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American multinational retailing company

  • 1,419PODCASTS
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  • Aug 12, 2022LATEST
Kroger

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Latest podcast episodes about Kroger

World Business Report
Consumer confidence grows in the US

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 27:59


People in the US are spending more than earlier in the year as the country's consumer sentiment survey results rise to a three-month high. We hear from the director of the University of Michigan's survey Joanne Hsu and restaurant owner Duane Greenleaf. An armed man who held customers and staff hostage in a Beirut bank has been hailed as a hero. Journalist Wael Talib explains from Lebanon. The French nuclear company EDF is suing its own government for more than eight billion dollars after it was forced to sell energy to consumers at a loss. Carole Nakhle an energy economist in Germany tells us whether this could set a precedent of nationalising energy countries across Europe. (Picture: HOUSTON, TEXAS - JULY 15: A customer shops in a Kroger grocery store on July 15, 2022 in Houston, Texas. Picture Credit: Getty Images).

TalkLP
Kroger Talks Tech & LPRC

TalkLP

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 11:40


TalkLP host Amber Bradley sits down with Chris McCarrick, Senior Manager, Asset Protection Solutions and Technology and Kevin Larson, Senior Manager of Asset Protection at Kroger to talk LP technologies and what's new at the Loss Prevention Research Council (LPRC).  Hear what Kroger is prioritizing to ensure their technologies are working together such as Gatekeeper Systems, FaceFirst, Everseen, etc. -- but how do you get the funding for these safety-critical technologies?  Hear these industry veterans walk through how they tackle this challenge! One way could be providing research from LPRC!  Hear how Kevin describes ways LPRC can be useful when obtaining capital funds for products! Interested in attending LPRC's Annual Conference?  Check it out here.  These two executives also talk face matching and how that technology can keep employees and customers safe -- don't fall for the face matching myths!  Download the Executive Briefing to learn how FaceFirst helps grocers stop violence, prevent theft, and create safer stores. Request our executive briefing now for use cases, benefits, and ROI details.

Just A Black Podcast
Episode Forty Seven: Kroger Donuts & Fake Samoas

Just A Black Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 79:36


On Episode Forty Seven: Barbershop Rants from Josiah  New Look Indianapolis Colts.  Sweet Tooth Guilty Pleasures: Jordan likes the Fake Samoas in Kroger and Josiah likes Kroger Donuts  When's the last time an album or a movie blew your mind?  Bill Russell: Rest in Heaven or Peace  Bishop Lamor Whitehead getting robbed in Brooklyn leads to stories about times when Jordan and Josiah had valuable things stolen from them  Special Guests Announcements  All this and more!!   Music: Life on Mars by Dexter Wansel  Follow, Share, Rate, Review, Subscribe all that love!  Follow @ablackpodcast on Instagram  Subscribe to YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCh26-xUPHTdUti5MsHBWzTA

Valuable Voices Podcast with Miranda Ward
Valuable Voices Podcast with Miranda #90 | Mimi Kroger

Valuable Voices Podcast with Miranda Ward

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 13:34


Mimi is redefining diet mentality and setting people free from deprivation dieting & emotional comfort eating through Biblical principles and Behavior Change Coaching Check out her Free eBook: Diets Don't Work: There's a Different Way to Permanently Lose Weight with Online Challenge (also free) registration. Register at www.dietsdontworkchallenge.com/info. Challenge takes place 9/13-15. Business name & website: Healthyhappyandheavenly.com Her #1 bestselling book: Holy Spirit, Help Me Heal: Overcoming Disease & Dysfunction through Spirit Connection & Soul Healing Valuable Voices Podcast with MirandaAdding value to the world with amazing people who have made an impact on my life and others that I can't help but share with you!Apply to be interviewed here - https://linktr.ee/mkward7878Check us out on:Youtube - https://youtu.be/THpsC42t70UFacebook - https://www.facebook.com/valuablevoicespodcastBuzzsprout - https://valuablevoices.buzzsprout.com/Apple - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/valuable-voices-podcast-with-miranda-ward/id1529343260

Essential Ingredients Podcast
001: What a Sanctuary Really Means for Animals and for Humans with Miyoko Schinner

Essential Ingredients Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 19:29


Series: Mindful Eating Film and Food Festival    Episode Description: "The animals need you… They want you-we need help! -Miyoko Schinner  Going plant-based is something that can make a massive impact on the world, and it's also something that we can do today. We don't have to wait for some significant change to happen—it's happening right now!  The Mindful Eating Film and Food Festival is one of the largest gatherings of people exploring the truth behind our food and animal agriculture systems. This fundraiser brings together changemakers, celebrities—and every one of us!  This event is produced by Rancho Compasión, Marin County's only non-profit urban animal sanctuary, which was founded by Miyoko Schinner. Rancho Compasión's Mindful Eating Film and Food Festival provides solid evidence of how to work together to create an informed world filled with compassion for animals and work together as a community to create a better world through our food choices. Learn the deepest secrets of the animal industry through thought-provoking documentaries, connect with like-minded changemakers, and be a part of humane programs geared to providing quality care to rescue animals. And all this is just scratching the surface!    In this episode, Justine and Miyoko talk about what to expect during the 3rd Annual Mindful Eating Film and Food Festival, what a sanctuary really means for both animals and humans, how animals connect with us, and how we may be indirectly contributing to the inhumane treatment of animals in factory farms. Miyoko also talks about her two passions— Rancho Compasión and Miyoko's Creamery, the home of plant-based dairy alternatives she founded.   Meet Miyoko:  Miyoko Schinner is the fearless CEO/Founder of Miyoko's, a food brand combining culinary traditions with food technology to revolutionize dairy by making cheese and butter without cows. Through an innovative proprietary process that merges food science with old-world creamery methods, Schinner has successfully scaled the production of fermented cheese and cultured butter made from plants. Under Schinner's visionary leadership, Miyoko's has replaced animal-dairy products on the shelves of more than 15,000 retailers nationwide and in Canada including Target, Trader Joe's, Whole Foods, Kroger, and Safeway. The pioneer of the plant-based cheese revolution, Schinner is a passionate culinarian, former restaurateur, best-selling cookbook author, co-host of the national public television cooking show Vegan Mashup, and a founding board member of the Plant Based Foods Association. Schinner also co-founded Rancho Compasión, a farmed animal sanctuary in California that provides a home to over 70 farm animals. She lives with her husband and has 3 grown children, 2 dogs, and 4 cats.   Twitter LinkedIn   Connect with Rancho Compasión: Website Facebook Twitter Instagram   Connect with Miyoko's Creamery:  Website Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube   Connect with NextGen Purpose: Website  Facebook  Instagram  YouTube Episode Highlights: 01:22 What is a Sanctuary? 04:59 Human and Animal Connections 07:23 The Mindful Eating Film and Food Festival 13:46 Miyoko's Creamery 17:36 Be Involved with Rancho Compasión

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News
EP294 - Amazon Q2 Earnings

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 52:55 Very Popular


EP294 - Amazon Q2 Earnings . Episode 294 is a breakdown of Amazon's Q2 2022 earnings. Episode 294 of the Jason & Scot show was recorded on Sunday July 31, 2022. http://jasonandscot.com Join your hosts Jason "Retailgeek" Goldberg, Chief Commerce Strategy Officer at Publicis, and Scot Wingo, CEO of GetSpiffy and Co-Founder of ChannelAdvisor as they discuss the latest news and trends in the world of e-commerce and digital shopper marketing Transcript Jason: [0:23] Welcome to the Jason and Scot show this is episode 294 being recorded on Sunday July 31st 2022 I'm your host Jason retailgeek Goldberg and as usual I'm here with your co-host Scot Wingo. Scot: [0:38] Hey Jason and welcome back Jason and Scott strip show listeners well we have had a plethora of vacations Jason did a business trip he's going to report on over it in our F and then I had a little covid situation so it's been The Universe has been trying to keep us from podcast so it's great to be back in the saddle tonight Jason. Jason: [0:59] I am thrilled to be chatting with you on a rare Sunday night this is unusual for us. Scot: [1:04] It is it is usually we watch our Disney movies have a little popcorn in called an evening but tonight we're going to throw down a podcast. Jason: [1:11] We I feel like we need to get ahead a little bit because you know there's a new Game of Thrones series coming soon. Scot: [1:16] I know and Lord of the Rings we got a lot a lot of geekdom kind of happening all at once here. Jason: [1:23] Exciting stuff and even more exciting than all of that Scott I'm super grateful that you're feeling well and recovered but mental picture for our listeners I have a mild version of what Jason considers a tan for the show which is super rare. Scot: [1:40] Wow and that is because you went to a that summer in RF show that's out in a ranch somewhere tell us about that. Jason: [1:48] Yeah I doubled down so I had a week of vacation in Upper Lake Michigan and then I went straight from there as one does when you work hard to a quote-unquote work trip which is in Ranchos Palos Verdes at The Tiara new resort on the beach in southern California. Scot: [2:07] Cool and then so I've been turning our F of n this time of year that was called the merchandise or the merch conference is that what you want to. Jason: [2:16] You are old school so originally when shoppbs.org and NRF were two separate entities shoppbs.org had a, fall summer event at this Resort that was exclusively focused on like digital merchandising and you're exactly right it was a great event called the merch Summit. And so this is kind of the spiritual successor to that than in a ref also had a event at the same time of year that was called the CIO Summit where all the cios got together and so they've kind of mashed those two events together change them a little bit try to make it even more inclusive and they now call it an RF Nexus and so it's focused on, really forward-looking Trends and technologies that are relevant to e-commerce professionals to digital leaders to cios and to see a Moe's so there was a you know kind of like senior execs across it marketing and. Digital all in attendance. Scot: [3:17] Nice nicer than what was the was there a topic to the event or what. Jason: [3:24] So there are a range of forward-looking topics. Like probably the trend that topic that got brought up most were various aspects of the metaverse and some of those conversations came very close to getting me kicked out of the. Scot: [3:43] Because you are. Jason: [3:45] Because I've become. Scot: [3:46] VR headsets. Jason: [3:47] I become a huge cremation. I know that's shocking to listeners who find me like wildly optimistic but you know we had a lot of outside speakers talking about the metaverse and. Spoiler alert I think the metaverse is super interesting it absolutely could be an important part of the future and when people say metaverse they're mostly talking about three things that don't necessarily go together but can which is. In ftes and blockchain stuff they're talking about the actual metaverse which is kind of like you know virtual reality and they're also talking about web 3.0. [4:24] And so they brought in a bunch of authors and subject matter experts, that are super bullish and are like it's a foregone conclusion that the future is with three and everyone's going to abandon web 2 and if you haven't already gone your, wheezes and secured your property in the metaverse then you're stupid and you're going to lose huge sums of money. And I disagree with most of that like I feel like it's. Wildly more up in the air than that and like at the moment first-movers that have tried to do Commerce things in the meadow verse have made more mistakes than not and so I spent a fair amount of time. Like debunking some of those claims and highlighting some of the catastrophic mistakes that people have been making when they when they try to make a splash in the metaverse Without Really knowing what they're doing and, I choose to believe that the attendees appreciated that counter perspective but I don't think some of the speakers appreciated being challenged. Scot: [5:20] What to do a deep dive where you essentially just dumped on the metaverse Jason dumps on the metaverse. Jason: [5:27] Well or. Scot: [5:28] Be part of our curmudgeon series. Jason: [5:29] Yeah a dose of reality about them again it could be a big thing I'm not saying it's not I'm just saying it's not a guaranteed big. And then a close cousin of that that I spoke was, the future of artificial intelligence for Commerce and I'm kind of and we've talked about this before but I'm kind of a curmudgeon on that as well only because. I think focusing on artificial intelligence is kind of silly like to me artificial intelligence is a tactic not an outcome and there are a bunch of super exciting outcomes that are, made much better by using artificial intelligence and so I talked about some use cases that I'm super excited about. But but I you know caveat that with they're not super exciting just because of the math that causes them to be artificial intelligence their super exciting because they help people find more stuff to buy and have more successful shopping trips. Scot: [6:26] Cool well that's that's definitely out there and we have history on the show of given our listeners more of the hot truth of what's going on right now so it was a it was a really interesting second quarter reporting period so we wanted to spend the bulk of our time today reporting on that I want you to lay the scene for us mr. US Department of Commerce what what's what are the things feeling like there and then you know I think we're all pretty red in on the macro that consumer confidence is like what 10 20 year lows inflation's at 40 year highs we had two quarters of negative growth that used to be called recession but no longer is called a recession. So yeah so. So that's kind of the macro backdrop and then then I saw you had done your normal really great analysis of the US Department of Commerce what's that looking like. Jason: [7:18] Yeah and there's not a lot like super game-changing in the in the monthly data from the US Department of Commerce I like is you just kind of called out I feel like we've just made this transition from. Overheated economy due to stimulus and extra covid demand and certainly a greater level of uncertainty and fluctuation but like in general, really robust retail sales to now we're having really robust retail sales because of inflation and so you know, looking at the numbers they're pretty consistent with the last couple months of numbers we've seen and so in general like July retail sales were up 8.3% from July of last year, and year-to-date all retail sales from from January through July of this year are up 8.8%, from July of last year so ordinarily we would expect retail to be up. [8:11] I'll call it you know three to four and a half points so being up 8.8 is a. Significantly higher growth obviously a chunk of that growth is. Fairly attributed to inflation and people having to spend more. But you know inflation is kind of I feel like is misunderstood and people talk about about it being one number consumers spend a bunch of money on a big basket of goods and the amount of inflation on each item in that basket of goods. Varies wildly right so the amount of inflation we're seeing in gasoline. And certain food items is really high consumer electronics are actually deflating it's a you'll get a cheaper TV this year than you did last year right so. So you know if you break down in a segments. Segments that have high inflation and you know we're negatively affected by the pandemic the last couple of years are killing it right now so it's a great time to own a gas station like that. Gas stations are up 50% year-over-year. Scot: [9:10] Yes cool and then it's too early to get the online number from the US Department of Commerce right that that's got it. Jason: [9:17] Yeah we don't have the quarterly number but the proxy that we do get is this like non-store sales and that's a nine point six percent from last year so we're where the brick-and-mortar number is up more than you would usually expect the. The non-star sales are e-commerce is up even higher but, probably a little lower than you would ordinarily expect we're kind of used to that kind of twelve to fifteen percent growth in the so you know 10% growth is a is a little bit lower. Scot: [9:50] That's because we're that they've got a comp problem because last year was such a surgery or with covid. Jason: [9:54] Exactly exactly. Scot: [9:56] Okay so that's one set up and then the other one was for some reason we've entered this interesting period where Snapchat is one of the first companies to report and. Jason: [10:06] They need to change that by the way. Scot: [10:07] Yeah I don't think that's her they like it. Because in our Recaps they've been kind of the first one to take it on the nose and it wasn't any different this quarter so July 21st they came out. And it was just a total mess and lower and a poop show because last quarter they basically said we got a handle on this we know what's going on with ID fa. You know I'm going to another Victory lap on this because I feel like you and I were like super early on I DFA and it's really coming home to roost and interesting ways and Snapchat continues to be a, non beneficiary of those changes but then addition to that, you're more in that business that I am but I've got to imagine that when you see recessionary head winds and and everyone's tucking in their expenses one of the first things that you look at is your ad spend right and you know maybe it's not a great place to be if you're Snapchat basically saying hey you know we're not really good anymore and measuring what's going on with your ads because it feels like I guess people would cut that they've also become you know one of the smaller platforms so I imagined. They're probably out on experimental ring of AD spend and maybe they get cut from that too so they had a double whammy of both kind of micro meaning I DFA and then macro softness so that was just a total total nightmare quarter for them. Jason: [11:33] No do it wasn't pretty 100% agree like I do think we call the that I DFA was going to be pretty substantial to some of these businesses but I do think. Some of there's like there they were mostly trying to blame it all on IDF a and I do think there's some softness in. Digital marketing spend right now right I guess you go into recession it's not the right thing to do but you know a lot of people that are nervous about their economic future are you know slow down their marketing spend right and it's kind of like when when you start to Skid on the ice. You know it's not very smart to hit the brakes but it's human nature to hit the brakes and and you know some people people are doing that right now and I think some of their their softness and then you know some of the softness in the other AD platforms we're going to talk about, is is related to that recessionary fear and the ongoing impact of the various privacy initiatives. Scot: [12:30] Yes so then we were all like okay that's that's Snapchat maybe it's isolated and then we had five days till Google was going to announce, or / alphabet there called a whole I will always call them Google and then there was a surprise announcement on July 24th Walmart basically came out and said hey we need to update our guidance that they had already lowered, for the quarter and they basically said sales are decent but profits are going to be way below kind of what we were talking about and they specifically called out some inventory problems so the CEO they now have everyone has a there's like 16 CEOs at Walmart or something but the CEO of us said, there's probably 20 percent of inventory if you could just wish it away and make it disappear you would, and then around that same time Target also came out and I think there's was even more severe, and then Walmart called out apparel as a problem area where basically I guess when you look at kind of your your wallet where you're spending money there's always, can't live without groceries but you can live without like that 10th pair of socks or, or a new outfit or something like that so it seems like consumers are definitely slowing down dramatically on the apparel side did you parse anything else out of the Walmart announced. Jason: [13:51] Yeah I mean I feel like those are the main two takeaways I Walmart in particular like they're got they reduce their guidance from like eleven percent profit 21 percent profit right so pretty meaningful and essentially what they said is a we're starting to see significant changes in consumer Behavior as a result of the recession and or as a result of the inflation I should say and the the specific behavior we're seeing is people are spending more on Essentials and less on non-essentials and the non-essentials are more profitable for us so our mix is getting less profitable which is why we're adjusting our guidance and it also means that we have too much of these non essentials we were already you know heavy on them because we over ordered, during all the supply chain crisis and now we're having trouble moving them so Walmart didn't say this but a lot of other pundits have said this like you can expect to see all these Goods at Walmart and Target start to really get discounted and in one weird way, that's potentially good news for the economy because that that could actually help counter some of the inflation that everyone's talking about. Scot: [14:56] Yeah yeah 10% profit change at Walmart's like a 40 billion dollar number. Jason: [15:02] Yeah I will say and you you're the stock market guy I'm not right so not shocking you come out and you revise your guidance in significantly down like that and not tracking your stock takes a pretty big haircut right so everyone wrote articles talking about the dipping the stock I happen to pick the stock right before we went on the show and its back it's completely rebuilt. Scot: [15:23] Yeah it's always better to take your medicine and then if you're going to do it kitchen sink it and throw in some stuff because it's an expectation machine not necessarily an absolute. Machine okay so then everyone was like well that's not good but maybe it's isolated to stores let's see what Shopify does well then well then Google came out and Google was mixed probably less bad than people thought so their Core Business which is people going to google.com and typing in stuff it exceeded expectations but their ad business and then their YouTube business were under pressure and they basically kind of counteract that each other where they did talk about you're more macro head runs around the ad world and that advertisers were pulling back so they kind of, added on to that Snapchat message of some softness with ad spend. Jason: [16:11] Yeah and just for Google followers I would add you know they're interested in comments Commerce particularly interesting just remember like the president of Google Commerce recently left, Bill ready to go to Pinterest right so they haven't announced a new head yet like I'm expecting them to call me any day so we'll see where that goes but previously one of the things they'd really been leaning into was YouTube for Commerce and they've added a ton of Commerce capability to YouTube and it it varies it doesn't seem like that paying off quite yet in the Google world. Scot: [16:47] Yeah and then everyone's like well let's see what Shopify does in so let's see after market close 26 was Google and then everyone was expecting Shopify to do something the next morning well then that evening Toby put out a Blog post saying hey we're laying off 10% of folks and then I was like oh boy that's not good the quarter must be really really bad. And it was really interesting to his credit I think Toby did a really good job in his blog post it's never easy to do these types of layoffs and I thought he did an exceptional job of laying out, why and essentially taking the blame for it basically saying he made a bet that this would be a pull forward it was you know. [17:32] And then when you're in the thick of it you do that was our logical, thing to think could happen and instead now we're reverting to the mean and they've gotten way out of their skis what did you think about and then the next morning because he had taken their medicine, it wasn't quite as bad and then Wall Street actually likes it when Shopify gets rid of expenses because they've added there, that's like a thousand people to them that they laid off our 10% so they've grown their head count up to this kind of astronomical 10,000 folks and then they, is one of those little quizzical because then they said you know it's not going to change our ability to innovate or do anything basically so then you're kind of like wow I wonder wonder hey how's it feel to be one of those thousand people here in that part of the message and then be you know what did they do that you didn't really need them and they were in the sales they have all these content management people so kind of not developers not product and so part of their message was they were going to double triple down on on product development and adding features. Jason: [18:33] Yeah I'll be interested to see how it plays out I got a ton of pings after that announcement because everybody did a Victory lap on my corpse right like everybody's calling and going ha ha mr. e-commerce guy e-commerce was an anomaly like it was it was big during the the pandemic but but now it's all gone see even Toby like over-invested in e-commerce and then he had to come out and say that he Comer sucks now. And so a I got a bunch of those kind of troll tweets that I had to respond to. And you know I have my own kind of issues / concerns with Shopify so a I would say. That shopify's actually been slower than I would like to see in product development leading up to this and in particular they have a product that's aimed at more Enterprises and less. Tiny businesses that's called the Shopify plus and most of the folks I talked to that have. Invest in Shopify plus I've been pretty disappointed with the rate of innovation and product development on that platform and a bunch of the people that got laid off. [19:38] Where the teams associated with Shopify plus so that seems. Interesting to me and I will tell you that like in Toby's announcement he published this this US Department of Commerce Economic Development. Which of course you and I are super familiar with and we talked about all the time but eat accurately represented it right like that there's, e-commerce has been at the certain rate and during the you know from 2022 2022 we had this crazy Spike and you know if you look at where it is now and you draw a dotted line to the growth you would have expected before the the pandemic like the. The line is barely above where you would have expected so they called that regressing to the mean and you know gosh we exuberantly over-invested in now that it's come back to the mean we have to right-size. And so the only thing that's wrong with that graph is it's kind of a it visually doesn't represent, the huge amount of growth that's in the mean like the mean is very high so, from 2022 2022 we added four hundred and twelve billion dollars a year of e-commerce sales so e-commerce in United States of America Grew 61% From 2022 2022, so when when Shopify another say oh man we covid dim boost e-commerce as much as we thought we only grew 61 percent over the last two years. [21:06] Um like how many people did you hire right like you did you you didn't add 61 percent to their their staff commensurate with that growth. So yeah I just I take exception with people that think. That this data in some way shows some some significant softness and the other thing I would say is all of these graphs that these people are talking about they all like to show the percentage of e-commerce to Total retail and. It's easy to overlook and forget the fact that the denominator in that that ratio has been fluctuating wildly because of covid-19. Scot: [21:42] Yeah yeah and then you know the other thing that mrs. is the it's like almost like a pie chart where you don't see the absolute dollars so so percentages are a tricky thing it's gonna be a better way to visualize it. One scary thing is maybe we don't revert to the mean like a week the you know the lines we haven't had enough time to know until that start sticking up you know we won't know if we're back on the mean or not who knows. Google. Jason: [22:11] I know for sure but I get you know like I will do it maybe a Shopify deep dive at some point but like to me Shopify does is. Great product for small businesses it caters to this long tail in my biggest gripe with Shopify as an investor is always that they never tell you what they're stainless or sales are like they never tell you how well last year's customers did this year they just tell you the gmv of all the customers they currently have and so as far as We Know, more than 50% of their customers go out of business every year and then you know 50% of new mom and pop start a smart start a business and sign up with Shopify so the unlike a lot of other retail platforms that report their their data and when they grow we can kind of assume e-commerce grew shopify's growth can be 100% attributed to turn we just don't know. Scot: [23:00] Yeah so then it was Thursday morning the 27th and meta formerly known as Facebook announced and that was a poop show so they had a myths of top and bottom and their second quarter of declining growth they threw the kitchen sink in there IDF a they're seeing macro issues Sheryl Sandberg is leaving and this has been announced for a while and then all the Talking Heads were like oh my God you know she when out of the top this is kind of the end of Facebook so that was that was pretty pretty negative sentiment there and then that brings us to the main topic we want to talk about which is after hours on Thursday Amazon announced. Jason: [23:41] And Scott one thing before you jump in the Amazon like you forgot the most important thing about meta. Scot: [23:46] What. Jason: [23:48] The Kardashians are mad at them. Scot: [23:50] Oh yes they changed Instagram in Kim's I don't I haven't tracked this you know it better than I do. Jason: [23:56] Yeah I'm just well it is an interesting thing will do another show about this at some point but like Instagram is has probably been the crown jewel of men of for a while and you know Instagram is getting a lot of competition from Tick Tock that the news feed and Tick-Tock is a lot more our rhythmic so the content you see is less related to who you particularly follow and more what the robots think they want to show you and the you know can monetize and so Facebook to try to follow suit is changing Instagram to be more algorithmic and less based on your followers and so if you're a mega influencer with 30 million followers you don't like that right like if you're Kim Kardashian you want everyone to see all of your content because they followed you you don't want them to see some unknown person that did something viral. And so the change that Instagram made is to be more like Tick-Tock and you know some of these big big influencers that benefited from the old model understandably don't like it in are criticizing it. Scot: [25:01] Got it yeah we should definitely do a Kardashian deep dive how fun will that be. Jason: [25:06] Yeah yeah finally be able to let Kylie on the show and so she'll stop bugging us. Scot: [25:12] Good. Okay so if you've been listening this recap there's two words I haven't said and those are beat and raised so then Thursday night Amazon came out and everyone was like oh boy this is gonna be bad and there was a CNBC person who actually like a lot of names Josh and. He was basically he they do this little lunch time. They have this investment committee they call it and he's had a short on Amazon because he kept thinking they were going to miss Q2 he basically said look with Walmart and Target basically reporting the way they have. To think Amazon would do differently means they have some totally different customer base I just don't think that's the case so Amazon surprised everyone with a beat and raised quarter. So how did they do that with all this you know we've got Walmart Surprise Miss Shopify surprise Miss Google. Less worse meta terrible Snapchat total disaster in an Amazon just kind of came out and surprised everyone. [26:16] So so one way to think about Amazon is this very unique business and there's not a lot of. That you know another company like this that they have this portfolio of businesses they have built and they're all intertwined but. They have I imagine they have this is my mental model is they have dials where they can turn up and down this portfolio of businesses because they're all intertwined and that's one of the benefits of keeping this stuff together like when PayPal and eBay were together there are some operational Dynamics there that you could use to you know if you hit a certain speed bump or something you could navigate that better, so Amazon has these things so they've got the core retail business which is lower margin it's a retail business still profitable on its own but. [27:02] Not a great business but a good business and but like a massive scale you know hundreds you know what three hundred million dollars plus annualized then you've got a third party Marketplace business that we talk a lot about. Very profitable, doing really well you've got a smaller ad business super profitable doing really well growing rapidly AWS the cloud component now merchant services which is essentially the monetization of the, Center asset you had to build for the first piece. And my mental model is what they basically said was well we're heading into this period where we've got all these recessionary things consumers Under Pressure let's dial back on first party and dial-up third party. And that really won the day so so what they did is the third party as a percent they don't really give us. The gmv of each of these things that the total sales in each bucket they give you a unit mix so the unit mix was at an all-time high I need a fact check on this I'm 99% sure this is right. Five 57% third party versus first party the highest previous that was last quarter at 55%. They may say let's 2% how could that really make that big a difference well. [28:18] That's actually big because when a hundred dollars moves from the first party bucket and you and I have talked about this a million times but just to recap for listeners in the first party bucket the accounting is a dollar is a dollar of Revenue. The third party Amazon doesn't get to recognize the hundred dollar widget that sold they only get to recognize their commission or take rate which is about 10%. So they lose 90 dollars if a doubt if a widget moves between those things and Revenue. But that ten dollars that's left is pure profit it's almost like 99% profit so so if you really want to you know juice profits you move things from the 1p bucket the 3p buck. So and then also tell us about Prime. Jason: [29:06] Yeah so Prime is a little confusing this year because it was in July and historically that's when Prime day has always been except this weird covid era that we've had so you know if you if you go back to 2020 they canceled Prime day in July and instead had it in October and then the following year in 2021 they went back to Summer but instead of having it in July I like they always have they had it earlier in June which is a big deal because it's a quarter earlier it's Q2 instead of Q3 so we're looking at Q2 this year we're competing against a cue to that had prime day in it and this year Prime day is in Q3 so this year Brenda is back to Mid July which July 12th and 13th so a lot of extra work and verbal gymnastics for the poor cf0 on the earnings calls. Scot: [30:03] Yes there was no benefit from Prime in the quarter so that didn't really it neither hurt or helped. So even though third-party carried the day and I kind of theoretically so let's say. Yeah let's say you're running one of these really large retail businesses and you're either a store based or a e-commerce base I feel like Amazon because they have their products in a central location they can be much more dynamic because you know think of the store networks that Target and Walmart have almost like an edge Network. [30:37] And that product gets pushed out to the edge and then if you need to Pivot for some reason well you've got a tough decision you can you can pull the product back it's not really desistance not really designed for that it's mostly returns comes back not like let me yank all the sweatshirts out of a you know store number 292 or something. Or you have to liquidate them and then you end up with this problem that you call so if your Edge is full of stuff that's not really moving right now, you can't really. Change that rapidly you know you've got like a 60 90 day cycle to flush that out clear room for the stuff that's going to work so I think that even even though they did turn up these higher-margin pieces to win the day I think being an e-commerce oriented retailer gives them a lot more flexibility in a world where inventory and consumer behaviors are changing rapidly do you agree or disagree with that. Jason: [31:34] Yeah no I I mean I feel like they're their breath of offerings and monetization make them much safer than most other retailers they have more levers to pull in more knobs to dial. Scot: [31:49] And then the other thing and you know here one of the reasons I started spiffy is because we had talked so much on this show about the bifurcation where K seal Obama has come on and. Talked about the value and the consumer and the convenience or any consumer and a lot of that data came from 08-09 the quote-unquote Great Recession and you know what we learned during that recession is there is a consumer that is largely immune from recessionary and in that point time we didn't have inflation but I think I think that's kind of the same. Same kind of Stew if you will of macroeconomic stuff that the consumer has to face whereas the value are going to Consumer was really impacted by it. So I will also another argument I have is that that guy Josh on CNBC was wrong there is a separate customer now surely there's overlap and what not. But Amazon has captured all if not you know. 98% of that convenience or any consumer and you know that is a great place to be when you have a lot of these recessionary wins because they're not as impacted as the value or any consumer. Jason: [32:57] Yeah no I do I think you're 100% right like this gets complicated because these are such large numbers but the way I think of it there's 240 million households in the United States of America there is more than 100 million. Prime households right so the you know a significant chunk of America shop Amazon and have Prime, 190 million households shop Walmart so basically all you know the vast majority of America except for rich people in New York and California shop Walmart so you can't talk about oh, there's a Walmart customer and there's an Amazon Customer because the vast majority of customers go to both places but. [33:38] There's a core customer that spends most of their money at these two places that is likely very different right so there's these these higher net worth individuals that spend the bulk of their discretionary money Amazon that are way more insulated from inflation than the average Walmart consumer that spends the bulk of their money there and then. A big difference in this inflationary period is if you're a cord customer that shops at Walmart or Target. You have more economic instability so you're spending more of your dollars on Essentials versus nice to haves right and guess where you get your Essentials Walmart and Target like that's still where you get your food. And so at Walmart the mix shifts right instead of buying a cool outfit you're buying more proteins for your family. But that that Amazon customer is both more affluent and therefore less impacted by by inflation and they probably don't get their protein from Amazon. Right so like we Amazon doesn't see their quote-unquote essential spending they only see their discretionary spending so they don't have the same. Dynamics like causing their mix to shift to less profitable mixes in a recession so I do think in that way. The economic headwinds facing Walmart and Target are very different than the ones facing Amazon. Scot: [35:05] You know if you are getting your protein from Amazon it's probably at a Whole Foods where I have a feeling that consumers pretty resilient based on. Jason: [35:13] Yeah which and again people do but like a see a statistically insignificant period of like whole food is less than 4% of the grocery market so yeah. Scot: [35:23] Well our are like Kroger and those folks feeling I don't track them as. Jason: [35:27] Yeah the so again they have less discretionary right so yeah they're they're doing pretty well like they're benefiting like a lot of the items in Kroger are impacted by inflation so there's their sales are up um the you know. They're like the discretionary retailers are losing more dollars to the grocer so it's I'm not saying that that the grocer particularly love the current circumstances they're in but but they are like if you navigate them right there economically favorable. Scot: [36:03] But then because it's not Walmart where interest or you're making the toys there's there's a loser somewhere and it's pie like a Macy's and JC Penney you're probably going to get hammered I would imagine because there's you know if Walmarts telling us people aren't buying much apparel than this kind of start Rippling through all these other places. Jason: [36:18] Yeah or I'll give you an even more painful example Bed Bath & Beyond. Scot: [36:22] Yeah yes Father they're not doing well. Okay let's peel the onion on this a little bit so Revenue grew 7.2 percent year-over-year to 120 1.2 billion and that exceeded the expectations of 119 billion by about 2 billion. So not a huge huge beat but again it was such a bad setup that that it seemed like. You know what a miracle in somewhere North America this is really interesting when you kind of look inside of Revenue North America came in at 74 billion and then expectation was sixty seven billion so that was a really that was almost like a 10% Len. But then International was a miss it was 27 verses 32 billion. Everything I forgot to say that the top and everything we do is outside of the impact of financial currency moves so it's called X FX and Wall Street parlance which which is important because the, currency moves are gyrating around like crazy right now so you swirl that together and that's where you get your North America was up seven, International is all five so that's how you get your two billion dollar win but it's really interesting because if you look at Amazon's North America they were up 14 percent year-over-year which Compares very favorably to your US Department of Commerce data. Jason: [37:44] Yeah yeah no that's a and again like, I look at this all in Aggregate and say this is a solid quarter in a challenging climate for Amazon and yeah they have performed the the industry average despite being one of the largest players. Scot: [38:04] Yeah and then you know a mere like less than a week after Walmart said they were going from kind of ten percent to one percent profit margin Amazon's gross margins improved 45 percent year over year versus the consensus 43 percent so that, that was the one that really yeah I think people are like well if they make revenues surely they're going to go out and readjust their profits and it's going to be really hard so they came in with an operating income of 3.3 billion and this was in our Sunday called out an incremental for billion of increased cost but that was offset from improved fulfillment center Ops so I think what's going on is they built out the Fulfillment center capacity so crazily and they'll since the pandemic they were basically just standing them up and just you know getting stuff out as quickly as possible. [38:51] And then this quarter they kind of came back and where they use this phraseology invest in Harvest so they go in these different modes so they're able to come out of invest mode and look around and say well. You know in 2020 we sure we're setting up fulfillment centers kind of crazily lets you know we need to tweak, this this and this and then I want to have billion dollars of operational efficiency came out of that they called out some areas that are increasing and expense are. Ews expenses so those sit there and use a lot of electricity which a lot of electricity is off fossil fuels and then I think I think computers are getting more expensive I guess that must be a chip related thing you said Electronics but that's probably like big screen TVs anyway. Then obviously they called out fuel as an area and then they have a particularly large amount of money going into digital. With the funding with digital content with the funding of The Lord of the Rings series coming out and then they also bought Thursday Night Football so they called those out is as expense items. And as I mentioned at the top third-party one today. And then looking inside of there we talked about that seller Services grew nine point one percent year over year to twenty seven point four billion and I think whenever any of these things, grow faster than the Baseline of 7% and they're higher-margin they're going to drop that much more dollars to the bottom line. [40:20] So there was that and then I don't know anything about ads so I'll kick that one over to you. Jason: [40:27] Yeah speaking of things that drop Towers to the bottom line so that the ad units is a reminder is a. This business Amazon has had for a while but only broke out as a separate segment recently and so now it's fun to see it every quarter so it Q2 of 2022 was up 21% versus, the second quarter last year, um if you add up the last four quarters of Ed Revenue its thirty four billion dollars in ads than Amazon selling and Amazon doesn't tell us the profitability of these individual segments but most people estimate that like. [41:06] Worst the advertising business is probably a 75% gross margin business so, 75% gross margins on thirty four billion dollars makes the ad business more profitable than AWS for Amazon so, um Healthy Growth again you think about all the other people selling ads Google Facebook snap, um you know really struggling but Amazon you know continues to grow and they're already the third largest advertising Network in the US so, that's pretty impressive, side note you know every other retailer in the world is trying to replicate this this new ad business than Amazon has invented and they're all doing it you know with great success at a much smaller scale. Um so that you know the ad dollars are shifting from these, kind of top of funnel content providers to these bottom of the funnel retail networks that have first-party data and don't have all these idea of a. Problems that the others are facing so that's. [42:10] The ad business you know separately Amazon Amazon has this subscription business which is mostly Prime but a few other things mixed in there and, you would expect that to be slowing down because they've you know hit they've saturated they probably have half of us households have Prime accounts but that's still growing at 14% which again. [42:31] Is pretty impressive and I think that's a picking up the rate of growth from last quarter so it's super interesting impressive to me that these, these plati sticky Echo systems are particularly strong and Amazon and then of course everyone always talks about AWS, you know I get and we'll talk about this later but we get all these annoying tweets that like oh the only profitable part of Amazon is a WS and it's great it is great right and revenue there was almost 20 billion dollars in nineteen point seven billion, which is well ahead of the confessed consensus estimates it's a decent margin business so I think there is a lot of hardware and electronic electricity, behind that business but it's still pretty high margins and you know a lot of the world hasn't moved to the crowd yet so it WS has a lot of, Headroom in its Tam but a lot of folks were worried that in these economic uncertainty times that I see shops would be slowing down their migration in the cloud and therefore AWS would, would take a hit and I want to say Microsoft announced a slower rate of growth before Amazon so there was an expectation there that might not be an awesome number and and again it was pretty solid solid beat for for AWS. Scot: [43:52] Yeah so that's kind of the different operating units and then, you know again wall Street's kind of a what have you done for me lately so then everyone's like well this is an anomaly surely surely you're not going to be able to repeat this and everyone said number one stop calling me Shirley and then number two Amazon put out Q3 guidance and basically both the revenue of that guidance and the prophet were well ahead of what Wall Street had been thinking. The the revenue guidance was 125 to 130 billion which at the midpoint is 15 percent growth so are one was was quite pleased by that it basically made it feel like they were feeling very strong because remember this is all 727 so Amazon's got 27 date they got about a third of the quarter already in the books and it basically was a signal Amazon saying yeah we feel pretty good about the quarter right now and Amazon had prime day in the books as well so that was good and then. [44:54] Do anything Wall Street loves more than a beat and then raised so the beat is current quarter and then the Rays was the going forward quarter is Abby trays in a buyback so then they also said oh and by the way we bought 3.3 billion dollars worth of stock in the quarter because we felt like the price the stock was was kind of left so so that was all very very well received and and really made Amazon stand out from from me up substantially from the other both retailers and add companies that had previously reported. Jason: [45:27] Yeah so. Scot: [45:28] And then you got Mean Tweets go. Jason: [45:30] Yeah so here's what's annoying so I would say that that's a terrific quarter for Amazon given the economic climate and you know frankly exceeded my expectations and in a number of areas. But you do know there's room for lots of different interpretation and a bunch of folks on Twitter like zoomed in on the profitability of the US retail sector was down and you know they jump on this whole like see this is what we've always been saying retails unprofitable it's a loss leader for Amazon, you know really Amazon is just about a WS and this like you know Silly retail thing is just a sideshow and there's no way to make money on it. How do they get away with a lot sweeter thing Jason don't I have that right like I got a bunch of tweets like that and I didn't respond because. I'm not articulate enough to answer in a short tweet so hopefully it will make everyone listen to this this whole podcast, but I would say you guys are all wow like it was a terrific quarter for Amazon retail like and there's two things you're missing Gap profit is not the same thing as how many dollars flow to your bank account right like, um you know how much money Amazon decides to invest in new warehouses that are going to pay off in the future dramatically affects their. [46:51] And so it's almost silly to look at Gap profit to say whether Amazon retailers a good business or not but more importantly. Um all these profitable businesses that everyone's talking about exist only because of retail right so that ad business I just talked about. [47:10] People aren't coming to Amazon to consume ads they're coming to Amazon to buy stuff in the ad show up right, um and the other business that's impossible for Amazon to lose money on that's growing wildly is merchant services that you hit on, um the merchant services are because Merchants want to sell stuff on Amazon on the retail platform and so it's a little when people are talking about oh gosh the retail business and Amazon's a loser but the ad business is profitable, that's a little bit like saying. The content creation business in b.c. is a total loser but the ad business at MBC is a winner right like know that they're only able to sell ads because they create that content and in the same way. Amazon is only able to make money on Merchant Services and ads and to some extent on subscriptions because of this, vibrant strong retail business um that you know has more favorable characteristics than a lot of other big retailers in this current inflationary potentially recessionary environment so I'm sorry guys I just I think you're wrong and wildly oversimplifying Amazon's business model and economic circumstances. Scot: [48:22] Yet another framing that's kind of fun is after retails been around for what like I guess even longer but I get I was here Sears like 150 years or something. And you have all that history and it took Jeff Bezos to figure out hey you can actually glom on these really profitable high margin businesses and make the whole thing better and there's a synergy synergy inside of there that enables you to like they did this quarter where they can dial things up and down don't you think Walmart had more of that right now or Target or you know Macy's or any of these other retailers so so in a way I think they're missing the point there to just pick out this one piece that can't be unintegrated and say that it's doing bad because you have to take the whole enchilada because they designed you know retail 2.0, by mixing all these things together in a unique way no one figured out till they did. Jason: [49:21] Yeah no hundred percent so so Props to Amazon and keep on keeping on. I did want to I think we're over on time but I just wanted to just like briefly hit on a couple non earnings related topics just to wet people's whistle so. Hey we talked about prime day there's a pretty significant week that there's going to be a second prime Day this year so a lot so a number of journalists have seen internal documents. That talked about a thing called Prime Early Access sale which is scheduled to happen this fall. And so most of us interpret that as likely going to be October which again is when they accidentally had Prime in 2020 because of covid-19. So look for more there but like potentially Amazon will have a second prime day to me that's really interesting because. I feel like the first Prime day at this point is mostly about comps and people turn to match last year's Prime day and it's I'm not sure it's necessarily totally additive but adding a new sail if it. [50:26] Works and capture sales in October that could be interesting so. I found that super interesting Amazon launched a new product that maybe is only cool to me but it's called retail store analytics and this is they're taking all the data from all the cameras and all the just walk out stores and they're selling it back to the brands. So you know just like a you know a cpg can go to Amazon and find out how many glances they got on their their product detail page and how many add to carts they got, they can now find out in a Whole Foods how many people looked at their package on the Shelf versus how many people bought it so there, they're monetizing all the customer insights they're getting from these brick-and-mortar stores using all those cameras which I thought was pretty cool. And then the last thing I'll leave people with is there were some significant articles talking about internal week memos about Amazon trimming its private label and its private label largely being. Unsuccessful and Amazon potentially moving away from private label and. Like I don't think those articles are wrong but I would just throw 11 piece of caution when you interpret those articles. [51:35] I've seen no evidence that Amazon's moving away from any of its successful private-label initiatives, so so what's happening Amazon has a huge amount of private labels they have a ton of Brands they invented a bunch of them never got traction never caught on never had significant sales and I do think they're doing a rationalization of all of those, but there still are Amazon private label brands, they're doing quite well and it appears the Amazon is doubling down on those so I guess what I would say is that they're really focused on the head tail private labeled it's doing well in there, they're kind of rationalizing the long tail that was not doing well so that is all of the Amazon news, and it's a good thing because we've blown through our lot of time once again as always if you found this episode valuable we sure would appreciate that five star review on iTunes. Scot: [52:33] Thanks everyone and until next time. Jason: [52:37] Happy commercing!

Dr. Howard Smith Oncall
More Mag Citrate Laxatives Are Recalled

Dr. Howard Smith Oncall

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 1:27


  Vidcast:  https://youtu.be/Em9TU8x5nkA   The FDA and Vi-Jon LLC are extending the recall of multi-branded Magnesium Citrate Saline Laxative Oral Solutions to include cherry and grape flavors as well as the initially recalled lemon flavor.  Again, the brands involved include: Best Choice, Care One, Cariba, Cruz Blanc, CVS,  Discount Drug Mart, Equaline, Equate Exchange Select, Family Wellness, Good Sense, Harris Teeter, HEB, Health Mart, Kroger, Leader, Major, Meijer, Premier Value, Publix, Quality Choice, Recall Rite Aid Signature Care, Sound Body, Sunmark, Swan, Tricare, Up & Up and Walgreens.  All of these laxative products are potentially contaminated with the bacterium Gluconacetobacter liquefaciens.  Immunocompromised persons infected with the bacterium can develop serious and life-threatening invasive infections. Stop using these products and return them to the place of purchase for a refund.  For additional information, contact Vi-Jon, LLC via e-mail Recalls@Vijon.com.   https://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls-market-withdrawals-safety-alerts/vi-jon-llc-expands-voluntary-nationwide-recall-all-flavors-and-lots-within-expiry-magnesium-citrate   #magnesiumcitrate #laxative #contamination #infection #recall   

NASCAR Live
NASCAR LIVE WIDE OPEN Episode 26 : Classic IRP Memories

NASCAR Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 25:03 Very Popular


The Camping World Truck Series returns to Lucas Oil Raceway Park this weekend. That track is home to many classic races and on a special edition of NASCAR Live Wide Open this week we revisit one of those. In a never before heard feature, Dan Hubbard takes us back through a classic battle between Brian Vickers and Shane Hmiel in the 2003 Kroger 200. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sixteen:Nine
PJ Thelen, RoveIQ

Sixteen:Nine

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 36:01


The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT When PJ Thelen talks about the company's software and hardware, he focuses almost entirely on the experiences they enable and deliver, as opposed to the features and specs of the technology. It's refreshing, because a lot of the conversation and marketing around outdoor displays for directories, wayfinding and advertising has been - at least in recent years - about how they were more than just screens, but smart city devices that did a variety of things, including WiFi connectivity and IoT sensors. Thelen went so far as rebranding the company he now runs from smartLINK to RoveIQ - getting away from the heavily-used smart moniker and emphasizing how Rove speaks to enabling people to navigate a space with intelligent - the IQ bit - guidance. The company has a CMS, sophisticated mapping, an ad server and analytics capabilities all designed to help people find their way around big places. The early adopters have been commercial properties - like mixed-use lifestyle developments. In many to most cases, those are wayfinding directories with mapping, supported by advertising. But Thelen sees a lot of possibilities working with large-footprint healthcare, helping people find their way around sprawling medical campuses. There would be physical screens providing guidance, but in his vision, RoveIQ guides people from the time they park in a hospital garage all the way to a specific building, floor and waiting room. Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes * Google Play * RSS TRANSCRIPT Peter, thank you for joining me. Can you tell me what RoveIQ is all about?  Peter (PJ) Thelen: RoveIQ really emphasizes smart kiosks and wayfinding software solutions.  We just rebranded our organization from smartLINK to RoveIQ and Dave, a big reason for that was we wanted to make sure our new name is better aligned with the solutions that we bring to market and the value that we provide for both our customers and partners. Now the word Rove, it's the whole idea of wandering, discovering, et cetera but the IQ element is to do it in an intelligent fashion. So you have a very efficient and enjoyable experience. So if somebody listening to this is trying to visualize what you do, the visual that would immediately spring to mind would be a display totem outside in a public plaza or something like that with directory or mapping, correct?  Peter Thelen: Yeah, without a doubt. So I always use the analogy, Dave, to pretend that you're going to a place for the first time. You're not quite sure where you are or what is around you so you leverage the hardware and our software to understand what is available and then ultimately leveraging either the kiosk experience or the mobile experience allows you to essentially get to where you want to go leveraging a Blue Dot scenario, which obviously is our wayfinding software. Blue Dot scenario, what do you mean by that, or is that just the name of the software itself?  Peter Thelen: No, that's just the analogy I use Dave, where if you think about where you are and let's just say, hypothetically, you want to go to a restaurant, the dots correlate to the path that you need to take to go from where you are to where you ultimately want to go. The old name, smartLINK, connoted the whole idea of smart cities and that there were all kinds of companies coming up with smart city kiosks in the last decade or so, and I don't necessarily see a lot of traction for those sorts of things. Is that kind of driving this as well? What if you better focus on the whole idea of guiding people, as opposed to saying this is this station that will do all these other things to help cities become smarter?  Peter Thelen: Yeah, we took a step back. RoveIQ is a software company. It just so happens that it needs a hardware platform to promote the value that we drive on a day in and day out basis. In our minds, smart was widely used. It didn't necessarily correlate to exactly what we do today and where we're going tomorrow. From a search engine optimization perspective, it was tough just because there's so many smart this and smart that. As RoveIQ continues to grow, we're growing more and more into other verticals beyond just the smart city. So the bottom line is that we wanted a name that more appropriately aligned with who we are and what we're doing on a day in and day out basis, and it just made sense.  It was a great exercise. It was about a six month long exercise with a phenomenal local company here called Brand Fuel, and we're very happy with the results. There seem to be two kinds of threads of these kinds of outdoor street furniture displays. There are those shopping malls and community business districts, that sort of thing put in to help people find their way around intelligently, and then there are those that are there primarily as advertising. “Oh, by the way, there's also a directory” or “there's also some sort of a lookup thing” but it exists for advertising. Do you go down one path or the other, or do you serve both?  Peter Thelen: Yeah, that's a great question, and we definitely serve both, but there is no doubt that the emphasis of our software is around creating experiences. Experiences that a visitor or a resident is wanting to have, or is not expecting, and ultimately has, which generates this great feeling.  Our software, which we consider a platform. It is a content management solution. It has the ability to be an ad server, which allows you to download and upload ads as well as schedule ads, then it has this third element around data analytics and reporting. So we feel like we have some of the best software out there. But there is no doubt at the end of the day, we're trying to promote more experiences as compared to just ads.  But a big part of the ROI from a customer perspective is that digital out-of-home ad opportunity, and post COVID that's growing significantly, which is creating great opportunities.  And ultimately, regardless of the venue and the scenario, something's gotta pay for the thing, right, so that's why advertising tends to come into play?  Peter Thelen: Yeah. We always say there's hard and soft ROI in terms of your investment in RoveIQ. The soft is the experiences that both the customer, the resident, the visitor, incurs on a per visit basis, and how do you measure that? Secondly, it is the digital out-of-home ads based on whatever DMA that property or the city resides in that correlates to how big of an opportunity that is, and then the third element, which in my mind is still fairly immature, but it's becoming more relevant and more mature each and every day is this whole idea of how do you leverage the data?  Whether it's the touch analytics, whether it's the video analytics and then the ability to potentially incorporate both WiFi and mobile, and then what do you use to do with that data to do something of value with it.  You mentioned experience, how do you define and characterize experience?  The experience can be what you see on the screen, what it looks like and everything else, or the experience can be, “that was easy. I found what I was looking for quickly, and that was a great experience” because now I can go in and experience whatever public plaza or mall or attraction that I'm at?  Peter Thelen: At the end of the day, people want to be informed, they want to be educated, they want to gain access to information in a very quick and inefficient manner, and ultimately, they want to.  We're designing our software where when you approach a kiosk and you start to interact, you can get off of it in less than 40 seconds and feel really happy about the experience and you're on your way, and you feel like you're on your way in an intelligent way. I always use the analogy, Dave, if you come to a property or a city for the first time, you're gonna be inclined to use our software. We at, RoveIQ wanna make sure every time you visit that city or that particular property, regardless if you know where you are and what is around you, because of your previous experience, you want to, once again, interact with our software, it causes you to want to come back, and if you're coming back, that means we're doing our job and adding great value to the customer, the property, etc.  So if you're doing your job, this is where repeat visitors tend to migrate to like Moss to a light. They just know, “I'll start here to help me find what I'm looking for”? Peter Thelen: That's a hundred percent correct, and our new brand promise is this whole idea of enriching lives through intelligent software designed to move humans, then we elaborate saying both physically and emotionally, and that emotional element is probably the most important.  So where does your company start and where does it stop in terms of services and technology that you provide? Peter Thelen: So knowing that we're a software company that ultimately needs a digital display to add value and differentiate, we're providing a fully integrated solution to a customer, which obviously includes the hardware, the related installation, the software, and then the ongoing maintenance. To do all of those things, you need to wrap it in a bow from a project management perspective, and then ultimately you're bringing this data element and this advertising element as part of the overall solution as well so the customer looks at you as a one stop shop.  So we have that ability today. Now, obviously, we leverage partners where that is their core business to add the ultimate value and aspects of the overall solution. But hopefully that's transparent to the customer.  Yeah, I'm guessing that you guys would be happy as clams if you could just be a software company and not have to worry, or really even think about hardware and just provide the specs that it needs to run on this sort of thing, but as you say, people want one stop shopping, they want turnkey.  Peter Thelen: Yep, but that does bring up a good point. Before I got here in May of 2021, we were predominantly dependent on hardware. Of course, in the last 14 months we've made phenomenal strides in promoting mobile-only solutions. So if you think about something as simple as a smart city or a mixed use real estate, yes, you're walking up to a kiosk, but as you exit that kiosk, you can scan or text to phone, to basically take that exact same experience from the kiosk with you on your mobile device, you don't have to download anything, it is considered a web app and off you go. We're also offering mobile-only solutions which are cool. As we penetrate colleges and universities and healthcare, we're not dependent on that hardware. You can get the benefits of our software, just leveraging your mobile device which has been pretty exciting to see and we look at that as a high growth vertical.  So in theory, let's say on a university campus, you could walk up to a support column in a building and there'd be a QR code on there with a message that says. “Having trouble finding your way? Scan this!” and it'll launch your app and off you go?  Peter Thelen: That's a hundred percent correct.  How do you make money off of that then?  Peter Thelen: Well, that's all our software. If you think about it, the theme you're probably hearing from me is, we're a software company, and every time we're providing value around our software, there is a fee for that subscription base , it's monthly and it's based on the opportunity.  So in a conventional setup where you are providing display hardware, you would have a play out license for that display, but with the university campus or something like that, if you're not using physical displays, you would just have some sort of a site license for the campus? Peter Thelen: That's a hundred percent correct. Okay. That makes sense then. I'm curious about wayfinding. Mapping for big public displays has been around, I'd say at least a decade, maybe 15 years, and like everything it's evolved, and I saw on your website, one of the things you talk about is three-dimensional wayfinding.  Over the years, what has your company found in terms of what resonates with end users? Do they care about certain things like it being three-dimensional or do they just want something that's very intuitive and quick?  Peter Thelen: I've concluded it's all the above. I think users today are smarter than ever. They have a very high expectation in terms of the experience that they're aspiring to have. So they want everything. There's a lot of wayfinding solutions out there. So we always think to ourselves, what makes ours better than the next, and knowing that we emphasize experiences, how do we really promote a better experience as it pertains to that whole wayfinding experience?  So not everybody does 3D, most only do 2D. The whole idea of interactive is a big deal, and we obviously wanna promote that fairly aggressively, but the one thing that we're really emphasizing, Dave, is this idea of hyperlocal. Do we capture all elements of a property? So when an individual starts their journey, leveraging our software, it's a great experience. They very clearly know where they're going, they can visualize the surrounding environment and as they're going, there's no fear and uncertainty or doubt about where they're ultimately going to get to, because there's a high degree of confidence in that. The hyperlocal is a very important element to our solution. It could be as simple as a bench, it could be a tree, it could be the look and feel of the building. Our UI/UX team does a phenomenal job of configuring the property on a per deal basis to make sure it looks and feels just like that property actually is. So some of the areas you're in like Port Orlando in Orlando, or Miami Design District and so on, if a shopping or mixed use outdoor district like that approaches you guys and says we want to do this. What is involved? You were talking about the UX design and everything. Do they go on site or how do they put this together?  Peter Thelen: Yeah, it's a lot of different elements, which makes it fun and exciting, but ultimately it starts with a site survey, where we walk the property with the respective owners. We identify those high traffic areas. We understand the goals from the owner in terms of what they really want from this hardware and software. You have to define the advertising opportunity as part of the whole digital out-of-home. Sometimes it's a great opportunity, sometimes it's just an average opportunity and in some instances, based on the location of the property, it might not exist at all. Then the last element is this whole idea of data.  Data is becoming more valuable like I referenced earlier. Each owner wants different types of data sets that's important to them. So as part of the onboarding, we define those data elements. But as we leave that site survey, you're taking all these pieces to the puzzle and assembling them into this picture that correlates to ultimately what they want which is a combination of hardware and software that are strategically placed throughout the property. We've built out the software in terms of the configuration so the experience as you approach the digital display looks and feels just like the property.  I always use the analogy, picture your iPhone. When you open up your iPhone, you have the various apps on the first page. That's no different than what we do for a customer as part of the configuration process, and then we build out the maps. Take into consideration that hyperlocal, 3D concepts  It is the core goal and aspiration simply to ensure that people who visit a venue like Port Orlando or whatever, to just not be lost and frustrated, or is it a little more sophisticated and evolved in the case of trying to influence where they might go? Peter Thelen: I'm chuckling a little bit because it's both. If you think about the whole idea of moving people physically and emotionally, the physical aspect is the wayfinding, and that is the emphasis of our software, but we're one of the first in industries to roll out augmented reality selfie. I was at the Avalon property outside Atlanta, Georgia last week, and I sat on the property for three hours, Dave and I watched people interact with our software, and 70% of the people were leveraging the selfie and having an absolute blast with it in terms of what filter to use, how many people to incorporate into the selfie picture. I watched them scan or text to phone and I watched them walk away giggling, because they were so happy with the experience.  Okay. So this is walking in front of a totem, there's a camera, it's capturing your image in front of the camera and then you're overlaying it like mouse ears or whatever? Peter Thelen: That's a hundred percent correct. I would say think of Snapchat filters, that's the exact experience that we're promoting, leveraging our software.  Is that all just about the experience? Like I did this at this location and it's going to brand it and say I was at Avalon, and I did this fun thing and it's cascading out to that person's followers and therefore it's helping the Avalon brand?  Peter Thelen: That's a hundred percent correct, and then the other side of that, and I'll just use an example of coupons. Think about the whole dynamic of a property wanting to potentially push more and more of the visitors to select locations or select stores, think about the whole idea of, I'm at Avalon for the first time, where is Lululemon? I used the software to understand where Lululemon is from a wayfinding perspective, Lululemon then offers me hypothetically a 10% coupon for today's spend, I scan that QR code, I work my way to Lululemon, I obviously make my purchase, I go to the POS as part of my payment process and I get 10% off my total order. Lululemon's ecstatic that our technology drove people to their store, but the visitors were ecstatic because they got 10% off that they weren't expecting, everybody's happy. Those are the ideal scenarios. So the next time that family comes to Avalon, they're gonna be very inclined to leverage our software to understand what other coupons are out there. That's got traceability too, right?  Peter Thelen: That's a hundred percent correct.  Yeah, and is that happening very often, people using it? Peter Thelen: The answer is yes, and it's happening more and more every day. RoveIQ has only been around since 2016, it was started by two individuals that also had another company. So you could make an argument, it really was a hobby. I came here in May of last year. We had very talented people, it just needed more direction and more leaders, and we're adding new features every single day to our software to once again, heighten the whole idea of creating more and more experiences. . Did you know much about this space when you came into it?  Peter Thelen: Yeah, I did a little, I do adapt to be dangerous, but I ran an IT solutions company for 19 years. I spent my last two years at an organization called Kroger, a rather large grocery store where I ran a division called Sunrise Technology, and that was all about leveraging technology that Kroger developed in house and realized that it worked, and the ask from me was to take that technology and sell it to the global retail world.  The emphasis of that technology was digital shelves inside a grocery store. So I took that same experience, in that case, it was a digital shelf. In our RoveIQ world, it's a digital display, but the elements of the solution were very similar: data, advertising and experiences.  I noticed in the press release announcing the name change that you also made a reference to healthcare software that was coming and I thought that's interesting, so what was that all about and is it now live?  Peter Thelen: I've had so much fun with the team and healthcare customers working on this new concept and it's going great. The premise is fairly simple. If you think about the average experience today, where you have to go to a healthcare facility tomorrow, and these healthcare facilities continue to get bigger and bigger, which from a patient perspective, creates a lot of apprehension and anxiety around, where do I park, what entrance do I go in, and how do I ultimately get to the department that I'm needing to go to?  So leveraging our legacy software, we have made tweaks where we are now integrating into their Epic and/or Cerner, where essentially a patient gets a text the day of their visit and that text takes them from their current location to the correct parking garage via car, then transfers to foot from the parking garage to the correct entrance, and then continues from the front entrance to the actual department. All leveraging a mobile device and obviously our software on that mobile device, and needless to say, it's addressing a rather large problem in healthcare that we believe with confidence we can solve and we're pretty excited about it.  Now, where does it stand? We're in pilots as we sit here today, which means we're learning every single day with a set of customers, and needless to say, our goal is to go live with many customers as we enter 2023.  That's an interesting one because an awful lot of big healthcare complexes started off as one building and ended up being eighteen buildings and they're all joined together and it's confusing as hell to find your way around, and I can certainly respect the idea of something that can say: go out this door, go down this hallway, go up three levels, then turn right and left, and eventually you're gonna find your way there because without it, you might have to leave super early because you know you're gonna get lost.  Peter Thelen: Completely agree, and if you think about the idea of hyperlocal and our legacy software with these enhancements, we can promote this unbelievable experience where you always feel like you know where you're going and where you need to go to ultimately reach your destination. And from a customer experience perspective, these healthcare entities that we're working with today, that's one of their big issues.  People need to feel good about where they need to go and how to go about getting there.  Do you address language as well? Peter Thelen: The answer is yes. Now our current pilots, they have not asked for that, Dave, but the bottom line is, our software has that capability.  Yeah. I asked because years ago I had a meeting with a hospital in Toronto and it was in a very multicultural area of Toronto, and they had a roster of staff and volunteers who just handled all the different languages that came to the reception desk, asking where the Pediatric Clinic was or whatever, and they would have to call people and say, we need somebody who speaks Lithuanian or Tagalog or whatever it may be, and it was this monumental challenge.  I suggested at the time that you might wanna look at some sort of interactive directory that you select your language first, and then it takes you where you need to go that way, and they said that's interesting, but they wanted to just do the wow factor, I can't do stuff in their public areas instead, and they're like, oh, okay, that's not gonna solve any problems, but fill your boots.  Peter Thelen: Yeah, the bottom line is you wanna make sure you have software that can cover the population. The healthcare entities we're working with are defining that population. Needless to say, we're making sure our software can perform, and since it's our own proprietary software, the sky's the limit in terms of the capability and potential.  Yeah, I could certainly see what you're describing is working well on university campuses as well, particularly for night courses and part-time students who aren't familiar with where they're going and really the same thing in airports. Peter Thelen: The airports for us, Dave, have been a tough market. It's so competitive, there's a fair amount of rather large players. Don't get me wrong, we focus on airports, but that's not necessarily where we have generated the most success today. Airports are also pretty conditioned to media companies coming in and saying, we'll put this in for free.  Peter Thelen: That's a hundred percent correct. I can play that game all day, every day. I can play, it's just a matter of, can I compete?  Yeah, you're not gonna win too often when the other guy's saying, we'll put it in free for you. Peter Thelen: You know that's the dynamic we deal with every day on a per deal basis. Based on the perceived digital out-of-home advertising opportunity, that can create a free experience or that unfortunately you have to pay for, it has to generate the corresponding value. So those are the discussions we have.  I'm guessing the majority of the opportunities that you run into and close are in some way bolstered by advertising, and there aren't that many that are purely just an informational display? Peter Thelen: It's interesting, we've had a phenomenal 2022 and the characteristics of each deal really are so different, especially as it pertains to advertising, and there is no doubt when advertising can generate that ROI on its own, it makes it a very easy decision for a customer. But when that's not the case, then it correlates to what are the other value elements and is that important to our property? And we're seeing that increase more and more, which has been exciting, because obviously that's creating great opportunities for us.  But there's no doubt, advertising is a big play here and at the end of the day, we're trying to do everything within our means to bring the best solution forward around advertising to optimize that ROI from a customer perspective. You mentioned programmatic in your press release. So are you working with the many programmatic companies out there? I don't even wanna rattle 'em all off, cuz there's so many and I'm so confused by it.  Peter Thelen: Yeah. So our software, because it's this platform and has this ad server capability, it integrates into programmatic partners, and we're constantly looking at the appropriate programmatic partners and then obviously incorporating those into our solution.  So yeah, that's a big opportunity. This whole idea of unused inventory, how can it be sold in an automated fashion? These programmatic partners make it very easy to fill a high volume, usually obviously lower revenue elements, but still important from a customer perspective.  The company itself, is it private or are you publicly traded?  Peter Thelen: No, it's private. It resides here in Northern Kentucky, right outside Cincinnati, Ohio. The emphasis today is within the United States, although we're always looking at growth outside of the US, but it's a fairly small company, but it's doing some really exciting and fun things. How many folks do you have working there?  Peter Thelen: So we have 12 people today. I'm trying to grow that by an incremental three between now and year end. We have about 25-30 unique customers across five verticals: smart cities, mixed use real estate or lifestyle centers, we call it entertainment, but the emphasis really there is sports arenas, and then college universities, like we talked about earlier and healthcare. We're heavily focused on five verticals.  All right. So if people wanna know more about RoveIQ, where do they find you?  Peter Thelen: Our new website is RoveIQ.com, which in the last three weeks has gotten a lot of attention, which is pretty exciting. But they can also email me, which is pretty simple: pj@RoveIQ.com, and you have my commitment that I'll respond and give it the appropriate attention.  All right this was great. Congratulations on growing the company the way you have. Peter Thelen:. Dave, I really appreciate your time. I appreciate your support. You do great work and thanks for giving RoveIQ an opportunity to talk about what we do on a day in day out basis.

MRN Classic Races
MRN Classic Races - 2011 Kroger 200 and AAA Insurance 200

MRN Classic Races

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 135:07


The MRN broadcasts of the 2011 Kroger 200 Xfinity race and the AAA Insurance Camping World Truck race from Lucas Oil Indianapolis Raceway Park. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

First Bite
Kitchen United is coming to gas stations, shopping malls

First Bite

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 5:59


On Monday, Kitchen United raised $100 million in its Series C funding round led by Kroger, Burger King parent Restaurant Brands International, shopping mall company Simon and convenience store brand Circle K. To date, ghost kitchen company Kitchen United has raised $175 million in funding. This diverse round of investors, including former football star Peyton Manning, proves that ghost kitchen and off-premises technology extends beyond strictly restaurant chains and can be useful within the retail and entertainment industries. NRN senior editor Joanna Fantozzi has more on the story. Plus, catch up on all the top news of the day with our daily news recap at the beginning of each episode. Be sure to subscribe to First Bite wherever you get your podcasts or on Castos, Spotify, or Apple Podcasts.

Nashville Daily
Tax Free Tennessee | Episode 865

Nashville Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 19:58


Just when you thought Kroger was at its end in Nashville, expansion is on their horizon. The Nashville Sounds set a record of their own during a recent game. Plus, the month-long way to save tons of money in Tennessee.Take a Tour With Us! Use code NASH for 20% off - https://www.xplrnash.com/toursToday's Sponsors: Brad Reynolds  https://thinkbrad.com/Blessed Day Coffee   https://www.blesseddaycoffee.com/   Use Code "XPLR20" for 20% off at checkoutNash NewsKroger Delivery Fulfillment Sitehttps://fox17.com/news/local/kroger-spoke-facility-will-create-more-than-180-jobs-in-south-nashville-grocer-groceries-tennessee-atlanta-fulfillment-delivery-services?fbclid=IwAR3Nl9vtc06PRw8HQeprm5xOfBFg7BA3C0qbVvI-725z25bGDuwmmT8Z8DU&fs=e&s=clAsurion Layoffshttps://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2022/07/19/asurion-layoffs.html?ana=TRUEANTHEMFB_NA&csrc=6398&fs=e&s=clNashville Sounds Ticket Attendance Record https://www.tennessean.com/story/sports/2022/07/18/nashville-sounds-tickets-attendance-record-first-horizon-park/10075067002/?csp=apple-newsTax Free Tennesseehttps://www.tn.gov/revenue/taxes/sales-and-use-tax/sales-tax-holiday.htmlTennessee's traditional sales tax holiday on clothing, school supplies and computers begins at 12:01 am on Friday, July 29, 2022, and ends at 11:59 pm on Sunday, July 31, 2022.https://www.tn.gov/revenue/taxes/sales-and-use-tax/sales-tax-holiday/sth-traditional.htmlImportant Notice 22-10: 2022 Sales Tax Holiday for Food and Food Ingredientshttps://www.tn.gov/content/dam/tn/revenue/documents/notices/sales/sales22-10.pdfImportant Notice 22-06: Sales Tax Holiday Extension for Gun Safes and Gun Safety Deviceshttps://www.tn.gov/content/dam/tn/revenue/documents/notices/sales/sales22-06.pdfNashville Daily Artist of the Day Playlist   https://open.spotify.com/playlist/51eNcUWPg7qtj8KECrbuwx?si=nEfxeOgmTv6rFUyhVUJY9AFollow us @ XPLR NASH   Website -  https://nashvilledailypodcast.com/   YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/c/xplrnash   Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/xplr.nash/   Twitter - https://twitter.com/xplr_nash   NASHVILLE & XPLR MERCH - https://www.xplrnash.com/shopMedia and other inquiries please email hello@xplr.life

Friendlier
End-of-summer gratitude

Friendlier

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 20:12


We discuss the things giving us life at the end of the summer. Links to Abby's bathing suit top and bottoms (although it looks like black is sold out).Life latelySarah loves the towel racks and trash can Neil custom made for their new bathroom. Abby is so thankful for her nursing school friends.Reading latelySarah read My Friend Anna: The True Story of a Fake Heiress by Rachel DeLoache Williams.Abby recently finished Take My Hand by Dolen Perkins-Valdez.Eating latelyIt's frozen food day on the pod. Abby was a bit disappointed in the Beecher's frozen corn and not-fried rice she tried, while Sarah's kids are into the Kroger chocolate chip frozen waffles.If you'd like to join in the conversation, please leave us a comment on our show notes, email us at friendlierpodcast@gmail.com, or find us on Instagram @friendlierpodcast. Thanks for listening! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Hamilton County Ohio Social Service News
Food Delivery Services for Low Income Individuals & Families

Hamilton County Ohio Social Service News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022


Amazon and Kroger both offer local food delivery services helpful to low income individuals and families. Many individuals on a fixed income and/or without reliable transportation struggle with grocery shopping, sometimes even wheeling grocery carts to the closest bus stop. Low cost and FREE delivery services for groceries can be Read More Shared by United Resource Connection July 25, 2022

Christ City Church Memphis
Unpacking the Will of God: Psalm 16

Christ City Church Memphis

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 25:24


With all that is, and continues, to happen in our world we can be quick to say the phrase “ It's the will of God” from everything to disease, war, and if there is a good parking spot for us at Kroger. But what do we really mean when we say “Will of God?” In this sermon Rev. Sandra will unpack this loaded phrase using the framework presented in “The Will of God” by Leslie Weatherhead. This short book was originally published in 1944, and remains a powerful tool for more deeply understanding what the Will of God is and how to live our lives accordingly.

Omni Talk
Fast Five | Prime Day Hot Takes, Google Search Revelations, & A Big Kroger ‘Boost'

Omni Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 48:54


In today's Omni Talk Retail Fast Five Podcast, sponsored by Microsoft, the A&M Consumer and Retail Group, Takeoff, Sezzle, and Groceryshop, A&M's Hemant Kalbag and Jonathan Sharp joined Anne and Chris to discuss - All the stats and figures from Prime Day - Whether Macy's taking Toys R Us to all stores will have any real long-term significance - Kroger's plans to expand its Boost membership program nationwide - The big (some might say massive) revelation from a Google exec that 40% of young people are using social media apps over Google to search for restaurants - And closed with a thoughtful critique of the WSJ's report that Amazon has been “considering” exiting its private label business There's all that, plus male beauty routines, sporting event must-haves, and contaminated Skittles. To learn more about Microsoft, visit: www.microsoft.com/en-us/industry/r…cloud-for-retail To learn more about the A&M Consumer & Retail Group, visit: www.alvarezandmarsal-crg.com/ To learn more about Takeoff, visit: www.takeoff.com/ To learn more about Sezzle, visit: www.sezzle.com/ To register for Groceryshop, head to www.groceryshop.com Plus, check out our Top 10 ranking in Feedspot's 60 Top Retail Podcasts: blog.feedspot.com/retail_podcasts/ Music by hooksounds.com

Alles auf Aktien
Das Draghi-Beben und Proteine für die Zukunft

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 16:44


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ berichten die Wirtschafts- und Finanzjournalistinnen Anja Ettel und Inga Michler über eine Sturmwarnung und den verkorksten Start in die US-Berichtssaison, die nächste Krypto-Pleite und Zalando stemmt sich gegen den Trend. Außerdem geht es um Apple, Intel, JP Morgan, Morgan Stanley, Marathon Oil, Valero Energy, Canoo, Twitter, Hugo Boss, Deutsche Telekom, Bitcoin, Beyond Meat, Oatly, Bayer, Deere, Merck KGaA, Strauss Group, Tyson Foods, Kroger, Ginko Bioworks, Kellogg, Gea Group, Pictet Nutrition (A0X8VA), Rize Sustainable Future of Food ETF (A2P876), VanEck Sustainable Future of Food (WKN: A3C8QC). Wir freuen uns an Feedback über aaa@welt.de. Disclaimer: Die im Podcast besprochenen Aktien und Fonds stellen keine spezifischen Kauf- oder Anlage-Empfehlungen dar. Die Moderatoren und der Verlag haften nicht für etwaige Verluste, die aufgrund der Umsetzung der Gedanken oder Ideen entstehen. Für alle, die noch mehr wissen wollen: Holger Zschäpitz können Sie jede Woche im Finanz- und Wirtschaftspodcast "Deffner&Zschäpitz" hören. Impressum: https://www.welt.de/services/article7893735/Impressum.html Datenschutz: https://www.welt.de/services/article157550705/Datenschutzerklaerung-WELT-DIGITAL.html

Talkin' Tofu
You're My Galapeño (Brave Robot Ice Cream Sandwiches & Zapp's Jalapeño Chips)

Talkin' Tofu

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 52:43


This week on the show, we'r talking about Brave Robot's new ice cream Sammies collab with Coolhaus and trying Zapp's Hotter 'n Hot Jalapeño Kettle Chips.Show notes:AMC's plain popcorn is vegan, according to their website at the time of recording. They also carry Impossible Nuggets!News item: The dreamiest soft serve in L.A. is vegan — and made from peas.Sevananda is where Dave found the ice cream Sammies. I later found them at Kroger, too!Thank you so much for listening! If you're enjoying the show, take a moment to leave us a review! You can also send us comments and suggestions at talkintofupod@gmail.com. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Success Made to Last
Success Made to Last with Founder and CEO of Simply Delish- Martin Pamensky

Success Made to Last

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 28:50


Success Made to Last special guest is Martin Pamensky, CEO and Founder of Simply Delish. As a curious foodie, conscious Dad and pioneer in natural foods, Martin knows about bringing healthy alternatives to make a difference in customers' lives with dietary restrictions. Simply Delish is the world's first ever Keto Certified plant based desserts, but it's really a health movement. Their products are delicious problem-solution products with people with allergies, diabetes, or from celiac. Now available in 1700 Kroger's across America, the next years look bright for Simply Delish...bringing more awareness of the effects of sugar. Enjoy this conversation with this visionary. Visit www.simplydelish.com.

The Take with Andy Sweeney
The Take 7-13-22 Hour 3 - Back in 15

The Take with Andy Sweeney

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 54:39


Andy wonders about KP being so quiet, the guys are frustrated over Calipari visiting Kroger, Streble provides a Louisville pivot, Branham sound, and Issel/Deener win the day with some sound. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

F**k This Shit Podcast
Call the Chicken Police

F**k This Shit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 78:16


Dre' discusses white nationalist marching in Boston, a 3.3 million dollar scam out of Houston, a racist Kroger security guard, a heinous republican plot, and a story about a man who got the chicken police called on him for protecting his family. F.T.S. Network: linktr.ee/fts_network

Smart Energy Voices
Leading from Within, with Amy Bond Ep #68

Smart Energy Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 24:56


In this episode of Smart Energy Voices, host John Failla introduces the opening keynote speaker from Smart Energy Decisions' recent Renewable Energy Forum, Amy Bond. Amy is the Sustainability Sourcing Manager at T-Mobile. In her talk, she presents actionable tips for navigating obstacles to success in implementing sustainability strategies, including her experience in executing Sprint's first virtual power purchase agreement.  You will want to hear this episode if you are interested in... Sustainability career in 2008 [02:45] Who is T-Mobile? [05:55] Overcoming misunderstandings [07:56] Challenges vs. opportunities [12:41] DiCE platform [15:34] The ability to influence [17:58] Be prepared to lead [22:16] Who is T-Mobile? T-Mobile is America's fastest and largest 5g network and the second-largest telecommunications provider. Headquartered in Bellevue, Washington, T-Mobile is supported by about 75,000 full and part-time employees with additional offices in Kansas, Texas, Georgia, and Virginia. The company's mission is to be the best at connecting its customers to their world. T-Mobile is the first and only U.S. wireless company to have set a goal to be 100% sourced for electricity from renewables by 2021, which it achieved. When the goal was established in 2018, less than 10% of its energy would have qualified for RE100. In just four years, T Mobile signed 3.5 million megawatt-hours of renewable energy contracts and spent approximately $3 billion yearly with diverse suppliers. Diversity in Clean Energy Supplier diversity is a business imperative for T-Mobile and a KPI within its procurement organization. After a conversation between Amy and her account manager at Duke Energy, Cheryl D. Comer, they pulled together a two-day business roundtable discussion with Cheryl's other corporate accounts. Those discussions drove the formation of the Diversity in Clean Energy (DiCE) coalition, initially supported by Duke Energy, T-Mobile, Kroger, GM, and Microsoft. The coalition has a visionary outcome to advocate and open doors for diverse-owned businesses that operate within the clean energy value chain. This platform will provide a way for minority business enterprises to elevate and market themselves to clean energy buyers. The platform is interactive and is scheduled to launch in the second half of 2022. Overcoming miscommunication Every energy project has obstacles, and T-Mobile's projects were no exception. One of the most significant obstacles is the miscommunication of a project or initiative. When leading a project within an organization, this issue often occurs due to misunderstanding the information the audience already has. When Amy joined the T-Mobile Energy and Sustainability Team, the company had only one community solar program. Amy thought that approach could be optimized to realize significant savings that could then be used towards purchasing renewable energy certificates. While T-Mobile's portfolio contains many different technologies, geographies, and sizes, there was still a gap between the renewable energy certificates these projects generated and what was needed to meet the company's renewable energy goal. That gap left the company purchasing non-project REC, so why not use community solar savings to offset that cost? Initially, Amy received considerable pushback because the company's previous experience was of lengthy negotiations with relatively small results. So she shifted her focus to finding ways to address these concerns and devised a new strategy that would reduce the execution timeline by more than half. What had taken over a year with one supplier for five projects now took only six months for 32 additional agreements. Reducing the impact of misunderstandings requires listening for pre-existing biases to find workarounds for a project. Resources & People Mentioned Simran Sethi Cheryl D. Comer Duke Energy Beyond the Meter - Episode 17: Collaborating to Drive Diversity in Clean Energy DiCE  Connect with Amy Bond On LinkedIn Amy Bond is the former Energy and Sustainability Program Manager for Sprint and is now a Sustainability Sourcing Manager for T-Mobile, where she continues to drive innovation. Amy was named an Industry Leader in Smart Energy Decisions' 2022 WISE (Women in Smart Energy) Awards and was selected as one of the top 100 energy professionals in the country by Environmental Leader. Amy's expertise includes clean energy power and utilities procurement, waste diversion strategies, corporate goal positioning, growing green transportation access, and carbon disclosure leadership. She is also passionate about driving diversity and equity in the renewables value chain. Amy was a founding member of the Diversity in Clean Energy (DiCE) coalition, where she continues to serve on its advisory panel to amplify the voices of diverse suppliers in the clean energy sector. Amy is a graduate of the University of Kansas with a degree in Psychology. She earned her MBA from Baker University and additionally is certified in Supply Chain Procurement, Logistics, and Negotiation. Prior to her sustainability career, Amy was an award-winning weekly newspaper publisher and columnist in Washington State. She has also served as a marketing professional and special events coordinator. Connect With Smart Energy Decisions https://smartenergydecisions.com Follow them on Facebook Follow them on Twitter Follow them on LinkedIn Subscribe to Smart Energy Voices If you're interested in participating in the next Smart Energy Decision Event, visit smartenergydecisions.com or email our Event Operations Director, Lisa Carroll at lisa@smartenergydecisions.com Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News
EP293 - E-commerce leadership changes and news

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 43:07 Very Popular


EP293 - E-commerce leadership changes and news Episode 293 previews Amazon no good, dirty, rotten, Q2. Including why Amazon's much hailed SCOT software may have led them astray (not a surprise given the name). We also discuss the recent leadership changes at Amazon, Google, Pinterest, and Bed Bath & Beyond. Episode 293 of the Jason & Scot show was recorded on Thursday June 30, 2022. http://jasonandscot.com Join your hosts Jason "Retailgeek" Goldberg, Chief Commerce Strategy Officer at Publicis, and Scot Wingo, CEO of GetSpiffy and Co-Founder of ChannelAdvisor as they discuss the latest news and trends in the world of e-commerce and digital shopper marketing. Transcript Jason: [0:23] Welcome to the Jason and Scot show this is episode 293 being recorded on Thursday June 30th 2022 I'm your host Jason retailgeek Goldberg and as usual I'm here with your co-host Scot Wingo. Scot: [0:38] Hey Jason and welcome back Jason Scott show listeners Jason this is a start-up land it's like a triple witching we have the end of the month the end of the quarter and the end of the first half so too it's a big day to be making sure you're hitting your opening so that's what I've been doing today how is your summer been. Jason: [0:59] Less XLE than yours it sounds like. Scot: [1:02] Oh I've seen you in that department of Commerce data comes out so. Jason: [1:13] I don't know maybe I feel like we should move it to like python or are something more more hip for the geeky kids. But I am I'm having a great summer there's been plenty of New Avengers and Star Wars content on in it's fun to see some people in person there have been a few more in person events, I'm a little stressed tonight though there's a big day for listeners is being recorded on on June 30th, and Twitter is sun setting my Twitter clients that I use numerous times a day tonight so it's, it's possible that a lot of people that are used to getting spammed all day by me on Twitter are going to go into withdrawal tomorrow. Scot: [1:56] No you're gonna have to use the app like the rest of us mere citizens. Jason: [2:01] Yeah yeah the neophytes I have to jump in with the unwashed masses and the vanilla Twitter client or some other third-party client if any listeners have a personal favorite I'm open to suggestions. Scot: [2:15] Yeah they're not a lot of good ones whatever you do don't sign up for that paid service because it just makes your tweets take 10 times longer to go out it's like the opposite of a feature. Jason: [2:25] Yeah doesn't sound that appealing. Scot: [2:27] It's supposed to keep you from drunk Tweeting or something but then like you just kind of forget that they're all cued up out there waiting. Jason: [2:34] My best Tweets are the advised ones. Scot: [2:37] Yeah yeah your best ones are grumpy grumpy old Jason once where you're like all right digital on the get the most interaction. Cool well we wouldn't be a Jason and Scot show without some Amazon news. Jason: [3:00] News new your margin is there opportunity. Scot: [3:07] Yeah there's a lot going on at Amazon one of the. If you kind of remember back in our queue to 2022 recap from their earnings they talked a lot about how they had over built their capacity for warehouses so that's the first time they've done that since, oh I don't know 1995 and that was just like a line in an earnings call well now we're starting to see that they're closing warehouses there's been reports of them closing between five and ten warehouses I've heard they're closing delivery stations and figuring all that out one of the funny topics is a lot of folks started contacting me and realize said things like hey did you know your mention and this Amazon article is like what, what turns out they have this technology they've developed called the supply chain optimization Technologies, abbreviated sco T which happens to be my name. Jason: [4:04] And for newest nur's that's actually the correct way to spell Scott is it not. Scot: [4:08] It is yeah it was the 60s and my dad thought it would be fun to have a unique name and it's he was right it's made me infinitely google-able so I have a lot of very easy to find on the Google. I'm very envious of my friend Michael Jones who is impossible to find on Google so so no anonymity for me, but anyway you know what's interesting is and I want to read this little excerpt from a Wall Street Journal article a thousand or something, you and I both know at Amazon because they have this engineering culture they try to take people out of most decision-making process sometimes they call it hands off the wheel so they have all these AI like one time we had a guest on that told us how you know frequently a vendor will be negotiating with an Amazon buyer through a chat and it's a bot on the other side of the the chat not a human. So they have this technology called Scott and what it does is it makes three different projections for basically the orders for looking out into the future it does a high medium and low and during the pandemic. [5:12] The high wasn't high enough so they were kind of taking the high and adding some percentage to it and building out the Fulfillment infrastructure and everything based on what this a I did well because the a I had never seen a pandemic and it obviously it couldn't keep up with the upside of the pandemics demand curve it didn't see the downside of the demand curve coming either, and then I think the humans you know when you when you have your, pilot like six to eight quarters into adding 10% to what this thing does and nailing it. You know they also didn't anticipate this in the bottom fell out and that's one of the reasons why you know they just kind of too, kept taking the Scott forecast adding 10 to 20% and then suddenly they found themselves kind of with their skis out over a cliff. This is really interesting that kind of in a way that the an AI gone wrong kind of caused some of the problems here so I thought that was kind of funny. Jason: [6:09] Yeah I mean like the synopsis here is that Scott is the biggest money sink in Amazon. Scot: [6:18] It's true yep I like to think because they listened to the podcast they named it in honor of me and somewhere in there is a robot named Jason I'm sure. Jason: [6:26] Because you are their Nemesis yeah. Scot: [6:28] Yeah retailgeek it's hard to do an acronym for retailgeek but I'm sure someone there is is working on. Also you know as listeners know there's a new CEO and the jassy and there have been a lot of high-profile departures and it's not clear if he's cleaning house or. Um you know these these issues stocks down a lot of the compensation that Amazon is from stock-based compensation and then, you know someone has to be accountable for these problems so they had there was kind of this domino effect so there was right one Jesse took over there was two other people that were are parents Bell and Wilkie and they left, and then just recently this year a 23 year old veteran Named Dave Clark left and he ran the whole consumer business. Interestingly he went to a company that's been in the news a lot called Flex Port their CEO has been on CNBC and the all in podcast talking about how to fix the supply chain problems. So that's that's interesting that he was able to see your Flex Port was able to lure away a 23 year old Amazon bet. So there was some Sour Apples on the way out Dave Clark told someone that Jesse's just a, terrible micromanager and yeah he'd been there 23 years and shouldn't have to be micromanage and that kind of thing. [7:51] And then they announced that this the guy that ran North America consumer who previously had reported to Dave Clark his name is Doug Harrington he was moving up into that role, what caused a further chain reaction for those people that didn't get the Dave Clark opening one of those was Alicia bowler Davis she was SVP of global consumer, and she went to this online pharmacy called Alto Pharmacy and then Dave Bozeman he went to he was the VP of Amazon transportation services kind of the middle mile so she was if I understand she was Last Mile and he was middle mile, so they both left so that's interesting that the Fulfillment center they've been building out and to the key Executives for the last five years or so left those not clear if that was because of this build out and someone had to be accountable or if they got picked away or what's going on there, so a lot of changes in Amazon at the upper echelons and yeah some chaos here as they re adjust for the new post covid normal. Jason: [8:54] Yeah and I mean almost feels like there's a little bit of a perfect storm of reasons for that senior leadership to start to turn right which historically they have had very little turn by the way right through most of their history but you know the the founder departs as you point out there's a ton of the overwhelming majority of compensation is, stock equity and is that becomes less valuable like those jobs are. Are less sticky you know and there's just the rates of growth at Amazon are are naturally slowing down and it's, you know for a lot of people that you know are used to being the Rockstar that's you know constantly doubling your business and growing really fast it's not as much fun to. To manage their downturns and you know at best slower rates of growth. Scot: [9:45] Yeah and then you notice some changes coming in the grocery side. Jason: [9:50] Yeah so grocery ends up being kind of a really interesting part of this whole Amazon churn so the first thing to know is the new head of consumer that did win Doug Harrington, had previously started Amazon Fresh at Amazon so so, he is a grocery guy and his pre Amazon experience is with webvan which is sort of the original digital grocer. So he is a pure digital grocery guy obviously he's had brought more recently he's had broader roles it. It Amazon. Then then just grocery but you know one would assume that Amazon Fresh is near and dear to his heart that's the only brick-and-mortar concept that still. Sort of in play and growing at an Amazon so that's kind of interesting and historically there's been kind of a tension between Amazon Fresh which is. The grocery business Amazon built organically and Whole Foods, the grocery business that Amazon bought right and there have been times when they seemed like they were smashing them together and then there are times when they're pulling them apart and at the moment they're opening a chain of Amazon Fresh doors that compete with Whole Food. [11:02] You would assume Whole Foods is kind of upmarket expensive grocery and Amazon Fresh is meant to be well Market but like when it washed Amazon Fresh was a little more mid-priced, then we expected and Whole Foods is kind of moving down price a little bit more than you might expect so it's all, it's all been interesting they fight a lot over over Revenue recognition for online grocery orders and it's I would argue it's a confusing customer experience right now because you can order a. Assortment of items with different prices and different service levels from Amazon Fresh and from Whole Foods. So it'll be interesting does Amazon fresh wind because that's Doug Harrington's baby or you know does he at least. [11:44] Put more more stock in solving that problem you know I would argue digital grocery is the biggest white space in the kind of digital retail thing and so it. It's not bad for Amazon that they have a senior leader that understands that space so it's that's going to be interesting, and then on the whole food side the you know the founder of Whole Foods has remained in places the CEO which is kind of surprising given that when was the acquisition 2017. [12:12] Five years ago so five years sounds like a suspicious number for an urn out but. The you know he stuck he was the founder he stuck with a company for a long time like culturally he's, kind of different than Amazonian so when one might not have expected him to last that long but now there's a new CEO which is a long time Lieutenant of his Jason Bushnell boo shell rather and, whether this is the first initiative from Jason or it's a coincidence like Whole Foods has kind of announced that they are pivoting their pricing strategy in really focusing on, improving their value prop and reducing their prices and obviously there's a lot of Economic headwinds and there's kind of a. You know a big big segment of consumers that are concerned about the economy so superficial you go oh yeah it's obvious. That Whole Foods would want to get cheaper but I would actually argue. That we've really seen and shout-out to our friend Steven Dennis we've really seen like this very overt bifurcation of the consumer and there's a bunch of consumers that like do not appear to be changing their shopping Behavior based on inflation and, economic concerns and then there's a bunch of value-oriented consumers that are very overtly changing their shopping behaviors and you would. [13:33] You know a lot of luxury brands are actually raising their prices right now and doing quite well and so you'd almost expect to see Whole Foods lean into that affluent consumer, and Amazon Fresh you know try to try to Target that that value went into consumer but it appears they both have decided to go after value. Scot: [13:51] Yeah it's super confusing as a consumer to figure out and sometimes what I want I want for things and it'll split the cart between the Whole Foods in the prime and like then then it's a hot mess at that point. Jason: [14:04] Yeah I can't get my weekly shop from either one like I like some of the items and my weekly shop are not available from Whole Foods and some are not available from Amazon Fresh it's annoying. Scot: [14:14] Yeah. Jason: [14:14] To add further customer confusion so Amazon Fresh is Amazon's grocery store concept what you might have thought that there'd be a bunch of benefits to being a Prime member and shopping in Amazon Fresh. But you'd be wrong until recently like there were no special Prime benefits for Amazon Fresh Shoppers and so they just launched last week a new program which is kind of a. It's I would almost call it like a traditional retail grocery Affinity program you basically get 20% off on a lot of. On an undisclosed random list of thousands of items where they call everyday essentials if you're a Prime member shopping at Amazon Fresh So this is you know I mentioned that Amazon Fresh didn't come out. Quite as good a value as I was expecting well this is the big move to maybe make them you know compete more directly with with Aldi and. Scot: [15:08] Caught another thing I wanted to pick your brain on is a couple folks have tagged us on social media because they have seen the prime pay badging and new payment mechanism out in the wild have you had a chance to play with that. Jason: [15:22] I have and I confess I'm I'm a little more perplexed than I was when it first launched so maybe like the 30-second recap, um you know Amazon announced this new beta pilot called Prime pay and it's essentially letting third-party sellers that are not selling on Amazon. [15:46] Accept Amazon pay and. Offer Prime benefits and have your orders fulfilled from fulfillment by Amazon. [15:59] Like if their Prime members right so if your Shopify Merchant in you're selling cat litter, you know you can have a bad you know and someone's a Prime member and they're on your Shopify site you can say hey check out with your Amazon pay and and you know get your goods in one day or even same day, if our cat litter is in the Amazon Fulfillment Network and that's that was when they announced this beta and they didn't provide a lot of the details. You know my first reaction was that's a shot directly across the bow of Shopify. Who had been making a lot of traction with shop pay and was making a lot of noise if not traction with their fulfillment systems and now you know Amazon swooped in and said hey don't screw around with these, you know barely scaled fulfillment things just put all your goods in the Amazon's fulfillment and when you sell it from Shopify will ship the order or when you sell it on Amazon will ship the order, and will give you access to the. The biggest bet best digital wallet in the US market which is Amazon pay right and I thought that was super interesting and I was frankly really curious. If Shopify was even going to allow its Merchants to use it which. It would have been way off brand for Shopify to not allow that but you have to imagine they didn't want to vote. Scot: [17:18] Yeah. Jason: [17:20] And so now fast forward a few months and we've seen the first betas in the live in in, live in the world and they are all Shopify Merchants so first question answered at least for now Shopify is allowing its merchants, to use prime pay but there's a huge Nuance in Prime pay that I kind of missed when the beta was first announced but now it's glaring at me, um Prime pay will only fulfill your goods if you're already a Prime member. So when they first saw this I thought oh my gosh they just captured the whole 3pl market and no other 3pl is going to have any room because you're not going to be able to compete with the service level of Amazon and the convenience of the aggregated inventory and then the bonus of. Of the Amazon digital wallet on top of all that that it was just going to be too compelling a value prop and so everybody every small seller in the world is just going to rely on Amazon for all those Services game over. But. There's about 100 million Prime members and there's about 240 million households in the US so there's still an awful lot of households that do not have Prime. And if you're a Shopify Merchant and you want to sell something to any of those households that don't have Prime. You can offer Prime pay for the Prime members but you have to have an alternative 3pl to fulfill for the non Prime members. So they really haven't put any of the other 3pls out of business at all they've just stolen some of their volume. Scot: [18:49] Yeah yeah Anderson more more complexity. Jason: [18:53] Yeah yeah so it's going to be interesting to see how it all plays out, but it yeah shout out to our friend Joe a Marketplace poles they always have great content and, he was the first one in the made me aware of some of these betas in the wild and he found the cat lady's.com and I'm not going to ask how he he. Scot: [19:14] Put me there. Jason: [19:17] But Joe I'm a fan and props to you. Scot: [19:21] Your fan of Joe or the cat ladies are both. Jason: [19:23] Now both originally Joe but now I my my love has expanded to the cat ladies. Scot: [19:29] Do they really sell kitty litter. Jason: [19:31] I believe they do or at least like artificial grass. Scot: [19:35] Yeah that's definitely in the crap category hey hey I'll be here all night, another thing that Amazon announced that I know you're excited for because you're actually moving so this is a great time to buy some cabling and some new mesh network key things they announced Prime Day this year it's going to be July 12th and 13th and then they promptly have started pushing the deals out like right now like just today and yesterday I've been getting flooded with emails that say, they have a new brand for it and they call it early Amazon Prime Day deal exclusives so it feels feels a little desperate to be honest with you that you know they set up this big shopping holiday and now they're kind of, pushing the deals out with a before then I don't know if they're trying to juice Q2 or if there. One school of thought is if we're going into this recessionary period the more dollars you can grab out of that shrinking wallet due to inflation as well, get them sooner versus later so maybe they had set this up before things the macro deteriorated now they're kind of like wow I wish we could set this earlier let's go ahead and get some deals out I may be reading too much into that but I don't ever remember them kind of they've always had you know. Black Black Friday and January or early October kind of things holiday deals in early but I've never seen them, push Prime day as hard and early as they are now. Jason: [21:00] Yeah I mean they always have had some pre-primed a deals like it's not completely unheard of but I agree with you the volume seem significantly higher and it's funny that we still call it Prime day right because for a long time is over it went from like Prime day to Prime 18 hours to Prime two days and now it's starting to feel like Prime month. Um which is interesting I don't know this comes into play, there are some consumer surveys out there that show less interest in Prime day than years past right and you're comping against a tough Prime day in a very different economic environment and so like it's possible that there's some concern like Amazon's rate of growth has slowed and everything else it's possible possible that there's some concern, that. That you know Prime day won't have the it's for sure going to have a spike but that it won't have the same spike it has in years past, um and you know so they're they're trying to you know find ways to Goose it more I you know. I don't know I do think one of the interesting Dynamics there's kind of like two opposite forces that happen on Prime day like secretly. The stuff that sells best on Prime day are Amazon. [22:20] But the penetration on those Amazon products you know continues to be higher so that that like. The what the law of large numbers just means like. You know not you can't sell a smart speaker to as many people as you used to be able to do because everyone has a heck of a lot of smart speakers right and they're they're frankly getting so cheap that it's not as big a win when they do sell one. And so then the other half is this long tail in there like one of the problems there so many sellers on Amazon there so many Lightning Deals that like the signal-to-noise ratio in the, the awareness of some particular good deal and the scarcity of a deal like all of those things that you would normally do that a normal you know brick and mortar retailer with you know constrain inventory, would do for a sale like they just don't work as well. For this Marketplace model and so I do think it's tricky to keep the hype and you know we've seen you know Prime day was modeled after singles day we've definitely seen singles day lose some momentum still a big deal but rate of growth slowing significantly and reasonably that will see that at Prime Day to all that being said the way to think about prime day is it's it's two days of sales in one day which is kind of a big deal. Scot: [23:38] Yeah and then I thought this was interesting that Amazon announced that they're going to use some of that data that we've been collecting in their stores that don't have a check out the just walk out technology and they're going to be selling some of that data to Brands so they can basically say to our brand hey 800 consumers walked by your product three picked it up and put it back on the shelf and you know of those three they read the ingredients and then they put it back on the shelf and and then presumably there are some action ability to that data what what do you think about that. Jason: [24:16] Yeah so I think it's really interesting you know way before there was just walk out technology like we were starting to get some some very early technology to give us some insight about how consumers behaved in stores right so you were starting to get some like, smarter people measuring things that could do heat mapping and and you know we were getting these I could GI tracking technologies that we'd put on on a small subset of customers to kind of understand how they browse through a store, because you know frankly for the last 100 years of Shopper marketing we mostly have been based on these like urban legends about how Shopper shop, and not having a lot of data and then e-commerce comes along and suddenly you've got super granular data about how people pick products and what they glanced at and didn't buy and what they added to their card and then check out and what they you know added to their card and then took out of their car like all of this pre buying behavior that we get in e-commerce, we've never really had in the store and you know the Technologies and the methodologies these match Panel test all these different studies we used to do we're really sort of Kluge, and so a lot of us have said hey one of the secret benefits of just walk out technology is that by accident, it collects all of this really valuable consumer data about how people behave, before they get to the cash register or before they consummate their purchase since they're I guess there is no cash. [25:41] Um and you know we've talked about that being a useful Advantage for Amazon and that they're probably using it too, um sort of inform how they design these new store Concepts, and so now like so many other things than Amazon does they take this this. [25:59] Like you know competitive advantage that they have and they turned it into a product and sell it to other people so now they're selling those. Those Shopper insights to cpgs and you know you're a cpg trying to figure out how people decide to pick your cat litter versus someone else's cat litter on the cat litter shelf in a retail store. Um [26:21] Kroger won't tell you a lot about how they make that decision because Kroger doesn't know but now you can get real data from Amazon about how they make that decision and Amazon and you can probably assume that there's a similar path to purchase at Kroger so, suddenly like Amazon becomes the market research firm for all of the Shopper marketing so I do think that's super interesting, um they're not alone Walmart actually has a store that's heavily instrumented like this that they watch first that's called them, the intelligent retail lab store that you know it's kind of a it doesn't have just walk out technology but it has thousands of cameras and sensors and they sell data from that store through their data licensing arm which is called illuminate if I'm remembering right. And then you know Amazon launched a new product. [27:09] Nine days ago on the 21st that I'm really excited about this called Amazon marketing stream and Amazon marketing stream is, a much higher volume more granular api-based, access to all of the marketplace shopping data so that's you know data on traditional Amazon shopping that like, previously was locked up or you could only get for your own brand or you could you know you can only get in Amazon premium services. Now it gets plugged into pack view in all of these of these digital media tools you get all this real-time visibility to have people are making purchase decisions and then at the same time. They're rolling out this that same kind of data for how people are making purchase decisions in a brick-and-mortar store, super long answer but I think this is kind of a big deal and I do think this is the future is kind of replacing, like urban legends and opinions about how consumers behave with actual data about how they really are. Scot: [28:11] You do you think this stuff is kind of stand-alone or they're going to build this is going to be kind of feeding into this ad Network because they seem to be really putting a lot of effort into Excel. Jason: [28:20] Yeah I do so I think there's only so much so many brands that are so I'll tell you who's not in a position to buy that data is all the digital native startups that then cut a deal to get you know distribution through. Right against the big cpg brands that can afford like have budgets to buy that data and then you know they have so much like institutional. Impediments that then you know they all talk about how much wonder they are with that data but it's really hard for them to act on that data and do anything different than they historically have. And so I think the best way to make that data actionable is you know to filter that data into. New audiences and new ad formats for retail media networks right so like I think there's a natural. Fit between those. Those two products so I'm sure we'll see more Integrations in that but I do think for really smart marketers and in particular the folks that are involved in customer experience design, the the raw data is is super useful and and you know gives gives Brands a competitive advantage that are able to get it and take action on. Scot: [29:30] Cool did you so that's where we are on Amazon any non Amazon news. Jason: [29:39] Yeah just a couple of things to keep our show in its it's tidy timebox format we talked a lot about executive changes so in my mind there are two other huge executive changes, in our industry this week. There's a guy that we've talked about on the show several times Bill ready who's the in X PayPal guy in X PayPal mafia guy. That red Commerce for the last couple of years at Google and he just announced that he's leaving Google to become the new CEO at Pinterest so the, the founder is stepping out of the CEO role at Pinterest and they're bringing over Bill ready, and to be honest that has the pundants whipped up into a lather because everyone's like oh man Bill ready is a Commerce guy he was PayPal he was head of Commerce a Google Now the fact that the Pinterest is bringing a you know a dedicated Commerce guy in the lead the company, it's the most overt sign yet that you know Pinterest thinks it's future is Commerce. Scot: [30:39] Yeah which I think it's driven by the IDF a stuff don't you. Jason: [30:44] Yeah yeah again harder to make a living on ads when you can't show the efficacy of the ads quite as well and you can't Target the ads quite as well and so it becomes much more appealing to say, you know let's monetize our Audience by selling stuff to our audience directly and also that you know gives you that first party data that then you know keeps you, well immersed in the in the advertising business so I think for any of these. Free hydrographic social media sites it's a, it's a perfectly reasonable hypothesis to explore to say hey we got to figure out how to play really well at Commerce and make Commerce part of our core offering and certainly you know Pinterest is doing that they've talk forever about how, how much higher buying intent that their users have then other other social networks Tick-Tock is leaning heavily into it snap is leaning heavily into it it's a perfectly reasonable hypothesis, the one unfortunate truth is nobody's been particularly successful at it yet and. Have they not been successful because they just haven't gotten the execution right or is it because the consumer doesn't really want that like I honestly think that's an open question I don't think it's a foregone conclusion that Commerce can save all these social media networks I mean it's worth trying, but I think the jury's going to be out and I will say the. [32:10] The sort of part of this the bill ready transition that's not talked about that I'm frankly more interested in is to me one of the companies that. His best position to win a Commerce and is underperforming at Commerce the most is the company Bill ready as weaving its Google and you know, bluntly like I don't think Google has made a ton of Commerce progress over the over the last two years that bill ready has been there it's going to be interesting like will Google replace him will they replace him with a, Google Insider will they replace them with another Commerce person will that person have some new ideas like you know will they be able to find a way to kind of Marshall some of the inherent assets Google has and be better at Commerce oh my God I'd love to see Google lean into in-store Commerce more and help solve search and you know all of these retail media Network opportunities for brick-and-mortar retailers like I feel like there's a lot of untapped. Opportunity there that I've been surprised to see Google not succeed at and so it'll be like is this a new chance for Google to start anew. Scot: [33:20] Yeah and then you know it's also interesting so if your Pinterest board and you're like we need an e-commerce Guru the PayPal Mafia thing is good but that was quite a while ago and Google hasn't. Done a ton so I would be hiring somebody to Amazon expects you know it'll be interesting to see what if. Because there's so many floating around what if some of them one of them ended up at Google that would be dug be kind of really interesting to see if Amazon has own Minion. Jason: [33:49] Especially when yeah if Flex Port can get a super senior SS team member. Scot: [33:53] Yeah why can't Google yeah it's kind of weird right, yeah and then you know to watch someone that maybe had a chip on their shoulder that said hey I didn't get a promotion I'm gonna I'm going to you know use all these assets that Google has and bring them to bear I think the reason why is when these people interview at these bigger companies be at a meta a Google or whatnot. You know there's not a board sea level and board level focus on it you know 21 if you're a Google. The sacred cow is the add thing and if you if you say something like you know what I want to divert 20% of traffic to this new thing then you know if you're not going to do that so so startups from probably more attractive because they have more flexibility and they're not stuck kind of in that innovators dilemma like some of the other systems are. Jason: [34:50] Yeah think about that that'll be my deep thought for today yeah so I think that one is super interesting I'm gonna continue to follow that closely one side note like Pinterest has previously hired a bunch of other, I'll call them like Commerce stars and like one that stands out to me is. The chief technology officer from Walmart I moved to Pinterest Jeremy King and so I mean there's you know this is not the first. White indication that Commerce is an important Initiative for Pinterest so we'll we'll see how Bill does there I hope he does well so one other transition that I'm getting a lot of calls about these last couple days, is Bed Bath & Beyond just had their quarterly their Q2 earnings report and it was atrocious, so their same-store sales were down like 24 or 25 percent their e-commerce was down like 23%, um and you know folks may remember like a year or two ago they forced out the. [35:52] One of the founders is CEO and they brought in a turnaround CEO this guy Mark Triton and I talked a lot about Mark Triton he was like very credibly one of the architects of targets exclusive, brand strategies and so he was, the chief Merchant that helped launched a bunch of products at Target that were wildly successful and he left Target to become the CEO of this struggling retailer, Bed Bath & Beyond shortly after they hired Mark Triton they got a new activists board member Ryan Cohen who bought a big chunk of. Bed Bath & Beyond Ryan was one of the founders of chewy and made a bunch of his money there he was like a principal shareholder and on the board at GameStop during all the, the craziness with Robin Hood and GameStop and Bone all that stuff and so, like Ryan kind of inherited Mark as his turnaround CEO and simultaneous with these like very disappointing Q2 earnings, they announced that Mark would be leaving and they appointed an interim CEO who's a Sugo of who's a, already a board member at Bed Bath and Beyond and former CEO from like Goff Smith and several other retailers. So [37:20] What I have found interesting about all this it's a really difficult situation but Bethenny on Xena in a tough situation. [37:29] And they certainly aren't performing very well and they have a lot of cooks there at the moment with with conflicting ideas about where to go but I have seen a lot of pundits kind of. Like dancing on Mark Triton's grave and talking about what a horrible higher this was and how stupid it was for Bed Bath and Beyond Beyond to go after this this. Exclusive brand strategy that Mark was trying to execute and how like oh obviously this was doomed from the beginning and anyone could have seen this wasn't going to work. Um and kind of writing him off and personally I feel like that's a little unfair like II. Mark certainly turned out not to be the right CEO for the circumstances the Bed Bath & Beyond was in but I actually think that that, you know Bed Bath & Beyond needs to invent a reason for people to go there and spoiler it's not the 20% off coupon anymore, um it's not the treasure hunt anymore, like you're not going to win on assortment as a big box like against Amazon right and so one of the smart ways to win against Amazon is to sell stuff that people want that Amazon doesn't have and if you can invent desirable products, that's a smart strategy and every big retailer in America is trying to execute that strategy and Mark like frankly has been better than most of executing that strategy I think. [38:52] That strategy kind of sucks when you're hemorrhaging your customer base people don't have a reason to come to your store and then you, execute the first wave of your private label products and they all get trapped on a boat off the coast of Long Beach and never make it to the store right and so I don't know of in a different era if Mark strategy would have worked. Ed Bed Bath & Beyond I don't think it was an unsound strategy you know it just right you probably needed a CEO who's a lot more focused on being good at supply chain and cost-cutting and was willing to make some hard decisions about. Curating the store assortment and stuff like that to kind of cut costs. Before you got around to launching these products and you know horrific timing that you tried to launch all these products like you do as a. During a huge supply chain disruption so I don't know what do you think you think it was a doom strategy. Scot: [39:47] I don't think the externalities are hard to pick out you know so you go from a supply chain crisis into a inflation. No stagnation spiral this is like a it's a really rough rough rough hand that he was dealt for sure. Jason: [40:04] Yeah yeah so I don't know I do think they're a bunch of other retailers that really aspire to launch more products so I have a feeling that you'll see Mark glance I'm somewhere pretty soon because I think he has a skill set that. That will be in demand and then it does not appear they're calling Sue an interim CEO I don't think anyone thinks she's the, the future of Bed Bath & Beyond so I think they're they are out there doing a CEO search it's going to be interesting to see what kind of person, what you know will step up to that challenge right now. Scot: [40:33] While you were talking about it kind of the crazy idea popped in my head you know these these Amazon FBA acquisition vehicles have all seemed to hit the skids pretty hard thrashy oh and what not, yeah there's a there's a path where maybe they buy one of those if you wanted to like parachute in 500 private label Brands to try and restore that, that's one acquisition path that you can take to become interesting I don't know if you know if that makes any sense for the categories or whatnot but that would be an interesting, way to solve that problem with an acquisition. Jason: [41:09] Yeah no I do think there's something there and I think just the. You know I'm not sure you want to hire a traditional product Centric Merchant driven CEO. You know for a traditional product Centric company you know that's kind of losing its way right like you probably need some complementary skills they add something new to the mix and you're right like there's kind of a big remix going on in the world right now there's a bunch of digital Talent from you know the Amazons and Google's of the world this spinning off there's a bunch of digital Talent from all these, kind of startup ecosystems that you know we're we're playing in the Amazon Echo System and now we're less appealing and in the the you don't have to be a roll ups are a perfect example of all those, you know I think a bunch of those guys you know and and women will probably find, their next career opportunities taking what they know and taking it to a different kind of business than kind of just recreating what they've been doing. Scot: [42:10] Totally agree we will see. Jason: [42:12] In e-commerce guy solving Carwash for the world or. Scot: [42:15] Crazy crazy talk you do cat litter I'll do car washes. Jason: [42:20] That sounds like a great plan and that sounds like a great place to leave it because it's happened again we've used up all our allotted time, but as I always have you found the show helpful or it was entertaining to scream at how wrong we were into your podcasting client then you could reward us for that entertainment by jumping on iTunes and leaving us that five star review. Scot: [42:44] Thanks everybody and until next time. Jason: [42:48] Happy commercing.

Women Entrepreneurs Radio
"Learning Financial Literacy" with Entrepreneur & Best-Selling Author Paige Cornetet

Women Entrepreneurs Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 41:23


Paige Cornetet is the bestselling author of the Spend-Then series, a collection of children's books teaching financial literacy by simplifying traditionally complicated concepts. A forward-thinking entrepreneur, Paige founded Millennial Guru at the age of twenty-six to provide companies like Kroger and Capital One with business coaching and strength-based team-building workshops. Paige, the eldest of four, is passionate about helping parents teach children imperative life skills and financial management techniques. She lives in Grand Rapids, Michigan, with her husband. About My Dad's Class As a parent, it's easy to feel insecure. What vital knowledge from your childhood should you pass on to your kids? How do you teach the importance of kindness and respect? When do you introduce the concept of money? How are you intentional with the lessons you impart? For Paige Cornetet and her three siblings, a childhood designed by their dad was a series of educational experiences woven into family activities. From investing in McDonald's as a stock market activity to using chore assignments as an opportunity for negotiation, the Cornetet kids gained insight into important subjects at an early age. Now, in My Dad's Class, Paige shares the strategies and principles her dad used to lay the groundwork for a happy, successful life. Told from the child's perspective, this is a parenting book unlike any other. Paige shows you how to get creative with tactics you're already using and customize a plan that works for your family. Parenting isn't always easy, but that doesn't mean it has to be hard. With daily, weekly, and monthly ideas you can use immediately, My Dad's Class is the simple framework you've been looking for to parent with intention and provide you with peace of mind. https://www.mydadsclass.com/   Deborah Bailey is a writer and host of Women Entrepreneurs Radio podcast. Learn more about her and her books and writing courses at: https://DBaileycoach.com For Deborah's paranormal and fantasy romance fiction, visit: https://dbaileycoach.com/brightbooks

Chatter with Steve
113. Things to Learn from Krogers Newest Move

Chatter with Steve

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 27:16


Kroger recently launched a warehouse in Central Oklahoma, one of their newest ventures to expand their empire by building hub and spoke delivery warehouses instead of retail locations. We talked about how these moves apply to the family owned retail business owners and what we can learn from it! Chris Fox from Fox Strategy Marketing co-hosts the show for this question. Starting or growing your family owned retail business is hard. The Better Business Podcast makes it a little easier by offering real advice from real business owners that will help you grow. Here's how to find me: Website Instagram: TikTok: Facebook:

Andy Loves Chips
111 Pickle Chip Off (The Ol Block) Better Made Special Pickle Chips, Trader Joe's In a Pickle, and Kroger Spicy Dill Pickle

Andy Loves Chips

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 18:41


In this episode of Andy Loves Chips, we have Pickle Chip Off (The Ol Block) Better Made Special Pickle Chips, Trader Joe's In a Pickle, and Kroger Spicy Dill Pickle Chips. This episode exists because of our Patreon Supporters... Support the podcast and help us make content AND get exclusive access to content you can't get on our normal feed by signing up for our Patreon: patreon.com/whatweremember Watch our show on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC17JhCBEMfIgIC-u9ciaw6w www.andyloveschips.com www.whatweremember.com

The Produce Moms Podcast
EP225: How You Can Help Cut Food Waste In Half By 2030 With Dana Gunders, Executive Director At ReFED

The Produce Moms Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 28:26


“Nobody wakes up wanting to waste food, it's just a matter of having the right information at the right time.”   Dana Gunders (19:34-19:41)   When it comes to food waste around the world, the statistics are staggering. We all know it's a problem and almost every country is fighting it. What can we do to effectively decrease our food waste (and the carbon emissions that come with it), decrease food insecurity, and create the food system we desire? ReFED is the leader in data-driven solutions to fight food waste, working across the food system to cut food loss and waste in half by 2030.   Dana Gunders, Executive Director of ReFED says they can only accomplish this with massive participation. It's estimated that over 400 billion dollars worth of food (about 2% of the GDP) is wasted, and if the food waste in America was eradicated alone, it would feed our country's food insecure population three times over! That's why ReFED is working in multiple ways to educate and inform, and assist the individuals and companies who want to put their dollars towards efforts that are going to implement the most change in the quickest manner.   “When folks allocative financial resources for a macro issue like food waste, they need the guidance of an institution like ReFED to make sure that investment is going towards a noble cause.” Lori Taylor (10:16-10:30)    The first pillar of work ReFED is focused on is collecting accurate data. No one's collecting data when they're throwing the garbage out, so a lot of estimating is still required. ReFED wants to paint an accurate picture of what's going on so people know where to focus their efforts. One way they do this is through a data platform on their website that's analyzed 42 solutions and their efficiency rate. Their second pillar of work is in the investment space, where they also have a capital tracker that monitors investment on their website. There's been quite a recent explosion of innovative startups and investment directed towards food waste and ReFED wants to catalyze investment through public, philanthropic, and private dollars.   Did you know about 35% of food grown in the United States ends up in the trash? 37% of that food waste is created at the household level, with the number one product of that waste being produce, and the number two being leftovers.   Even though ReFED doesn't work to reach consumers directly, their role in connecting companies, small businesses, stakeholders, researchers, and local governments with one another has a greater impact. For example, there's over 200 companies globally who have made some sort of commitment to helping eradicate food waste, but they need ReFED's help in understanding how to reach that goal. They're also working to encourage federal agencies to create a consumer awareness campaign to spread this information further. Grocery retailers, like Kroger and their Zero Hunger Zero Waste commitment (which has already seen a 19 reduction in waste), have been doing a great job at driving forward sustainability initiatives, like educating consumers on how to use produce once it's wilted or bruised.   “There's a great opportunity to help people use their products better and that helps them use their food budget better.” Dana Gunders (16:25-16:37)   Considering the average family of four is spending $2,000 on food they aren't actually eating, implementing changes that help reduce waste should be high on everyone's list! Outside of ReFED, Dana has written her own book called The Waste Free Kitchen Handbook, which you can learn more about on Episode 79, that offers strategies, references, recipes and a directory of produce which shows you how to use food items up in a clever way when you might've just thrown them out. For example, Dana's book has a delicious berry avocado chocolate mousse recipe that uses overripe berries and avocados that are brown!    There's plenty of action for us to take across the entire food supply chain, and starting with Dana's book or learning more on ReFED's website is how you can make a major difference in your kitchen at home. Visit ReFED's website at www.refed.org and listen to Episode 79 to learn more about the actionable strategies you can start implementing today with Dana's book.%   How to get involved Join The Produce Moms Group on Facebook and continue the discussion every week!  Reach out to us - we'd love to hear more about where you are in life and business! Find out more here.    If you liked this episode, be sure to subscribe and leave a quick review on iTunes. It would mean the world to hear your feedback and we'd love for you to help us spread the word!

Lour After Hours
LTC-6-24-22-Thee Kroger

Lour After Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 55:52


The LTC crew welcomes EdBob on to the pod to take us on a journey. Flem sits back on a lazy river, Aaron and Jeff get wild and discuss jell-O shots. If you could change the ending to a show or movie which would you choose? Do you call it the Kroger? @Fleminem_Raps @los_jiv @JohnAGauldin @Heat_EdBob @PowChrisol Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Taste Radio
Buyers Were Initially Skeptical About His Brand. Now, It's An Anchor For A Fast-Growing Set.

Taste Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 47:01


When Ibraheem Basir launched A Dozen Cousins in 2018, retail buyers questioned the marketability of the brand's first products, a line of premium-positioned cooked beans. Four years later, those buyers are asking a different question: “How do we keep up with consumer demand?” A former marketing executive with General Mills, Basir founded A Dozen Cousins to increase accessibility of better-for-you food within Black and Latino communities via healthy ingredients, authentic seasonings and convenient preparation. Available in varieties such as Mexican Cowboy Pinto Beans and Trini Chickpea Curry, the beans are packaged in microwavable pouches that can be heated in 60 seconds. As A Dozen Cousins expanded distribution, the brand found traction with a broad variety of consumers seeking a quick, flavorful meal or side dish. The company has since added two complementary product lines – bone-broth cooked rice and seasoning sauces for rice and meat dishes – and widened its presence in stores across retail channels, including Whole Foods, Walmart, Trader Joes, Kroger and REI. In an interview featured in this episode, Basir spoke about how the brand's initial focus has evolved, working with co-manufacturing partners to ensure quality standards, why sampling was critical to its development and why keeping a foot in the familiar is a key tenet of its innovation strategy. He also explained why A Dozen Cousins is relatively quiet about raising capital and shared his take on improved opportunities and continuing challenges for BIPOC food entrepreneurs. Show notes: 0:42: Interview: Ibraheem Basir, Founder & CEO, A Dozen Cousins – Basir spoke with Taste Radio editor Ray Latif at NOSH Live Summer 2022 where they discussed their shared experience growing up in large families, alternate names for A Dozen Cousins and how the brand addresses “two different levels” of consumer needs. Basir also spoke about how he prepared for a national launch at Whole Foods while the brand was still in its infancy, the impact of his experience as an employee at a large food conglomerate, what social media taught the company about the unexpected ways consumers used the beans and what moved the needle for retail buyers that were initially skeptical about the brand. Later, he explained why the launch of A Dozen Cousins' rice was about creating something “additive” to the category, why he wants the brand to be “in the middle of the spectrum” when it comes to innovation, the reason the company isn't vocal about funding and why he points to the lack of “insider knowledge” as a hurdle for BIPOC founders. Brands in this episode: A Dozen Cousins, Annie's

The Talent Economy Podcast
Investing in New Beginnings

The Talent Economy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 22:17


How does the country's largest supermarket chain manage more than 400,000 employees across the country? Tim Massa, Senior VP and Chief People Officer of Kroger, dives into the company's comprehensive programs for employee engagement, such as diversity training, environmental volunteer opportunities, and leadership conferences.Tim Massa has more than 30 years of HR experience—20 of it with Procter & Gamble. Massa worked for P&G in several cities across the US before completing an international assignment in Poland. He eventually joined Kroger in 2010 as the Corporate VP of Human Resources, and in 2014, became Kroger's Senior VP and CPO. Some Questions Asked:How did Kroger address mental health concerns after the tragic events that occurred in their stores and factories? 13:06How have CSR and ESG efforts affected your ability to attract and retain talent? 7:10How did you manage leadership among globally diverse workforces? 5:22 In This Episode, You Will Learn:How Kroger retains diverse talent by investing in employees' education.How corporations foster a unified culture among leaders from different regions.How Kroger's diversity programs train staff to create an inclusive work culture. Links:Tim Massa - Company profileTim Massa - LinkedInKroger - LinkedInMichelle Labbe - LinkedInToptal - LinkedInThe Talent Economy podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Eric Chase
Social Workers

Eric Chase

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 53:31


How long can we go before we talk about THAT? I've never had a bad experience at this place most people hate going.  Don't just give money to the Social workers. Hire them. How do you pronounce Thehater? Alex should have no shame for her Kroger delivery. Now we talk about that. A different way of approaching it. Important aspects that haven't been much discussed. 

The Azure Podcast
Episode 428 - Java and Spring Apps

The Azure Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022


Our resident expert on all things Java on Azure, Asir Vedamuthu Selvasingh, gives us all the latest updates on running your Java workloads on various Azure services. He also dives into the newly renamed Azure Spring Apps service which now has more SKUs to address various use-cases.   Media file: https://azpodcast.blob.core.windows.net/episodes/Episode428.mp3 YouTube: https://youtu.be/PaMaWij21N0 Resources: Start Enterprise - https://aka.ms/spring-apps-EnterpriseDevelop your first Spring Boot app - https://aka.ms/Start-SpringLearn using a self-paced workshop - https://aka.ms/Learn-SpringWatch bite-size demos - https://aka.ms/Spring-PlaylistLeverage best practices - https://aka.ms/Spring-BootBuild and deploy Java apps on Azure - https://aka.ms/LearnJavaInteract with Azure services using Spring - https://aka.ms/Spring-Cloud-Azure   Technical Case StoriesFedEx - https://aka.ms/FedExNational Life Group - https://aka.ms/National-LifeDigital Realty Trust - https://aka.ms/DLRSwiss Re - https://aka.ms/Swiss-ReRaley's - https://aka.ms/Raley'Liantis - https://aka.ms/LiantisKroger - https://aka.ms/Kroger-on-AzureMorgan Stanley - https://aka.ms/Morgan-StanleyBosch - https://aka.ms/Bosch.IO   Other Updates: See how 3 industry-leading companies are driving innovation in a new episode of Inside Azure for IT https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/see-how-3-industryleading-companies-are-driving-innovation-in-a-new-episode-of-inside-azure-for-it/   Responsible AI investments and safeguards for facial recognition https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/responsible-ai-investments-and-safeguards-for-facial-recognition/   Azure IoT increases enterprise-level intelligent edge and cloud capabilities https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/azure-iot-increases-enterpriselevel-intelligent-edge-and-cloud-capabilities/   https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/updates/general-availability-azure-databricks-available-in-new-regions/ https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/updates/general-availability-azure-sdk-for-go/   Various Load Testing updates: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/updates/public-preview-azure-load-testing-supports-splitting-input-data-across-test-engines/ https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/updates/public-preview-azure-load-testing-support-for-user-specified-jmeter-properties/ https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/updates/public-preview-azure-load-testing-support-for-customermanaged-keys/ https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/updates/public-preview-azure-load-testing-support-for-userassigned-managed-identities/ https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/updates/public-preview-azure-load-testing-supports-quick-start-tests-with-web-url/   General availability: Azure Data Explorer connector for Power Automate, Logic Apps, and Power Apps   https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/updates/power-platform-connector-ga/

Mundo Now
Noticias 23 de junio

Mundo Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 3:10


Confirman saldo mortal en dos tiroteos durante la noche.Amenaza de tormentas severas en el noreste de EEUU mientras peligrosa ola de calor afecta docena de estados.Jurado perdona a hispano que atropelló a personas en Time Square por una insólita razón.Walgreens y Kroger retiran miles frascos de aspirina, ibuprofeno y acetaminofén.

Ben Davis & Kelly K Show
06/22/2022 The One With The Lottery Tickets, Cheating Boss and Life Longevity Test

Ben Davis & Kelly K Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 53:27


We got a DM about the etiquette of giving lottery tickets as gifts, and if you are owed anything if they win big! Then in Group Therapy, she lives a few blocks from her boss and husband and are chummy. She recently saw her boss kissing another man and wants to know if she should say anything! Then we put science to the test to see if we can live another 10 years!! Plus the search for love takes us to a less-than-hot "jackal" looking for sushi at Kroger, and a hottie showing his derriere on the bus!

The Dan Bongino Show
Horrifying Details About Uvalde That Must Be Addressed (Ep 1794)

The Dan Bongino Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 57:16 Very Popular


In this episode, I address the horrifying new details surfacing about the Uvalde massacre. I also discuss Biden's latest whopper of a lie.  News Picks: A deeply troubling report on the Uvalde massacre. Harris Teeter and Kroger go woke. Household debt is becoming a huge problem.  This Federal ‘Stimulus' Program Cost Taxpayers $850k Per Job Saved. “Mini-Terminator” robots are already on the battlefield.  China is abusing COVID tracking for surveillance, as predicted. Copyright Bongino Inc All Rights Reserved Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

A Sandwich and Some Lovin’
430: A Sandwich and Some Fishin' for a Drone

A Sandwich and Some Lovin’

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 56:33


Allen had an action packed Father's Day weekend at the lake with the boys, fishing, filming a commercial and destroying thousands of dollars worth of electronic equipment. Nobody trips more than Kellie Rasberry Evans, but Allen is doing his best to catch up. Hear all about the eyeball drama that led to Allen's dramatic fall in the Kroger parking lot. And if you think Kellie Claps Back is entertaining, wait till you hear what Allen's mother had to say. Thank you to our podcast sponsors! BetterHelp is customized online therapy that offers video, phone, and even live chat sessions with your therapist, so you don't have to see anyone on camera if you don't want to. It's much more affordable than in-person therapy and you can be matched with a therapist in under 48 hours. Our listeners get 10% off their first month at BetterHelp.com/sandwich. Varsity Tutors offer one-week-long, small group camps on fun, educational topics. Kids get all the benefits of summer camp–learning new things, making new friends, exploring their favorite subjects– and it's all from the convenience of home. Go to VarsityTutors.com and use promo code SANDWICH at checkout to save $50 on any summer camp. Go to GreenChef dot com slash sandwich130 and use code sandwich130 to get $130 off, plus free shipping!Green Chef - The #1 Meal Kit for Eating Well.

Taste Radio
The ‘Perfect' Plan To Become A Billion-Dollar Brand

Taste Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 57:07


It's rare for an entrepreneurial food or beverage brand to generate a billion dollars in annual revenue. Yet that hasn't kept ambitious founders from envisioning a 10-figure future for their companies. Yanni Hufnagel, the founder and CEO of Lemon Perfect, is one of those aspiring leaders, and based on the trajectory for his brand this far, he has a realistic shot. Launched in 2018, Lemon Perfect markets a line of low-calorie, lemon-flavored water. Positioned as hydration beverages, the USDA certified organic drinks come in seven varieties each sweetened with a blend of erythritol and stevia and containing five calories per 12 oz. bottle.    Available nationwide at Publix, Kroger, Whole Foods and Ralph's, Lemon Perfect anticipates over $60 million in sales and a retail footprint of over 40,000 doors by the end of 2022 as it expands into Costco, CVS, Walmart and Target. Earlier this year, the company closed on a $31 million Series A funding round that included a high-profile roster of celebrity investors headlined by music icon Beyoncé Knowles-Carter. The recent financing brought Lemon Perfect's total funding to $42.2 million and a valuation of over $100 million. In an interview featured in this episode, Hufnagel spoke about his overarching vision for Lemon Perfect, the parallels between coaching college basketball and running a beverage company, why nailing “the big decisions” has been critical to the brand's development and how his perspective on gross margin has evolved. He also explained why Lemon Perfect has invested heavily in field sales, how he cultivated a culture of hustle and commitment and why he says that he's never sold the brand to an investor.   Show notes: 0:42: Interview: Yanni Hufnagel, Founder & CEO, Lemon Perfect – Before diving into Lemon Perfect's backstory, Hufnagel and Taste Radio editor Ray Latif chatted about the entrepreneur's Instagram handle, his brief flirtation with investment banking and the origin of the brand's name. Hufnagel also discussed the simplicity of Lemon Perfect's ingredients, how he got up to speed in the beverage industry (hint: a certain podcast was key), his counterintuitive advice about gross margin for early-stage brands, why moving to a shelf-stable formulation was instrumental in the brand's growth and why not hiring a CEO was one of the best decisions he's made. Later, he explained why Lemon Perfect's unit economics make it highly attractive to investors, his praise (and acronyms) for hard work and why “being great fiduciary of a capital” is a point of pride.  Brands in this episode: Lemon Perfect, Vitaminwater, Bai, Vita Coco

Guy Benson Show
Head of State Police Calls Response to Uvalde Shooting an ‘Abject Failure'

Guy Benson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 122:07


3:05pm: The Biden Blame Game! 3:20pm: Germany will fire up coal plants again in an effort to save natural gas 3:35pm: Guest: Kim Strassel, Potomac Watch columnist for Wall Street Journal edit page & Fox News Contributor. 3:50pm: DNC is slashing prices for a photo w/ Kamala Harris. Tickets for a photo with the VP at the Women's Leadership Forum started at $15,000, but it failed to sell enough tickets & is being postponed. VP's June fundraiser in Cali is charging $5,000 for a photo 4:05pm: Guest: Juan Williams, Fox News Analyst, Columnist for The Hill & author of What the Hell Do you Have to Lose 4:20pm: Harris Teeter, Kroger face backlash for pulling pro-America items after complaints: 'Get woke, go broke' 4:35pm: Uvalde: The Texas Tribune has reviewed law enforcement transcripts and footage that federal and state investigators are examining after the May 24 tragedy. 4:50pm: Kicker Topic: The Supreme Court just struck down a Maine program that does not allow public funds to go to schools that promote religious instruction. 5:05pm: Guest: Kent Strang, the Managing Director for Americans for Prosperity.  5:20pm: Bill Maher: What an Embarrassing Mess at the Washington Post, Huh? 5:35pm: (Replay Kim S) 5:50pm: Remember calling for movie times  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

More Than A Mile
Bowerman Blueberries' family-run farm and market hand-pick their bushes to ensure quality and flavor. Andrew VanTil, co-owner, joins Nick to talk blueberries (including wine), diversifying business, and connecting with customers through Market Wagon.

More Than A Mile

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 34:13


Episode 14 Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (00:01): Today, we're gonna have a conversation with Andrew VanTil of Bowerman Blueberry Farm and Farm Market. They're in West Michigan and if you have tasted blueberries that you bought from Walmart or Kroger, you probably tasted their blueberries at one point or another. So how does a farm who has national distribution in some of the largest retailers in the country, find the value in connecting directly with you on Market Wagon so that you can know their farm, their name, and chat with them so that you can know where your food came from. Happy 4th of July and enjoy the episode. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (00:35): Welcome to More Than A Mile, a local food podcast from Market Wagon, focused on connecting you to local food through farmer stories from across America. I'm Nick Carter, your host, a farmer and CEO and co-founder of Market Wagon. We are your online farmers market with a mission to enable food producers to thrive in their local and regional markets. Food is so much more than just nutrients and calories. It's actually the fabric that holds us together. And I look forward to crafting a generational quilt of farmer stories and experiences, the victories and challenges of individuals, families, and teams doing their part to help democratize food in America. Thanks for joining me for this episode of More Than A Mile, and thank you for buying local food. It's one critical step in making an investment in food for future generations. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (01:26): Well, my guest today is Andrew VanTil from Bowerman Blueberries in Michigan. And welcome to the show, Andrew. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (01:34): Good morning, Nick. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (01:35): Great to have you here. Thanks for joining. So this is our 4th of July episode. We're coming up on the middle of the summer. Is that holiday, does that have a big spike for you guys or what kind of impact does that have on your farm? Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (01:48): Oh man. 4Th of July. It's really the start of the season for us. You know, we start harvesting blueberries about a week after the 4th of July. But I think it--I think it really signifies the start of summer for a lot of people. You know, it, here in Michigan, it's, you know, cherries become available right around the 4th of July. We start harvesting blueberries about a week after everybody's out of school, everybody's in summer mode and, you know, for us, it really, it kicks off the summer of amazing Michigan produce. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (02:21): Awesome. And blueberries are your main thing. Is there anything else you guys grow? Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (02:26): So we have dabbled in a lot of things. We have grown strawberries here on the farm. We've grown raspberries on the farm, we've grown pumpkins, you know, it's all been a matter of you know, figuring out how to bring customers in, not only during this time during the 4th of July when things are really busy, but you know, kind of extending that experience out into other parts of the summer. So, you know, we used to grow asparagus to kick things off really early. That was--that was hard. I'm not gonna lie . And like I said, we then moved into, we did some strawberries, we've done some raspberries, you know, we've tried a lot of different things. And what we found is that, you know, everything that you grow, everything that you do on the farm, it requires a lot of passion, you know, and for us, our passion is definitely it's definitely in blueberries. So while we have done a lot of different things and we've allocated a lot of different space on the farm for different fruits right now we're back to what we started with, and that is blueberries. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (03:27): Sticking with the core. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (03:28): That's right. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (03:29): Okay. And one of the things I've heard you say, I wanna get a little bit into your family farming background, and I've heard you say farming is family. Tell me about that phrase, how that works into your colloquial. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (03:43): Yeah. So we know that better than anyone here at Bowerman's, you know we are truly your quintessential family farm. I--right now Bowerman is run by me, my sister-in-law and my brother-in-law. Mom and dad still live here on the farm. They're pushing their mid seventies and, you know, they're honestly still the hardest workers on the farm. And I, I don't think they're ever they're ever gonna quit which is great because we absolutely love having them around. But it, as, you know, as we've grown, we've taken in even more you know, more family members. So now I have another brother-in-law, who's working here at the farm. We're starting to see our nieces and nephews get to the age where they're working at our farmer's markets. They're working at our restaurants, you know all the way from from doing dishes at the restaurant to helping on the back of the harvester here on the farm. You know, it's, it really is a, a family effort. And as it's been harder to get you know, employees and good, good people on the farm sometimes, you know, families who you have to rely on. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (04:47): Yeah, for sure. Very reliable. And I wanna get into, you've mentioned restaurants and farmer's markets and I wanna get into how you've diversified your business, but for a second, I kind of wanna just lean in on the farm side. So we've talked about all the different things you've grown in the past. Talk to me a little bit about blueberries. This is a permaculture, right? These are bushes. How long do they last? How long do you--how long before you have to replace the plant? What's that process look like on your farm? Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (05:19): Yeah, so blueberries are a little bit different than a lot of other fruits and trees and that kind of stuff. So our farm was actually started in 1954. The first bushes were planted back in 1954, and some of those bushes are still here today. So...Yeah. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (05:37): Really? Okay. It's more like an orchard then? Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (05:38): It, it is. Yeah. And it's you know, it's one of the longest standing industries in Michigan in terms of farming. And there are bushes that are here in Michigan that have been alive and been harvested for the last 80 years. You know, it's, as far as we know, as long as you keep up on, you know, proper nutrition on trimming the bushes and you know, harvesting 'em and that kind of stuff. As far as we know blueberry plants will continue to produce for as long as you take care of 'em, it's not like some other crops where, you know, after 10 or 15 years, you have to rip the plant out and kind of redo it. So definitely a permaculture here. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (06:16): Fascinating, fascinating. And you know, I've got a small farm in Indy. We've tried to diversify a lot of different things. One of the things we've tried and not done very well with here has been berries. More--we tried blueberries, the deer got all of them. We've tried raspberries and blackberries and we get some, but I think there's a difference between our climate and yours. Can you talk about why Michigan just produces so much in the berry crop and so much better produce? Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (06:45): ? Yeah. Well, and of course I'm gonna be a little bit biased. I'm gonna say the best blueberries definitely come from West Michigan. But there's a lot, there's a lot of different factors that, that go into that. You know, I think the reason why the industry was kind of started here blueberries are--blueberries have an affinity to sandy acidic soil. And so when you're on the lake shore of West Michigan that's what we have here. We have sandy acidic soil. And so blueberries naturally thrive in the soil here. And then on top of that, we have the climate, you know, so blueberries take a lot of chill hours during the winter. So there are some varieties that are grown in Mexico and Peru, and that kind of stuff that are kind of an all season crop. They can grow them and they can harvest them at any time. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (07:30): But the reason that they've been so successful in Michigan is because the blueberry plant naturally needs to go into a dormancy period. It needs to hibernate for a little bit. And so in Michigan we get those chill hours. We get that winter and then it really needs an even climate. So one of the things that the lake does for us is it helps to moderate that climate a little bit, you know, instead of the big temperature swings if it's really hot out, generally, the lake is a little bit cooler and we're getting a nice full breeze, you know, off the lake. It also delays our crop a little bit. So, you know, here in Michigan when you're closer to the lake shore you're growing degree days and the things that that make your bush ready and mature are a little bit pushed back the closer you are to the lake. And we really are a mile and a half off the lake shore. We're in this perfect storm of climate and amazing soil. And then--and you know, bush blueberries are natural here in the Northern Michigan. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (08:32): Yeah. I'll keep trying to get berries to grow on our little Central Indiana farm here mainly for our own kids to have to go out and pick through some thorns. It builds character--but I'm still gonna be buying berries from you guys for sure. Because we can't get the blueberries to grow here and there's just a difference in quality--it is appreciable. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (08:54): Well, and you mentioned of struggling to get any with the deer and stuff. And I get customers every year that come and buy blueberry bushes from the farm and they're like, oh, I'm gonna set up, you know, two or three in my front yard and I'm gonna harvest some blueberries off of it. And you know, I say, well, honestly the, I hope you're there. I hope you're getting 'em for looks because you're gonna fight with the birds. You're gonna fight with the deer. And I think the only reason that we end up with any bit of a crop is just because we have so many that the birds and the deer leave full. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (09:22): Yeah. I've heard that you have to just plant enough--you can't try and keep the birds and deer away, you just have to plan enough that they get full and you still have something to harvest. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (09:29): Essentially, yeah. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (09:31): Really? We, yeah, we fight with the deer a lot. We're in a, kind of an urban forest area. So deer and raccoons. Do you do any sweet corn? Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (09:42): We don't. Nope, no traditional row crops. We don't do sweet corn or soybeans or anything like that. 100% blueberries and specialty crops. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (09:50): Cool. Sweet corn is something that raccoon can smell them ripening and it is infuriating . All right. So you said blueberries, it sounds like that's the staple--kind of that's the fuel that drives everything. Are there any other crops, does the, the fall comes along that you're gonna be harvesting? Is there any other specialty crops that you do have there that are--that you're picking? Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (10:14): You know, for the last couple years we've put a couple acre plot of pumpkins in, and again, this is that's really to kind of enhance and extend that customer experience, you know, to let them come in the fall. We make donuts at our farm market. We do a, you know, like sometimes we'll do a, U-pick pumpkin thing or, you know, just be, be that hub for people to come and get their fall decor, and to, you know, still be able to really visit the farm. And like I said, get some bakery items, get some ice cream, you know, having a family experience. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (10:49): So we obviously love delivering your food all over the Indiana area and Michigan to customer's doorsteps. We have the online farmer's market on Market Wagon, but sounds like there is quite an experience for the customer to come to your farm. Talk about all the things that if somebody wants to hear this podcast and--in addition to ordering from you on Market Wagon regularly--make a day trip out of it, what would they experience? Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (11:16): Well. So our farm has been growing over the last couple of years and and so we put a farmer's market here on site that has has a full bakery. So we specialize obviously in blueberry donuts. That's one of our number one products, you know, it's kind of what has put us on the map and made us famous. We put a lot of care and effort into those things. But we've also, I mean, we started making, we make our own pies from scratch. We do things like muffins and breads and, you know, we're--with the addition of the restaurant--we've started doing things like handmade cheesecakes and, you know, different kinds of hand pies and that kind of stuff. But when you come to the farm, you get to not only obviously see the agriculture in its true form, you get to come. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (12:00): And we have you pick available on the farm. You can bring your family here. You can, you can pick as many blueberries as you want to, to take home with you. We have a full ice cream shop here at the farm. We have a retail store. We do events, you know you know, you talk, we talked a little bit about July fourth. We do a summer harvest celebration pretty shortly after that, you know, we bring face painters and, you know, all sorts of different bouncy house and different activities here to the farm because really, you know, we're in the business of making memories and making traditions, you know, so that, that farm experience, that agritourism that has been growing in the last 10 years we've really embraced that and we're looking ahead to what the next step in that is. And that, you know, sometimes we host a lot of school events and school field trips and that kind of stuff. And I could definitely see us in the future, even hosting things like corporate events and potentially weddings and, you know, like there are so many things that are on the docket to really look at in the future. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (13:04): That's awesome. That's really cool. I'm gonna have to make a trip up there. It's only a couple of hours. Yeah. So talk to me about off farm. You, you've also gotten, you know, your blueberries are in other bakeries. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (13:17): Yeah. Yeah. So, you know, as a, as a small family farm one of the things that we have to do is we have to carve out a niche in this, in this huge, you know, industrial complex of a, of a produce market. And for us, that niche has been quality. You know, we're, we're a hundred acre blueberry farm which it, you know, it's big, but at the same time, it it's it's very small compared to a lot of the farms that are out there. And so one of the things that we've done to carve out that niche for ourself has been to hyper-specialize in quality. You know one of the things that Market Wagon provides for us is just an amazing logistics network. You know, it allows us to take orders from people all week long. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (14:00): And the day before we are ready to bring those blueberries down to Indy or to any one of the different hubs for Market Wagon we're out there harvesting those berries that day, you know, so we harvest 'em, we get 'em in the cooler that night. And then the next morning we get 'em packaged into, you know, whether it's a pint or a box that is getting shipped out. And so it's--Market Wagon has been able to reduce the amount of time that it takes to go from field to somebody's fridge. And that's key. I mean, blueberries are a perishable product. They have a great shelf life, but you know, the quicker that we can get 'em into people's hands, the better quality of a product that they're gonna have as well, because we can let those blueberries sit on the bushes a little bit longer, develop a little bit more sugars, get a little bit of that better flavor profile, you know, compared to maybe some other traditional sales methods where, you know, we have to pick 'em a little more ahead of time because we're shipping 'em to Texas and they're gonna be, you know, in a cooler for a week or something. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (15:01): And if you've gotta put 'em in a cooler for a week that you kind of need to keep them from getting too ripe, right? Cause ripe fruit is tender fruit and doesn't ship as well. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (15:13): Absolutely. And and not only is it tender, but blueberries specifically are very finicky. I mean, you're dealing with something that, you know, you could have anywhere from 200 to a thousand of them in a pound, you know, compare that to something like apples, where a pound of apples, you might have one apple , you know, and it's, it's really easy. That's a big apple to, yeah. It's easy to do quality control on a single apple, but when you're, when you're doing quality control on a thousand blueberries you know, it's, it's a lot, it's a lot harder. And so our, our machinery, our equipment is very specialized you know, in dealing with that and keeping quality up it's, it's a constant struggle, you know, especially with, with weather, with all the different, you know, different things that can affect quality. It's our job really to, to maintain that. And part of that is maintaining cold chain on the way to the customer and, you know, picking the fruit when it's, when it's at its, you know, peak ripeness, but also, you know, it can withstand the, the little bit of, of bumping that it's gonna take from getting picked. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (16:15): So, yeah. Tell me, gimme a picture. It was when I think when the average customer thinks of picking blueberries, they see you reaching your hand into the bush and grabbing a blueberry fruit off of there. I'm imagining this is probably a little bit more sophisticated than that. Is it a shaking method with a conveyor underneath or what's the pick method look like? Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (16:34): So we have several different ones. We do machine harvest some stuff but everything that goes to our retail outlets, anything that goes to Market Wagon or goes to our own farmer's market or anything like that that's all gonna be handpicked fruit and the reason...yeah. The reason for that is quality is so much higher in handpicked fruit. Because like you described, we have machines that can pick blueberries and they go over top of the bush, they shake the bush fairly violently and those blueberries--as they fall onto the conveyor--they tend to get a little bit bruised. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (17:06): So that's gonna go into my blueberry pancakes, my blueberry donuts? Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (17:09): Correct. So the majority, I would say 99% of the fruit that we machine harvest goes into our frozen line. So we wash them--the berries--immediately. We freeze them immediately before any of the bruising can really take effect on the fruit. And that's what goes into the five pound bags and the two pound bags of frozen. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (17:28): But if a, if a listeners, you know, here's this episode it's gonna drop around July 4th happy Independence Day. And, they order Bowerman Blueberries on Market Wagon and get 'em delivered. Those were hand picked for quality and freshness. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (17:43): 100%, 100% of our retail blueberries are hand picked and that's, Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (17:47): I'm blown away. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (17:48): That is a challenge in itself. I will tell you, I mean, with a hundred acres of blueberries, we will take on anywhere from 60 to 110 hand pickers in a year to accommodate getting that volume off. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (18:04): Wow. That's awesome. That's really cool. And, and it sounds like your parents are the hardest workers in that crew, right? Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (18:14): Yeah. Again, they come from a different generation and you know, dad, when they, when they first started the farm, it was a struggle. And the blueberry industry wasn't well established and you know, they didn't have the logistics methods that we have today. So, I mean, for him, it was--it was growing blueberries during the day, and then it was packing them into a semi and driving them to Detroit at night. It was--and they did all that themselves. You know, we've grown today to be able to specialize in our different roles here on the farm. But I mean, one of the things that I love about being a farmer is that you really learn every different trade aspect, you know, being a farmer, Nick, and I'm sure, you know, this, it makes you become a plumber and an electrician and a builder, and, you know, and a social media marketer and a, you know, logistics, you know, person. I, I mean, there's just so many different Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (19:06): Facets and a soil scientist too, right? Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (19:09): Oh yeah. Oh man. Absolutely. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (19:11): Yep. Test the pH levels and figure out how to amend. Oh yeah. Really cool. And what a Testament to the hustle and the entrepreneurial mindset of that last generation. I mean, like you said, picking by hand, building a market, driving at night to Detroit to get it going. And the legacy is here. It's what you've built today. Just a curious question. So your name is Andrew VanTil--where's Bowerman. Where does that fall in the family tree? Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (19:36): Oh man. Bowerman. Bowerman lives with my wife. So I married into the family. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (19:41): I see. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (19:42): Oh yeah. And, you know, back when I first joined the farm, which was a little over 10 years ago, it was really more about hiring people that they could trust, you know, it was a growing... Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (19:53): ...and they trusted their son-in-law. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (19:56): Yeah. Believe it or not, believe it or not, you know, marrying the daughter is one thing, but coming to work on the farm over, Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (20:02): But taking the blueberry farm over Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (20:03): that? Yeah. That's a whole 'nother ball game. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (20:06): A whole 'nother set of vows, right? Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (20:07): Yeah. Oh, trust me, dad was very protective of his daughter, but you wanna talk about being protective of the farm that was a whole nother hurdle to jump . Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (20:17): Well, he's had those, he's had those plants since 1954, so... Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (20:20): That's right, exactly. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (20:21): Yeah. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (20:22): So, no, but it's you know, I joined the farm about 10 years ago, back then it was a growing industry and a growing farm. And so they needed people that they could trust. And I came from a background of sales and production and marketing. And so that's kind of what I jumped into when I came here. I take care of most of our our sales channels. So things like Market Wagon, things like retail markets and restaurants and stuff, but then also our more, you know, national markets. So we ship our blueberries to all the Piggly Wigglys and the Walmarts and the Krogers of the world all over the country. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (21:01): Wow. And so that's a direct relationship that doesn't go through, like a produce distributor or anything like that. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (21:06): We do have a marketing company that we work with that helps us to distribute because again the logistics--what you do on your side of things, Nick--it still amazes me to this day because the logistics side of things, it's a struggle, you know? And I mean, even with rising gas prices nowadays, it's getting trucks to deliver. That's a talent in itself. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (21:29): So it's, it's a fun challenge. And it's something that we know it's a challenge for farms. You know, you have been able, kudos you guys, to figure out how to be able to get distribution at a scale to, like you said, Krogers and Walmarts. But that direct to consumer relationship is really challenging because really the, the last mile, what we call the last mile distribution in Walmart, or in Kroger is the customer driving their car to the parking lot and putting a cart in their hands and pushing it down the aisle and for us to get it to their doorstep, to do that for them or for a farm to be able to do that, it's really challenging. So we've been excited to be able to bring that solution to farms like yours. And it's a great partnership. We love having you guys on board. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (22:09): Yeah. And that's definitely our favorite relationship to nurture, you know, for the farmer it is best to go direct to the consumer. And so, you know, whether that be through our farmer's market here on site or restaurant or an offsite farmer's market, or a sales channel like Market Wagon, you know, the best relationship and interaction that a farmer can have is direct to the consumer. And that's the best relationship a consumer can have too, because they then know where their food is coming from and the story behind it. You know, I think, I think the general consumer nowadays is far more interested in where's my, where's my food coming from, who's growing it? And do they care about what they're doing? You know, I mean, I have a four year old daughter that comes to the farm and, you know, she walks right up to a blueberry bush and that's what she wants to eat right off the bush. And so, you know, creating safe tasty produce is what we're passionate about. And I think it's what the people who shop on Market Wagon and the people who are coming to the farm to buy produce and have that experience--that's the type of customer they are. They are far more informed about what they're getting and also just want to develop that relationship. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (23:22): Yeah. And it's hard to get that relationship or to know, you know, because the shopper going down the aisle at a Walmart, you know, they're gonna feed that to their four year old daughter too, but there's an increasing I guess trepidation around, is this safe? What was put on it? What are the chemicals on this blueberry? And to know that we're sitting here talking to the guy who grows them and his daughter eats them right off the bush. And that means a lot. It means a lot to the people who can know that. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (23:49): Absolutely. And one of the cool things that Market Wagon offers is it offers that direct communication channel from the consumer, right to the farmer. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (23:58): So do you get a lot of questions that way? I mean, I know we have a chat right on our website, so customers can just hit you up. Do they light you up a lot? Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (24:04): Absolutely. And thankfully I have a very dedicated team of people that are there to answer those questions, you know? And like we talked about how the average consumer is more informed. I I'm amazed at some of the questions that I get from people. You know, some of the people want to really know the intricacies of farming and of where again, where their produce comes from and the different farming methods that we use. You know, because again, we take a lot of steps to make sure that our food is safe, that our food is tasty, you know? And and that it's a very involved process that people want to feel like they're a part of. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (24:43): Very cool. Well, thank you for investing the time to answer those questions, to, you know, entertain that relationship and entertain those questions and the curiosities of the consumers, because it makes--that's what makes the experience on Market Wagon worthwhile. So thank you. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (24:58): Oh yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. We love it. We actually develop great relationships with with customers. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (25:06): Very cool. Well, this has been a really fun conversation. I appreciate you sharing your time with us. Is there, other than on Market Wagon, we've talked extensively that people can find you online at Market Wagon, they can chat with you on Market Wagon. Where else can people find Bowerman Blueberries and connect with you? Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (25:21): Oh man. Well, my, my first response to that is--has got to be come to Michigan, you know, come to Michigan. It's, it's such a beautiful state, you know, and we're, we're positioned, like I said, we're about a mile and a half from the lake shore. You can't find a more beautiful town and a more beautiful area--it really is blueberry country around here. You know, if you drive right down the road from me, you're just gonna see acres and acres of blueberries. But we have a lot of different ways that people can find us. So of course, come to Michigan, come see our farm, come pick blueberries directly from the bush, come experience, you know, all the different things that we have to offer. We did just open up a restaurant in downtown Holland, Michigan. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (26:03): Again, it's an amazing cafe experience. It's beautiful windows wide open. We do breakfast and lunch there, and again, a full bakery and ice cream and all that kind of stuff. Market Wagon is gonna be the most convenient. I'll be honest. You know when you taste our products, you fall in love with them. The easiest way to get them to your front door is gonna be via Market Wagon. You know, it allows us to really spread that net out and reach customers that are in places that we never would've had the opportunity. So I have customers that vacation here in Holland, Michigan, and they fall in love with our products and I find out where they're from and I'm like, 'Hey, you're within a Market Wagon distribution network. So here's where you can find us--jump online, jump on Market Wagon. You know, we can deliver our products right to your door.' Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (26:52): I love to hear that. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (26:53): And we also I did mention that we're nationally sold in many different grocery stores. And that goes through our marketer who's North Bay Produce. And again, very passionate people about what they do. Amazing company that allows us to distribute our products all over the country. And again, that's another label that is a very safe and very trustworthy name in the grocery store. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (27:19): So if we're at a supermarket and we see North Bay Produce, we can know one of the farms that they are putting into those clamshells is from you and others that you know. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (27:31): Yup, exactly. There's about 11 other Michigan farmers and you know, we're all very close knit. We all help each other. We all keep each other in check and hold each other accountable. And so, yeah, it's a great network. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (27:43): It's a tight community. Farming is a small community. And I think that in and of itself, the relationship that happens between farmers is also why it's just so relational between farmers and then the consumers that are, that are drinking or that are eating the food you grow. Hey, I've got one more silly question and maybe you'll laugh at me and tell me no. Any chance that there's gonna be a blueberry wine in the future? Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (28:08): So we actually developed a blueberry wine last year. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (28:12): No way! Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (28:13): We did. Yeah. So... Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (28:15): This was not planned. I--you didn't feed me this question. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (28:19): No, no, I sure didn't so that's been something that's been on our radar for a long time, and I will tell you that, you know, the licensing process for that, you know, whether it's just to sell a bottle of wine that you created or to have somebody be able to enjoy it on site. That's a--it's a long process and it's very, very involved. And we went, we went through that process at our farm market last year. We had a blueberry wine developed, again, it blew me away. So we work with a lot of different, amazing companies. And when you think blueberry wine, well, I mean, the first thing that comes to your mind is like, oh, it's gonna be a very sweet dessert wine. It's gonna be, you know, yeah... Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (28:53): Fruit forward. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (28:54): Yeah, absolutely. And what we developed was a much darker red wine. It definitely has the blueberry notes right up front. It's definitely got an inherent sweetness. But it's a much more traditional red wine and it has, and it finishes like a red wine. And it's been, it's been extremely popular. We've been selling it like crazy over the last year. And we're definitely in the process right now of getting our license for our restaurant downtown, because we believe that, you know, people are gonna want to come and enjoy a slice of pie and a glass of wine at our restaurant, you know. Nick Carter - Host (Market Wagon) (29:33): Well, we have been experimenting as well. And I'll have to check into again, the regulations are a huge hurdle, but we are now delivering Indiana wine on Market Wagon. We had to go through a lot of permitting, a lot of processes, and even change some of our own tech and processes to fit the regulations. Of course we have to check ID and all that stuff. But the other infuriating part about those regulations that they're different state by state. So we will have to start the whole process over again in Michigan, but now I'm motivated. So that's our next project. We're gonna go and check out what the rules are in Michigan, and we're gonna roll out our wine delivery. You heard it here, first folks, we're gonna do it in Michigan. Next. We're gonna figure out to get it done. And first product on the market's gonna be Bowerman Blueberry wine. Andrew VanTil (Bowerman Blueberries Farm Market) (30:21): Oh, that's awesome. I can't wait. My wife has done several of the, like the mail order wine programs, where they send you a couple different wines each month to try. But if we had the ability for her to jump on Market Wagon and pull them from, you know, different farmers like ourselves, people that are again putting a lot of passion and c