Podcasts about Cambodia

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Country in Southeast Asia

  • 2,792PODCASTS
  • 5,128EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 2, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about Cambodia

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Latest podcast episodes about Cambodia

Twisted History
The Twisted History of Genocide

Twisted History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 99:10


Presented by Waterbird Spirits. Raphael Lemkin, The Armenian Genocide, 3Chi, Punic Wars, Aktion T4 Program, The Gombe Chimpanzee War, Cambodia, and more ...

10K Dollar Day
206: Siem Reap, Cambodia + Missoula, Montana: The luxest luxe

10K Dollar Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 48:26


Treat yourself to watching the companion YouTube video of this episode where the ladies discuss carousels, breweries, and bugs. You'll even see how no matter how long you know a bestie, they can always find a way to surprise you! Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/10KDollarDay/)

The Bangkok Podcast | Conversations on Life in Thailand's Buzzing Capital
Tech, Trade & Bridges with Belgian Ambassador Sibille de Cartier [S5.E38]

The Bangkok Podcast | Conversations on Life in Thailand's Buzzing Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 38:58


Greg interviews Belgian Ambassador to Thailand, Madam Sybille de Cartier, formerly Ambassador to Egypt and Sudan, with plenty of diplomatic experience in other posts around the world.  She discusses the long history that Belgium and Thailand share, going back all the way to 1839, which is pretty amazing since Belgium itself was founded in 1830. Belgium also played a key role in the modernization of Thailand under King Chulalongkorn, providing advisors that aided in maintaining the Kingdom's independence and building up its legal system.  Next, the Ambassador talks about her country's current relationship with Thailand, especially economically, and the function of the embassy in Bangkok which actually also services Cambodia, Myanmar, and Laos. The two continue and discuss a myriad of the details of the relationship, from mutually beneficial social security rules to the genesis story of the famous Thai-Belgian bridge of friendship, a story worth hearing in detail.  Special thanks to Ambassador de Cartier for taking the time to be our guest! :) Don't forget that Patrons get the ad-free version of the show as well as swag and other perks. And we'll keep our Facebook, Twitter, and LINE accounts active so you can send us comments, questions, or whatever you want to share.

Bike Life
Making the Journey Yours

Bike Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 32:16


Today, we are joined by Susan Doram. Susan is a published writer, award-winning personal trainer, cycle coach, and worldwide solo cyclist.In 2017, Susan set off for a 2 ½ year solo cycling tour around the world. Her epic journey took her through 15 countries on four continents! It was a “slow cycle” tour, and she credits her bike for helping her meet the most interesting people, especially her Warmshowers hosts, some of whom she is still in touch with today. She returned home to the UK in 2020, just before the pandemic lockdown and in time for her 50th birthday. Before her journey, she spent a full two years planning and organizing her trip. The whole idea of a long cycle tour scared Susan. So in 2015, she announced to everyone that she planned to take a round-the-world cycle tour just to push herself into actually doing it. Since returning, Susan shares her story to hopefully motivate others to set off on their own cycle adventures. Before Susan left, she read all of the books about touring, which made her believe the trip would be absolutely grueling; cycling all day and night. But in fact, a cycle tour doesn't have to be that way; it can be whatever you want it to be. The beauty of the bicycle is that it takes you off the beaten track and into so many places that you would not see if you were in a car. Sometimes, not following the recommended, traditional route allows you to see and do some pretty amazing things.Susan recalls some of the highlights from her trip, including; the best food she ate, which was in South Korea, Taiwan has fantastic cycle routes with people cheering you on along the way, cycling the Pacific Coastal Highway is beautiful, but going inland off the path can take you to some amazing places. Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, and Cambodia are all very cycle-friendly. Her favorite place to cycle was in Southeast Asia, where she felt very safe and welcomed. Susan's tour motivated her to become a cycling coach. Her new venture, teaching people how to ride and tour, is so inspiring. She recently taught a woman in her 70s to ride for the first time. Susan's enthusiasm for cycling is contagious, and her goal is to get more people out there riding.You can follow Susan on Instagram at @SusanLongHaulTrucker and learn more about her adventures on her website SusanDoram.com. Join our community at Warmshowers.org, or you can reach Tahverlee at tahverlee@warmshowers.org.Follow us on Instagram; @Warmshowers_org

The Dave Pamah Show
Author Interview - How I Survived The Killing Fields with Sara Im

The Dave Pamah Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 31:28


In this episode I talk to Sara Iman who mastered overcoming adversity in the mass genocide in Cambodia and her inspirational Award-Winning Book " How I Survived The Killing Fields” was honored in 2015. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Real Estate Investing For Women
Syndication Series #4: Opportunity Zones and how they can make you rich with Eng Taing

Real Estate Investing For Women

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 35:13


What real estate investments have growth opportunities nowadays? Eng Taing, born in a refugee camp in Thailand, where his family escaped the Khmer Rouge from Cambodia, immigrated to America. Despite not having much, he found a way to thrive for success. Blessed with being good at math, Eng understood data patterns in the real estate market. Now, he is focusing most of his time and money on senior living investments. So how did he end up investing in senior living? Find out by tuning in and learning more about this asset!Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share! https://blissfulinvestor.com/podcast/

Of Course I'm Not OK: The Podcast
64. Rage Revisited

Of Course I'm Not OK: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 58:11


Happy Thanksgiving, Listeners! This week, Karen and Katie get into a deep discussion about everything from travel (Katie once lived in Nepal, while Karen once lived in Cambodia!) to the VERY problematic history of Thanksgiving to Katie's reasoning for wanting to have a funeral for coffee. Sadly, Katie's microphone didn't work properly for this episode (something we didn't notice until the editing phase), so this show also introduces 'mic gate.' We hope to fix all sound issues by next week! The pair then gets into a discussion around rage: allowing rage, how rage and anger can be expressed without emotional or physical violence, and how healthy it can be to encourage ourselves to express and feel a wide range of emotions. Thanks for listening! Resources from today's show: - Check out Patrick Is A Navajo: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmJC-2WmfoQCzwMtK9oC6jQ

Healthy Balanced Birth and Beyond Podcast
Doing Your Own Research and Trusting your Intuition with Sarah Smits

Healthy Balanced Birth and Beyond Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 85:02


About Sarah:Womb Alchemist. Dreamer and birther of Down to Birth Midwifery. Gypsy soul. Birth keeper. Space holder. Wellness promoter. Midwife. Passionate advocate for women, birth and breastfeeding.Since 2013 Sarah has immersed herself into everything pregnancy, birthing, nutrition, wellness and healing. She holds an unwavering trust in our abilities to grow, birth and nurture our babes. With the belief that knowledge is power, she is a passionate sharer of stories and information.Sarah's gypsy soul has taken her around the world. Her interest in birth has lead her to learn both modern and traditional practices from the countries she's explored. She has experienced birth in Australia, India, Cambodia and Vanuatu and incorporates these experiences into her practice.She has created a holistic lifestyle for herself and this emanates in her care and support. Through nutrition, exercise, body work, breath work, self-healing and energetic practices, she has successfully improved her health and wellbeing and actualized many achievements in her fulfilling career. She believes in the power of these positive lifestyle changes and incorporates these tools in the support she provides.Connect with Sarah:Website: https://downtobirthmidwifery.com/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/down_to_birth_midwifery/

Far East Travels Podcast
Cambodia Opens To Fully Vaccinated Travelers/Vietnam-First Tourists Welcomed Back In 20 Months

Far East Travels Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 34:03


Cambodia surprised everyone recently abandoning their phasing in of tourism to fully reopening the country to travelers. They're even paying for the rapid test on arrival! That's two countries in Southeast Asia that are now fully opened to travelers. This week also saw the first tourists to arrive in Vietnam in 20 months. Nha Trang, Da Nang/Quan Am, and how Phu Quoc are hosting international travelers on fixed itinerary travel packages. It's exciting to see the countries of SEA start to welcome back tourists. I do believe the industry will not be fully confident in the opening of all services until the whole region is open and all categories of tourists can be accomodated. In this episode we'll also go back to Okinawa, Japan and take a walk down Naha's famous Kokusai Dori Tourist Street. If you're ever in Taipei, Taiwan it's a very convenient place to launch a journey into the wonderful island life of Okinawa.Thanks as always for listening and your continued support!Donations: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/JohnASaboePatreon:https://www.patreon.com/FarEastTravelsWrite a Review For The Podcast:https://apple.co/3B4ld1p

I Speak Engrish!
2 - 7 : Preah Ko and Preah Keo; A Cambodian Legend

I Speak Engrish!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 33:23


Welcome back to Southeast Asia, and this time, Lilly is sharing a Cambodian tale! And boy is it a doozy. Did you know that green mangos are dangerous? Yeah, that's right. Next time you go to your local supermarket, make sure to run away as fast as you can if you see green mangos, otherwise you might just give birth to a calf (yes, even if you're a dude). If we haven't scared you off yet, give this episode a listen and let us know what you think it says about Cambodia's culture, peoples, and its relationship with Thailand. You can send us your thoughts to ispeakengrishreally@gmail.com. Also don't forget to follow us on Instagram, Lilly at @lillytalksalot and Anton @whatsupanton. Also, listen to Lilly on Real, Raw, and Racialized. https://open.spotify.com/episode/3esoSR1i6A77ACl9qMSVfJ?si=CBCCEQdiSVSJHJhv0TsEYA See y'all next time! http://www.leisurecambodia.com/news/detail.php?id=63 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preah_Ko_Preah_Keo --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ispeakengrish/message

Squiz Kids
Friday, November 19 - Mystery sailor revealed; Cambodia's Facebook quirk; turning pig poo into power; and Harry Potter stars reunited.

Squiz Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 10:35


Squiz Kids is an award-winning, free daily news podcast just for kids. Give us ten minutes, and we'll give you the world. A short podcast that gives kids the lowdown on the big news stories of the day, delivered without opinion, and with positivity and humour. ‘Kid-friendly news that keeps them up to date without all the nasties' (A Squiz Parent) This Australian podcast for kids easily fits into the daily routine - helping curious kids stay informed about the world around them. Fun. Free. Fresh. LINKS Australian War Memorial website:www.awm.gov.au Khmer Keyboard: https://www.lexilogos.com/keyboard/khmer.htm How To Become A Squiz Kids Correspondenthttps://drive.google.com/file/d/1FH2HA28InnLU6UxE91wrLBAbCMT40Mua/viewSquiz Kids Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/squizkids/?hl=enGot a birthday coming up and you want a shout-out? Send us an email at squizkids@thesquiz.com.au See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Bitch Talk
A Place to Breathe with Michelle Grace Steinberg and Robyn Bykofsky

Bitch Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 28:24


A Place to Breathe is a documentary that "explores the universality of trauma and resilience through the eyes of immigrant and refugee healthcare practitioners and patients". It provides an important glimpse into the heinous crimes that have happened (and continue to happen) around the world that have led people to escape their homes and seek refuge, and the people that run the organizations and clinics created to help them heal. We sat down with director/producer Michelle Grace Steinberg and producer Robyn Bykofsky about their process in choosing which stories to highlight, how medical care is so much more than just physical, the healing power of cultural festivals and events, the unnecessary loopholes that immigrants/refugees need to go through, and the ultimate goal for their production company, Underexposed Films. We thank them for their work, and for sharing this story in such a critical time in our country.Click here to see where you can watch A Place to BreatheYou can follow the film A Place to Breathe on IG & FBYou can follow producer Robyn Bykofsky on IGGive to Metta Health Center and Street Level Health Project--Thanks for listening and for your support! We couldn't have reached 600 episodes without your help! --Be well, stay safe, Black Lives Matter, AAPI Lives Matter, and thank you for being vaxxed!--SUPPORT US HERE!Subscribe to our channel on YouTube for behind the scenes footage!Rate and review us wherever you listen to podcasts!Visit our website! www.bitchtalkpodcast.comFollow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.Listen every other Thursday 9:30 - 10 am on BFF.FMPOWERED BY GO-TO Productions 

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 11-16-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 5:25


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for November 16th, 2021.A couple of openings to tell you travelers about. India started letting fully vaccinated foreign tourists enter the country on regular commercial flights. Infections are falling and vaccinations rising there. Visitors haven't been allowed in since March 2020. Or maybe Cambodia's more to your liking. It reopened its borders to fully vaccinated travelers two weeks earlier than planned and has one of the world's highest rates of immunization. But here's where not to go, especially if you're using the CDC as your travel agent. The agency has advised against travel to the Czech Republic, Hungary, and Iceland because of rising cases there. However, they moved some countries to the level one low risk category, including Japan, India, Pakistan, Liberia, Gambia, and Mozambique. Without waiting for authorization from the FDA or a recommendation from the CDC, all adults in New York City are now allowed to get booster shots. Three states, California, Colorado and New Mexico, are also shoving the federal government aside and taking matters into their own hands. COVID sure hurt the melting pot on U.S. college campuses. International student enrollment fell by 15% or 1.1 million students during the 2020-2021 academic year. That's the biggest drop since the late 1940s. Travel restrictions and delayed visa processing were largely to blame. Amazon agreed to pay $500,000 and be monitored by California officials to make sure that from now on, it notifies workers within a day about new coronavirus cases. It will also notify local health agencies within 48 hours. The half-million will go to enforce the state's consumer protection laws. All of this is because of California's “right-to-know” law that took effect last year. In the United States cases were up 14%, deaths are down 14%, and hospitalizations are down 7% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending up since November 3. The five states that had the most daily deaths per 100,000 are Wyoming, Montana, Kentucky, Alaska, and Ohio. There are 9,237,610 active cases in the United States. The five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: Rhode Island 34%, Michigan 22%, Minnesota 20%, and New Mexico and South Dakota 15%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Nome Census Area, AK. Scotts Bluff, NE. San Juan, NM. Grant, NM. Scurry, TX. Big Horn, MT. Wadena, MN. Bethel Census Area, AK. Otsego, MI. And Washburn, WI. There have been at least 764,363 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont unchanged at 72%, Rhode Island at 71.7%, and Connecticut and Maine at 71.4%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia at 41.2%, Wyoming unchanged at 44.8%, and Alabama at 45.5%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 58.8%. Globally, cases were up 12% and deaths were down 3% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending up since October 15. There are 19,303,850 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 70,823. The U.K. 39,705. Russia 38,420. Germany 30,483. And Turkey 23,852. There have been at least 5,106,593 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Coronavirus 411 podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

ROI’s Into the Corner Office Podcast: Powerhouse Middle Market CEOs Telling it Real—Unexpected Career Conversations

Peter Greer is the president and CEO of HOPE International, a global Christ-centered economic development organization serving throughout Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Eastern Europe. Prior to joining HOPE, Peter worked internationally as a microfinance adviser in Cambodia and Zimbabwe and as managing director for Urwego Bank in Rwanda. He received a B.S. in international business from Messiah University and an MPP in political and economic development from Harvard's Kennedy School. Peter's favorite part of his job is spending time with the entrepreneurs HOPE serves—whether harvesting coffee with farmers in Rwanda, dancing alongside savings groups in Haiti, or visiting the greenhouses of entrepreneurs in Ukraine. As an advocate for the Church's role in missions and alleviating extreme poverty, Peter has co-authored over 10 books, including Mission Drift (selected as a 2015 Book Award Winner from Christianity Today), Rooting for Rivals (selected as a 2019 Leadership Resource of the Year in Outreach magazine), The Spiritual Danger of Doing Good (selected as one of the top 40 books on poverty by WORLD magazine) and Created to Flourish (which his mom reviewed with five stars and a smiley face emoji). More important than his role at HOPE is his role as husband to Laurel and dad to Keith, Liliana, Myles, and London. While his sports loyalties remain in New England, Peter and his family live in Lancaster, PA.

Rise Up For You
Episode #381 John Patrick Morgan How To Create What You Want

Rise Up For You

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 20:34


John Patrick Morgan is a Philosopher and Champion for Being. He leads a team of powerful Creators who teach, coach and guide thousands of people in being more free, loving and powerful. By learning to embody the Creating Perspective, their clients achieve a nexus of outcomes integrating spiritual growth, material success and societal impact. Post his formal studies in Physics and Mathematics, JP built multiple small businesses (including one from a laptop and a backpack before the term ‘digital nomad' existed), developed & invested in property, travelled the world for years on end, coached human rights leaders, recorded albums & toured with his band, created a kids library in Cambodia, learned to scuba dive & pilot gliders, published writing and photography, competed as a black belt & triathlete, trained with buddhist monks in India, cycled toured for months and many other adventures. In recent years, his adventures have turned inward as his family came to be. He and his wife recently moved with their two young boys to live on a mountain in Maui. The foundation of John Patrick Morgan's role as a philosopher, teacher and guide, is his being a real-world practitioner. He walks the talk, lives what he teaches and has a genuine and powerful commitment to people.

Haven Today
Pilgrims on the Way, Ep. 1 - Meet Tyler Van Halteren

Haven Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021


Tyler Van Halteren is a missionary in Cambodia who also has the heart and skills to creatively introduce one of the greatest Christian books of all time to a new generation. Hear his story.

New Books Network
Alice Beban, "Unwritten Rule: State-Making through Land Reform in Cambodia" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 37:38


Why do so many Cambodian small landholders live in fear? How did the issuance of official land titles contribute to growing indebtedness in rural areas? Why did the government send thousands of university students to the countryside to help with the land titling process? And why did international donors eventually become so disllusioned? In this podcast, Alice Beban, senior lecturer in development sociology at Massey University, discusses her new book Unwritten Rule: State Building Through Land Reform in Cambodia (Cornell 2021) with Duncan McCargo, Director of the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies at the University of Copenhagen. Unwritten Rule draws on eighteen months of ethnographic fieldwork to paint a disturbing picture of how an ambitious land reform project, generously funded by leading donors, largely failed to deliver the benefits it promised. In 2012, Cambodia—an epicenter of violent land grabbing—announced a bold new initiative to develop land redistribution efforts inside agribusiness concessions. Alice Beban's Unwritten Rule focuses on this land reform to understand the larger nature of democracy in Cambodia. Beban contends that the national land-titling program, the so-called leopard skin land reform, was first and foremost a political campaign orchestrated by the world's longest-serving prime minister, Hun Sen. The reform aimed to secure the loyalty of rural voters, produce "modern" farmers, and wrest control over land distribution from local officials. Through ambiguous legal directives and unwritten rules guiding the allocation of land, the government fostered uncertainty and fear within local communities. Unwritten Rule gives pause both to celebratory claims that land reform will enable land tenure security, and to critical claims that land reform will enmesh rural people more tightly in state bureaucracies and create a fiscally legible landscape. Instead, Beban argues that the extension of formal property rights strengthened the very patronage-based politics that Western development agencies hope to subvert. If you liked this podcast, you may also enjoy two other podcasts, hosted by Duncan McCargo on related topics, here and here.  Duncan McCargo is an eclectic, internationalist political scientist and literature buff: his day job is directing the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies at the University of Copenhagen. Learn more here, here, here, and here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Microsoft Libraries and Museums Podcast
A 'Journey to Cambodia's Sacred Mountain' through HoloLens, Holograms, and More at the Cleveland Museum of Art

Microsoft Libraries and Museums Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 25:24


In 'Revealing Krishna: A Journey to Cambodia's Sacred Mountain,' visitors learn about a 1,500 year old sculpture of the God Krishna through multiple digital experiences ranging from 360-degree immersive cinematic video to HoloLens to holograms. Jane Alexander, Chief Digital Information Officer and Sonya Rhie Mace, George P. Bickford Curator of Indian and Southeast Asian Art, at the Cleveland Museum of Art, collaborated closely to bring these experiences to life. In this episode, they share their journey of supporting the narrative of this important sculpture through mixed reality; their guiding philosophy around leveraging technology; and what the future of massive digital projects is at CMA. Plus, commentary by Microsoft's Catherine Devine. Episode resources: Revealing Krishna website Interview transcript

Stories of Sacrifice - WW2 American POW/MIAs Podcast
Stories Of Sacrifice || Vietnam War MIA Hunter David MacMillan Pt 2

Stories of Sacrifice - WW2 American POW/MIAs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 84:52


Part 2 - Late night chat with Australian David MacMillan who spent years in SE Asia working on US POW/MIA cases. We discuss remains he found and turned over to the US Government for identification. Today's part 2 we discuss Sean Flynn, son of actor Errol Flynn and Dana Stone who were freelance journalists captured by communist in April 1970 in Cambodia and have never been found. Thank you to MyHeritage for the use of their photo app used to colorize and animate these pictures: https://www.myheritage.com/?utm_source=partner_uspowmiafamilylocating&utm_medium=partner&utm_campaign=uspowmiafamilylocating_hp&tr_funnel=web Find our podcast, Stories of Sacrifice on your favorite podcast player or visit https://www.storiesofsacrifice.org/ How You Can Help: All money raised goes to support our Podcast and our POW/MIA Family Research where we are directly involved in the repatriation of WW2 POW/MIA's. Direct Support - https://paypal.me/JBear213 Monthly Support - https://www.buymeacoffee.com/sospodcast Please visit our affiliate links that help support our Podcast and POW/MIA research. I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you! Keep in mind that I link these companies and their products because of their quality and not because of the commission I receive from your purchases. All money earned goes to support our Podcast and support to POW/MIA family research. Flipside Canvas - Owned by Medal of Honor recipient Dakota Meyer (USMC). At Flipside Canvas, we believe that art offers an opportunity to showcase your commitment to empowering yourself and others. High quality materials that will last 100+ years. All our art comes stretched and ready to hang on your wall. 100% Made in America using locally sourced and manufactured materials. https://flipsidecanvas.com/?ref=SOSPodcast The Home Depot - Is not only for the Do It Yourself building and construction projects, you have access to over two million products ranging from small appliances to your everyday needs for the home, RV travel to camping. Purchase online and pick up your order at your local Home Depot free of charge or ship it to your home! The sky's the limit on the products offered by the Home Depot! https://homedepot.sjv.io/SOSPodcast FAIR USE NOTICE These videos/audio may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, such material has been referenced to advance understanding of political, human rights, ecological, economic, scientific, moral, ethical, and social justice issues. This constitutes a "fair use" of any such material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. #SeanFlynn #CambodiaIncursion #MissingInAction --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/storiesofsacrifice/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/storiesofsacrifice/support

Warfare of Art & Law Podcast
Art Crime & ARCA: A Conversation with Dr. Noah Charney

Warfare of Art & Law Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 44:20


To learn more, please visit ARCA's website.SHOW NOTES:03:00 Dr. Charney's interest in being a playwright led to foundation of Association for Research into Crimes against Art (ARCA)05:00 Charney's first book 05:30 first conference to bring academics and art police together06:30 criminalistics applied in Slovenia - a balanced policing system that merges the theories of criminology and practice of criminal investigation, forensics & police procedure11:00 ARCA's summer conference on art crime in central Italy14:00 Italy's Carabinieri Art Squad17:50 ARCA's CEO Linda Albertson18:30 Albertson's blog post about return of objects to Cambodia by Doug Latchford's Estate19:00 ARCA's blog21:30 recommendations to those who want to return looted art or cultural heritage objects24:00 Missing Masterpieces exhibition 25:35 thief of Van Gogh's Parsonage arrested though painting is still missing25:50 tip on whereabouts of Jean-Baptiste Oudry's The White Duck26:20 panel of Ghent Altarpiece stolen in 1934 is still missing and is an ongoing open case in Ghent, Belgium27:45 a work is ‘extant' if its location is known28:25 Justice Cycle panels by Rogier van der Weyden referenced in Charney's Museum of Lost Art 29:00 The Deposition in the Prado in Madrid is now considered van der Weyden's masterpiece29:10 van der Weyden considered The Justice of Trajan and Herkinbald from the Justice cycle to be his masterpiece29:45 the Justice cycle destroyed in a fire circa early 17th C.29:55 survivor bias for works that still exist and a negative space history of art is explored in Charney's 2018 book The Museum of Lost Art31:10 Charney's most recent book The Devil in the Gallery: How Scandal, Shock, and Rivalry Made the Art World? also has a negative space approach31:55 Charney's 2017 book The Collector of Lives focuses on the life of Giorgio Vasari 33:00 rivalry of artists as shown in Caravaggio's 1599 The Calling of St. Matthew wherein the artist used a duplicate of Sistine Chapel Ceiling's hand of God by Michelangelo to paint the hand of Jesus 34:15 Charney's online discussion of Caravaggio's 1599 The Calling of St. Matthew 34:50 top missing work that Charney would like to see recovered is the Book of Drawings, twelve folios by Giorgio Vasari36:05 second work is Leonardo da Vinci's Battle of Angiati; Vasari's use of false walls to preserve works he valued like da Vinci's Battle of Angiati37:15 third work would be the Justice Cycle37:30 Charney's preference for work in situ39:00 Vasari's use of false walls to cover paintings 39:50 Vasari's false wall in front of da Vinci's Battle and reasons to keep or remove wall40:50 Charney's recommendations of books published by ARCA41:10 Context Matters: Collating the Past by David W.J. Gill - collection of essays on antiquities, looting and archaeology41:20 Transnational Art Crime by ARCA academic director Edgar Telehouse41:45 The Secret Collector: the Lost Art Collection of Erich Šlomovič by Leon Pogelick and Slavko Pregl42:45 Charney's The Art Thief's Handbook - art theft essaysTo view rewards for supporting the podcast, please visit Warfare's Patreon page.To leave questions or comments about this or other episodes of the podcast, please call 1.929.260.4942 or email Stephanie@warfareofartandlaw.com. © Stephanie Drawdy [2021]

The Trip That Changed Me
Cambodia with Scott Neeson: making it in Hollywood, following your instincts, and the secret to a life well lived

The Trip That Changed Me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 50:10


Scott Neeson has lived many lives. He was born in Scotland and raised in Australia in a small industrial town with a high unemployment rate. As a young man, he managed to get an entry-level job as a movie theater projectionist, and from there had one of those legendary ascents to the role of President of 20th Century Fox International. It was as glamorous as you'd imagine - think private jets with Hollywood's biggest actors - but suddenly seemed insignificant after a trip to Cambodia in 2004. Shaken by a visit to a landfill where he saw hundreds of children scavenging to survive, Scott left his Hollywood career, moved to Phnom Penh, and founded the Cambodian Children's Fund, an organization that now educates almost 2000 children and supports families with community-based projects. Scott and Esme discuss the celebrity tantrum that gave him the nudge needed to quit and pursue his calling in Cambodia, the meaningful milestones that make the anxious, sleepless nights worthwhile, and the real secret to a happy life well lived.   You can find Scott's non-profit organization, Cambodian Children's Fund, on Instagram @cambochildrensfund and visit their website Cambianchildrendsfund.org.   Learn more about Full-Time Travel by visiting fulltimetravel.co and follow us on Instagram @full_time_travel. Be sure to rate, review, and follow so that you don't miss out on travel tips, inspiration, and your potential next adventure!    

Trend Lines
The AUKUS Defense Pact Is Shaking Up ASEAN

Trend Lines

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 31:19


Australian Foreign Minister Marise Payne is finishing up a four-nation tour of Southeast Asia this week, having begun her trip in Malaysia before moving on to Cambodia, Vietnam and finally Indonesia. A main goal of the visit is to conduct follow-up talks after Canberra agreed in late October on a new “comprehensive strategic partnership” with the main regional bloc, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. Another prominent item on Payne's agenda is to seek understanding from ASEAN members for Australia's three-way defense partnership with the U.S. and the U.K., which was just announced in September. Known as AUKUS, the pact calls for Australia to deploy nuclear-propelled attack submarines with British and American assistance. This week on the Trend Lines podcast, Susannah Patton, a research fellow in the Foreign Policy and Defense Program at the University of Sydney's United States Studies Center, joins WPR's Elliot Waldman to discuss the mixed reception of AUKUS in Southeast Asia and how ASEAN is positioning itself amid rising tensions between China on one hand, and the U.S. and its allies on the other. If you would like to request a full transcript of the episode, please send an email to podcast@worldpoliticsreview.com. Relevant Articles on WPR:  Australia Can't Get By on Nuclear Subs Alone Looming Over the AUKUS Deal Is the Shadow of War China's Growing Influence in Cambodia and Laos Has Vietnam on Edge The AUKUS Deal Is a Clarifying Moment for Biden's Foreign Policy   Trend Lines is produced and edited by Peter Dörrie, a freelance journalist and analyst focusing on security and resource politics in Africa. You can follow him on Twitter at @peterdoerrie. To send feedback or questions, email us at podcast@worldpoliticsreview.com.

InAsia
Water, Gender, and Poverty Collide in Cambodian Watershed

InAsia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 9:52


A years-long collaboration that's been working away in Cambodia's vital Stung Chinit Watershed has found that solutions to water inequality lie at the crossroads of infrastructure and gender. Project principals Laura Forni of the Stockholm Environment Institute and Paula Uniacke of The Asia Foundation hold down the discussion of a powerful new analytic approach in this week's podcast. 

Down the Pub Podcast
Epiosde 116: Emerald Exiles author Barry Landy

Down the Pub Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 52:32


On this episode I am joined by author of the fantastic new book Emerald Exiles: How the Irish Made Their Mark on World Football, Barry Landy.  We chat about the inspiration behind the book and how it came to be. We look at how Irish people were a big part in the history of two of the world's biggest clubs, Ajax and Barcelona.  We talk about how Irish people have turned up in some unlikely places like Terry Conroy in Hong Kong and Conor Nestor winning a championship in Cambodia. We also look at the great advantages of playing abroad and also some of the pitfalls.  This is a fantastic book and definitely worth checking out with incredible stories about Jack Kirwan, Anne O'Brien, Patrick O'Connell, Liam Brady, Robbie Keane and others. There's also first hand interviews with players including Stephanie Roche, Cillian Sheridan, Claire O'Riordan, Darren O'Dea and a host more. The book is available on Kindle and most other e-reader platforms. It's also available in all good bookshops in Ireland. You can also check it out here: https://www.newisland.ie/nonfiction/emerald-exiles          

Your Brain on Facts
Secret Cities (do-over, ep 170)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 33:46


Quick, switch over to Vodacast to see the pictures I talk about in the episode! We all lose things -- keys, wallets, patience -- but how do you lose an entire city?  Hear the stories of three American towns built in a hurry but kept off the map, secure Soviet enclaves known by their post codes, ancient cities found by modern technology, and the ingenious engineering of underground dwellings. YBOF Book; Audiobook (basically everywhere but Audible); Merch Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs. Support the show Music by Kevin MacLeod, .   Links to all the research resources are on our website.    In the opal-mining region of South Australia, lies the town of Coober Peedy.  You're welcome to visit, but don't expect to see much.  There aren't many buildings, though the landscape is dotted with ventilation shafts.  There's almost no movement at all.  So if the town is here, where are its 3500 residents?  Look down.  My name's Moxie and this is your brain on facts.   In 1943, three ordinary-looking US cities were constructed at record speed, but left off all maps.  Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Richland, Washington; and Los Alamos, New Mexico held laboratories and sprawling industrial plants, as well as residential neighborhoods, schools, churches, and stores.  The three cities had a combined population of more than 125,000 and one extraordinary purpose: to create nuclear weapons as part of the Manhattan project, the U.S. military's initiative to develop nuclear weapons.     Their design was driven by unique considerations, such as including buffer zones for radiation leaks or explosions. In each case, there were natural features, topographical features, that were considered to be favorable. In all three cases, they were somewhat remote—in the case of Richland and Los Alamos, very remote—which offered a more secure environment, of course. But also, in the event of a disaster, an explosion or a radiation leak, that would also minimize the potential exposure of people outside the project to any sort of radiation danger.  The sites were  selected far from one another in case German or Japanese bombers somehow managed to penetrate that far into the United States, it would be harder for them in a single bombing run to take out more than one facility.  K-25 plant at Oak Ridge, which was where they enriched uranium using the gaseous diffusion method, was the largest building in the world under a single roof, spanning more than 40 acres.    Before you being any building project, you have to clear the site of things like trees, high spots, people. In 1942, the government approached the families that lived near the Clinch river in Tennessee, some of whom had farmed there for generations, and kicked them out, telling them the land was needed for a “demolition range,” so as to scare off hold-outs with the threat of adjacent explosions.  The town scaled up fast.   Oak Ridge was initially conceived as a town for 13,000 people but grew to 75,000 by the end of the war, the biggest of the secret cities. The laboratories took up most of the space, but rather than constructing basic dormitories for employees, the architects and designers settled on a suburban vision.  To pull this off quickly and secretly, the architects relied on prefabricated housing, in some cases, a house might come in two halves on the back of a truck to be assembled on-site. These were called “alphabet houses;” A houses were the most modest (read: tiny), while D houses included dining rooms.  Housing was assigned based on seniority, though allowances were sometimes made for large families.     And race.  This was the early 40's, after all.  The secret suburbs for factories manufacturing megadeaths were segregated by design.  Their houses were called “hutments,” little more than plywood frames without indoor plumbing, insulation or glass in the windows.  Though two of the first public schools in the south to be desegregated were in Oak Ridge. They even threatened to secede from Tennessee in order to desegregate, so at least there's that.  There were white families in the hutments as well and all of the residents of that lower-class neighborhood were under more surveillance and stricter rules than the families in better housing.  Married couples may be forbidden to live together.  By the end of the war, most of the white families had been moved out of the hutments and but many of the African American families continued to live in the basic dwellings until the early 1950s.    These towns didn't appear on any official maps, and visitors were screened by guards posted at the entrances.  Anyone over 12 had to have official ID.  Firearms, cameras, and even binoculars were prohibited.  Billboards were installed all over town to remind workers to keep their mouths shut about their work, even though most workers knew very little about the project's true scope.  For example, you job may be to watch a gauge for eight hours and flip a switch if it goes to high.  You don't know what you're measuring or what the machine is doing.  All you've been told is to flip the switch when the needle hits a certain number.  In Los Alamos and Richland, the entire neighborhood may have the same mailing address.  At Oak Ridge, street addresses were designed to be confusing to outsiders. Bus routes might be called X-10 or K-25 while dorms had simple names such as M1.  There were no signs on buildings. The town was full of such ciphers, and even employees didn't know how to decode them all.  The use of words such as “atomic” or “uranium” was taboo lest it tip off the enemy.   When the US dropped the atom bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, in 1945, the city's secret was out. Many residents celebrated at this turning point in the war, but not all.  Mary Lowe Michel, a typist in Oak Ridge, is quoted in an exhibit on display now at the National Building Museum in DC: “The night that the news broke that the bombs had been dropped, there was joyous occasions in the streets, hugging and kissing and dancing and live music and singing that went on for hours and hours. But it bothered me to know that I, in my very small way, had participated in such a thing, and I sat in my dorm room and cried.”  All three cities remained part of the military industrial complex, continuing to work on nuclear weapons during the cold war as well as broader scientific research.  Today Oak Ridge is heavily involved in renewable energy, minus the barbed wire fence.   For most of the twentieth century, if the US was doing it, so was the USSR.  We had closed cities to build nuclear weapons, and so did the Soviet Union.  We had three, they had….lots. Like, a lot a lot.  Like, multiple screens on the Wikipedia list.  Where the US began to open its closed cities after the war, the USSR was building more and more, and not just for nuclear weapons.  These closed cities were nicknamed “post boxes,” because they would be named for the nearest non-secret city and the end of their post code; or simply “boxes” for their closed nature. During the two decades following World War II, dozens of closed cities were built around the country. Some were naukogradi (“science cities”) or akademgorodoki (“academic cities”), while others developed military technology and later spacecraft.  The official name was closed administrative-territorial formations or zakrytye administrativno-territorial'nye obrazovaniya, or ZATOs.    The cities were largely built by slave labor from the Gulag prison camps, which at the time accounted for 23% of the non-agricultural labor force in the Soviet Union.  They were guarded like gulags, too - surrounded by barbed wire and guards, with no one was allowed to enter or leave without official authorization.  Many residents did not leave the city once between their arrival and their death.  That being said, the captive residents enjoyed access to housing, food, and health care better than Soviet citizens elsewhere.  While most towns in the Soviet Union were run by local communist party committees, military officials oversaw the secret cities that would eventually be home to over 100,000 people.  Even during construction, officials were ordered to use trusted prisoners only, meaning no Germans, POWs, hard criminals, political prisoners.  Nevertheless, even living alongside Gulag prisoners, residents believed they were making a valuable contribution to their country. Nikolai Rabotnov, a resident of Chelyabinsk-65, remembered, “I was sure that within our barbed labyrinth, I inhaled the air of freedom!”   Arzamas-16, today known by its original name Sarov, was one of the most important sites in the early development of the first Soviet atomic bomb and hydrogen and was roughly the Soviet equivalent of Los Alamos.  Scientists, workers, and their families enjoyed privileged living conditions and were sheltered from difficulties like military service and economic crisis.  Leading researchers were paid a very large salary for those times.  Chelyabinsk-65 or Ozersk was home to a plutonium production plant similar to the American facilities built at Richland.  Located near a collective farm in the southern Ural Mountains, Chelyabinsk-65 was more or less built from nothing, where Arzamas-16 was an existing town that was taken over.  After the basics of the city were completed, early years were very difficult for the residents. The cities lacked basic infrastructure and suffered from high rates of alcoholism and poor living conditions. The Mayak Plutonium Plant dumped nuclear waste in the nearby Techa River, causing a health crisis not only for the residents of Chelyabinsk-65 but for all the villages which ran along it.   Conditions at Chelyabinsk-65/Ozersk would not improve until after the death of Joseph Stalin in 1953.  You remember that story, it was in our episode For Want of a Nail.  Owing to the plutonium plant, Chelyabinsk-65 is still one of the most polluted places in the world. Some residents refer to it as the “graveyard of the Earth.”  Somehow, though, it's considered a prestigious place to live where.  When the government polled residents after the Cold War had thawed over whether to open the city, they voted to keep it closed.  In fact, half of the nuclear scientists said they would refuse to stay if it was opened.  As one resident explained, “We take pride in the fact that the state trusts us enough to live and work in Ozersk.”   In 1991, the Soviet Union officially disbanded and its fifteen republics became independent, four of which had nuclear weapons deployed on their territories. This was of great concern to the West, as these newly formed nations did not have the financial or technological means to properly store and safeguard these weapons.  With budgets a fraction of what they were in the decades before, the standard of living in the ZATOs quickly declined.  Security went with it, as the soldiers who guarded the ZATOs also saw their wages slashed.   With little prospect of employment and limited security, scientists suddenly had the freedom not only to leave their cities but to leave the country.  Fear quickly spread in the United States that they could help develop nuclear programs in other countries, such as Iran.  In 1991, the Nunn-Lugar Act financed the transportation and dismantlement of the scattered nukes to not only reduce the number of nuclear weapons in the world but to provide the scientists with proper employment.  One result of this effort was the International Science and Technology Center in Moscow, which employed many former atomic scientists on non-weapons programs and still exists today.      If you need to hide a city from your enemies, you'd do well to move it underground.  Built in the late 50s in Wiltshire, England, the massive complex, codename Burlington was designed to safely house up to 4,000 central government personnel in the event of a nuclear strike.  In a former Bath stone quarry the city was to be the site of the main Emergency Government War Headquarters, the country's alternative seat of power if the worst happened.  Over 2/3mi/1km in length, and boasting over 60mi/97km  of roads, the underground site was designed to accommodate the Prime Minister, the Cabinet Office, civil servants and an army of domestic support staff.   Blast proof and completely self-sufficient the secret underground site could accommodate up to 4,000 people  in complete isolation from the outside world  for up to three months.  Though it was fortunately never used, the grid of roads and avenues ran between underground hospitals, canteens, kitchens, warehouses of supplies, dormitories, and offices.  The city was also equipped with the second largest telephone exchange in Britain, a BBC studio from which the PM could address the nation and a pneumatic tube system that could relay messages, using compressed air, throughout the complex.  An underground lake and treatment plant could provide all the drinking water needed.  A dozen huge tanks could store the fuel required to keep the generators in the underground power station running for up to three months.  The air within the complex could also be kept at a constant humidity and heated to around 68F/20C degrees.   The complex was kept on standby in case of future nuclear threats to the UK, until 2005, when the underground reservoir was drained, the supplies removed, the fuel tanks were emptied and the skeleton staff of four were dismissed. Some cities were not secret in their heyday, but were lost to time until recently.  In what's being hailed as a “major breakthrough” for Maya archaeology in February 2018, researchers have identified the ruins of more than 60,000 buildings hidden for centuries under the jungles of Guatemala.  Using LiDAR, or Light Detection And Ranging, scholars digitally removed the tree canopy from aerial images of the area, revealing the ruins of a sprawling pre-Columbian civilization that was far more complex and interconnected than most Maya specialists had supposed.   Mounted on a helicopter, the laser continually aims pulses toward the ground below, so many that a large number streak through the spaces between the leaves and branches, and are reflected back to the aircraft and registered by a GPS unit. By calculating the precise distances between the airborne laser and myriad points on the earth's surface, computer software can generate a three-dimensional digital image of what lies below.  To put the density of this jungle into perspective, archaeologists have been searching the area on foot for years, but did not find a single man-made feature.   “LiDAR is revolutionizing archaeology the way the Hubble Space Telescope revolutionized astronomy,” said Francisco Estrada-Belli, a Tulane University archaeologist and National Geographic Explorer. “We'll need 100 years to go through all [the data] and really understand what we're seeing.”  The project mapped more than 800 sq mi/2,100 sq km of the Maya Biosphere Reserve in the Petén region of northern Guatemala, producing the largest LiDAR data set ever obtained for archaeological research.  The old school of that held that Mayan civilization existed as scattered city-states, but these findings suggest that Central America supported an advanced civilization that was, with as many as 14 million people at its peak around 1,200 years ago, comparable to sophisticated cultures like ancient Greece or China.  The LiDAR even revealed raised highways connecting urban centers and complex irrigation and agricultural terracing systems.  And that was without the use of the wheel or beasts of burden   Despite standing for millennia, these sites are in danger from looting and environmental degradation.  Guatemala is losing more than 10 percent of its forests annually, and habitat loss has accelerated along its border with Mexico as trespassers burn and clear land for agriculture and human settlement.  “By identifying these sites and helping to understand who these ancient people were, we hope to raise awareness of the value of protecting these places,” Marianne Hernandez, president of the Foundation for Maya Cultural and Natural Heritage.   Lidar has also helped scientists to redraw a settlement located on the outskirts of Johannesburg, South Africa, and it tells the beginnings of a fascinating story.  Scientists from the University of Witwatersrand believe the newly discovered city was occupied in the 15th century by Tswana-speaking people who lived in the northern parts of South Africa.  Many similar Tswana city-states fell during regional wars and forced migration in the 1820s, and there was little oral or physical evidence to prove their existence.  Though archaeologists excavated some ancient ruins in the area in the 1960s, they couldn't comprehend the full extent of the settlement. By using LiDAR technology, the team was able to virtually remove vegetation and recreate images of the surrounding landscape, allowing them to produce aerial views of the monuments and buildings in a way that could not have been imagined a generation ago.    Using these new aerial photographs, they can now estimate that as many as 850 homesteads had once existed in and around the city they've given the temporary designation of SKBR.  It's likely that most homesteads housed several family members, meaning this was a city with a large population.  There are also stone towers outside some homesteads, as high as 8ft2.5m high with bases 16ft/5m wide.  The academics believe these may have been bases for grain bins or even burial markers for important people.  Though the team estimates they are still another decade or two away from fully understanding the city's inhabitants and how the city came to be, and ceased to exist.   Modern technology has also helped us find an ancient city in Cambodia.  Constructed around 1150, the palaces and temples of Angkor Wat were, and still are, the biggest religious complex on Earth, covering an area four times larger than Vatican City.   In the 15th Century, the Khmer kings abandoned their city and moved to the coast.  They built a new city, Phnom Penh, the present-day capital of Cambodia.  Life in Angkor slowly ebbed away.  Everything made of wood rotted away; everything made of stone was reclaimed by the jungle.   An international team, led by the University of Sydney's Dr Damian Evans, was able to map out /370 sq km around Angkor in unprecedented detail in less than two weeks - no mean feat given the density of the jungle.  Rampant illegal logging of valuable hardwoods had stripped away much of the primary forest, allowing dense new undergrowth to fill in the gaps. It was unclear whether the lasers could locate enough holes in the canopy to penetrate to the forest floor.  The prevalence of landmines from Cambodia's civil war are another area where shooting Lidar from a helicopter really shines. The findings were staggering.  The archaeologists found undocumented cityscapes etched on to the forest floor, with remnants of boulevards, reservoirs, ponds, dams, dikes, irrigation canals, agricultural plots, low-density settlement complexes and orderly rows of temples. They were all clustered around what the archaeologists realized must be a royal palace, a vast structure surrounded by a network of earthen dikes—the ninth-century fortress of King Jayavarman II. “To suspect that a city is there, somewhere underneath the forest, and then to see the entire structure revealed with such clarity and precision was extraordinary,” Evans told me. “It was amazing.”     These new discoveries have profoundly transformed our understanding of Angkor, the greatest medieval city on Earth.  Most striking of all was evidence of large-scale hydraulic engineering, the defining signature of the Khmer empire, used to store and distribute seasonal monsoon water using a complex network of huge canals and reservoirs.  Harnessing the monsoon provided food security - and made the ruling elite fantastically rich. For the next three centuries they channelled their wealth into the greatest concentration of temples on Earth.  Angkor was a bustling metropolis at its peak, covering /1,000 sq km; It would be another 700 years before London reached a similar size.     Bonus fact: and not to be a pedant, but “monsoon” refers no to the heavy rains in the rainy season from May to September, but to the strong, sustained winds that bring them.   And that's where we run out of ideas, at least for today.  Some cities are hidden, not for reasons of subterfuge or dereliction, but by necessity.  80% of the world's opal comes from the area of Coober Peedy, but that wealth is nothing to the sun it's going to continue with the Mad Max motif.  It may be 115 degrees F/47C outside, but it's only 74F/23C underground.  When heavy mining equipment was introduced a century ago, people took advantage of it to dug themselves homes, a church, hotels and B&Bs, a museum, casino, a gift shop, and, of course, a pub.  Remember...thanks... Source: http://www.nationalgeographic.com.au/history/laser-scans-reveal-maya-megalopolis-below-guatemalan-jungle.aspx https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/lost-city-cambodia-180958508/ https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-29245289 https://www.citylab.com/design/2018/05/inside-the-secret-cities-that-created-the-atomic-bomb/559601/ https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/how-to-build-secret-nuclear-city https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2018/may/03/off-the-map-the-secret-cities-behind-the-atom-bomb-manhattan-project https://www.atomicheritage.org/history/soviet-closed-cities https://metro.co.uk/2015/05/28/theres-a-whole-town-in-australia-that-lives-underground-5219091/ https://www.nationalgeographic.com/photography/proof/2016/09/coober-pedy-opal-mining/ https://www.outback-australia-travel-secrets.com/coober-pedy-underground-homes.html http://www.bbc.co.uk/wiltshire/content/articles/2005/12/14/burlington_nuclear_bunker_feature.shtml https://theculturetrip.com/africa/south-africa/articles/a-lost-african-city-has-just-been-discovered-by-scientists/ https://www.historicmysteries.com/derinkuyu-underground-city-cappadocia/

No One's Okay
Snapshots with Sean Moore

No One's Okay

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 39:55


Thanks for listening! This week, photographer and woodworking extraordinaire Sean Moore joins me to talk about his career journey. He shares how he got started in photography and what some common misconceptions are about the business of art. We talk everything from weed and carpentry, to making memories while traveling, tattoo souvenirs, and how to properly taste a good whiskey. As always we concluded with the eternal question, “Are You Okay?” But, spoiler alert… we weren't. xo, Pamela LISTEN/SUBSCRIBE TO THIS PODCAST Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/no-ones-okay/id1495487224 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/71zwoGcKEgZ8FvMVcwPawh?si=85kZIupGTICYMvarnmw0ag Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/no-ones-okay NO ONE'S OKAY SCHEDULE New Episodes every Tuesday BASED ON SCHEDULE New Episodes every other Monday CONNECT WITH US Website- http://www.noonesokay.com SOCIAL MEDIA Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/noonesokay @PamelaPortnoy SEAN MOORE PHOTO https://www.instagram.com/seanmoorephoto/?hl=en SEAN MOORE FURNITURE https://www.instagram.com/seanmoorefurniture/?hl=en #NoOnesOkayPodcast #SeanMoorePhoto #Photography

Mixed Messages
Ep. 60 - Little Cambodia

Mixed Messages

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 20:43


Today we start our interview with Mary, a daughter of Cambodian immigrants, who escaped hell to make a better life for their family. Mary's integration into American culture helped shape who she is today.For more information visit our website at https://www.mixedmessagespod.com.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/mixedmessagepod)

Hormonally Speaking
Season 3, Episode 4: How To Get Good Healthcare When You Are A Traveler Or Expat w/Vashti Kanahele

Hormonally Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 43:06


Planning a long trip or moving abroad for a job or for fun (aka #lifegoals)? Figuring out the healthcare situation in a new place can be both daunting and frustrating. That's where Expat Health Code comes in. Especially if you have been working with or using Functional or Naturopathic medicine, it can be hard to find these options outside of the US or Europe. That's why today's guest, Vashti Kanahele, MS, CHHC created Expat Health Code. Bringing together a Naturopathic Doctor alongside functional health coaches, Vashti has developed a comprehensive experience for the expat community to access the healthcare they may be missing. After living in 6 countries outside of the US, from Iraq to Nigeria, Vashti understands the ups and downs and pitfalls of trying to figure out healthcare in different countries. She shares her experiences (some of which will surprise you!) and explains how to navigate a new place to build yourself the best healthcare team. You'll also learn where she got the best healthcare, and where it was the toughest. This is a fascinating episode for those Americans living outside the US, or anyone who moves to a country different from their place of origin. Or if you are like me, and plan to eventually move abroad, this episode will give you the health foundations you need for the eventual move. Find out more at the Expat Health Code website or on their IG. Vashti Kanahele is a Functional Medicine Coach and founder of Green Papaya Health.Vashti has a background in healthcare and international development. She is a certified holistic health coach through the Integrative Women's Health Institute. Vashti has pursued further education in Hormone Health, Environmental Health, completed the Fix Your Period Apprenticeship, as well as advanced studies in Functional Medicine. Before becoming a Health Coach, she worked for the United States Agency for International Development, focusing on maternal/fetal health. Vashti worked in conjunction with the United Nations on several projects in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. She holds a BA and MSHS. Her own journey with complex chronic illness, miscarriages, and feeling passed over by the medical system led Vashti to change careers and become a health coach. She believes that crap food, toxins, and stress are a big reason why we struggle and is on a mission to help as many people as possible get better and stay better. In her private practice, Vashti works with women with complex chronic illnesses including mold illness, Lyme, and autoimmune conditions. Vashti doesn't subscribe to a one-and-done method, but rather that each individual that she's see's is unique, and therefore, their coaching experience is based on their biodindivuality. She is constantly researching new methods to meet clients where they're at to help them regain vitality. Vashti has been an expat for 12 years, and while it has its challenges, she can't imagine living life any other way. She has lived in Baghdad, Beirut, Phnom Penh, Bangkok, Lagos, and Willemstad. Vashti is passionate about bringing a blend of functional and naturopathic care toexpats and their families and building a supportive community. In her practice, Vashti provides 1:1 consultations and coaching packages. Find out more at her website. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/christine-garvin/support

Guidelines For Living Devotional
Questions For A Sovereign God

Guidelines For Living Devotional

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 4:50


If you live in a Republic, the highest elected official in your country is a President; however, if you live in a Kingdom—say, for example, the British Isles or in Cambodia, you have a king, and that means only God ranks higher. Presidents can be voted out of office, but kings traditionally derive their power from their blood line, and most kings would tell you they are king by right of divine appointment.

EWN - Engineering With Nature
The Next Generation Makes the Future of EWN Even Brighter

EWN - Engineering With Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 38:19


This episode exemplifies our theme for Season 3 –Creating the Future with EWN. Host Sarah Thorne and Jeff King, Deputy Lead of the Engineering With Nature program at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, are talking with three PhD students who are doing truly groundbreaking work: Matt Chambers from the University of Georgia, Joseph Holway from Arizona State University, and Justine McCann from the University of Oklahoma.   These students represent three of the academic institutions associated with the Network for Engineering With Nature (N-EWN) initiated in October of 2020. Education and research are at the heart of the N-EWN. In this episode, we discuss the journeys of Matt, Justine, and Joseph–how they got interested in environmental science, engineering, natural infrastructure, EWN, and their plans for the future. Their paths have similarities: a personal interest in the environment, early exposure to environmental issues, finding an academic advisor whose interests aligned with their own, and then pursuing a PhD focused on a passion. These students are committed to making a difference.   Joseph describes how, as a child, he fell in love with the Grand Canyon and spent a lot of time there, then spent a semester there as an undergraduate that transformed into a years-long job running around the Grand Canyon doing science. “I was like, wow, you're going to pay me to do these things? I wanted to work towards being more than a lab technician. I met my advisor, Dr. John Sabo, who was doing work in the Mekong River Basin; and now I'm in Cambodia working with fish and looking at how the amount of water and the timing of the water affects a fishery in Southeast Asia on the Mekong River.”   With a background in Mechanical Engineering, Matt struggled to find a long-term path that suited him. He took environmental science courses that aligned with his interest in environmental stewardship. These courses eventually led him to Dr. Brian Bledsoe's lab where he is working on riverine systems and flood management infrastructure using nature-based features. Dr. Bledsoe is the Director of the Institute for Resilient Infrastructure Systems at the University of Georgia. As Matt describes his work, “Utilizing nature-based features that already perform natural processes that manage floodwaters will be one way that we can make those systems more resilient in the face of climate change.”   Justine has a background in geology. A strong field program at Penn State introduced her to the complex problem of mine drainage prevalent in the coal country of Appalachia. After doing some consulting, she found her path forward: “When I heard my current advisor, Dr. Bob Nairn, talking about that at the Geological Society of America meeting, I thought his approach to it was very interesting.  because it's such a low-energy approach to solving such a complex problem. I thought it would be a great fit for me to work on these more innovative strategies.”   When talking about the future, the students focused on the key elements of EWN: using science and engineering to produce operational efficiencies to better understand systems and achieve desired outcomes by leveraging natural processes and working collaboratively with local communities. As Justine puts it, “I think that there's a lot to be said about considering how to work with nature instead of imposing our will on nature. That's a lot of what EWN is about.”   Joseph's vision is for future generations to be able to appreciate rivers as he does: “I want to work in a space where I can ensure that rivers are going to flow as wild and as free as possible, but it's kind of balancing all of the services that rivers provide. In places where there's going to be dams, we can manage them in ways that are least to people downstream, whether it's fishing for livelihoods or recreating on boats.” Joseph is also dedicated to sharing his knowledge and passion by mentoring and teaching future scientists through the NexGen Mekong Scientists program. Through this program, Arizona State University and the U.S. Department of State partner to build a network of young scientists in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam. Joseph says it is a two-way street: “As much as I'm able to provide, I feel like I'm getting more back from the folks that are here. There's a tremendous amount of knowledge that each individual person that I work with in Cambodia has.”   Matt adds that, even as grad students, they can help dispel uncertainties around the application of nature-based solutions through the research projects they are working on. “Then maybe we can get to a place where this is commonplace for engineers, for general engineering practice. I think that would be a big step forward in a transition to a more environmentally sustainable world.” Jeff agrees: “As a graduate student, you may feel sometimes like you're not quite ready or in a position to be able to communicate information about your work and why it's important because you're so relatively new in that career track. But that's just not true. You've got very important messages to share, and you need to be finding those opportunities to get out there and tell people your story.”   November 8 is STEM and STEAM Day, which stands for science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics. The purpose is to inspire students. Joseph, Justine, and Matt offered advice to future students, assuring them that there's no one path; take your time; you don't have to have it all figured out right now; and above all, follow your passion. As Joseph says, “I wish I'd have learned in grade school that we know so little. There's so much exploration that's out there to be discovered. Let your curiosities run wild, dream big and most importantly, embrace, celebrate, and lean into your failures.” Justine adds, “Follow what you're actually concerned about, like climate change, and put your energy into working on solutions.”    Matt directed his advice to parents: “Take your kids outside. Go somewhere wild and with some acreage and try to open their mind to ideas in science and environmental stewardship. Do everything you can to set them up for an organic experience of total and complete awe with the natural world.”   Jeff wraps up the episode by sharing his excitement for the future: “We are in good hands with this next generation. I feel so good about the passion, the intensity, and the intellect that students—not only the three that we have here today, but students around the globe—are going to bring to this space and help us overcome all the challenges that we have in front of us today.”   Related Links EWN Website ERDC Website Jeff King at LinkedIn Jeff King at EWN Network of Engineering With Nature University of Georgia, Institute for Resilient Infrastructure Systems Brian Bledsoe at UGA University of Oklahoma Center for Restoration of Ecosystems and Watersheds Robert Nairn (thesis advisor for Justine McCann) John Sebo, Audacious Water (thesis advisor for Joseph Holway) NexGen Mekong Scientists Royal University of Agriculture STEM and STEAM at Wikepedia USACE National STEM Awareness Program STEM/STEAM Day   EWN Podcast S1E10 Collaborating with Academia to Create EWN-Focused Scientists and Engineers EWN Podcast S3E2: Considering and Evaluating the Benefits of Natural Infrastructure

Far East Travels Podcast
Cambodia Announces Reopening Plan, News From Vietnam, Thailand And More!

Far East Travels Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 31:38


Cambodia finally announces reopening plans set for the end of November. Thailand reopened this week to fully vaccinated tourists from select countries and Vietnam has more regions getting ready to open possibly in November along with Phu Quoc Island. Clearly there is urgency to get things rolling again with airlines on the verge of bankruptcy and hotels and resorts exhausting their financial resources. Indonesia's key carrier is on the brink of bankruptcy and if the tourism industry doesn't start opening up in Asia more will follow. I will cover off the latest news and reopening plans as well as visit one of my favorite sites in the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal, Patan's Durbar Square(2018).Support the podcast!Donations: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/JohnASaboePatreon:https://www.patreon.com/FarEastTravelsWrite A Review:https://tools.applemediaservices.com/podcast/1079513943?country=us

American Conservative University
Hilarious Biden Musical Parody, Vietnam an Imperialist War?, The Guide to the Vietnam War,  Bruce Herschensohn, Dennis Prager, Michael Medved.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 61:29


Hilarious Biden Musical Parody, Vietnam an Imperialist War?, The P.I.G. Guide to the Vietnam War,  Bruce Herschensohn, Dennis Prager, Michael Medved.   Sing with Joe Biden! (musical parody) Was The Vietnam War An Imperialist War? (Michael Medved) The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Vietnam War Bruce Herschensohn Discusses the Vietnam War w? Dennis Prager   Sing with Joe Biden!  (Musical parody) https://youtu.be/7mY9JqCwt5Y 210,276 views Oct 21, 2021 FreedomToons 708K subscribers all of your favorite biden moments in one single collection! http://patreon.com/freedomtoons   Was The Vietnam War An Imperialist War? (Michael Medved) https://youtu.be/4N-Hn5bu2cY Oct 17, 2021 Sean Giordano 13.1K subscribers Michael Medved tears down a myth regarding the Vietnam War and it's critics. (This is recovered audio from Vimeo*) _________________________________ For more clear thinking like this from Michael Medved... I invite you to visit: http://www.michaelmedved.com/ Donate to these two wonderful causes: https://www.prageru.com/donate | and | https://www.adflegal.org/donate I use AVS4YOU.com for audio editing, and VEGAS Pro 17 for pairing audio and media (https://tinyurl.com/ybgou46g). ===== *My Vimeo account was terminated; this is a recovered audio from it. (Some will be many years old, as is the case with this audio.) =====   An Interview with Author and Vietnam Veteran, Phillip Jennings https://youtu.be/APh-vR3V9ik Oct 17, 2021 Sean Giordano Phillip E. Jennings served in Vietnam with the United States Marine Corps, flying helicopters, and in Laos as a pilot for Air America. He is the author of Nam-a-Rama and Goodbye Mexico, and won the Pirate's Alley Faulkner Society first prize for fiction with his short story, “Train Wreck in a Small Town.” A successful entrepreneur, he is currently CEO of Molecular Resonance Corporation, which is developing technology to detect Improvised Explosive Devices. The book discussed is, "The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Vietnam War (The Politically Incorrect Guides)" (This is recovered audio from Vimeo*) _________________________________ For more clear thinking like this from Michael Medved... I invite you to visit: http://www.michaelmedved.com/ Donate to these two wonderful causes: https://www.prageru.com/donate | and | https://www.adflegal.org/donate I use AVS4YOU.com for audio editing, and VEGAS Pro 17 for pairing audio and media (https://tinyurl.com/ybgou46g). ===== *My Vimeo account was terminated; this is a recovered audio from it. (Some will be many years old, as is the case with this audio.) =====   Bruce Herschensohn Discusses the Vietnam War w? Dennis Prager https://youtu.be/oM13ucecQjk Sean Giordano Bruce Herschensohn, a conservative American political commentator (RIP), author, and senior fellow at the Pepperdine University School of Public Policy in Malibu, California -- discusses why we "lost" the Vietnam war. His book discussed is "An American Amnesia: How the U.S. Congress Forced the Surrenders of South Vietnam and Cambodia." (This is recovered audio from Vimeo*) _________________________________ For more clear thinking like this from Dennis Prager... I invite you to visit: http://www.dennisprager.com/ ~ see also: http://www.prageruniversity.com/ Donate to these two wonderful causes: https://www.prageru.com/donate | and | https://www.adflegal.org/donate I use AVS4YOU.com for audio editing, and VEGAS Pro 18 for pairing audio and media (https://tinyurl.com/ybgou46g). ===== *My Vimeo account was terminated many years ago; this is a recovered audio from it. (Some will be many years old, as is the case with this audio.) ===== --------------------------------------------------------------------  Visit Pragertopia  https://pragertopia.com/member/signup.php  The first month is 99 cents. After the first month the cost is $7.50 per month. If you can afford to pay for only one podcast, this is the one we recommend. It is the best conservative radio show out there, period. ACU strongly recommends ALL ACU students and alumni subscribe to Pragertopia. Do it today!  You can listen to Dennis from 9 a.m. to Noon (Pacific) Monday thru Friday, live on the Internet  http://www.dennisprager.com/pages/listen  ------------------------------------------------------------------------ For a great archive of Prager University videos visit- https://www.youtube.com/user/PragerUniversity/featured   Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2eB2p0h Get PragerU bonus content for free! https://www.prageru.com/bonus-content Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/2aozfkP JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2aoz2y9 -------------------------------------------------------------------- The Rational Bible: Exodus by Dennis Prager   NATIONAL BESTSELLER "Dennis Prager has put together one of the most stunning commentaries in modern times on the most profound document in human history. It's a must-read that every person, religious and non-religious, should buy and peruse every night before bed. It'll make you think harder, pray more ardently, and understand your civilization better." — Ben Shapiro, host of "The Ben Shapiro Show" "Dennis Prager's commentary on Exodus will rank among the greatest modern Torah commentaries. That is how important I think it is. And I am clearly not alone... It might well be on its way to becoming the most widely read Torah commentary of our time—and by non-Jews as well as by Jews." — Rabbi Joseph Telushkin, bestselling author of Jewish Literacy Why do so many people think the Bible, the most influential book in world history, is outdated? Why do our friends and neighbors – and sometimes we ourselves – dismiss the Bible as irrelevant, irrational, immoral, or all of these things? This explanation of the Book of Exodus, the second book of the Bible, will demonstrate that the Bible is not only powerfully relevant to today's issues, but completely consistent with rational thought. Do you think the Bible permitted the trans-Atlantic slave trade? You won't after reading this book. Do you struggle to love your parents? If you do, you need this book. Do you doubt the existence of God because belief in God is “irrational?” This book will give you reason after reason to rethink your doubts. The title of this commentary is, “The Rational Bible” because its approach is entirely reason-based. The reader is never asked to accept anything on faith alone. As Prager says, “If something I write does not make rational sense, I have not done my job.” The Rational Bible is the fruit of Dennis Prager's forty years of teaching the Bible to people of every faith, and no faith. On virtually every page, you will discover how the text relates to the contemporary world and to your life. His goal: to change your mind – and then change your life.   Highly Recommended by ACU. Purchase his book at- https://www.amazon.com/Rational-Bible-Exodus-Dennis-Prager/dp/1621577724     The Rational Bible: Genesis by Dennis Prager  USA Today bestseller Publishers Weekly bestseller Wall Street Journal bestseller Many people today think the Bible, the most influential book in world history, is not only outdated but irrelevant, irrational, and even immoral. This explanation of the Book of Genesis, the first book of the Bible, demonstrates clearly and powerfully that the opposite is true. The Bible remains profoundly relevant—both to the great issues of our day and to each individual life. It is the greatest moral guide and source of wisdom ever written. Do you doubt the existence of God because you think believing in God is irrational? This book will give you many reasons to rethink your doubts. Do you think faith and science are in conflict? You won't after reading this commentary on Genesis. Do you come from a dysfunctional family? It may comfort you to know that every family discussed in Genesis was highly dysfunctional! The title of this commentary is “The Rational Bible” because its approach is entirely reason-based. The reader is never asked to accept anything on faith alone. In Dennis Prager's words, “If something I write is not rational, I have not done my job.” The Rational Bible is the fruit of Dennis Prager's forty years of teaching the Bible—whose Hebrew grammar and vocabulary he has mastered—to people of every faith and no faith at all. On virtually every page, you will discover how the text relates to the contemporary world in general and to you personally. His goal: to change your mind—and, as a result, to change your life.   Highly Recommended by ACU. Purchase his book at- https://www.amazon.com/Rational-Bible-Genesis-Dennis-Prager/dp/1621578984

American Conservative University
Hilarious Biden Musical Parody, Vietnam an Imperialist War?, The Guide to the Vietnam War,  Bruce Herschensohn, Dennis Prager, Michael Medved.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 61:29


Hilarious Biden Musical Parody, Vietnam an Imperialist War?, The P.I.G. Guide to the Vietnam War,  Bruce Herschensohn, Dennis Prager, Michael Medved.   Sing with Joe Biden! (musical parody) Was The Vietnam War An Imperialist War? (Michael Medved) The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Vietnam War Bruce Herschensohn Discusses the Vietnam War w? Dennis Prager   Sing with Joe Biden!  (Musical parody) https://youtu.be/7mY9JqCwt5Y 210,276 views Oct 21, 2021 FreedomToons 708K subscribers all of your favorite biden moments in one single collection! http://patreon.com/freedomtoons   Was The Vietnam War An Imperialist War? (Michael Medved) https://youtu.be/4N-Hn5bu2cY Oct 17, 2021 Sean Giordano 13.1K subscribers Michael Medved tears down a myth regarding the Vietnam War and it's critics. (This is recovered audio from Vimeo*) _________________________________ For more clear thinking like this from Michael Medved... I invite you to visit: http://www.michaelmedved.com/ Donate to these two wonderful causes: https://www.prageru.com/donate | and | https://www.adflegal.org/donate I use AVS4YOU.com for audio editing, and VEGAS Pro 17 for pairing audio and media (https://tinyurl.com/ybgou46g). ===== *My Vimeo account was terminated; this is a recovered audio from it. (Some will be many years old, as is the case with this audio.) =====   An Interview with Author and Vietnam Veteran, Phillip Jennings https://youtu.be/APh-vR3V9ik Oct 17, 2021 Sean Giordano Phillip E. Jennings served in Vietnam with the United States Marine Corps, flying helicopters, and in Laos as a pilot for Air America. He is the author of Nam-a-Rama and Goodbye Mexico, and won the Pirate's Alley Faulkner Society first prize for fiction with his short story, “Train Wreck in a Small Town.” A successful entrepreneur, he is currently CEO of Molecular Resonance Corporation, which is developing technology to detect Improvised Explosive Devices. The book discussed is, "The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Vietnam War (The Politically Incorrect Guides)" (This is recovered audio from Vimeo*) _________________________________ For more clear thinking like this from Michael Medved... I invite you to visit: http://www.michaelmedved.com/ Donate to these two wonderful causes: https://www.prageru.com/donate | and | https://www.adflegal.org/donate I use AVS4YOU.com for audio editing, and VEGAS Pro 17 for pairing audio and media (https://tinyurl.com/ybgou46g). ===== *My Vimeo account was terminated; this is a recovered audio from it. (Some will be many years old, as is the case with this audio.) =====   Bruce Herschensohn Discusses the Vietnam War w? Dennis Prager https://youtu.be/oM13ucecQjk Sean Giordano Bruce Herschensohn, a conservative American political commentator (RIP), author, and senior fellow at the Pepperdine University School of Public Policy in Malibu, California -- discusses why we "lost" the Vietnam war. His book discussed is "An American Amnesia: How the U.S. Congress Forced the Surrenders of South Vietnam and Cambodia." (This is recovered audio from Vimeo*) _________________________________ For more clear thinking like this from Dennis Prager... I invite you to visit: http://www.dennisprager.com/ ~ see also: http://www.prageruniversity.com/ Donate to these two wonderful causes: https://www.prageru.com/donate | and | https://www.adflegal.org/donate I use AVS4YOU.com for audio editing, and VEGAS Pro 18 for pairing audio and media (https://tinyurl.com/ybgou46g). ===== *My Vimeo account was terminated many years ago; this is a recovered audio from it. (Some will be many years old, as is the case with this audio.) ===== --------------------------------------------------------------------  Visit Pragertopia  https://pragertopia.com/member/signup.php  The first month is 99 cents. After the first month the cost is $7.50 per month. If you can afford to pay for only one podcast, this is the one we recommend. It is the best conservative radio show out there, period. ACU strongly recommends ALL ACU students and alumni subscribe to Pragertopia. Do it today!  You can listen to Dennis from 9 a.m. to Noon (Pacific) Monday thru Friday, live on the Internet  http://www.dennisprager.com/pages/listen  ------------------------------------------------------------------------ For a great archive of Prager University videos visit- https://www.youtube.com/user/PragerUniversity/featured   Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2eB2p0h Get PragerU bonus content for free! https://www.prageru.com/bonus-content Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/2aozfkP JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2aoz2y9 -------------------------------------------------------------------- The Rational Bible: Exodus by Dennis Prager   NATIONAL BESTSELLER "Dennis Prager has put together one of the most stunning commentaries in modern times on the most profound document in human history. It's a must-read that every person, religious and non-religious, should buy and peruse every night before bed. It'll make you think harder, pray more ardently, and understand your civilization better." — Ben Shapiro, host of "The Ben Shapiro Show" "Dennis Prager's commentary on Exodus will rank among the greatest modern Torah commentaries. That is how important I think it is. And I am clearly not alone... It might well be on its way to becoming the most widely read Torah commentary of our time—and by non-Jews as well as by Jews." — Rabbi Joseph Telushkin, bestselling author of Jewish Literacy Why do so many people think the Bible, the most influential book in world history, is outdated? Why do our friends and neighbors – and sometimes we ourselves – dismiss the Bible as irrelevant, irrational, immoral, or all of these things? This explanation of the Book of Exodus, the second book of the Bible, will demonstrate that the Bible is not only powerfully relevant to today's issues, but completely consistent with rational thought. Do you think the Bible permitted the trans-Atlantic slave trade? You won't after reading this book. Do you struggle to love your parents? If you do, you need this book. Do you doubt the existence of God because belief in God is “irrational?” This book will give you reason after reason to rethink your doubts. The title of this commentary is, “The Rational Bible” because its approach is entirely reason-based. The reader is never asked to accept anything on faith alone. As Prager says, “If something I write does not make rational sense, I have not done my job.” The Rational Bible is the fruit of Dennis Prager's forty years of teaching the Bible to people of every faith, and no faith. On virtually every page, you will discover how the text relates to the contemporary world and to your life. His goal: to change your mind – and then change your life.   Highly Recommended by ACU. Purchase his book at- https://www.amazon.com/Rational-Bible-Exodus-Dennis-Prager/dp/1621577724     The Rational Bible: Genesis by Dennis Prager  USA Today bestseller Publishers Weekly bestseller Wall Street Journal bestseller Many people today think the Bible, the most influential book in world history, is not only outdated but irrelevant, irrational, and even immoral. This explanation of the Book of Genesis, the first book of the Bible, demonstrates clearly and powerfully that the opposite is true. The Bible remains profoundly relevant—both to the great issues of our day and to each individual life. It is the greatest moral guide and source of wisdom ever written. Do you doubt the existence of God because you think believing in God is irrational? This book will give you many reasons to rethink your doubts. Do you think faith and science are in conflict? You won't after reading this commentary on Genesis. Do you come from a dysfunctional family? It may comfort you to know that every family discussed in Genesis was highly dysfunctional! The title of this commentary is “The Rational Bible” because its approach is entirely reason-based. The reader is never asked to accept anything on faith alone. In Dennis Prager's words, “If something I write is not rational, I have not done my job.” The Rational Bible is the fruit of Dennis Prager's forty years of teaching the Bible—whose Hebrew grammar and vocabulary he has mastered—to people of every faith and no faith at all. On virtually every page, you will discover how the text relates to the contemporary world in general and to you personally. His goal: to change your mind—and, as a result, to change your life.   Highly Recommended by ACU. Purchase his book at- https://www.amazon.com/Rational-Bible-Genesis-Dennis-Prager/dp/1621578984

Sacramental Whine
Empowered to Glorify God with Rick Saint

Sacramental Whine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 37:13


Welcome to episode 103, in this episode I have the honor of interviewing Bishop Rick Saint. Originally from the southern United States, Bishop Rick Saint is currently based in Thailand. The son of a protestant pastor, he grew up in church. Feeling a call to ministry as a teen, he attended Southeastern University for his undergraduate degree before pursuing a Master's of Church Ministries from Assemblies of God Theological Seminary. While doing his studies, Bishop Rick served on the ministry team of Carpenter's Home, a 10,000-seat church located in Lakeland, Florida. He hosted a 6-hour inspirational radio program, “The Rick Saint Show” each Sunday on church's radio station, as well as 15-minute and 30-minute daily spots teaching on the Jewish roots of Christianity. During this time, he felt God calling him into the historic churches and began to pursue holy orders with the Old Catholic Church of North America. While continuing at Carpenter's Home, he also served as a deacon on the altar of the Pro-Cathedral of Jesus of Nazareth, part of the Iglesia Filipina Independiente (Philippine Independent Church) in Tampa, Florida. After completing a Master's of Divinity from St. Michael's College, Bishop Rick was ordained a priest in 2004. As a bi-vocational priest, he pioneered St. Thomas More Old Catholic Mission which quickly grew from 3 to 25 adult members plus children while he also taught public school. Unable to find Old Catholic catechism materials for his parish, he published A Short Catechism of the Old Catholic Church. During this time, Bishop Rick was the featured speaker at conferences in various churches teaching on the Jewish roots of Christianity and the arts in worship, as well as training clergy and lay leaders in the areas of healing and deliverance. In 2007, Bishop Rick took a position as the Director of Continuing Education at Walters State Community College in Tennessee and turned the pastorate of St. Thomas More over to one of the clergies he had trained. After 2 years at Walters State, he resigned and relocated to Asia, where he has worked in international education as a teacher, head of school, and academic officer in Korea, Thailand, Cambodia, and Myanmar. While he was in Asia, the Old Catholic Church of North America reorganized as the Old Catholic Communion of North America, leaving him without a spiritual “home.” Although he worked with different churches over the years, as these countries are primarily Buddhist, Bishop Rick found there were very few open and affirming churches in Asia and only one church that was part of the Independent Sacramental Movement in any of the countries in which he lived. Bishop Rick began Resurrection Fellowship in Thailand, which he currently pastors. As people were coming to (then Father) Rick to be confirmed, there was a demand for episcopal oversight. In searching for such, Bishop Rick developed a fraternal relationship with Bishop Regen Luna of the Philippines, who was seeking to develop an independent sacramental jurisdiction in Asia. Out of their friendship/cooperation, Christ Communion was born, and they elevated Bishop Rick to the episcopacy to do the work of a missionary bishop in Thailand. Only a year old, Christ Communion already has parishes and ministries growing in the Philippines, Thailand, Korea, and the United States. Focusing on the overwhelming grace of God, Bishop Rick continues to preach and teach “how Jesus of Nazareth, anointed by the Holy Spirit, went about doing good and healing all who were oppressed by the devil.” Links: Sacramental Whine: Chronicling the Independent Sacramental Movement, Vol. 1 Sacramental Whine: Chronicling the Independent Sacramental Movement, Vol. 2 This podcast is hosted by Bishop David Oliver Kling, and produced by the Community of Saint George (the Young Rite).

New Books in Southeast Asian Studies
Wonders of the Mekong: Rethinking Sustainable Development and Resilience in Cambodia's Tonle Sap Lake

New Books in Southeast Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 20:20


Cambodia's Tonle Sap is the largest inland lake in Southeast Asia. Each year, during the monsoon, this freshwater lake experiences an incredible hydrological phenomenon, in which it is inundated with swelling waters from the Mekong River, causing it to rise by up to tenfold in some places, before returning to its pre-monsoon level as the dry season returns. But Tonle Sap is facing a triple environmental threat: climate change, the damming of the Mekong River, and over-fishing, with devastating impact not only on the wildlife, but also on local floating village communities. To share more, Dr Josephine Gillespie joins Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories and invites us to rethink global environmental protection regimes in Southeast Asia. Taking Cambodia's Tonle Sap Lake as a case-study, she argues that in order to maintain the ecological, cultural, and economic integrity of the most important river and delta system in the world, environmental management projects and policies must take into account people-place dynamics and local livelihoods. About Josephine Gillespie: Dr Josephine Gillespie is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Geosciences, Faculty of Science at the University of Sydney. She researches environmental regulation and people-place dynamics across the region, with a particular focus on Cambodia. Jo's research projects have focused on protected areas, especially the management of world heritage places and wetlands. She is the author of Protected Areas: A Legal Geography Approach (2020) and a co-editor of Legal Geography: Perspectives and Methods (2020). Jo has published widely about environmental management in the Asia-Pacific. For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre's website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/southeast-asian-studies

New Books in Environmental Studies
Wonders of the Mekong: Rethinking Sustainable Development and Resilience in Cambodia's Tonle Sap Lake

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 20:20


Cambodia's Tonle Sap is the largest inland lake in Southeast Asia. Each year, during the monsoon, this freshwater lake experiences an incredible hydrological phenomenon, in which it is inundated with swelling waters from the Mekong River, causing it to rise by up to tenfold in some places, before returning to its pre-monsoon level as the dry season returns. But Tonle Sap is facing a triple environmental threat: climate change, the damming of the Mekong River, and over-fishing, with devastating impact not only on the wildlife, but also on local floating village communities. To share more, Dr Josephine Gillespie joins Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories and invites us to rethink global environmental protection regimes in Southeast Asia. Taking Cambodia's Tonle Sap Lake as a case-study, she argues that in order to maintain the ecological, cultural, and economic integrity of the most important river and delta system in the world, environmental management projects and policies must take into account people-place dynamics and local livelihoods. About Josephine Gillespie: Dr Josephine Gillespie is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Geosciences, Faculty of Science at the University of Sydney. She researches environmental regulation and people-place dynamics across the region, with a particular focus on Cambodia. Jo's research projects have focused on protected areas, especially the management of world heritage places and wetlands. She is the author of Protected Areas: A Legal Geography Approach (2020) and a co-editor of Legal Geography: Perspectives and Methods (2020). Jo has published widely about environmental management in the Asia-Pacific. For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre's website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

New Books Network
Wonders of the Mekong: Rethinking Sustainable Development and Resilience in Cambodia's Tonle Sap Lake

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 20:20


Cambodia's Tonle Sap is the largest inland lake in Southeast Asia. Each year, during the monsoon, this freshwater lake experiences an incredible hydrological phenomenon, in which it is inundated with swelling waters from the Mekong River, causing it to rise by up to tenfold in some places, before returning to its pre-monsoon level as the dry season returns. But Tonle Sap is facing a triple environmental threat: climate change, the damming of the Mekong River, and over-fishing, with devastating impact not only on the wildlife, but also on local floating village communities. To share more, Dr Josephine Gillespie joins Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories and invites us to rethink global environmental protection regimes in Southeast Asia. Taking Cambodia's Tonle Sap Lake as a case-study, she argues that in order to maintain the ecological, cultural, and economic integrity of the most important river and delta system in the world, environmental management projects and policies must take into account people-place dynamics and local livelihoods. About Josephine Gillespie: Dr Josephine Gillespie is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Geosciences, Faculty of Science at the University of Sydney. She researches environmental regulation and people-place dynamics across the region, with a particular focus on Cambodia. Jo's research projects have focused on protected areas, especially the management of world heritage places and wetlands. She is the author of Protected Areas: A Legal Geography Approach (2020) and a co-editor of Legal Geography: Perspectives and Methods (2020). Jo has published widely about environmental management in the Asia-Pacific. For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre's website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

SSEAC Stories
Wonders of the Mekong: Rethinking Sustainable Development and Resilience in Cambodia's Tonle Sap Lake

SSEAC Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 20:20


Cambodia's Tonle Sap is the largest inland lake in Southeast Asia. Each year, during the monsoon, this freshwater lake experiences an incredible hydrological phenomenon, in which it is inundated with swelling waters from the Mekong River, causing it to rise by up to tenfold in some places, before returning to its pre-monsoon level as the dry season returns. But Tonle Sap is facing a triple environmental threat: climate change, the damming of the Mekong River, and over-fishing, with devastating impact not only on the wildlife, but also on local floating village communities. To share more, Dr Josephine Gillespie joins Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories and invites us to rethink global environmental protection regimes in Southeast Asia. Taking Cambodia's Tonle Sap Lake as a case-study, she argues that in order to maintain the ecological, cultural, and economic integrity of the most important river and delta system in the world, environmental management projects and policies must take into account people-place dynamics and local livelihoods. About Josephine Gillespie: Dr Josephine Gillespie is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Geosciences, Faculty of Science at the University of Sydney. She researches environmental regulation and people-place dynamics across the region, with a particular focus on Cambodia. Jo's research projects have focused on protected areas, especially the management of world heritage places and wetlands. She is the author of Protected Areas: A Legal Geography Approach (2020) and a co-editor of Legal Geography: Perspectives and Methods (2020). Jo has published widely about environmental management in the Asia-Pacific. For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre's website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac.

The Savage Nation Podcast
BIDEN'S GUN GRAB - THE KILLING FIELDS

The Savage Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 77:04


Savage talks with Neil Hansen, an Air America pilot who flew the last plane to freedom out of Cambodia during the communist revolution of the 1970s. They cover the abominable Khmer Rouge takeover, and the concept of "crisis" which is the first step to subverting a country from within. Hansen agrees with Savage that the Biden administration, as controlled by Bernie Sanders and 'the squad' in Congress, are a lot like the architects of the Cambodian revolution. The Khmer Rouge was a militia made up of murderous, vicious young Cambodians, named for the red scarves they wore. Sound like ANTIFA? They were armed while the population was disarmed. Sound like Biden's gun grab?  The Khmer Rouge mostly killed middle class doctors and lawyers and educated entrepreneurs -- basically "anyone who wore eyeglasses". Sound like the assault on white people? They beheaded victims and displayed the heads on fence posts. Somewhere between 1.5 and 2 million people were killed, leading to a mountain of skulls. Savage recounts the story of one survivor who has spent his life seeking justice for family members he lost, and for the old man who saved his life by convincing prison guards to free him but sacrificed his own life in the process. The podcast also includes a classic interview with Yuri Bezmenov, a KGB defector who explained "ideological subversion" for killing countries from within. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Your Brain on Facts
This Is (still) Halloween

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 35:49


♪♫This is Halloween!  This is Halloween!♫♪  Supporters on our Patreon and fans in our FB group chose the topics for today's episode (plus now there's a sub-reddit):  01:35 sorting Dracula fact from fiction 07:49 how horror stars got their stars 20:01 when did clowns become scary 23:29 the history behind zombies 28:38 movie monster fast facts!  Mentioned in the show: Overly Sarcastic's Frankenstein run-down Cutting Class podcast on Christopher Lee Oh No! Lit Class on The Phantom   Who needs a costume when you could wear this?!   Read the full script. Reach out and touch Moxie on FB, Twit, the 'Gram or email. Music by Kevin MacLeod  Sponsor: City of Ghosts Brandi B. asked that we sort fact from fiction on Vlad Dracula.  Personally, I can remember a time when I didn't know that Vlad the Impaler was thought to be the inspiration from Bram Stoker's genre-launching vampire Dracula.  Hop in your magic school bus, police box, or phone booth with aerial antenna, and let's go back to 15th's century Wallachia, a region of modern day Romania that was then the southern neighbor of the province of Transylvania.  Our Vlad was Vlad III.  Vlad II, his father, was given the nickname Dracul by his fellow Crusade knights in the Order of the Dragon, who were tasked with defeating the Ottoman Empire.  Wallachia was sandwiched between the Ottomans and Christian Europe and so became the site of constant bloody conflict.  Without looking it up, I'm going to guess that they failed, since the Ottoman Empire stood until 1923.  Dracul translated to “dragon” in old Romanian, but the modern meaning is more like devil.  Add an A to the end to denote son-of and you've got yourself a Vlad Dracula.   At age 11, Vlad and his 7-year-old brother Radu went with their father on a diplomatic mission into the Ottoman Empire.  How's it go?  No too good.  The three were taken hostage.  Their captors told Vlad II that he could be released – on condition that the two sons remain.  Since it was his only option, their father agreed.  The boys would be held prisoner for 5 years.  One account holds that they were tutoried in the art of war, science and philosophy.  Other accounts says they were also subjected to torture and abuse.  When Vlad II returned home, he was overthrown in a coup and he and his eldest son were horribly murdered.   Shortly thereafter, Vlad III was released, with a taste for violence and a vendetta against the Ottomans.  To regain his family's power and make a name for himself, he threw a banquet for hundreds of members of his rival families.  On the menu was wine, meat, sweetbreads, and gruesome, vicious murder.  The guests were stabbed not quite to death, then impaled on large spikes.  This would become his signature move, leading to his moniker Vlad the Impaler, but wasn't the only arrow in his quiver.  Facing an army three times the size of his, he ordered his men to infiltrate their territory, poison wells and burn crops.  He also paid diseased men to go in and infect the enemy.  Defeated combatants were often treated to disemboweling, flaying alive, boiling, and of course impalement.  Basically, you turn your enemy into a kabob and let them die slowly and, just as important, conspicuously.  Vlad's reputation spread, leading to stories we have trouble sorting from legend, like that he once took dinner in a veritable forest of spikes.  We do know that in June of 1462, he ordered 20,000 defeated Ottomans to be impaled.  It's a scale that's hard to even imagine.   When the Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II came upon the carnage, he and his men fled in fear back to Constantinople.  You'd think Vlad was on the road to victory, but shortly after, he was forced into exile and imprisoned in Hungary. [[how?]]  He took a stab, no pun intended, on regaining Wallachia 15 years later, but he and his troops were ambushed and killed.  According to a contemporary source, the Ottomans cut his corpse into pieces and marched it back to Sultan Medmed II, who ordered them displayed over the city's gates.  History does not record where the pieces ended up.   Vlad the Impaler was an undeniably brutal ruler, but he's still considered one of the most important rulers in Wallachian history for protecting it against the Ottomans and a national hero of Romania.  He was even praised by Pope Pius II for his military feats and for defending Christendom.  So how did get get from Vlad Dracula, the Impaler, a warrior king with a taste for torture, to, 400 years later, Dracula the undead creature of the night who must feed on the blood of living, can morph into bats or mist, and must sleep in his native earth?  Historians have speculated that Irish author Bram Stoker met with historian Hermann Bamburger, who told him about Vlad III, which ignited some spark of inspiration, but there's not actually any evidence to back this up.  Stoker was actually the first writer that we know of to have a vampire drink blood.  Vampires are actually a common folklore baddie around the world, from the obayifo in Africa which can take over people's bodies and emit phosphorus light from their armpits and anus to the manananggal of the Philippines who can detach her torso from her legs so she can fly around with her organs trailing behind her and use her snakelike tongue to steal babies from the womb.  In Western culture, though, Vlad the Impaler became the basis for everything from Bela Lugosi's Dracula to Count Chocula.  That means he's also the source of the Twilight saga, truly one of history's greatest monsters.   Ronnie asked for “how some legends got their stars.”  I wasn't sure what that meant, so I asked for clarification.  No, I didn't, I launched off immediately and at a full gallop with the first interpretation that came to mind, as I do in all aspects of my life.  So let's talk horror actors and the Hollywood walk of fame.   Even if he weren't a recognizable face, Vincent Price is probably the most recognizable voice in horror history.  For folks my age, you probably heard him for the first time on Michael Jackson's Thriller.  Folks in their 30's might have heard him first as Prof. Ratigan in The Great Mouse Detective.  Price wasn't always a horror icon.  He'd done theater, radio, including Orson Wells Mercury Theater of the Air, and other genres of films, but 1953's House of Wax, which was also the first 3D movie to crack the top 10 box office gross for its year, solidified his place in horror history.  It's almost odd that Price went into acting at all.  His father was the president of the National Candy Company and his grandfather had set the family up with independent means thanks to his brand of cream of tartar.  Price and his wife Mary wrote a number of cookbooks, one of which my mother had when I was young.  You cannot fathom my confused disappointment that it was just a regular cookbook full of regular, boring, non-scary recipes.  And now, for no other reason than it makes me smile, is another amazing voice, Stephen Fry, talking about Price on QI.:  Romanian-born Bela Lugosi was a classical actor in Hungary before making the move to movies.  In fact, he was already playing Dracula on stage when the movie was being assembled.  Lugosi wanted the role so badly he agreed to do it for $500 per week, about $9K today, only one quarter that of actor David Manners who played Jonathan Harker.  It was a good investment, I'd say, since everyone knows Lugosi and this was the first time I'd ever seen David Manners' name.  Though Lugosi turned down the role of the monster in Frankenstein, he was quickly locked into horror.  He appeared in minor roles in a few good movies, like “Ninotchka” with Greta Garbo, but mostly bounced like a plinko chip from mediocre to bad movies, with ever decreasing budgets.  His drug addiction probably had a cyclical relationship with his work prospects.  He died two days into filming the absolutely dreadful “Plan 9 From Outer Space” and was replaced by a much younger and taller actor and his ex-wife's chiropractor because he fit the costume.   Peter Lorre is a name you might not recognize, but you would absolutely recognize his overall aesthetic.  It's still being referenced and parodied to this day.  See the bad guy?  Is he short, with round eyes, and a distinctive way of speaking?  What you got there is Peter Lorre.  Hungarian-born Lorre struck out at 17 to become a star.  For 10 years he played bit parts in amateur productions, but in 1931 he got his big break in the German film “M,” and Hollywood took notice.  His first English-speaking role was in the Hitchcock thriller “The Man Who Knew Too Much.”  The character spoke English, but Lorre didn't.  Just like Bela Legosi during his first turn as Dracula, Lorre had to memorize his lines phonetically.  Imagine how difficult it must be to put the right pacing and inflection into a sentence when you don't know which word means what.  He continued portraying psychopaths until John Huston cast him in a quasi-comic role in “The Maltese Falcon” with Humphrey Bogart and Sidney Greenstreet, which led to lighter roles like the one he played in Arsenic and Old Lace.  If you never seen it, make it you next choice.  It's a comedy, but you can definitely watch it with your horror movies, since it's about a pair of serial killers hiding bodies in their cellar.   Arsenic and Old Lace also features a bad guy getting plastic surgery to avoid the police, which accidentally leaves him looking like Boris Karloff and he's really touchy about it.  I don't know why.  Even though he played many monsters and villains in his career, Karloff was said to actually be a kind, soft-spoken man who was happiest with a good book or in his garden.  We hear him narrate How the Grinch Stole Christmas every year.  He doesn't sing the song, though.  That's Thurl Ravenscroft, who was also the original voice of Tony the Tiger.  The title role in Frankenstein took Karloff from bit player to household name.  Karloff said of the monster, “He was inarticulate, helpless and tragic.  I owe everything to him. He's my best friend.”  By the way, if you're one of those people who delights in going “Um, actually, Frankenstein was the name of the doctor,” can you not?  We all know that.  And since it's the last name of the man who gave him life, aka his father, it's a perfectly passable patronym to use.  Oh and by the way Mr or Ms Superior Nerd, Frankenstein wasn't a doctor, he was a college dropout.  I refer you to my much-beloved Red at Overly Sarcastic Productions on YouTube for a thorough explanation of the actual story.  Penny Dreadful did get pretty close in their interpretation.   Here's a name more people should know, John Carradine.  Wait, you say, the guy from Kill Bill?  No, that's his son David.  Oh, you mean the FBI guy the sister was dating on Dexter.  No, that's his other son Keith.  Revenge of the Nerds?  No, that's Robert.  The patriarch John Carradine was in over 500 movies, big names like Grapes of Wrath and A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, but he also did a lot of horror, though it could be a mixed bag — everything from Dracula in House of Dracula down to Billy the Kid vs Dracula.  Not always for the love of it, either.  Sometimes a gig's just a gig.  He told one of his sons, “Just make sure that if you've got to do a role you don't like, it makes you a lot of money.”  Good advice for many areas of life.  If you've got Prime Video or Shudder, look for The Monster Club.  It's an darling, schlocky little anthology movie, which they just don't seem to make anymore, starring Carradine and Vincent Price.     Jaime Lee Curtis could have been on this list since she was in 5 of the Halloween films, but I just don't think people think “horror” when they hear her name.   There were a few names surprisingly not set in the stones.  While ‘man of a thousand faces' Lon Chaney, who played the original Phantom of the Opera and Hunchback of Notre Dame, has a star, his son, Lon Chaney Jr, who played the Wolfman, the Mummy and numerous other roles in dozens of horror movies, does.  Somehow, Christopher Lee doesn't either.  In addition to the 282 roles on his imdb page, he deserves a star just for playing Dracula 10 times and still having a career after that.  Also, he was metal as fuck, recording metal albums into his 80's and there was the time he corrected director Peter Jackson on what it's like when you stab someone, because he *knew.  My buddies over at Cutting Class diverged from their usual format to tell us all about his amazing life.   Over in the Brainiac Breakroom, (plug sub reddit, thank Zach), Alyssa asked for the history behind clowns being evil.  One day, a man dressed up as a clown and it was terrifying.  Thank you for coming to my TED talk.   No?  Okay.  Fine!  It's not like I have to research them and keep seeing pictures of clowns.  Clowns weren't really regarded as frightening, or at least a fear of clowns wasn't widely known, from the creation of what we'd recognize as a clown by Joseph Grimaldi in the 1820's until fairly recently.  David Carlyon, author, playwright and a former clown with Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus in the 1970s, argues that coulrophobia, the fear of clowns, was born from the counter-culture 1960s and picked up steam in the 1980s.  “There is no ancient fear of clowns,” he said. “It wasn't like there was this panic rippling through Madison Square Garden as I walked up through the seats. Not at all.”  For centuries, clowns were a funny thing for kids — there was Bozo, Ronald McDonald, Red Skelton's Clem Kaddidlehopper and Emmet Kelly's sad clown– then bam!  Stephen King's hit novel “It,” the doll in “Poltergeist,” and every incarnation of The Joker.  It could be seen as a pendulum swing.  Clowns had been so far to the good side that it must have been inevitable they would swing *way the hell over to evil.   Not so fast, argues Benjamin Radford, author of the book “Bad Clowns,” who argues that evil clowns have always been among us.  “It's a mistake to ask when clowns turned bad because historically they were never really good.  Sometimes they're making you laugh. Other times, they're laughing at your expense.”  Radford traces bad clowns all the way to ancient Greece and connects them to court jesters and the Harlequin figure.  He points particularly to Punch of the Punch & Judy puppet shows that date back to the 1500s.  Punch was not only not sweet and loveable, he was violent, abusive, and even homicidal.   Maybe when isn't as important as why.  Why are some of us afraid of clowns?  Personally, I think it's their complete disregard for personal space.  Kindly keep your grease-painted face at least arm's length away.  The grease paint may be part of it.  It exaggerates the features.  The face is basically human in composition, but it's not.  It dangles us over the edge of the uncanny valley, where something makes us uncomfortable because it is *almost human.  The makeup obscures the wearer's identity, so we don't really know who we're dealing with.  Clowns also act in aberrant ways, contrary to societal norms and expectations, and that might subconsciously get our back up.  As for coulrophilia, sexual attraction to clowns…. I got nothing.  You do you.   Charlie asked for the real history behind popular horror icons, like werewolves, vampires, and zombies.  Even though the zombie craze held on longer than the 2017 obsession with bacon, most people don't know about them pre-George Romero's Night of the Living Dead.   The word “zombie” first appeared in English around 1810 in the book “History of Brazil,” this was “Zombi,” a West African deity.  The word later came to suggest a husk of a body without vital life energy, human in form but lacking the self-awareness, intelligence, and a soul.  The Atlantic slave trade caused the idea to move across the ocean, where West African religions began to mix with force Christianity.  Pop culture continually intermixes many African Diasporic traditions and portrays them exclusively as Voodoo. However, most of what is portrayed in books, movies, and television is actually hoodoo. Voodoo is a religion that has two markedly different branches: Haitian Vodou and Louisiana Vodoun. Hoodoo is neither a religion, nor a denomination of a religion—it is a form of folk magic that originated in West Africa and is mainly practiced today in the Southern United States.   Haitian zombies were said to be people brought back from the dead (and sometimes controlled) through magical means by voodoo priests called bokors or houngan. Sometimes the zombification was done as punishment (striking fear in those who believed that they could be abused even after death), but often the zombies were said to have been used as slave labor on farms and sugarcane plantations. In 1980, one mentally ill man even claimed to have been held captive as a zombie worker for two decades, though he could not lead investigators to where he had worked, and his story was never verified.   To many people, both in Haiti and elsewhere, zombies are very real and as such very frightening.  Think about it.  These people were enslaved, someone else claimed dominion over their body, but they still had their mind and their spirit.  What could be more frightening to an enslaved person than an existence where even that is taken from you?   In the 1980s when a scientist named Wade Davis claimed to have found a powder that could create zombies, thus providing a scientific basis for zombie stories, a powerful neurotoxin called tetrodotoxin, which can be found in several animals including pufferfish.  He claimed to have infiltrated secret societies of bokors and obtained several samples of the zombie-making powder, which were later chemically analyzed.  Davis wrote a book on the topic, “The Serpent and the Rainbow,” which was later made into a really underappreciated movie.  Davis was held up as the man who had scientifically proven the existence of zombies, but skeptic pointed out that the samples of the zombie powder were inconsistent and that the amounts of neurotoxin they contained were not high enough to create zombies.  It's not the kind of thing you can play fast & loose with.  Tetrodotoxin has a very narrow band between paralytic and fatal.  Others pointed out nobody had ever found any of the alleged Haitian plantations filled with zombie laborers.  While Davis acknowledged problems with his theories, and had to lay to rest some sensational claims being attributed to him, he insisted that the Haitian belief in zombies *could be based on the rare happenstance of someone being poisoned by tetrodotoxin and later coming to in their coffin.   Bonus fact: Ever wonder where we get brain-eating zombies from?  Correlation doesn't equal causation, but the first zombie to eat brains was the zombie known as Tarman in 1984's Return of the Living Dead.  This wasn't a George Romero movie, though.  It's based on a novel called  Return of the Living Dead by John Russo, one of the writers of Night of the Living Dead.  After Russo and Romero parted company, Russo retained the rights to any titles featuring the phrase “Living Dead.”    Cindra asked for movie monster facts.  The moon is getting full, so let's hit these facts muy rapido.   1922's Nosferatu was an illegal and unauthorized adaption of Bram Stoker's Dracula.  Stoker's heirs sued over the film and a court ruling ordered that all copies be destroyed.  However, Nosferatu subsequently surfaced in other countries and came to be regarded as an influential masterpiece of cinema.   Not a single photograph of Lon Chaney as the Phantom in The Phantom of the Opera (1925) was published in a newspaper or magazine, or seen anywhere before the film opened in theaters.  It was a complete surprise to the audience and to Chaney's costar Mary Philbin, whos shriek of fear and disgust was genuine.   In the original Dracula, Lugosi never once blinks his eyes on camera, to give his character an otherworldy vibe.  Francis Ford Coppolla did something similar by having Dracula's shadow move slightly independently, like the rules of our world don't apply to him.   Even though he starred in the film, Boris Karloff was considered such a no-name nobody that Universal didn't invite him to the premiere of 1931's Frankenstein.   Karloff's classic Mummy the next year did not speak because the actor had so many layers of cotton glued to his face that he couldn't move his mouth.   The Creature from the Black Lagoon's look was based on old seventeenth-century woodcuts of two bizarre creatures called the Sea Monk and the Sea Bishop.   To make a man invisible for 1933's The Invisible Man, director James Whale had Claude Rains dressed completely in black velvet and filmed him in front of a black velvet background.   The movie poster for The Mummy (1932) holds the record for the most money paid for a movie poster at an auction: nearly half a million dollars.   Boris Karloff's costume and makeup for 1935's Bride of Frankenstein were so heavy and hot that he lost 20 pounds during filming, mostly through sweat.  His shoes weighed 13 lb/6 kg/1 stone apiece.   The large grosses for the film House on Haunted Hill (1960) were noticed by Sir Alfred Hitchcock was inspired to make a horror movie after the seeing the box office gross for William Castle's House on Haunted Hill.   Filming the shower scene for Psycho was pretty mundane, but actress Janet Leigh was so terrified by seeing the finished product –thanks to the editing by Alma Reveill-Hitchcock and Bernard Herrmann score– that she did not shower, only bathed, from the premier in 1960 to her death in 2004.  You can read more about Alma Revill in the YBOF book.   According to our friends Megan and RJ at Oh No! Lit Class podcast, the first use of Toccata Fuge in G Minor in a film was the 1962 Phantom of the Opera.  It's hard to imagine classic horror without it.   In Night of the Living Dead, the body parts the zombies ate were ham covered in chocolate sauce.  George Romero joked that they shouldn't bother putting the zombie makeup on the actors because the choco-pork made them look pale and sick with nausea anyway.   A lot of people know that Michael Myers' mask in the original Halloween was actually a William Shatner mask painted white.  They bought it because it was on clearance and the film had a small budget.  Most people don't know that Shatner later repaid the favor by dressing up as Michael Myers for Halloween.   Freddy Kruger's look was based on a scary drunk man Wes Craven saw outside his home as a child.  His glove made of leather and steak knives was actually inspired by Craven's cat.  Looks down at scratches on both arms.  Yeah, that checks out.  The idea of being killed in your sleep comes from real deaths of people who survived the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia, only to die mysteriously later.   1987's The Monster Squad. With a werewolf, a mummy, Dracula, and Frankenstein's monster in the mix, the group looked suspiciously like the line-up of the 1930s and '40s Universal horror movies. To avoid confusion (i.e. lawsuits), filmmaker Fred Dekker made some subtle changes to his monsters, like removing Dracula's widow's peak, and moving Frankenstein's neck bolts up to his forehead. See? Totally different!   Yes, those were real bees in Candyman, even the ones in Candyman's mouth.  Tony Todd had a clause in his contract that he would get $1k for every bee sting he got during filming.  Even though juvenile bees with underdeveloped stingers were used, he still got $23k worth of stings.   You might think 1991's Silence of the Lambs was the first horror movie to win an Oscar, but Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde beat them to it by 60 years with Fredric March's Oscar for Best Actor.

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Rock N Roll Pantheon
Crime in Music 72: I'm Billy Idol and I Hate Teasing the Yank!

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 101:30


This english punk rocker was raised in New York City, USA. After his sister was born his family moved back across the pond, where he fell in love with the english punk scene. He played guitar for the band Generation X. After the band breaks up, he takes his shot at being a lead singer and with the help of some local musicians, he ditched the glasses, bleached his hair and bought a studded leather jacket. After several radio hits in America and back in his homeland of England, he started branching out and became one of the most played artists on a brand new television channel, MTV. With the popularity of his music videos, his stardom skyrocketed. He could be scene in movie, tv and live performances around the globe. While on vacation in Thailand, he and his friend Harry Johnson accidentally buy heroin, piss off the President of Cambodia and are forcibly removed by the Thai Army after 3 weeks of drugs, alcohol and prostitutes. Buckle up for the furiously feverous fast paced fun of Billy Idol. Leave an Anonymous SpeakPipe Voice Msg: www.crimeinmusic.com Tweet Us: www.twitter.com/crimeinmusic Gram: www.instagram.com/crimeinusic FaceBook: www.facebook.com/crimeinmusic Proud member of the Pantheon Podcasts Network Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

American Prestige
Bonus - Vietnam from the Vietnamese Perspective, Ep. 4 w/ Sean Fear (PREVIEW)

American Prestige

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 2:55


In the fourth episode of our series on Vietnam, Danny and Derek speak with Sean Fear, lecturer in international history at the University of Leeds, about the early period of Nguyễn Văn Thiệu's reign, Richard M. Nixon's "Vietnamization" strategy and the war's expansion to Laos and Cambodia, the American anti-war movement, and North Vietnam's position after the failure of the Tet Offensive. Become a patron today! www.patreon.com/americanprestige

Frontier Missions Journal

Told by the Lewis family who is serving at the AFM Great River Project in Cambodia

Counting Countries
Tommy Shuai Shao … Chasing 244

Counting Countries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 140:50


Key Links How Many Countries Are There In The World video Support Counting Countries at Patreon The new Counting Countries Merch Store Thank you to my Patrons…Phillip Jones, Simen Flotvik Mathisen, Thor Pedersen, Steph Rowe, Adam Hickman, Bisa Myles & Ted Nims. Be the first on your block to sport official Counting Countries apparel!  You can purchase them today on Amazon. And now, you can listen to Counting Countries on Spotify! And Alexa! Subscribe on Apple Podcasts today! And write a review! Check out our friend: Large Minority.  They organize international rallies around the world, including Sri Lanka, Cambodia, the Philippines, and the Amazon.  And watch my full-length documentary in Cambodia when I traveled with Large Minority.   I am friends with Tommy on Facebook and also met him on the somewhat famous Adam Hickman Covid Zoom travel trivia game, but he was many of my social media friends who I really did not know.  On Tommy's FB page I noted some interesting posts with a lot of flight maps.  It definitely caught my attention and thought I would love to learn more about Chasing 244.    After my conversation with Tommy, I will be checking in with Thor Pedersen again of Once Upon A Saga.  I have been documenting Thor's journey to every country in the world and all of the challenges he has been facing with this pandemic.  You will hear a snippet of this conversation but my patrons will hear the entire conversation.  Thanks to Phillip Jones, Simen Flotvik Mathisen, Steph Rowe, Ted Nims, Bisa Myles, Thor Pedersen, and Adam Hickman for supporting Counting Countries. They help pay for the production of this podcast.  You can support this podcast by going to Patreon.com/CountingCountries.  I endeavor to interview a diverse set of voices within our community.  I want to hear different perspectives and experiences and I believe you appreciate that as well.  It has been my shortcoming that I have not had a guest from China, the world's most populous country.  Well, that has been rectified with this conversation with Tommy as we learn about his journey to every country in the world and his recent project of Chasing 244. I was in Yerevan, Armenia for this recording while Tommy was in Shanghai.   Please listen in and enjoy.   Subscribe on Apple Podcasts today!! About Counting Countries Counting Countries is the only podcast to bring you the stories from the dedicated few who've spent their lives on the singular quest of traveling to every country in the world. Fewer people have traveled to every country in the world than have been to outer space. Theme music for this podcast is Demeter's Dance, written, performed, and provided by Mundi. About GlobalGaz Ric Gazarian is the host of Counting Countries. He is the author of three books: Hit The Road: India, 7000 KM To Go, and Photos From Chernobyl.  He is the producer of two travel documentaries: Hit The Road: India and Hit The Road: Cambodia.  Ric is also on his own quest to visit every country in the world. You can see where he has traveled so far and keep up with his journey at GlobalGaz.com. Well…that depends on who you ask! The United Nations states that there are193 member states. The British Foreign and Commonwealth office states that there are226 countries and territories. The Traveler's Century Club states that there are329 sovereign nations, territories, enclaves, and islands. The Most Traveled Person states that there are949 unique parts of the world. The Nomad Maniadivides the world into 1301 regions. SISO says there are3,978 places in the world. Me? My goal is the 193 countries that are recognized by the UN, but I am sure I will visit some other places along the way. An analysis of these lists and who is the best traveled by Kolja Spori.  Disclaimer: I will earn a fee if you order from Amazon/Agoda. Or book a trip through G Adventures.  PS  Thanks! ----- Produced by Sonorous Lab Studio  

The Feedfeed
What's For Dinner? Davy Khy AKA @loveinmybelly joins the show to talk about her Cambodian roots!

The Feedfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 37:22


In this episode, Feedfeed Food Editor Alexa Santos virtually sits down to dinner with Davy Khy AKA @loveinmybelly. Davy is the daughter of immigrant parents who survived the Cambodian genocide in the late 1970s. She was born in a refugee camp before her parents immigrated to the U.S when she was barely a month old. After years of watching her mother cook, testing out her recipes, and traveling all over Cambodia, she has finally brought her mother's dishes to life through her memoir cookbook LOVE IN MY BELLY. Davy talks about her relationship with food, her culture, and what went into the production of this memoir cookbook.Heritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support The Feedfeed by becoming a member!The Feedfeed is Powered by Simplecast.

NüVoices
A Conversation with Sophie Richardson, China Director of Human Rights Watch

NüVoices

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 45:15


Sophie Richardson is the China Director at Human Rights Watch, a position she's held since 2006.She frequently testifies to parliaments around the world and is the author of China, Cambodia and the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence, which examines Chinese foreign policy since the 1954 Geneva Conference. She speaks Mandarin, earned a doctorate from the University of Virginia and a BA from Oberlin College. Sophie joins Sophia Yan, NüVoices board member and Telegraph China correspondent, to discuss human rights in China, what it feels like to be sanctioned by the Chinese government, and how HRW keeps its staff healthy mentally and emotionally healthy given demanding work.

The Thriving Christian Artist
295 - How to Hear God's Voice: A Conversation with Taylor Jensen

The Thriving Christian Artist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 48:18


If you believe that God can create through you, that He can speak to others through the medium of your artistic talents and ability, then you're going to want to listen to this episode of the Thriving Christian Artist podcast!As artists who desire to partner with God in creating Prophetic Art, discerning God's voice is something that we must do - but that doesn't mean it's easy!In this episode we discuss all the details about hearing God's voice with my friend and guest, Taylor Jensen.  We'll ask the hard questions, likeWhat are the different ways we hear God's voice?  How do you discern if it's God's voice versus your own? How does God speak specifically to you and through you?And if this is a brand-new experience for you, how do you even get started?Believe it or not, this is actually a pretty controversial subject - people have a lot of strong feelings about it!   Taylor is no stranger to that controversy, as he regularly speaks on how to seek and discern the voice of God.  He also served for years as a missionary with Youth With a Mission (YWAM), going from desperate places like Colombia to Cambodia to… California!  Our yearning to hear God's voice is universal.⭐ Listener Special ⭐Taylor has a wonderful Bible study called He Speaks: How to Hear, Listen, and Understand the Voice of God.   This four-week Bible Study is designed to help you discover the ways God speaks to His people throughout the Bible so that you can begin to hear Him like never before.  And he's offering my podcast listeners a special savings of 20% when you purchase the study - just use the discount code THRIVING!   Thanks to Taylor for this special opportunity!Connect with Taylor online at http://FireplaceFaith.comhttps://instagram.com/taylorcjensenhttps://facebook.com/taylorcjensen===========Connect with Matt online:www.matttommeymentoring.comwww.instagram.com/thethrivingchristianartistwww.facebook.com/thethrivingchristianartistYou can also watch this podcast on YouTube at youtube.com/mjtommey.  Be sure to subscribe so you don't miss an episode!

The Bangkok Podcast | Conversations on Life in Thailand's Buzzing Capital
From Coffee to Conflict: Kenyan Ambassador Lindsay Kiptiness [S5.E32]

The Bangkok Podcast | Conversations on Life in Thailand's Buzzing Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 44:27


Greg interviews Lindsay Kiptiness, the Kenyan Ambassador to Thailand. Ambassador Kiptiness begins by introducing himself and explains his responsibilities as ambassador to Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia and Burma. He explains his unfortunate arrival during COVID times, and his desire to really explore Thailand when it fully re-opens. The Kenyan healthcare system is behind Thailand's, but he notes that Nairobi did serve as the center of COVID treatment for UN officials.  Greg asks the Ambassador about Kenyan products, and the Ambassador regales Greg with pitches for Kenyan coffee and Kenyan purple tea. No, that's not a typo, and the Ambassador assures us it is the best tea in the world. :)  The conversation continues on to cover cultural misconceptions, the fickle nature of the global community in times of crisis, and the expatriate Kenyan (and African communities) in Thailand, which is growing, and the Thai community in Kenya, which unfortunately is not. Greg and the Ambassador discuss the reasons for this, and the Ambassador contends there is simply not enough information about Kenya and Africa in Thailand. In fact, the Ambassador makes the point that Greg has made many times on the podcast: all expats are to some extent ambassadors for their home country, and Mr. Kiptiness encourages all Kenyans in Thailand to do their best to promote their home country.  Don't forget that Patrons get the ad-free version of the show as well as swag and other perks. And we'll keep our Facebook, Twitter, and LINE accounts active so you can send us comments, questions, or whatever you want to share.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 10-15-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 5:25


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for October 15th, 2021. A major study shows infections among school-aged children in England are “high and rising.” That probably ups the intensity of the debate over kids and vaccines. The reproduction rate of those aged 17 and younger was 1.18, meaning on average every 10 infected young people are passing it on to about 12 others. From the gee I wish we'd known this earlier department, two new international studies show the immune protection from two doses of Pfizer drops off after a mere two months. One study found the drop especially true for men, people 65 and older, and those with immunosuppression. The study also found immunity lasts longer from a vaccination if you've already had a natural case of COVID-19. Penn State College of Medicine researchers found more than half of the 236 million people diagnosed with COVID-19 worldwide since December 2019 will experience post-COVID symptoms for up to six months after recovering. These include tiredness, difficulty breathing, chest pain, sore joints and loss of taste or smell. The research team said healthcare officials should get ready for all those survivors who'll need care for psychological and physical conditions. How do airline passengers feel about vaccine mandates to fly? Well, it's America, so the answer is, it's split. That's according to the travel website Skift's poll. 45% definitely want a mandate, 23% don't care either way, and 33% are against it. The older the person, the more likely they are to be in favor of requiring vaccinations to fly. With all the stories of overworked nurses with PTSD and of nurses who are getting fired or quitting because of vaccine mandates, you'd think it wouldn't be a very alluring occupation right now. But applications to nursing schools are actually rising. Up 5.6% in 2020 according to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and number are also trending up in 2021. The reasons; unprecedented career opportunities, the challenge, and many people have been inspired by healthcare workers over the past couple of years. In the United States cases were down 22%, deaths are down 5%, and hospitalizations are down 21% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending down since September 13. There are 9,702,828 active cases in the United States. With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: Michigan 26%, Minnesota 21%. North Dakota 16%, Montana 13%, and Pennsylvania 11%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Bethel Census Area, AK. Stark, ND. Goshen, WY. Kenai Peninsula Borough, AK. Lewis, KY. Lake, MT. Nome Census Area, AK. Rio Grande, CO. Matanuska-Susitna Borough, AK. And Whitley, KY. There have been at least 720,482 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont unchanged at 70.3%, Connecticut unchanged at 69.6%, and Rhode Island at 69.5%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia still unchanged at 40.7%, Idaho unchanged at 42.5%, and Wyoming at 42.7%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is unchanged at 56.5%. The five countries with the biggest 24-hour increases in the number of fully vaccinated people: Cambodia, New Zealand, Australia, Thailand, and Oceana all up 2%. Globally, cases were down 14% and deaths were down 15% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending down since August 26. There are 17,809,484 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 99,775. The U.K. 42,606. Turkey 31,248. Russia 28,717. And India... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Post Reports
Looted treasure and offshore accounts

Post Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 18:49


Cambodia wants its religious artifacts returned. Dozens tied to an indicted collector remain in prominent museums. The Pandora Papers expose his reliance on offshore secrecy. Plus, U.S. lawmakers respond to revelations in the Pandora Papers.Read more:Cambodia wants its religious artifacts returned. Dozens tied to an indicted collector remain in the Met and other prominent museums. The Pandora Papers expose his reliance on offshore secrecy, as Peter Whoriskey reports. Although it's only been a few days since the Pandora Papers published, there has already been a wave of reaction around the world, including in the United States. Will Fitzgibbon, a senior reporter with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, reports that lawmakers are calling for a crackdown on financial “enablers.”