when people undergo. An unexpected, very sudden death of a loved one, in my case, it was the death of my eight year old son from a common virus that attacked his heart, and in the case of Celine Navarro in the 1930s, she was abducted tortured and punished by her community, supposedly for committing an act of infidelity. Even though she was undergoing violence for quite some time within the community. The death happened, very suddenly her family did not know what had happened or where she was. So when you undergo a sudden and unexpected death, the meaning of your own life, really comes to the, fore. You become, I think, intensely alive because your loved one cannot have their life. So the question then emerges, what do you do with your life? And I had to turn to making the film as an act of creativity in the face of devastation, you know, my own demise because the death of a child. Could really have meant my own death, even though I was still alive. And in the act of filmmaking, you're really bringing together a community, in my case, it's bringing together not only community historians and Filipino-American scholars in the academy, but also my students, I think I opened up a way of speaking with my students that acknowledged, the pain that they also undergo, and it became for us a collective effort of looking into history and I'm making it come alive by becoming close to Celine Navarro's family. So when the articles first came out about her, it became such an affirmation of this unbelievable thing really did happen and we carry it with us. This is something that flows, within multiple generations of her family. And it's a question for me I think that I really think about a lot, like my son was eight, but he had a community, he had a huge impact in our own family about the way, he lived this life. So the question for me was how do you remember someone you love, who died but continues to live almost like in a very physical way, I feel his presence. And so I. Take the love that I continue to feel for my son and use that to make something in this world. I'm so happy to be alive, to be able to make this film. For example, that I can make this gift through the film for Celine Navarro's family, but then also to invite Filipino American women to say, you can be the center of your own story, and that your story is multilayered and it's worth investigation, because of course, what I found out in digging up Celine Navarro's story was that she herself was a very courageous woman who spoke up against domestic violence, that led her to testify against men who were protecting another violent man. I can't even imagine what that was like, and so to be able to pull up that story and to ask the question that began the film where are Filipino women in American history? I wanted to start the movie in that way because I want everyone to care about Filipino women so I wanted that to also be a courageous act that honored the subject of my film. [00:33:21] Miko Lee: Thank you so much. I'm one, just so sorry for the loss of your son. And so appreciative of the fact that you utilize your grief to funnel it into a beautiful work of art. Thank you so much for that [00:33:34] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: You're welcome and I also wanted to say, that my new film 80 years later, is about my family on my husband's side. It explores the racial inheritance of Japanese American family incarceration during World War II. As you may know, this year is the 80th anniversary of executive order 9066 that imprisoned 120,000 Japanese Americans, and my film shows. Conversations between survivors and their descendants as they continue to grapple with their legacy and I asked the question, how do we care for our stories? What stories do we feel responsible for carrying or admonishing or living? What is that ongoing legacy and how do we live it? [00:34:23] Miko Lee: Well, I'm looking forward to seeing it. That's very exciting. So much of what you're saying around adding women's stories are hidden stories. How we care for our stories. It reminds me of a Dr. Jamaica Heolimeleikalani Osorio talks about this idea of Koana, which is a Hawaiian word for many perspectives that we have all these layers. For so many white Americans, we see all those different layers, but for our people, for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, we don't get the multitude of stories. I'm wondering if you cover some of this in your upcoming book, The Movies of Racial Childhoods: Screaming, Self Sovereignty in Asian America. [00:35:05] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: Yes. So my new book that's forthcoming from Duke University Press “The Movies of Racial Childhoods” it's motivated by two very powerful forces that I can't deny. The first is it's a book that really explores who my son would be now, if he were alive, I think about, the independence of one who was in middle childhood, one who is in adolescence, when my son died, I was so stunned by the world that he owned apart from me. When you think about a child, you think, oh, I control what they're exposed to, who they talk to, but when they're in school, they meet so many people and they create their own world. So I found out things that I didn't know, that how he was the judge of handball in the recess, world, so if something happened, he would adjudicate what was fair or unfair. I had no idea that he was doing this, and he had been doing it for years. And when I look at the films that I'm studying, I'm always stunned by, how the subjectivity of people of color are eclipsed. So that's the second motivation of the book is when I think about childhoods, you always think about an innocent kind of white childhood. Oh, they don't work because they're children. But we think about people of color from the beginning they, they work, they enslaved children had to work and they had no right to play for example, when you're looking at the scholarship of, African-American childhoods, so what does it mean to talk about an Asian or Asian American childhood? Like people say, oh, there's going to represent our family. So you're forever a baby, in that vision. But there's also this premature, adultification that co-exists with this intense infantilization and you also see the college admissions process. It's oh, you can't play around because you have to get into an amazing school. Therefore you have to disavow play and you have to become, the future lawyer of America while you're 12, and you can also see this in the, sexualization of youth as well. So I'm trying to figure out, know those two questions. I've just finished the book and hopefully it'll be out next year. [00:37:16] Swati: You are tuned in to APEX Express at 94.1 KPFA and 89.3 KPFB in Berkeley. And online@kpfa.org. [00:37:28] Miko Lee: Dr. Robyn is the academic elitism that you talk about why you founded the Women of Color, Non-binary People of Color Scholars Inclusion Project? [00:37:36] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: Oh, yeah, absolutely. , I could tell you stories about my experiences of just racism in academia. So WACSIP or the Women of Color Scholars Inclusion Project, it's really a space primarily for those who identify as women of color or non-binary of color, both graduate and faculty. And it's really meant as a safe space for us to be able to convene and support one another. It started off as simply a support group where we could all gather from across campus and all the various places where we are. If you're a woman of color, a non binary, a person of color, the likelihood is that there's just always one or two of you in a particular department or program, and so part of what we wanted to simply do is just get everybody together from across campus, in a space that felt safe where we could literally break bread with one another and be very honest with one another and transparent about what we were struggling with. There is a way that sometimes you feel like you're being gaslighted or you're not really certain that what you've experienced is actually some form of racism or sexism. And sometimes all you need is just, a space where people who have experienced what you've experienced can just affirm that yes, your experience is a real thing and it's not okay and we're here to simply be there as support. We also would organize more formal programs, of course organizing people to come and provide tips and tricks, I guess, to approach teaching and how to, negotiate the challenges of teaching, but especially sometimes the challenges of teaching as women of color. Teaching about race and gender and sexuality as women of color and, contending with sometimes the undermining of our authority as professors in the classroom or by our peers. We'd also organize more formal workshops like that. Writing workshops even, to provide folks with support on publishing because that adage, publish or perish is a very real thing when you're at a major research university, if you do not publish, you cannot secure tenure, you cannot move up in the academic kind of pecking order. So yeah, that was what the intention of the space was, is to create this space of support and it was also to engage as we could in institutional change, trying to document our collective experiences and offer up recommendations to higher ups around shifts that needed to happen to transform institutional culture. That is the piece that was always the struggle. And perhaps what's fed into my frustration with academia, among many other things, but we were successful in providing a space of support for one another. To what extent these groups that I've founded, helped to really shift institutional culture less clear. [00:40:20] Miko Lee: I'm wondering, because WACSIP was has been focused on networking around Critical Race and Ethnic Studies has the anti- CRT fervor that sort of going on by right wing propaganda. Has that impacted your work? [00:40:34] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: Yeah, I think anti-CRT fervor it's interesting. I don't know, to what extent that actually has impacted my work at the university in the sense that I feel as if academia has been effectively anti-CRT and anti-Ethnic Studies for a very long time. And it doesn't have to be articulated in the ways that the current movement that's engaged primarily at banning CRT in the K through 12 levels, it's never taken that kind of vitriolic kind of tone at the university, but we know it by the failures of investments, in our departments, in faculty of color who do work on race. So we've been dealing with, I feel like I, along with my colleagues who do this sort of work, we've been subject to “anti- CRT” campaigns at the university level for quite some time now. But again, how they've manifested has been in the form of, a failure of investments whether it's we can't get new hires, we can't get funding support for our research, whether we're not being recruited to take leadership positions, how many times have I been in conversation with people administrators who I know barely encounter women who look like me, on the faculty and can never get my name right. Or know who I am at all. This is just what we're contending with. So in some ways, what's happening outside the university doesn't affect us because we've already been under attack certainly it doesn't help us either. [00:42:09] Miko Lee: Dr. Celine You have so many things in the works right now at the same time. How are you balancing all this? [00:42:15] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: As Dean, I have to take care of so many people not to take care of the institution, and I think a lot about how there's very few Asian-American women in this role and I think a lot about how, we live such a intensely sexualized, life. There is that force of sexualization that I've felt growing up, throughout my childhood, throughout my early adulthood and as a full grown woman, this intense sexualization, and I don't think that's compatible with our understanding of who is a leader. There's an amazing book by Margaret Chin called “Stuck”, which identifies how very few Asian Americans there are in C-suites, but also in executive leadership roles, but just stunning considering how many Asian-Americans are in these, leading higher ed institutions, but so few of us are leaders of higher ed institutions, right? So it's important, every day to think about how I'm refashioning, what is a popular understanding of what leadership looks like. It is one that is a compassionate and empathetic. And also, how I have to take care of myself through it because you're so in service of others. And I actually go to my own work in order to always remember what is the purpose of my life? What is it that I am protecting in the enterprise of the university, which is, the freedom to inquire. With courage about the most challenging issues of our day, so yeah, it's working out for me, going to my own work, even in the most demanding moments of leadership. It's a reminder, you know what I want to make sure our faculty and students and staff have access to, which is, the excellence of inquiry and debate that is truly available in the university unlike other places, in our world right now you have so many reactionary uneducated, superficial perspectives, but what we do in the university is so special. The seminar is so special where you come into a room and you would have read, material deeply, closely together. You figure out the questions that you have that have been asked by generations before you, you stand on the shoulders of people who have done the work in order to produce your own. There's no greater pleasure. So I'm so happy to be the guardian of that, I'm so happy to lead the arts division that UC Santa Cruz, because that is our enterprise and what's amazing about it is that it produces beautiful work, impactful work, needed work in our world today. I think about empowering every single voice, in our university and to be open, to be surprised by it. And I think the abundance of voice, doesn't just mean the background, that you carry the cultural inheritances that you're trying to grapple with, but it's really also working with people who are different from you, across class, across nation, across region, to see what you can come up with together. And so the students really feel like, oh my God these films are really going to make an impact, and so I think a lot about what we can do on university campuses that really train the next generation of students to be ready for a truly, multiracial world, in 2045, we're going to be a majority people of color country, and so our students need to be educated as, as widely and broadly as possible not only in terms of what they know, but also how they take care of themselves. And we're doing so much here. That's so exciting we're saying these are the people who are coming to this campus and trying to figure out their voices, trying to learn their craft. And what we're going to do is to give them a space in order to get. share their experiences, whether it's with policing or prison abolition, the university is a place where we can do all of that. [00:46:11] Miko Lee: Robyn, I've heard you talk about being a people's professor. Can you share what that means? [00:46:17] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: Sure for me, people's professor it means that the university pays me, but I work for my community. And what that means is that I have always seen my work, whether it's my research and scholarship, you know what I decide to research who I'm writing for when I do, when I write what I teach, how I teach it what I do, but recognizing kind of the stature that comes with being a university, professor, all of my research, my teaching, how I move in the world is driven by and rooted in my community organizing and activist commitments. It comes out of my personal interest, true, but I've been very attuned, always to the issues that emerge in the organizing spaces that I am part of. I've always been a member of a community organization wherever I've been. So I have commitments, it's not simply that I have my ear on the ground and I see issues that pop up in the media. I have commitments, I'm part of the community, I joined organizations, I know what our communities are grappling with and all of that is always shaped my research agenda and found its way in my teaching. That's what I mean by people's professor that, my allegiance is not to the university, my allegiance is not even to my career and advancing my career. It's really to, using my skills, using my training, using my platform to advance the work of social justice. I think that's the role I feel like I want to play. That's why I entered academia to begin with. [00:48:00] Miko Lee: So your next iteration of the people's professor after you leave UC Davis next year, will be the School for Liberating Education. [00:48:09] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: The School for Liberating Education is quite simply a platform that allows anybody in the community to be able to access Ethic Studies knowledge, I think it's just so vital and healing and transformative to take Ethnic Studies courses. And yet, as you mentioned earlier, we are under attack. We've had many important Ethnic Studies victories, but there've been sufficiently forces who've managed to water down the kind of curriculum that many of us who fought for Ethnic Studies and continue to fight for Ethics Studies really want. And so among the things that the pandemic offered us is new kinds of technologies to connect virtually and, I myself, was taking virtual courses as part of my own healing process in the wake of the loss of my son in August of 2020. And it occurred to me that, these courses were amazing for my own healing journey and that I could possibly use these same platforms that were helping me to be able to offer Ethnic Studies to a broader audience of folks, especially in a context where Ethnic Studies or CRT was being viciously attacked. So yeah, that's really what it started off as, and in its first phase it's been a series of online courses first in, Asian American studies, which is really in my wheelhouse, and in Filipinx Studies specifically, I'd like to expand even more of the offerings that dive deep into the Chicanx experience and Latinx experience the Black experience, Native studies, Native and Indigenous studies and interracial kind of examinations as well, just in terms of the online courses. I guess the 2.0 version of this School for Liberating Education is the courses that I'm hoping to offer here on site at the new farm that we've just purchased. We want to be able to host intensive learning retreats and kind of educational workshops that center land-based and Indigenous knowledges. So in other words, either doing in-person short courses that are somewhat based on the current offering of courses online or extensions of them or just kind of new courses. There's a lot of new work in advancing healing justice that I also want to help to organize and curate here at the farm. Definitely want to center these land based and Indigenous knowledges and I'm super excited about the possibilities of what I can do as a people's professor outside of the space of academia outside of also the space of, the politics of it all and here. We're just at the beginnings of setting up the farm proper we're beginning to break ground because we have some seeds in the ground. I have my Hmong father and mother-in-law are helping us and already passing on generations of wisdom about the land and how to till the land and how to, just be in community with the land, just, in the work that they've been doing and helping us to cultivate it, but yeah, this is the next phase and I'm just really excited about the possibilities for learning that I can extend, but also for myself, I don't see myself as only being the professor actually in this space. I see myself more as an organizer and a curator who has some knowledge to impart, but also as somebody who can gathered together other people with other forms of expertise. [00:51:27] Miko Lee: It's a combination of a lot of your wheelhouse, a lot of your strengths as an educator and doing cross solidarity work and bringing in this sense of connecting to the land and healing and wellness. It's very beautiful. I'm looking forward to learning more and we will post a link to School for Liberating Education in the show notes for APEX Express. You spoke about healing and wellness. And I know 2020 was a really hard year and I am so sorry for the loss of your son. I really appreciate how you are turning that just tragic loss into a powerful foundation. Can you speak about the foundation and what that's all about? [00:52:08] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: Yeah. Absolutely. I'm still struggling. The healing process is ongoing for me. And people often talk about how there are different kinds of losses one can experience, and I've experienced a lot of those kinds of losses. I've lost a dear grandparent, my grandmother who helped raise me, I've lost a parent. I lost my father in 2014. And all of those losses, hurt in deep ways, of course, but there is something acute about the loss of a child. And though, he was a young man so full of promise though, just at the young age of 22 to have lost his life. And the foundation is an opportunity for me to ensure that his legacy and everything that he was so passionate about and that he lived and fought and died for lives on. And, so the Amado Khaya Foundation is meant to be a space that will support the causes that , was so passionate about. Clearly indigenous people's struggles, that's where he spent the last few months of his life, he was serving the Magguangan and Maduro in the wake of terrible typhoons that had hit the island. He was also very passionate about Ethnic Studies, that was an issue he was very involved in before leaving for the Philippines. He was passionate about housing justice. He really came of his own as a community organizer and activist. And I want to just ensure that, the work that he started can continue, but I also want to center mental health and wellness in the work that Amado Khaya does because he really acutely understood the ways that community organizers and activists hold the collective trauma of our people. His father who I am no longer with, was an anti-apartheid activist in South Africa. Had really experienced the violence of the apartheid regime was witness to the violent clashes between activists and the police and the state, and that had a major impact on Amado's father. And deep mental health impacts that Amado recognized, so that's something I really want to also center in the Amado Khaya Foundation is not just continuing to support the organizations or the issues he fought for, but to support the mental health and wellness of organizers themselves, who are doing all this great work and kind of providing them the support and care that they also really require to continue the work of social justice and among the things that we've we've done through Amado Khaya, we're still finishing up our 501c3 process. But we have a home that we purchased in honor of Amado called Amado's Kaia, which translates into Amado is home. Kaia actually also means home in Zulu. But we have a home that we offer as a gift to organizers as a sanctuary refuge for rest. We've been able to get some grants and in the process of setting up a digital media lab, Amado was a aspiring filmmaker. So we want to be able to also use media film in particular, which was what he was passionate about, and video as a way of also supporting activists causes. Part of what I'm also hoping that Amado Khaya does , and this is what the connection comes back to the school, I'm very inspired by Grace Lee Boggs, so Re-Imagination Lab is the social enterprise that holds all of my kind of entrepreneurial initiatives and the idea is that we want to get to a place where we generate a surplus revenue that we would reinvest into Amado Khaya, other non-profits. Somebody who's worked in alongside nonprofits we know how much our, a nonprofit organizations struggle to hustle for funding. And they're often beholden to foundations, that, oftentimes relate to non-profits in what amounts to a very colonized and very white supremacist, relationship and which constrain the kind of work that nonprofit organizations can do in service of the community. And so I want to be able to get to a place where Amado Khaya will either draw sufficient donations from individuals or revenues from Re-Imagination Lab so that we can help fund movements without constraints so they can do the work that they need to do without any limitation. I think that there are a lot of us who are trying to figure out how do we redistribute resources in our community and not have to be beholden to foundations that may very well be responsible for creating the very problems that nonprofits are forced to have to address. [00:56:56] Miko Lee: Dr Robyn, the people's professor. Thank you so much. Dr. Celine thank you both for turning your grief into positive action and thank you for just continuing to share your work with by and for the broader community. I really appreciate what you're doing. [00:57:12] Miko Lee: Please check out our website, kpfa.org backslash program, backslash apex express to find out more about the show tonight and to find out how you can take direct action. We thank all of you listeners out there. Keep resisting, keep organizing, keep creating and sharing your visions with the world. Your voices are important. Apex express is produced by Miko Lee Jalena Keane-Lee and Paige Chung and special editing by Swati Rayasam. Thank you so much to the KPFA staff for their support have a great night. The post APEX Express – 11.3.22 – A Tale of 2 Professors appeared first on KPFA.

Agents Growth Academy
70. Lefty's Life Lessons: Face Challenges with Resilience

Agents Growth Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 44:12 Transcription Available


It's far too easy to get bogged down by negative experiences and let them define us. But Michael Zalle brings his experience of being born with a small right hand and losing a seven figure sale just minutes before the interview as proof that your experiences make you the person you need to be today. Join him alongside host Jim Schubert to discuss the fundamentals of entrepreneurship and how you can do well while doing good at the same time on this episode of Agents Growth Academy.3 Key TakeawaysIn entrepreneurship, you have to learn to adapt.  Figure out how to work around it and don't let it stop you from moving forward.Don't take things so personally–not everything is about you. Accept that sometimes things happen that are out of your control.Don't dwell on setbacks. Pick yourself up and keep going (in 24 hours or less).ResourcesThe Daily Stoic by Ryan Holiday and Stephen HanselmanThe Daily Stoic PodcastLinkedInWebsite: goyellowbird.comAbout Michael Zalle Michael is the Founder and CEO of YellowBird. He is responsible for creating, building, and launching new concepts and companies, resulting in multiple successful exits over a 25-year tech career. He has built a career through a unique balance of commercializing novel business models, operationalizing innovative technologies and platforms, rapidly scaling operations, and building market-shaping ecosystems. Michael's companies and purpose are ever focused on serving others. Whether it be satellite systems for First Responders, environmental products for flood and spill response, or time and economic support for difference-making organizations, Michael believes in “doing well while doing good.”Michael's college journey began at San Francisco State University and was completed at Pepperdine University Graziadio Business School while working full-time and traveling at age 19. As a lifelong member and mentor for the Amputee Coalition of America, he enjoys the time he's able to invest in mentoring kids with physical challenges.Married 22 years with two children, Michael spends most of his free time at lacrosse or soccer games chasing balls, applying band-aids, and handing out snacks. He enjoys traveling and engages in a variety of sports including golf and tennis; he ranks himself an incredibly average golfer and perhaps even worse tennis player.Get the FREE: Agency Guide To Filling Your Talent Pipeline - agentsgrowthacademy.com/talentpipeline

Really Charlie
Dmitra Lucas, “Miss Meech”

Really Charlie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 57:55


Join your Host Charlie Perry & Ms. Meech as we highlight her poetry and her book. She has a poetic pulse and is an all-around awesome person. Dmitra Lucas, “Miss Meech” is a poet, author, creative, and student of life. Originally, born and raised in Fairfield, CA. She has used journaling as a way to cope with life since a young adolescent. After being exposed to Spoken Word and Poetry Expressed By All Kinds “SPEAK", a student organization on the campus of San Francisco State University catered to slam style poetry and creative expression, she ventured into writing poetry and spoken word in 2014. Miss Meech has been experimenting with multiple styles of poetry to find her voice and niche in the genre. She aims to inspire others to introspectively recognize and be true to their voice through her writing. Miss Meech aims to monetize her passion for writing as well as extend her knowledge and prior experiences to help others retain ownership of their work through self-publishing. Currently, she resides in Austin, TX and manifests everything her inner child dreamed of with Listen to Me: A collection of poetry and prose being the gunshot to commence her marathon. To get more information regarding either of Miss Meech's business ventures check out her contact information below: Email: dedic8d.lifestyle@gmail.com IG: @ _immeech FB: Dmitra Lucas --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/charles-perry/message

Hudson Mohawk Magazine
Talking Pool Halls, Trailer Parks, & Zines with Rebecca Schumejda

Hudson Mohawk Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 10:07


Rebecca Schumejda has worked hard over her time as a writer and editor to make poetry accessible to everyone, not just those in academia. She herself graduated with a BA in English and Creative Writing from SUNY New Paltz and a MA in Poetics and Creative Writing from San Francisco State University. Rebecca is the author of the following full-length books: Falling Forward (sunnyoutside press), Cadillac Men (NYQ Books), Waiting at the Dead End Diner (Bottom Dog Press), Our One-Way Street (NYQ Books) and the following chapbooks: The Tear Duct of the Storm (Green Bean Press) Dream Big, Work Harder (sunnyoutside press), The Map of Our Garden (verve bath press), From Seed to Sin (Bottle of Smoke Press) and is the co-author of Common Wages with Don Winter (Working Stiff Press). In her writing, she often tells the stories of the working class. She once took a job as a waitress for her book, Waiting at the Dead End Diner (Bottom Dog Press), and got inspiration from the people who walked in the door and sat at her tables. In her book, Cadillac Men, Rebecca writes about the regulars who frequented the pool hall she and her husband opened in Kingston, NY. She read about one of those characters, Mikey Meatballs, at Restaurant Navona in Albany on October 19, 2016.

Movement Toward Change
Lauren Cox: The Journey from Freelance Dancer to Jazz Professor

Movement Toward Change

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 43:28


“Dance has always been something I have gravitated to, to understand the world around me.” In this episode we speak with Lauren Cox. We discuss what inspired her to begin a career in commercial dance, how she built a schedule as a freelance dance artist, and cultivating healthy relationships in the field. We also talk about her transition from freelance artist to jazz professor. About Lauren: Lauren is an accomplished poet, story-teller, and professor of Jazz Dance at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She holds a B.A. in Sociology from San Francisco State University. Lauren has been on faculty at Joffrey Ballet School Jazz & Contemporary, The Ailey School Junior Division, and the co-creator and lead choreographer for Kaimera Productions' SPACES. Her choreography has been commissioned by many institutions such as LaGuardia Performing Arts Center and Harlem Arts Festival. As a professional performer, she has taken part in a wide variety of commercial and contemporary works both live and on television. 

Awakin Call
Nikos Patedakis -- Dangerous Wisdom: Unveiling our Collective Insanity with an Awakened Heart

Awakin Call

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022


“Wisdom is dangerous. Love and beauty are too. Our culture has kept us away from them, and must do so to perpetuate the insanity we see all around us.” Mankind has lost its way, which is why we now have plastic in our blood, lead in our bones, iron and mercury in our brains, says Nikos Patedakis, a philosopher on a mission to nudge us back onto the path of wisdom, where all of human endeavor is of service to life. The problem is that much human activity today serves narrow interests and agendas, not the common good. And while many of us pin our hopes on technology to solve the world’s problems, which we have largely caused, Nikos insists that “the solution to our problems is not a technological one, because … it’s a spiritual [issue].” To grow spiritually, we need to open ourselves up to learning, and Nikos embodies the drive to achieve such growth through meaningful experiences, an eco-literate mindset, and consistent practice. Wisdom is a practice, as is love, and both are forms of each other, and manifestations of true understanding. But today, he laments, we tend to seek knowledge, not wisdom. Yet by acquiring, clinging to, and then teaching such fragments of knowledge, “we marginalise and distance ourselves from the very thing we are ultimately chasing: wisdom, meaning, purpose, and learning that will reconnect us to the sacred.” Fragmented knowledge is dangerous. According to Nikos, it’s like “we’re running around with a torch and think we have the sun in our hand.” Nikos himself has practiced many things, having worked as a professional dance teacher and blackjack player, a negotiation trainer, a consultant for Fortune 500 companies, and an Alexander Technique teacher. Having pioneered wisdom-based learning at San Francisco State University and University of California, Santa Cruz, he left academia to become a consulting philosopher, educator, and Co-Director of the Haumea Ecoliteracy Programme. He also has a podcast called Dangerous Wisdom, the name inspired by Buddha’s advice to handle his teachings with the same care as a venomous snake. Today, Nikos works as a consulting philosopher rooted in the ancient Greek orientation – as well as a friendly, neighborhood soul doctor, mentor, permaculture designer, and artist – applying the most powerful, holistic teachings of the wisdom traditions that influenced people like Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. Quoting Epicurus, he says “Vain is the word of the philosopher that heals no suffering.” And so drawing from the arts and sciences, he helps professionals from all walks of life learn to think the way nature works and reconnect with the philosophical traditions of the world. Humility is a good starting point, knowing what you don’t know. In his experience, top performers are so committed, so hungry, they always want to learn more, from any source, and their willingness to learn makes them humble. Nikos, too, is humble, being a serious “student of horses,” which have a culture of the wild. In their sacred presence, horses defy conquest consciousness so profoundly that even those who love horses get a little nervous because horses present an existential--and potentially humiliating--threat to the dominant culture and the human ego. Nikos sees horses as “part of the magic and mystery of the world,” incarnating dangerous wisdom, which makes them great teachers. To experience the magic of the horse, we need to heal and re-indigenize, renouncing what doesn’t work and learning to live a culture rooted in wisdom, love, and beauty, in a manner attuned to ecological and spiritual realities. Nikos argues that Homo sapiens, a being originally rooted in wisdom, love, and beauty, has morphed into a destructive homo economicus, imposing a “conquest culture” intent on taming, shaping, and ultimately degrading our planet, creating “value” for ourselves at the expense of all other beings and our own interconnectedness with the cosmos. “This culture makes us into takers and the planet pays for our ignorance,” says Nikos. “The world can absorb a certain amount of ignorance. But things are now out of hand, so we need to think in a new way. We have become used to thinking in a certain way, but that way is out of sync with nature.” Drive by agendas, such as development, growth, and innovation, we practice “spiritual materialism,” disconnecting us from reality and distorting it through a narrow view of conquest consciousness. In this epoch of “endarkenment,” business and political “leaders” even insist that our need for a thriving, just world is not “realistic,” even though we—and they—all know that our well-being depends on ecological health, that we are mutually interdependent, that our true culture is about belonging and interconnectedness to a greater whole, and that we will succeed most profoundly by cooperating and collaborating, re-attuned to our wisdom and “re-indigenized.” Philosophy helps us paint an accurate picture of the cosmos and give us an awareness of our place in it. Education in the dominant conquest culture “protects” people from philosophy and art. As Nikos wryly comments: “It takes a dysfunctional education to have a dysfunctional culture. Otherwise, people wouldn’t put up with it.” We need to see the world with fresh eyes and an awakened heart. For Nikos, art and philosophy both foster this, offering insight and inspiration for the benefit of all citizens and the broader community of life. Join us in conversation with this philosopher and purveyor of “dangerous wisdom.”

Ageless by Rescu
Harry Glorikian | Healthcare Entrepreneur, Author | AI and The Future You

Ageless by Rescu

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 41:04


Harry Glorikian is a global healthcare entrepreneur, podcaster and author. For over three decades, he has built multiple successful ventures in the healthcare space, and he is well known for being at the forefront of helping invest in and grow innovative healthcare companies that are tackling groundbreaking areas of healthcare and biotechnology. Glorikian holds an MBA from Boston University and a bachelor's degree from San Francisco State University. In his latest book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence (AI) Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer, Glorikian explores how AI is disrupting healthcare and what you need to know to navigate the new medical paradigm and improve your health in monumental ways—starting today.  In this episode, we talk about big data and the power of merging this information with AI and wearables. You'll learn how doctors are treating once-incurable diseases by rewriting our DNA, and how AI is helping them diagnose different cancers and prescribe treatments more precisely. We explore how smartphone and smartwatch technology can help us reach health and fitness goals, and sometimes to predict and survive a health emergency.  According to Harry Glorikian, there's quite literally nothing about health and wellness that won't be utterly transformed by the power of AI. This episode focused on The Future You,  is a preview on what's coming—and what is already here. Watch the full episode on Ageless By Rescu YouTube Channel here: https://youtu.be/p2_C7waXCz0See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ramblings of a Designer podcast
Ramblings of a Designer eps. 141 - Adam Sherman

Ramblings of a Designer podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 44:57


This one you don't want to miss, we have Adam Sherman is a long-time San Francisco resident, graduate of San Francisco State University, environmental social justice activist, and a writer who is relatively new to the scene, having mostly done his writing on social media and public service announcements through his activism before embarking on his first published book. With past experience in public service programs and overseas internships, Adam is here with us today to talk about his book, Living Beyond Normal, how it relates to our common humanity and the need to be more accepting of those who are different from us in thinking and behavior, and who deserve all the success and life experiences as anyone else in society. As for chapters, I think it is a good idea that we highlight 3-4 chapters across the three stages of my book so we can give listeners an encompassing insight into its content. My opinion is we start with the first two chapters since they lay the foundation of what's to come, chapter 15 to highlight the struggle of expressing personal feelings and dealing with the real world effects of them, and chapter 18 to highlight the dangers of workplace abuse and the discrimination that comes with searching for work in the job market. Ramblings of a Designer podcast is a monthly design news and discussion podcast hosted by Laszlo Lazuer and Terri Rodriguez-Hong (@flaxenink, insta: flaxenink.design). Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/Ramblings-of-a-Designer-Podcast-2347296798835079/ Send us feedback! ramblingsofadesignerpod@gmail.com, Support us on Patreon! patreon.com/ramblingsofadesigner You can find Adam's book here: https://thesagergroup.net/books/living-beyond-normal      

The 180
Dr. Shawn Ginwright: Four Pivots — A Pathway to Healing, Well-Being and Thriving

The 180

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 40:12


In his new book, The Four Pivots: Reimagining Justice, Reimagining Ourselves, Dr. Shawn A. Ginwright provides what he describes as a “roadmap” for people to embody the change they want to see in society. He encourages readers to consider the transformative power of reflection, of considering not only what we do but who we want to be as individuals. That means grappling with trauma, harm and inequality as a critical step toward healing, well-being and ultimately flourishing. In school settings, this means that teachers have to be well enough and self-aware enough themselves to foster the well-being and thriving of the young people they are educating. More on Dr. Ginwright. He is a Professor of Education in the Africana Studies Department and Senior Research Associate at San Francisco State University. He is the Founder and CEO of Flourish Agenda, Inc., a national nonprofit consulting firm which designs strategies for healing and engaging youth of color and adult allies in their schools and communities. From 2018 to 2021, Dr. Ginwright served as Chairman of the Board for The California Endowment. In addition to The Four Pivots, he has written the books Black in School, Hope and Healing in Urban Education and Black Youth Rising. For his outstanding research and work with urban youth, Shawn Ginwright earned a Fulbright Senior Specialist Award from the U.S. State Department. To learn more about how to transform 21st century education using 21st century science, go to turnaroundusa.org.

The NFN Radio News Podcast
Harry Glorikian: Better Health Via Technology

The NFN Radio News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 40:47


Healthcare seems to be getting more and more complicated. In fact, sometimes it's as though we, as patients, must do our own research to make sure what our doctor is recommending is the right approach. Should that be? Do we have the tools to do that?We're going to talk about that with Harry Glorikian, a global business expert, healthcare entrepreneur, podcaster and author. Glorikian is a General Partner at Scientia Ventures, which invests in tech companies involved in healthcare. The company works with entrepreneurs with big ideas to build companies with the potential of transforming healthcare.Besides that Glorikian is on the boards of StageZero Life Sciences, a publicly traded healthcare technology business dedicated to the early detection of cancer and multiple disease states through whole blood, and Drumroll Health, which develops AI technologies to foster closer partnerships between patients, healthcare professionals and healthcare companies.On his podcast, The Harry Glorikian Show, he speaks with leaders in the healthcare and life sciences industry about the ongoing data-driven transformation of their industry.“From new ways to diagnose & treat patients, bring down costs & creating new value, all the way to AI algorithms that increase efficiency & accuracy, better data is revolutionizing healthcare,” Glorikian says. He holds an MBA from Boston University and a bachelor's degree from San Francisco State University.He is the author of a new book "The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer." We are going to talk about that today.Welcome, Harry, to the Lean to the Left podcast.Q. Let's start with a big question: How is technology changing everything we know about healthcare today? Do you have an elevator speech type response for that one?Q. Most people like to think they can rely on their doctor to guide them through whatever their ailment might be, serious or not. Is that true? Can they really do that?Q. You did an episode about E-Patient Dave, a patient who had a brush with cancer and ended up doing his own research to find the medication that ultimately saved his life. It was in the late 2000s and the healthcare system was unprepared to help patients like him who wanted to access and understand their own information. Has that changed?Q. So that means that for many people, it's on us to find the best solution to our medical problems?Q. You say that new technologies and standards have the potential to open up a new era of participatory medicine – if patients are willing to do a little more work to understand their health data, if innovators can get better access to that data, and if doctors are willing to create a partnership with the patients over the process of diagnosis and treatment. That sounds like a lot. Q. Shouldn't we as patients be able to count on our healthcare providers to find the right answer? Why should we have to do our own research and wade into data?Q. Is all of this addressed in your book?Q. Also, I see you and a co-author previously did a book called Moneyball Medicine.” Great title. What's that about? Q. In Moneyball, you map out many of the changes taking place, their impact, and outline some predictions in healthcare for the future. What are some of those predictions?Q. I have a smart watch and it can measure my heart rate, do an ECG, track my cycle if I was a woman, and even tell me when to pause to breath. Is this stuff really useful?Q. New drugs, of course, are a critical component of our healthcare system, and there was a big fight on Capitol Hill that culminated in legislation allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices with the pharmaceutical companies. They complained, of course, that this would impede research – their constant argument. What's your take on this? Website(s): glorikian.com Instagram: harryglorikian Twitter: @HGlorikian

CAA Conversations
Cara Jordan // Robin Veder // Preparing Your Journal Article for Submission

CAA Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 51:59


How can authors improve their chances for publication in academic journals? In this podcast, editors Cara Jordan and Robin Veder approach the topic with empathy for all who are navigating what can be an unnecessarily mysterious and intimidating process. We share strategies for how to prepare your manuscript for the best possible outcome, including how to select the right venue for your article; what you can do to ensure that journal editors and peer reviewers focus on your ideas; and what to expect in editorial relationships. Among other resources for pre-submission feedback, we discuss offerings from the Flatpage editorial agency and the Smithsonian American Art Museum's Toward Equity in Publishing professional development program, which aims to remediate the inequitable conditions that precede and impede publication. Upcoming deadlines are September 15, 2022, and March 15, 2023. To apply, click here: https://americanart.si.edu/research/toward-equity-publishing. Cara Jordan received her PhD in art history from the Graduate Center, CUNY, and is currently the president and chief editor at Flatpage, an editorial agency and publishing house based in Washington, DC. With a roster of academic editors with PhDs (many in art history) and varying expertise, Flatpage offers manuscript evaluation and editing, as well as job application assistance, book proposal critique, and other forms of writing support for authors of all backgrounds and levels. Cara has seen many sides of the academic journal publishing industry: as an author, a managing editor of a journal, and as a freelance developmental and copy editor. Robin Veder is the executive editor of American Art, the peer-reviewed journal co-published by the Smithsonian American Art Museum and University of Chicago Press, and founder of the journal's Toward Equity in Publishing program. Before joining the journal in 2017, Veder was a tenured associate professor of humanities, art history, and visual culture at Penn State Harrisburg. She is a cultural historian whose publications include a study of kinaesthetic modernism in early twentieth-century US art—The Living Line: Modern Art and the Economy of Energy (2015)—and various articles on visual culture, landscape, pastoralized labor, and history of the body. She earned her BA (1991) in interdisciplinary art from San Francisco State University and her MA (1995) and PhD (2000) in American studies from the College of William and Mary.

Keen On Democracy
Deborah Holt Larkin on More Real-Life Murder Stories: The Evil Mother-in-Law Who Organized One of California's Grisliest Killings

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 31:36


Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world's leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Deborah Holt Larkin, author of A Lovely Girl: The Tragedy of Olga Duncan and the Trial of One of California's Most Notorious Killers. Deborah Larkin holds a bachelor's degree in American History and Literature from the University of California at Davis, and she studied creative writing at the University of California at San Diego. She has a master's degree in the Education of Exceptional Children from San Francisco State University. She has spent more than three decades teaching students with special needs before becoming an elementary school principal. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

I am Carl
Profo Won | Episode 16

I am Carl

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 51:10


In this episode, Carl Paoli sits down with Profo Won, who has been in the BAY AREA HIP-HOP dance scene for 30 years and is still going strong. Twenty-seven of those years, he has dedicated his life to the dance called Breakin', representing the FloorGangz Worldwide and Knuckle Neck Tribe. He started the first Breakin' podcast called the Epicenter in 2012 and continued the concept in the podcast called “The Trades” in 2016. The first to teach the art of Breakin' in After School Programs in San Francisco from 2001 to 2009. He has judged, lectured, and spoken on the history of Breakin' in schools and colleges like San Francisco State University, Tufts University, and Temple University. He has thrown events for his crew, the FloorGangz USA Anniversary 2018 and 2019, and done color commentary for the Undisputed World Finals in 2018 and Massive Monkees Anniversary 2018 and 2019. Profo Won has traveled, judged, and competed in countries like Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia, Taiwan, South Korea, Canada, Russia, Philippines, and other places around the world!!! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/carlpaoli/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/carlpaoli/support

The Author's Corner
Episode #75: Journey to Authorship with Writer, Philosopher, and Technologist, Gary F. Bengier

The Author's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 42:33


Check out this episode with best-selling science fiction author Gary F. Bengier as we dive into the editing and marketing process of writing a novel, why he chose to be an indie author, and some sneak peeks into his book Unfettered Journey. Don't miss our multilayered conversation to sharpen your writing abilities and broaden your thinking today.Key Takeaways from This EpisodeChallenges in writing science fiction novels and the future of technologyExpert advice for cohesive and better writingShould you write from one or more characters' points of view?Tips for developing well-rounded charactersMarketing platforms and advice you should know aboutPros and cons of self-publishing your bookResources Mentioned in This EpisodeGoogle GlassQualiaMoby Dick by Herman MelvilleScrivenerMicrosoft WordEditorial Freelancers AssociationAdobe Premiere ProWordPressKDP SelectIngramSparkSmashwordsBarnes & NobleDune by Frank Herbert | Paperback and KindleAbout Gary F. BengierGary F. Bengier is a writer, philosopher, technologist, and author of the bestselling sci-fi novel Unfettered Journey. He grew up in the small Midwest town of Richmond, Ohio, playing in unfettered woods, developing an early love for nature, and learning self-reliance. He is a Kent State University undergrad hooked on astronomy, and his fascination with science drew him to California's tech industry, which led him to become eBay's Chief Financial Officer. A polymath, Gary has an MBA from Harvard Business School and an MA degree in philosophy from San Francisco State University. Gary lives in San Francisco with his wife, Cynthia. When he isn't traveling the world, he raises bees and makes a nice Cabernet at the family's Napa vineyard. Website: Gary F. BengierGary's Book: Unfettered Journey by Gary F. BengierLove the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share! Here's How » Join The Author's Corner Community today: Website: Robin ColucciLinkedIn: R Colucci, LLCFacebook: Robin ColucciTwitter: @Robin_ColucciRobin Colucci's Book: How to Write a Book That Sells You: Increase Your Credibility, Income, and Impact

Talk World Radio
Talk World Radio: Nancy Mancias and Cindy Piester on Upcoming COP27

Talk World Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 29:00


This week on Talk World Radio we're discussing the upcoming COP27 UN climate meeting in Egypt, with Nancy Mancias and Cindy Piester. Resources discussed are posted here: https://worldbeyondwar.org/cop27 Nancy Mancias is a doctoral student in Anthropology and Social Change at the California Institute of Integral Studies. She holds a MBA from Dominican University of California and BA in Drama from San Francisco State University. She has worked over 15 years in the non-profit sector, focusing on social services, social justice, and theater. She has volunteered and visited the refugee camps in Greece and Kurdistan, Iraq, and provided migrant support on the US-Mexico border. As an anti-war advocate, Mancias has been actively trying to bring the troops home from their overseas misadventures. She has also been part of the movement against torture and a proponent of closing the prison in Guantanamo. Cindy is a lifetime activist and organizer focusing on peace, justice, human rights, and the military impacts on the climate crisis. A former cable access television alternative media producer and host, and a US war crimes documentarian, She is the surviving spouse of Vietnam veteran, John Piester, and a founding member of Veterans For Peace Climate Crisis and Militarism Project. She is a Board Member with a national Unitarian organization, a member of WILPF US' Climate Justice + Women + Peace Project and WILPF's International Environmental Working Group. Cindy has been calling for cutting the DoD budget and ending perpetual wars that enrich the war industry while depriving all of us the means necessary to urgently mitigate the climate crisis.

The Venue RX
Bringing Your Entrepreneur Energy | Chanda Daniels | The Venue RX

The Venue RX

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 32:30


If you are a new or existing venue owner and want a professional team to operate and mangage your venue business click here! https://www.cseventservices.com In this weeks video, our host Jonathan Aymin sits down with Chanda Daniels to discuss how to get your business organized, what an ideal client looks like and why its never too late to learn something new! About our Guest: Chanda Daniels is the Owner & Creative Director of Chanda Daniels Planning + Design (www.chandadaniels.com) and founder of A Monique Affair (www.amoniqueaffair.com), one of the leading event planning companies in the San Francisco Bay area. A natural at designing and planning events, Chanda's years of design experience have established her as an expert in her field. Earning a bachelor of the arts degree in hospitality management from San Francisco State University, Chanda has mastered the fundamentals of her craft. Combining these skills with her passion for creating events, she founded A Monique Affair in February 1999 and in 2018 founded Chanda Daniels, Planning + Design which focuses on refined fine art wedding weekends. With 25 years of planning and design experience, Chanda has worked with some of the most prestigious venues and creatives in the industry. As an industry educator, Chanda loves to educate her peers and new creatives entering the wedding industry on LGBTQ+ Weddings and Diversity and Inclusion. Chanda believes in celebrating milestone events with class, style, and richness. Chanda's weddings have been featured in several national publications, including Martha Stewart Weddings, Munaluchi Bride, The Knot, and Today's Bride, and was recently named Top Wedding Planner by Harper's Bazaar, Martha Stewart Weddings & BRIDES Magazine. Find Her Here: WWW.CHANDADANIELS.COM chanda@chandadaniels.com https://www.facebook.com/AMoniqueAffair/ https://twitter.com/amoniqueaffair https://www.linkedin.com/in/chandadaniels/ BE A GUEST! If you are interested in being a guest on our show, or you know someone who you would recommend, go to our website and submit a request! We will review your application and get back to you promptly. ► Website http://thevenuerx.com/submit Don't forget to smash that LIKE Button. Remember to SUBSCRIBE to my YouTube channel and click the BELL ICON to set alerts for all our new weekly videos! CONNECT WITH US & SUPPORT!!! ✩ Instagram https://www.instagram.com/thevenuerx/ ✩ Facebook https://www.facebook.com/thevenuerx ✩ Website: www.thevenuerx.com ✩ Anchor: https://bit.ly/3gKSshE LISTEN / SUBSCRIBE TO THE PODCAST ✩ Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/3qW7ntS ✩ Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3gIz7h3Android: https://bit.ly/3njXOTE

The Technically Human Podcast
Gary Bengier's Unfettered Journey

The Technically Human Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 60:30


In this episode of “Technically Human,” I interview Gary Bengier, the author of the award-winning science fiction novel, Unfettered Journey. We talk about the relationship between his prior work as a technologist, and his current career as a writer of science fiction; we talk about the relationship between technology, philosophy, and science fiction; and we talk about the possibility of making moral choices in a world governed by deterministic technologies. Gary F. Bengier is a writer, philosopher, and technologist. After a career in Silicon Valley, Gary pursued multiple projects animated by his intellectual passions, studying astrophysics and philosophy. He is the author of the award winning science fiction novel, Unfettered Journey. Before turning to writing speculative fiction, Gary worked in a variety of Silicon Valley tech companies. He was eBay's Chief Financial Officer, and led the company's initial and secondary public offerings. Gary has an MBA from Harvard Business School, and an MA in philosophy from San Francisco State University. Set in a richly imagined near future, Gary's novel, Unfettered Journey is a cross-genre novel combining thrilling action, adventure, and a love story. It traces an epic journey – from inside the human mind to the vastness of space, from AIs battling in the desert to the peace of a mountain refuge. It asks social, spiritual, and philosophical questions that reach into some of the major topics of this show. How do human values interact with technological products? How does ethics—that is to say, what we should do or ought to do, change and our respond to our new technological world? And how can science fiction itself transform our vision of who we want to become?

Tests and the Rest: College Admissions Industry Podcast
394. TEST PREP PROFILE: Erin Billy

Tests and the Rest: College Admissions Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 19:35


Ready to learn the history, philosophy, and practice of an experienced professional in the test prep industry? MEET OUR GUEST Erin Billy is the founder of Test Magic in San Francisco, California and the test prep forum Urch Forums. Since 1991, he has personally worked with thousands of students to help them get into great universities in the US, from the academic preparation in the early years to the tests and applications required to apply, both to under-graduate and graduate programs. Erin worked in restaurants in Washington, D.C. during the 1980s and 1990s to support himself through college. He graduated from George Mason University with a degree in English Literature, after which he traveled for four years, spending a few months in Europe and three years in Rio de Janeiro. He is currently working on a Master's Degree in Education from San Francisco State University. After working, and after preparing delicious, nutritious meals for his family, Erin is working on distilling his experiences running a business and helping students apply to college in books and websites Find Erin at https://www.testmagic.com. ABOUT THIS PODCAST Tests and the Rest is THE college admissions industry podcast. Explore all of our episodes on the show page. ABOUT YOUR HOSTS Mike Bergin is the president of Chariot Learning and founder of TestBright. Amy Seeley is the president of Seeley Test Pros. If you're interested in working with Mike and/or Amy for test preparation, training, or consulting, feel free to get in touch through our contact page.

On Religion
On Sacred Sites, Indigenous History, and Spanish Colonialism

On Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 67:30


Abel R. Gómez (he/him/his) is a Ph.D. candidate in the Religion Department and earned a Certificate of Advanced Studies from the Women's and Gender Studies Department at Syracuse University. His research focuses on sacred sites, ritual, and decolonization in the context of contemporary Indigenous religions. Abel is currently completing his dissertation, an ethnography of sacred sites protection movements among the Ohlone peoples of the San Francisco and Monterey regions. He is a steering committee member for the Native Traditions in the Americas Unit of the American Academy of Religion and recently served on the committee organizing the annual Bay Area American Indian Two-Spirits Powwow in San Francisco. He earned a B.A. in philosophy and religion from San Francisco State University and an M.A. in religious studies from the University of Missouri. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rich Zeoli
Schools “Social Justice” on its Students

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 40:41


In the third hour of the show, Rich discusses A young Hispanic woman who is pursuing her math studies at San Francisco State University. The prevailing ethos on college campuses condemns the school for forcing “social justice” on its students. If minority students refuse to partake in social justice, they are ostracized and maybe excused from the university for not following its core values. U.S. government officials are adding data from as many as 10,000 electronic devices each year to a massive database they've compiled from cellphones and other devices. The government uses this technology to search for potential dangers to America. The F.B.I and homeland security have a right to search personal products to check for potential threats.  

Mindful Minds
Why Latina Representation Matters + Equity & Privilege with @latinaswithmasters - Ep. 50

Mindful Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 69:55


CW: we do chat briefly about micro aggressions, but this episode does not cover graphic depictions of racism. It approaches racism from a more educational lens This week on Mindful Minds, for our 50th episode, *woo woo!!,* we have Christina Rodriguez (she/her/ella) of @latinaswithmasters . Christina is the founder of the online community and podcast, Latinas with Masters, whose mission is to Inspire, Empower and Educate nuestra comunidad and future generation leaders with equitable pathways, academic advancement and professional growth in a safe, positive and supportive environment. In this episode, we chat about equity and privilege from testing discrimination, Latina/o/x representation, the importance of seeing Latinas in academia, and why Christina knew this space was needed. Christina V. Rodriguez is a first-generation Nicaraguan-American Latina with a multi-cultural and equity-minded mindset with a commitment in creating equitable opportunities for Women of Color in Business, Housing and Academia. Christina received her Bachelor's degree in Latino/a Studies from San Francisco State University and went on to receive her Master's degree (MBA) with an emphasis in Marketing at Notre Dame de Namur University. She is a currently pursuing her doctorate in Educational Leadership and provides 15+ years of marketing experience in the San Francisco Bay Area. If you want to learn more about Latinas with Masters and Christina, you can follow @latinaswithmasters on IG/FB/Twitter/Tik Tok and https://www.latinaswithmasters.com online! The Latinas with Masters website also features graduate services, swag, resources, and more! You can also listen to the Latinas with Masters podcast on all podcast streaming platforms. You can also visit her website to donate & support Christina's work and future & current grad students! Mindful Minds is a podcast centered on mindfulness and intentionality. From sex to religion to mental health, we are focusing on how to be mindful & intentional about important topics! Join as we learn and grow together!Please rate us 5 stars and leave us a review! You can find more about Mindful Minds at mindfulmindspod.com & Serafina Blog on serafinablog.com & on Instagram (@serafinablog). And you can follow our podcast account on Tik Tok @mindfulmindspodcast and my personal account where I do a lot of deconstruction content @fina__bina . Support the show

Rich Zeoli
We Have a Border Crisis

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 194:58


We are not a Sanctuary State In the first hour, Rich discusses Ron DeSantis' statement on what is happening at the southern border. DeSantis expresses “We are not a sanctuary state, and we will gladly facilitate the transport of illegal immigrants to sanctuary jurisdictions.” Don Lemon Loses CNN Primetime Gig, to Co-Anchor New Morning Show With Poppy Harlow and Kaitlan Collins. Rich talks about his recent experience at the union meeting and his attire. Using the wrong pronoun is considered abuse and disrespect. Can 90 be the New 40s?In the second hour of the Zeoli show, Dr. Michael Roizen joins the show to discuss health and new studies on how to maintain a healthy long life. Rich and Roizen talk about the life span and how life expectancy has increased by 30 years. More people are living healthy and productive lives.  Dr. Roizen's book “The Great Age Reboot” is a guide on how to live a healthy life. Rich discusses ‘Kidnapping' Investigation Into GOP Governors Who Relocate Migrants. Governor Newsom sent a letter to Attorney General Merrick Garland asking for a “kidnapping” investigation into Republican governors who fly or bus migrants away from their states. What's on the cut sheet Pt.1 Schools  “Social Justice” on its students In the third hour of the show, Rich discusses A young Hispanic woman who is pursuing her math studies at San Francisco State University. The prevailing ethos on college campuses condemns the school for forcing “social justice” on its students. If minority students refuse to partake in social justice, they are ostracized and maybe excused from the university for not following its core values. U.S. government officials are adding data from as many as 10,000 electronic devices each year to a massive database they've compiled from cellphones and other devices. The government uses this technology to search for potential dangers to America. The F.B.I and homeland security have a right to search personal products to check for potential threats.   Blue States is finally get a taste of what Red states deal With  In the final hour, Rich discusses John Fetterman releasing some results from a cognitive test as he strives for his upcoming debate. cognitive tests show his brain is working normally for a person his age, after his May stroke. The test results weren't revealed but it has been stated Fetterman is clear for the debate. Rich explains how we are not a sanctuary state for having a mass amount of illegal immigrants and where these people should go. What's on the cut sheet Pt.2  

Off The Lip Radio Show
OTL#686 - Sachi Cunningham

Off The Lip Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022


I was honored to interview via live stream, this amazing woman, Sachi Cunningham cancer survivor, documentary filmmaker and Professor of Multimedia Journalism at San Francisco State University. Her award winning stories have screened at festivals worldwide, and on outlets including the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, PBS FRONTLINE, FRONTLINE/World and the Discovery Channel. The Emmys, Webbys, and Pictures of the Year International have honored Cunningham's work. A graduate of UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism and Brown University, Cunningham's documentaries focus on international conflict, the arts, disability, and the ocean environment. On land she has turned her lens everywhere from the first presidential election in Afghanistan, to the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. In the water, she has swum with her camera along side everything from 350-pound blue fin tuna to big wave surfers, to Olympian, Michael Phelps. Once an assistant to actress Demi Moore and Director/Producer/Writer Barry Levinson, Cunningham brings a decade of experience in feature films and commercial productions in New York, Hollywood and Tokyo to her career in journalism and filmmaking

The Dissenter
#678 Gilbert Herdt: The Anthropology of Sexual Orientation

The Dissenter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 56:34


------------------Support the channel------------ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thedissenter PayPal: paypal.me/thedissenter PayPal Subscription 1 Dollar: https://tinyurl.com/yb3acuuy PayPal Subscription 3 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/ybn6bg9l PayPal Subscription 5 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/ycmr9gpz PayPal Subscription 10 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/y9r3fc9m PayPal Subscription 20 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/y95uvkao This show is sponsored by Enlites, Learning & Development done differently. Check the website here: http://enlites.com/ Dr. Gilbert Herdt is Emeritus Professor of Human Sexuality Studies and Anthropology and a Founder of the Department of Sexuality Studies and the National Sexuality Resource Center at San Francisco State University. He founded the Summer Institute on Sexuality and Society at the University of Amsterdam (1996). He conducted long-term fieldwork among the Sambia people of Papua New Guinea, and has written widely on the nature and variation in human sexual expression in Papua New Guinea, Melanesia, and across cultures. In this episode, we talk about sexual orientation from an anthropological perspective. We first talk about the societies Dr. Herdt studied in Papua New Guinea. We then discuss how to study sexuality on the field, how sexual attraction develops, the influence of culture in the development of sexual orientation, and norms regarding sexual behavior. We talk about how to understand homosexuality from the perspective of anthropology. Finally, we talk about factors that impact the mental health of homosexuals, including norms, marriage denial, and discrimination due to the AIDS pandemic. -- A HUGE THANK YOU TO MY PATRONS/SUPPORTERS: KARIN LIETZCKE, ANN BLANCHETTE, PER HELGE LARSEN, LAU GUERREIRO, JERRY MULLER, HANS FREDRIK SUNDE, BERNARDO SEIXAS, HERBERT GINTIS, RUTGER VOS, RICARDO VLADIMIRO, CRAIG HEALY, OLAF ALEX, PHILIP KURIAN, JONATHAN VISSER, JAKOB KLINKBY, ADAM KESSEL, MATTHEW WHITINGBIRD, ARNAUD WOLFF, TIM HOLLOSY, HENRIK AHLENIUS, JOHN CONNORS, PAULINA BARREN, FILIP FORS CONNOLLY, DAN DEMETRIOU, ROBERT WINDHAGER, RUI INACIO, ARTHUR KOH, ZOOP, MARCO NEVES, COLIN HOLBROOK, SUSAN PINKER, PABLO SANTURBANO, SIMON COLUMBUS, PHIL KAVANAGH, JORGE ESPINHA, CORY CLARK, MARK BLYTH, ROBERTO INGUANZO, MIKKEL STORMYR, ERIC NEURMANN, SAMUEL ANDREEFF, FRANCIS FORDE, TIAGO NUNES, BERNARD HUGUENEY, ALEXANDER DANNBAUER, FERGAL CUSSEN, YEVHEN BODRENKO, HAL HERZOG, NUNO MACHADO, DON ROSS, JONATHAN LEIBRANT, JOÃO LINHARES, OZLEM BULUT, NATHAN NGUYEN, STANTON T, SAMUEL CORREA, ERIK HAINES, MARK SMITH, J.W., JOÃO EIRA, TOM HUMMEL, SARDUS FRANCE, DAVID SLOAN WILSON, YACILA DEZA-ARAUJO, IDAN SOLON, ROMAIN ROCH, DMITRY GRIGORYEV, TOM ROTH, DIEGO LONDOÑO CORREA, YANICK PUNTER, ADANER USMANI, CHARLOTTE BLEASE, NICOLE BARBARO, ADAM HUNT, PAWEL OSTASZEWSKI, AL ORTIZ, NELLEKE BAK, KATHRINE AND PATRICK TOBIN, GUY MADISON, GARY G HELLMANN, SAIMA AFZAL, ADRIAN JAEGGI, NICK GOLDEN, PAULO TOLENTINO, JOÃO BARBOSA, JULIAN PRICE, EDWARD HALL, HEDIN BRØNNER, DOUGLAS P. FRY, FRANCA BORTOLOTTI, GABRIEL PONS CORTÈS, URSULA LITZCKE, DENISE COOK, SCOTT, ZACHARY FISH, TIM DUFFY, TRADERINNYC, TODD SHACKELFORD, AND SUNNY SMITH! A SPECIAL THANKS TO MY PRODUCERS, YZAR WEHBE, JIM FRANK, ŁUKASZ STAFINIAK, IAN GILLIGAN, LUIS CAYETANO, TOM VANEGDOM, CURTIS DIXON, BENEDIKT MUELLER, VEGA GIDEY, THOMAS TRUMBLE, AND NUNO ELDER! AND TO MY EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS, MICHAL RUSIECKI, ROSEY, JAMES PRATT, MATTHEW LAVENDER, SERGIU CODREANU, AND BOGDAN KANIVETS!

Black Menaces Podcast
BMP 15: The FIRST Ever Menace Chapter

Black Menaces Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 28:15


Nate and Rachel got to talk with one of the founding members of the very FIRST menace chapter, Adokor Swaniker is originally from San Diego, California, and is currently a senior studying cinema at San Francisco State University. Adokor joined Black Menaces to get more involved in the community and be a part of the change. She's very excited to see what new experiences come her way. During this conversation, you'll hear about the differences between BYU and SFSU, why Adokor wanted to start a menace chapter, and the other ways SFSU has been the first for social issues. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/black-menaces/support

Something You Should Know
SYSK Choice: How Food Companies Skew What We Eat & How to Avoid Tech Stress

Something You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 53:17 Very Popular


Since watching a scary movie can be so stressful and even unpleasant – why do people do it? This episode begins with a discussion on why people watch them and the benefits of doing so. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/07/070725152040.htm We all make food choices every day. And a lot of things influence those choices which can make it difficult to eat a healthy diet.  To help understand how to make better food choices and resist those negative influences is Marion Nestle, PhD. Marion is the Paulette Goddard Professor of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health, Emerita, at New York University, and she has researched and written several books about food, nutrition and the politics of food – including Unsavory Truth: How Food Companies Skew the Science of What We Eat (https://amzn.to/2EUTGbm) She also has a rather simple way to lose weight you likely want to hear.  Millions of us sit at a computer almost all day – and nothing could be worse! When we slouch and strain our neck and do all the other things we do, it cause all sorts of physical problems. Plus, when you spend a lot of time looking down at your phone, that's not helping either. Joining me to give some expert advice on what to do about this is Erik Peper. He is a professor of Holistic Health at San Francisco State University and co-author of the book Tech Stress: How Technology is Hijacking Our Lives, Strategies for Coping, and Pragmatic Ergonomics (https://amzn.to/2QEyZCS). What makes it more likely that you get pulled over by the police? Yes, speeding is the obvious reason but you can also get pulled over because of your position in relation to the other cars as well as other factors. Listen to hear some advice on how to improve your chances of not getting pulled over by the cops. Source: Interview with Eric Peters of https://www.ericpetersautos.com/ PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS! With Bambee, get access to your own dedicated HR Manager starting at just $99 per month! Go to https://Bambee.com RIGHT NOW and type in Something You Should Know under PODCASTwhen you sign up - it'll really help the show! Start hiring NOW with a $75 Sponsored Job Credit to upgrade your job post at https://Indeed.com/SOMETHING  Offer good for a limited time. Redeem your rewards for cash in any amount, at any time, with Discover Card! Learn more at https://Discover.com/RedeemRewards https://www.geico.com Bundle your policies and save! It's Geico easy! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices