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Latest podcast episodes about filipino american

The Filipino American Woman Project
152: "We are redefining what it means to be Pinay. We are the ones that have the power to shift culture." Presenting THENEWFILIPINA.COM with Jen and Nani

The Filipino American Woman Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 62:54


152: "We are redefining what it means to be Pinay. We are the ones that have the power to shift culture." Presenting THENEWFILIPINA.COM with Jen and NaniHAPPY NEW YEAR! Jen and Nani are back with holiday season reflections and 2023 major updates for our community! They share why this is the first episode they've published in the new year, updates on their YouTube channel, when their monthly Instagram Live events and monthly book club sessions will be taking place, and lastly, they proudly present their new online home: THENEWFILIPINA.COM. This conversation is also available on YouTube: https://youtu.be/z0qxVmU-krwIMPORTANT: If you are a current Discord Member, BUYUSBOBA.COM Supporter or Member, we will be personally reaching out (if we haven't already) to show you how to join our new community.Major Updates:YouTube Channel - subscribe to our channel to get snippets of past TFAW Project episodes and teasers for our Tsismis with Jen and Nani Private Podcast https://www.youtube.com/@thefilipinoamericanwomanpr234/shortsMonthly Events:Jen & Nani Unfiltered Instagram Live Show - Every 1st Friday of the month @ 12 PM (PST) / 1 PM (MST) / 2 PM (CST) / 3 PM (EST) via Instagram Live @thefilipinoamericanwomanLet's talk ASSERTIVENESS with Dr. Abby - Every 2nd Tuesday of the month @ 7 PM (PST) / 8 PM (MST) / 9 PM (CST) / 10 PM (EST) via Instagram Live @thefilipinoamericanwomanTsismis with Jen and Nani Book Club - Every 3rd Friday of the month @ 12 PM (PST) / 1 PM (MST) / 2 PM (CST) / 3 PM (EST). First-Time Members can join today at https://bit.ly/tnf-book-clubRead our latest newsletter, published Tuesday, January 17th, 2023: https://mailchi.mp/8bc8573f0e4d/tfawproject--WANT MORE FROM OUR SHOW? Join our *NEW* online community that offers daily conversation, book club sessions, and the Tsismis with Jen and Nani Private Podcast at http://thenewfilipina.com/NEWSLETTER: Receive the latest stories, updates and media coverage by subscribing to our FREE newsletter: http://eepurl.com/cO0bifABOUT US: Welcome to the Filipino American Woman Project - A Podcast Show that shares stories and life lessons told by individuals living (or have lived) in America, that are of Filipino descent and are cisgender female. For Season 4, Jen and Nani pivot the show to focus on their journey as podcasters, content creators, and entrepreneurs -- with a focus on advocating for Filipino American women storytellers and authors.UPCOMING BOOK: Special thanks to the Bulosan Center for Filipino Studies at UC Davis for the opportunity to present our academic paper, Pinay Podcasters: Building a Self-Sustaining Community Through Storytelling, Collective Healing & Learning, and Collaboration. The initial draft is now available! Read more at

Caffeinated Crimes
Episode 151: North Valley JCC Shooting (Murder of Joseph Ileto)

Caffeinated Crimes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 43:13


On August 10, 1999, a white nationalist entered the North Valley Jewish Community Center and shot at children attending summer camp. He fired 70 shots in a short amount of time. Once he fled, the man also shot and killed a Filipino American postal worker, Joseph Ileto. Tune in to hear all the details about the JCC shooting as well as the murder of Joseph Ileto. We also briefly discuss the shooter. Tune in to hear all the details! Instagram: @caffeinatedcrimespodTwitter: @caffcrimespodEmail: caffeinatedcrimespod@gmail.comFacebook: Caffeinated CrimesSupport the show

Tests and the Rest: College Admissions Industry Podcast
434. FINDING YOUR AUTHENTIC SELF IN THE PATH TO COLLEGE

Tests and the Rest: College Admissions Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 25:23


Aspiring college students tend to commit abundant time and resources to learning all about specific schools and programs, yet remain oblivious to their own motivations and needs. Amy and Mike invited author Tracy Badua to comment on finding your authentic self in the path to college. What are five things you will learn in this episode? Why is the concept of authenticity so central to discussions about life after high school? In what ways does a high-pressure academic environment impact a high schooler? What makes being rejected by a dream school so difficult for teens? What lessons can you share for students who feel that they “owe” their parents success? What advice should every teen take to heart about high school, college, and life? MEET OUR GUEST Tracy Badua is a Filipino American author of books about young people with sunny hearts in a sometimes stormy world. According to her grandmother, Tracy inherited this love of the written word from her great-grandfather, a school teacher in the Philippines. To Tracy, this means writing is in her blood, and she continues this family tradition by telling stories with her own spin in an accessible, heartfelt way. Tracy's newest book is This is Not A Personal Statement?, released Jan 2023. By day, she is an attorney who works in national housing policy and programs, and by night, she squeezes in writing, family time, and bites of her secret stash of candy. School and work brought her from California to Washington, DC, and back, and she now lives in San Diego, California, with her family. Tracy served as an Article Editor for the California Real Property Journal, was a Round 8 mentor for Author Mentor Match and 2021 Pitch Wars mentor, and is actively involved in the Filipino American lawyer community. She was awarded the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators first Out from the Margins Award and a Conference Choice Award at the 2017 San Diego State University Writers' Conference. She is represented by Natalie Lakosil of the Irene Goodman Literary Agency. Find Tracy at https://tracybadua.com. LINKS This Is Not A Personal Statement RELATED EPISODES COLLEGE ADMISSIONS INSANITY WHAT DOES UNHOOKED MEAN IN ADMISSIONS? ADMISSIONS INSIGHTS FOR HIGHLY SELECTIVE UNIVERSITIES ABOUT THIS PODCAST Tests and the Rest is THE college admissions industry podcast. Explore all of our episodes on the show page. ABOUT YOUR HOSTS Mike Bergin is the president of Chariot Learning and founder of TestBright. Amy Seeley is the president of Seeley Test Pros. If you're interested in working with Mike and/or Amy for test preparation, training, or consulting, feel free to get in touch through our contact page.  

Talk Murder To Me
397 | A Voice From The Grave: A True-life Murder Ghost Case

Talk Murder To Me

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 48:10


Teresita Basa was a Filipino-American nurse who was murdered in Chicago in 1977. Her case gained notoriety because of the unusual circumstances surrounding her death. Teresita's spirit reportedly communicated with a psychic who claimed that Teresita had "spoken from the grave" to reveal the identity of her killer.Hate the ads?? Yeah, so do we. We have no control over the ads, so get rid of them by going to Patreon.com/TalkMurder

Nuances: Beyond first impressions with the Asian diaspora
S2 E7 - Darrel J. Delfin on being a Filipino-American actor, working with his childhood heroes, and finding his niche in voiceover.

Nuances: Beyond first impressions with the Asian diaspora

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 43:26


GUEST BIO Darrel J Delfin is a 30 year-old Filipino American actor based in Los Angeles, California. He is Kaede in Fena: Pirate Princess, Kazuma Arashiba in Scar on the Praeter, Legatus Laendur & Legate Pumpkee in the Fallen Legion series, General Geshtar in Secret of Mana, and Emilio Baretti in Lupin III vs Detective Conan: THE MOVIE. He has provided voices for shows like Sword Art Online, Hortensia Saga, Kill la Kill, Beyblade Burst Rise, Dragon Ball Super, and many more. He is also a regular cast member and lead stunt coordinator of the "We The Geeks of East LA" YouTube Channel. Instagram | Twitter DEFINITIONS Bisaya also known as Binisaya or Cebuano is a language spoken in the southern Philippines and counts 22 million speakers. Ilokano - is also a language spoken in the Philippines. It is the third most-spoken native language in the country, with 8.1 million speakers. TAKEAWAYS We often need a cheerleader before giving ourselves permission to dream big. The diaspora experience of a culture is often less nuanced, reductive. For many of us our only connection is food. Weird is relative. Asians aren't objectively weird. Only relative to whiteness. We often only start to appreciate our culture in adulthood, when there's less pressure to fit in Many of us regret not learning our culture's language. The pandemic has made hiring remote talent the norm, and has raised the bar when it comes to accurate media representation of our cultures. CONTACT Instagram | TikTok | Blog | LinkedIn | Twitter Host: Sherry-Lynn Lee & Ariadne Mila

Nomi Chronicles | Transition your hobby into a career
Continuing the Traditions in Today's Filipino-American Food With the Owners of Uncle Tito

Nomi Chronicles | Transition your hobby into a career

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 6:12


In this episode, Meg Dre interviewed the Owners of Uncle Tito Vince, Joe, and Paolo. The trio discussed their Filipino Food restaurant located in the SoMa District, Downtown San Francisco. They went on to share their story of how they started their business and shared why it was important to continue the traditions in today's Filipino-American Food. Connect with Nomi Chronicles & Meg Dre: Nomi Visuals Website Follow Nomi Chronicles on Instagram Follow Meg Dre on Instagram Follow on Twitter Like on Facebook Subscribe on YouTube Follow on Twitch Follow on TikTok Follow on Soundcloud Connect with Uncle Tito, Vince, Joe & Paolo Follow Uncle Tito on Instagram Follow Vince on Instagram Follow Joe on Instagram Follow Paolo on Instagram Dine at Uncle Tito --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nomichronicles/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nomichronicles/support

Young Entrepreneur Mindset Podcast
A Steady Income For Entrepreneurs

Young Entrepreneur Mindset Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 32:18


Gianna Marie Rahmani, often referred to as "G”, is known first and foremost for her passionate love for, and devotion to, her husband, Farhad, and two boys, Nikolas and Dominik. G is the type of person you want in your corner, as she would do anything in her power to help those in need. A Filipino-American, G immigrated to the US in 1990, when she was seven years old. She grew up in Secaucus, NJ and Ellicott City, MD, eventually moving to El Sobrante, CA where she met Farhad. There, G also started her career in property management, throughout which she would often write industry-related articles for blogs and magazines. In school and in business, G has earned the respect of her peers for her amiability, positivity, maturity, versatility, creativity, and ingenuity, resulting in accolades such as Unsung Hero, Scholar Athlete, Homecoming Queen, Rising Star, and Manager of the Year. She helped lead teams in winning seasons, smashing goals, earning awards, and reaching #1 rankings. Regardless of the endeavor, G is always on the fast track to the top as team captain, director, committee chair, or board president. As a mentor or keynote speaker, G is always looking for ways to inspire and motivate through her words and by example. Given her proven track record, it's no surprise that G retired at 39 from a highly successful 20-year career, now focusing on her and her husband's businesses and investments from warm and sunny Florida. It's no further surprise that G is pursuing her passion for writing to help others have happy and fulfilling lives and relationships. As an author, G is carrying out her personal mission to deliver a message of love through every word she speaks (or writes) and action she takes, reflective of her favorite F words – Family, Fun, Faith, Fitness, Food, Finances, Freedom, and Fulfillment. She is the other half of F&G – Farhad and Gianna. It's rare to see a couple that is as close to each other as they are. F&G do everything together and are partners in every sense of the word, from being best friends and gym buddies, to being parents of two amazing boys and co-founders of several businesses. Together, F&G hustle to The Honeymoon Life – what they've characterized as a life focused on love and adventure, and one that you don't need a vacation from. They don't shy away from taking risks and making bold moves, as long as they have a plan, have faith, and do it together. And they want to inspire others to do the same. As entrepreneurs and investors, they are the founders of Day Hustle™️ and are recognized as the original angel employers™️, helping employees to unlock their golden handcuffs of so-called job “security” and to get on the fast track to financial freedom. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/yourpodcaster/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/yourpodcaster/support

Color of Success
From Marvel to Viu Philippines: Corinna Vistan-Takahashi's Journey in Entertainment and Advocacy

Color of Success

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 33:17


In this episode, I sit down with Corinna Vistan-Takahashi, Head of Originals for Viu Philippines, Southeast Asia's largest streaming platform. Corinna shares her experience working at Marvel Studios and producing content for 19 out of 23 Marvel films. She also discusses her efforts to promote Filipino talent and Asian representation on a global stage. Additionally, Corinna talks about the importance of seeking support for mental health, raising children with a global perspective, and how Korean content has led to a wider appreciation for Asian entertainment. ==========================================Thank you to our sponsor, fiction author, Citra Tenore (Pronounced: Cheetra Tenorae).  She published her first book, a children's novel, when she was eleven. At twenty, she's now promoting the first book in her new science fiction series, The Dead Planets' Requiem. Go check out the Sci-fi mystery series anywhere you get your books online. ========================================== To get our FREE resource: 3 Ways to Reduce Burnout & Boost Well-being, visit colorofsuccesspodcast.com to sign up for our mailing list!   Ways you can support the show for FREE: Share our content Join our communities on streaming platforms and social media to give your suggestions on guests and reflection questions: Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts YouTube Instagram LinkedIn Facebook Twitter ========================================== Full bio: Corinna Vistan-Takahashi is a Filipino-American film and TV studio executive who currently serves as Head of Originals for Viu (Pronounced View) Philippines.  Viu is Southeast Asia's largest streaming platform with 8.4 million active monthly users and the region's go-to platform for Asian dramas.  Prior to VIEW, Corinna worked at Marvel Studios as a Creative Content Producer for theatrical releases, lending her expertise to record-setting blockbusters such as Avengers: Endgame and Ant-Man and the Wasp.  During her tenure, she crafted creative content strategies and produced content for 19 of the 23 Marvel films, released between 2010-2019.  She also worked with Apple to pioneer moving graphics on AppleTV.  Corinna continues to bridge the cultural gap between Filipino talent and trained US filmmakers, spotlighting phenomenal Filipino talent and increasing visibility and representation of Asian entertainment on a global platform.

This Filipino American Life
Episode 181 – Hilaw Pa 5.0

This Filipino American Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 61:43


Hilaw Pa 5.0!  Once again it's a new year. With a new year comes new ideas. In this 5th iteration of Hilaw Pa, the TFAL crew once again come up with new random “half-baked” ideas related to Filipino Americans that should be out there in the world. Listen as we discuss a solution to California's...

Creating Phenomenal For Your Life
Ep #172 - Wisdom from Dr. Connie Mariano

Creating Phenomenal For Your Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 31:31


This episode is filled with so much greatness.  Dr. Connie Mariano has led an unstoppable life and shares her world with us - where she's been, what she's learned, how she thinks about service and serves all who come in contact with her, and what she's welcoming for 2023.  In the next 30 minutes you'll smile, tear up, and feel a genuine connection to the stories she shares. Dr. Connie Mariano is used to breaking barriers and shattering the glass ceiling. Her life has been filled with many achievements: high school valedictorian, graduate with honors at the University of California at San Diego, medical degree from the Uniformed Services University School of Medicine, and a distinguished 24-year career in the U. S. Navy. Dr. Mariano has also been the first in the following achievements: The first military woman to become the White House Physician to the President The first woman Director of the White House Medical Unit The first Filipino American in US history to become a Navy Rear Admiral Dr. Mariano now works full time in her private practice, the Center for Executive Medicine, in Scottsdale.  She is the author of the book, The White House Doctor: My Patients were Presidents, A Memoir. She also hosts her own talk show on the VoiceAmerica network, “House Calls with Dr Connie,”. Even with all of her accomplishments, she believes her most important titles are wife, mother, grandmother, and since July 2019, widow. She is currently writing her memoir about widowhood and launching her second monthly podcast, The Widow's Walk, on the Voice America Empowerment Channel dedicated to the 700,000 new widows each year in America. Find out more about Dr. Mariano at www.cemedicine.com

The Yay w/Norman Gee & Reg Clay
Episode 250: Lauren DePass

The Yay w/Norman Gee & Reg Clay

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 73:40


For the first Yay episode of 2023, I'm excited to interview Lauren DePass – she last graced the stage at Sixth Street Playhouse in their production of The River Bride, along with Terrance Smith (Episode 102). Norman Gee is celebrating the new year in Tahoe with his beautiful wife Mara, so my guest host is Katherine Park (Episode 246), who will be participating in the L12 Loft Space Songwriting Festival on Saturday, February 11th – you can find details here: https://www.facebook.com/events/2475594082616188. Lauren tells us about her upbringing, how she got into theater, how bay area theatre is treating her and where she sees herself in the future. Lauren can be contacted directly via Instagram: @laurendepass SHOWS: L12 Space Songwriting Festival February 11th from 2-8pm Katherine Park (Episode 248)will be there https://www.facebook.com/events/2475594082616188 Siren (Shotgun Players) Jan 9 & 10 (streams on Jan 10) Kimberly Ridgeway (Episode 155) is in the show http://shotgunplayers.org/online/article/30th-csrs Paradise Blue (Aurora Theatre) Starts Jan 27th Michael Asberry (Episode 183) is in the show Dawn Monique Williams (Episode 112) is directing the show https://auroratheatre.org/paradiseblue?fbclid=IwAR3Ve7t8A4JDvLghx-aLpVdu-0-piW67kzdqmN60P8sdvedNtkOv1Ch0ouc Nanay (Town Hall Theatre) Jan 20, 21, 27 & 28 Molly Olis Krost (Episode 195) wrote the play https://www.townhalltheatre.com Barry Graves (Episode 104) has a new podcast out! The Black Man's Heart On Spotify and all your podcast apps Our wonderful consulting producer Mallory Somera (Episode 151) produces two podcasts for KCBS radio: As Prescribed, a weekly conversation with leading medical experts at UCSF Medical Center; and It's Generational, a deep dive on how each generation looks at things differently. Each episode features subject matters from perspectives of the Boomers, Gen X, Millennials and Gen Z. Check out As Prescribed and It's Generational on all podcast apps. Central Works Script Club is a podcast where you download and read a play script and then listen to an audio interview with the playwright. Delivered semi-annually. You can find the Central Works Script Club on any podcast app. Also, Bindlestiff Studios has a podcast called the Fobcast, exploring Filipino American immigrant stories. Check out The Fobcast in any podcast app. The Yay (Twitter: @TheYay3) Reg Clay (@Reg_Clay) Norman Gee (@WhosYrHoosier)

The Filipino American Woman Project
151: "It's a gift to know, to honor, and to evolve our ancestors' history from here on out." Jayme Sy's Instagram Live Interview with Jen and Nani

The Filipino American Woman Project

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 70:28


151: "It's a gift to know, to honor, and to evolve our ancestors' history from here on out." Jayme Sy's Instagram Live Interview with Jen and NaniAt the end of Filipino American History Month (FAHM), Kara and Jayme invited Jen and Nani to chat via Instagram Live! They talk about how TFAW Project was founded, their family backgrounds, favorite parts of Filipino American history, how colonization affects us today, and Filipino folklore and spirituality. Finally, they wrap up by answering the question: what would you say to your younger Filipino self?This conversation is also available on YouTube: https://youtu.be/8ysIjdnU1B8For the original Instagram Live Replay: https://www.instagram.com/reel/CkRUku0JCEM/YOU'RE INVITED to our FREE Vision Board Event led by Dr. Abby on Tuesday, December 27th @ 6 PM (PST) / 7 PM (MST) / 8 PM (CST) / 9 PM (EST)! Email or Text us to RSVP: jen@tfawproject.com, nani@tfawproject.com, or 415-484-8329.Read our latest newsletter, published Friday, December 16th, 2022: https://mailchi.mp/13da762eaa34/tfawproject--LOVE OUR SHOW? Show your support at http://www.buyusboba.com/ Supporting us with a minimum of one cup of boba gets you access to our monthly book club. A monthly or annual support gets you access to our monthly book club and exclusive access to our private podcast: Tsismis with Jen & Nani! FREE ONLINE COMMUNITY: Chat with Jen and Nani, along with your fellow podcast listeners on Discord https://discord.gg/2hSaHK9CpsNEWSLETTER: Receive the latest stories, updates and media coverage by subscribing to our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/cO0bifABOUT US: Welcome to the Filipino American Woman Project - A Podcast Show that shares stories and life lessons told by individuals living (or have lived) in America, that are of Filipino descent and are cisgender female. For Season 4, Jen and Nani pivot the show to focus on their journey as podcasters, content creators, and entrepreneurs -- with a focus on advocating for Filipino American women storytellers and authors.UPCOMING BOOK: Special thanks to the Bulosan Center for Filipino Studies at UC Davis for the opportunity to present our academic paper, Pinay Podcasters: Building a Self-Sustaining Community Through Storytelling, Collective Healing & Learning, and Collaboration. The initial draft is now available! Read more at http://pinaypodcasters.com/RECOGNITION: In December 2020 and December 2021, we received an Honorable Mention at the Asian American Podcaster's Golden Crane Podcast Awards. August 2020, Jen Amos participated as a speaker on behalf of TFAW Project for PodFest Global, which now holds the GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS™ title for Largest Attendance for a Virtual Podcasting Conference in One Week. May 2020, we were recognized as “Amplifying Asian Women Voices” on Spotify during AAPI Heritage Month.We've also been featured in Realtime Community Oakland, Mochi Magazine, Ossa Collective, SUPERBANDS, Chopsticks Alley, FoundHer by Entrepinayship, Spotify, PodFest Expo, Philippine American Foundation for Charities, When In Manila, You Are Collect;ve, San Diego Union Tribune, NBC 7 San Diego, and much more! Read more at:

Happy Doc Student Podcast
#91 It's Smart to be Assertive with Dr. Abby Hamilton

Happy Doc Student Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 26:30


Dr. Abby Hamilton is a 2-time TEDx speaker, Filipino-American industrial/organizational psychologist, and author of Amazon Bestseller “Speak Up, Anak”. Dr. Abby helps people find their voice so they can be more and do more in life.The bamboo ceiling, a glass ceiling for Asian Americans, served as an inspiration for Dr. Abby's dissertation. How can you be assertive without being ugly? When it is done right, it is beautiful!Communication styles1.    Passive – You don't voice your opinion and let others lead the way.2.    Aggressive – You dominate the conversation without acknowledging the feelings of others3.    Assertive – A way of being firm but respectful, calm, professional dignified, and noble.Tips for being assertive in a beautiful way1.    Be aware of your lack of assertiveness2.    Look for moments where you can speak up for yourself3.    Use a technique – like the "Repeat Button". Come up with one sentence and just repeat it (in a calm and composed tone). It will be hard in the moment but makes your life easier in the long term (you won't be carrying resentment, for example). STAY STRONG!Highlights·      You are the CEO of your doctoral education – it is smart to be assertive·      At some point you will be THE expert in your topic area. There will be a time when you OWN that. When you do, be assertive in your communication with your committee.·      “Jesus was just a carpenter in his hometown.”·      Your faculty are human too (don't forget that!)·      Know your worth. Know your value. Trust your voice. ·      Be a friend to your future self!Dr. Abby's book: https://amzn.to/3NDVR26Both TEDx Talks: http://drabbytedx.comWebsite: http://drabbyhamilton.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/shinealreadyInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/abbyhamilton333/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-abby-hamilton-02860721/TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@drabby333YouTube videos: https://drabbytv.comThis episode is brought to you by Frank Buck Consulting.Sign up for Frank's email list at: https://www.FrankBuck.orgListen to Frank on episode #87: https://www.buzzsprout.com/1547113/11526361 Get The Happy Doc Student Handbook: https://www.amazon.com/dp/0578333732Other resources at: http://Expandyourhappy.com Support this free content: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/expandyourhappyWant to make my day? Rate, review, subscribe & share with someone you love.

Crown and Chakra - The Bright Phoenix's Podcast
Embracing Ancient Future Baybayin with Kristian Kabuay

Crown and Chakra - The Bright Phoenix's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 52:48


Support My Podcast:  buymeacoff.ee/Aligned https://insighttimer.com/mariyakatrina Schedule your therapy sessions.

Stateside from Michigan Radio
Filipino-Americans Carry on Musical Tradition

Stateside from Michigan Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 12:18


Kulintang music, native to several Indigenous tribes in the Southern Philippines, has been passed down as an oral tradition over hundreds of years. That tradition has traveled 8,000 miles overseas, all the way to Ann Arbor, Michigan. Stateside Producer Ronia Cabansag helps tell part of that story.  GUEST: Gean Vincent Almendras, Philippine Ensemble Music lecturer, University of Michigan ___ Looking for more conversations from Stateside? Right this way. If you like what you hear on the pod, consider supporting our work.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Get To Know You with Tiffeny Farag
Ep 113. Why do we ignore the red flags? with Sugar Vendil

Get To Know You with Tiffeny Farag

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 51:08


On this episode of GET TO KNOW YOU, we discuss  another thought-provoking topic; ‘ Why do we ignore the red flags? '. This week, I'll be sitting down with Sugar Vendil https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/05/magazine/dorland-v-larson.htmlSugarvendil.com . She is a composer, pianist, choreographer, and interdisciplinary artist based in Brooklyn. She started her artistic life as a classical pianist, and after spending nearly a decade searching for her own voice, her practice evolved into performances that integrates sound, movement, and unconventional approaches to the piano. She writes and performs her own solo music for piano and electronics and has a keyboard/synth duo, Vanity Project, with composer Trevor Gureckis. Vendil is a proud second generation Filipino American.Vendil was awarded a 2021 MAPFund grant to support Antonym: the opposite of nostalgia. Recent commissions include Chamber Music America to write a new work for her ensemble, The Nouveau Classical Project, which she founded in 2008; ETHEL's Homebaked 2019 for Unsacred Geometry, and ACF | Create to write for Box Not Found. Tune in as we discuss; inspiration behind a composer, creative dance, absence of empathy, the main reasons we ignore red flags and what to be aware of. Stay tuned to the end of the episode to find out how you can join the conversation on the Get To Know You Cafe.FREE Exclusive offer:  https://tiffenyfarag.com/CreditsMusic- Sara Oliveira Support the show

4 Million Filipinos - Filipino-American Origin Stories
Jo Koy's Movie "Easter Sunday" A hit or miss for Filipino Americans?

4 Million Filipinos - Filipino-American Origin Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 48:00


The one where the guys unpack all the reasons for negative reviews from the Fil-Am community for Jo Koy's recent movie Easter Sunday. where Jo Koy stars as a man returning home for an Easter celebration with his riotous, bickering, eating, drinking, laughing, loving family, in this love letter to his Filipino-American community.

The Filipino American Woman Project
149: "If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together." December festivities and exciting events with Jen, Nani and Tsuki

The Filipino American Woman Project

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 46:40


149: "If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together." December festivities and exciting events with Jen, Nani and TsukiJen and Nani are joined with BUYUSBOBA.COM Book Club member and past guest Gretchen "TSUKI" Puddicombe! Together, they talk about their holiday plans, give grace during a busy season, share the latest updates on the Instagram Reflection Series, share details on the LAST book club session of the year, invite everyone to their FREE vision board event, and much more!December Events:Join us for our LAST BOOK CLUB OF THE YEAR on Friday, December 16th @ 5:30 (PST) / 6:30 PM (MST) / 7:30 PM(CST) / 8:30pm (EST) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/p/1504387Join our FREE Vision Board event on Tuesday, December 27th @ 6 PM (PST) / 7 PM (MST) / 8 PM (CST) / 9 PM (EST)! Simply email us to RSVP at jen@tfawproject.com and nani@tfawproject.comResources:This episode is also available on YouTube: https://youtu.be/1Ge6pqEvGIwFor the unedited version of this conversation: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/jenandnani/tfawp-e149-jen-nani-unfiltered-instagram-live-ft-tsukiListen to Tsuki's first interview with us on Ep. 138: "I'm so high on being Pinay." Outdoor adventures, adoptee raised in Vermont, and returning to the motherland with Gretchen "TSUKI" Puddicombe https://tfawproject.com/episode/138Listen to Tsuki's pre/post-interview: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/jenandnani/033-tjn-exclusive-why-everything-race-becauseRead our latest newsletter, published Friday, December 9th, 2022: https://mailchi.mp/cddd96c2eac3/tfawproject--LOVE OUR SHOW? Show your support at http://www.buyusboba.com/ Supporting us with a minimum of one cup of boba gets you access to our monthly book club. A monthly or annual support gets you access to our monthly book club and exclusive access to our private podcast: Tsismis with Jen & Nani! FREE ONLINE COMMUNITY: Chat with Jen and Nani, along with your fellow podcast listeners on Discord https://discord.gg/2hSaHK9CpsNEWSLETTER: Receive the latest stories, updates and media coverage by subscribing to our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/cO0bifABOUT US: Welcome to the Filipino American Woman Project - A Podcast Show that shares stories and life lessons told by individuals living (or have lived) in America, that are of Filipino descent and are cisgender female. For Season 4, Jen and Nani pivot the show to focus on their journey as podcasters, content creators, and entrepreneurs -- with a focus on advocating for Filipino American women storytellers and authors.UPCOMING BOOK: Special thanks to the Bulosan Center for Filipino Studies at UC Davis for the opportunity to present our academic paper, Pinay Podcasters: Building a Self-Sustaining Community Through Storytelling, Collective...

ESPN Daily
Jason Robertson is 23, Filipino-American, and #1 in NHL Goals (Pablo is Excited)

ESPN Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 35:03


You may be familiar with some of the NHL's biggest stars. Names like Sidney Crosby, Alexander Ovechkin, and Connor McDavid have transcended the sport…but there's a new star in Dallas who is currently rising above ALL of them. Jason Robertson is a 23-year-old winger for the Dallas Stars, leads the NHL in goals…and is in the conversation for MVP. So we called in our old friend Emily Kaplan, and she tells us everything about hockey's latest phenom…including why he's now Pablo's favorite hockey player. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

MeSearch: Feat. Filipino American Perspectives
What Is Neurodiversity? (Ft. Warjay Naigan)

MeSearch: Feat. Filipino American Perspectives

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 39:21


Neurodiversity refers to the differences between individuals' brain function and behavioral traits. These differences are normal variations across the human population. Neurodivergence is often used in the context of autism spectrum disorders. In this episode of MESEARCH, Dustin and Krystle, talk to friend of the pod, Warjay Naigan. At 26, Warjay was formally diagnosed with autism, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Join us as Warjay shares how they navigate the world as a neurodivergent Filipino American person. Stay connected with us at https://www.mesearchpodcast.com/ and via social media (@mesearchpodcast): Twitter: https://twitter.com/MeSearchPodcast Instagram: https://instagram.com/MeSearchPodcast Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mesearchpodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mesearchpodcast/message

Nuances: Beyond first impressions with the Asian diaspora
S2 E2: Charlene Vela on dance aesthetics, Asian accents, and what to do if you don't know how to pronounce someone's name.

Nuances: Beyond first impressions with the Asian diaspora

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 44:39


GUEST Charlene is a Filipino American. She was born in Switzerland and moved to the states with her parents and younger brother when she was four years old, living most of her life in Texas. During the day she works at a tech company in Austin, and in her free time she loves being part of the local dance community, and playing board games with her friends and husband. Instagram DEFINITIONS Body shaming is criticizing or mocking someone for supposed bodily faults or imperfections, such as their height, weight, facial features, skin, hair texture, tattoos, etc. TAKEAWAYS Growing up in the only Asian family in town can make it hard to connect with one's culture when we have no one to compare notes with. It becomes hard to know what's a family quirk versus a cultural thing. Negative comments about accents add pressure on immigrants and their kids to assimilate. When people commented on their parents' accents, both Ari and Charlene were embarrassed, thinking there was something wrong with their parents. So they tried to sound more white, and do what the white kids do, which sometimes meant distancing themselves from their Asian culture in order to fit in. Careless words can have lasting impact.The people making these off-hand comments often don't think they said anything hurtful and soon forget about it. But their words have lasting impacts on the people receiving them. While it might be hard to understand someone with an accent, it's worth remembering that they are speaking in a language other than their mother tongue, and appreciate their ability and willingness to do so for our benefit. Simply being surrounded by people who look different can make you self conscious, even if no one ever body shames you. In ballet for example, the costume sizes being unrealistically small, or the curvier dancers being placed in the back enforce a culture of valuing thinness without necessarily saying so. If you don't know how to pronounce someone's name, ask them how to pronounce it, and then give it a shot. People will appreciate you trying rather than giving up and saying “Oh I'm not even gonna try to pronounce that”. Coz that makes them feel like they don't belong and that they're an inconvenience to you. Finally, it doesn't matter whether you speak the language, or spent time in the country your ancestors came from. You are Asian enough. CONTACT Instagram | TikTok | Blog | LinkedIn | Twitter Hosts: Sherry-Lynn Lee (Lazou) & Ariadne Mila

The Filipino American Woman Project
148: "I like to consider this a very special time of the year because the world is lighting up for me." Birthdays, holidays and exciting updates with Jen and Nani

The Filipino American Woman Project

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 46:11


148: "I like to consider this a very special time of the year because the world is lighting up for me." Birthdays, holidays and exciting updates with Jen and NaniHappy December! Jen and Nani first share what it means for them to celebrate their birthdays and the holidays within the same month. Then they dive into exciting updates and shoutouts to their Instagram 5-Day Reflection Series members, Book Club members, BUYUSBOBA.COM supporters, and BUYUSBOBA.COM members! They also hint at an upcoming interactive vision board activity later in the month. Finally, they invite you all to join them via Instagram Live show taking place today, December 2nd @ 2 PM (PST) / 5 PM (EST) - https://instagram.com/thefilipinoamericanwomanThis conversation is also available on YouTube: https://youtu.be/PGRss7Xc1cIRead our latest newsletter, published Friday, December 2nd, 2022: https://mailchi.mp/40c1239614aa/tfawproject--LOVE OUR SHOW? Show your support at http://www.buyusboba.com/ Supporting us with a minimum of one cup of boba gets you access to our monthly book club. A monthly or annual support gets you access to our monthly book club and exclusive access to our private podcast: Tsismis with Jen & Nani! FREE ONLINE COMMUNITY: Chat with Jen and Nani, along with your fellow podcast listeners on Discord https://discord.gg/2hSaHK9CpsNEWSLETTER: Receive the latest stories, updates and media coverage by subscribing to our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/cO0bifABOUT US: Welcome to the Filipino American Woman Project - A Podcast Show that shares stories and life lessons told by individuals living (or have lived) in America, that are of Filipino descent and are cisgender female. For Season 4, Jen and Nani pivot the show to focus on their journey as podcasters, content creators, and entrepreneurs -- with a focus on advocating for Filipino American women storytellers and authors.UPCOMING BOOK: Special thanks to the Bulosan Center for Filipino Studies at UC Davis for the opportunity to present our academic paper, Pinay Podcasters: Building a Self-Sustaining Community Through Storytelling, Collective Healing & Learning, and Collaboration. The initial draft is now available! Read more at http://pinaypodcasters.com/RECOGNITION: In December 2020 and December 2021, we received an Honorable Mention at the Asian American Podcaster's Golden Crane Podcast Awards. August 2020, Jen Amos participated as a speaker on behalf of TFAW Project for PodFest Global, which now holds the GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS™ title for Largest Attendance for a Virtual Podcasting Conference in One Week. May 2020, we were recognized as “Amplifying Asian Women Voices” on Spotify during AAPI Heritage Month.We've also been featured in Realtime Community Oakland, Mochi Magazine, Ossa Collective, SUPERBANDS, Chopsticks Alley, FoundHer by Entrepinayship, Spotify, PodFest Expo, Philippine American Foundation for Charities, When In Manila, You Are Collect;ve, San Diego Union Tribune, NBC 7 San Diego, and much more! Read more at: https://linktr.ee/tfawproject.featured CONTACT US: Find us on social media: Instagram @thefilipinoamericanwoman, Facebook @thefilipinoamericanwoman, Twitter...

The Latter-day Disciples Podcast
Ep. 48 | "God is Great, All the Time," with Tony Aguilar

The Latter-day Disciples Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 61:09


Meghan is pleased to share Tony Aguilar's story in this unique episode. Topics Include:- Overcoming Trauma- Dreams, Visions, and a Near-Death Experience- Allowing God to Prevail in Our LivesTony Aguilar is a 2nd generation Filipino American. He had discovered throughout the years that his upbringing was filled with a variety of traumas including coming from a broken family, having a father in prison for 25 years off-and-on before passing away from addiction, struggling through school, sexual molestation, experimenting with illegal drugs, etc.Tony allowed God to enter his story in 2002, and never turned back! He was baptized in 2006, married in the temple to his best friend, and is the father of 2 precious little girls.Tony's goals are to help  children who have come from a similar background as he has, and to build and uplift the family unit. He graduated from Cal Poly Pomona in 2019 with a BA in Sociology and was accepted to multiple Social Work Programs to start the fall of 2020 prior to Covid. He put that education on hold to instead teach and care for his children during the pandemic. His goal is to become a  Licensed Clinical Social Worker and start a non profit in my local town of Pomona, although he is open to God having other plans for him. Have you heard about the Secret Saviors Project?? Between now and Christmas, the Latter-day Disciples team is orchestrating a holiday service where we administer relief to the families and individuals YOU know, who may be in need this Christmas season. You can participate in two ways: 1. By submitting nominations of families and individuals you know in need 2. By donating to the Secret Saviors Project. 100% of collected funds will be used to bless select nominees, with gifts coming in the form of Christmas presents, grocery cards, gas cards, cash, etc. Please prayerfully consider participating with us this holiday season as we seek to become "saviours on Mount Zion" to our brothers and sisters. A very Merry Christmas season to you and yours!

The Latter-day Disciples Podcast
Ep. 48 | "God is Great, All the Time," with Tony Aguilar

The Latter-day Disciples Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 62:29


Meghan is pleased to share Tony Aguilar's story in this unique episode. Topics Include: - Overcoming Trauma- Dreams, Visions, and a Near-Death Experience- Allowing God to Prevail in Our LivesTony Aguilar is a 2nd generation Filipino American. He had discovered throughout the years that his upbringing was filled with a variety of traumas including coming from a broken family, having a father in prison for 25 years off-and-on before passing away from addiction, struggling through school, sexual molestation, experimenting with illegal drugs, etc. Tony allowed God to enter his story in 2002, and never turned back! He was baptized in 2006, married in the temple to his best friend, and is the father of 2 precious little girls. Tony's goals are to help  children who have come from a similar background as he has, and to build and uplift the family unit. He graduated from Cal Poly Pomona in 2019 with a BA in Sociology and was accepted to multiple Social Work Programs to start the fall of 2020 prior to Covid. He put that education on hold to instead teach and care for his children during the pandemic. His goal is to become a  Licensed Clinical Social Worker and start a non profit in my local town of Pomona, although he is open to God having other plans for him.  Have you heard about the Secret Saviors Project?? Between now and Christmas, the Latter-day Disciples team is orchestrating a holiday service where we administer relief to the families and individuals YOU know, who may be in need this Christmas season. You can participate in two ways: 1. By submitting nominations of families and individuals you know in need 2. By donating to the Secret Saviors Project. 100% of collected funds will be used to bless select nominees, with gifts coming in the form of Christmas presents, grocery cards, gas cards, cash, etc. Please prayerfully consider participating with us this holiday season as we seek to become "saviours on Mount Zion" to our brothers and sisters. A very Merry Christmas season to you and yours!

Moveable Do
Matthew Lyon Hazzard

Moveable Do

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 62:23


Matthew Lyon Hazzard, DMA candidate at the University of Houston, joins Moveable Do this week to discuss how to create a "stunning landscape of sound." He discusses his earliest musical memories, his Filipino-American heritage, and the importance of choral music education. Featured on this episode: "The Prow," "When We are Gone," "Flight," and "So Much to Seek." For more info about Matt and his music, visit https://lyonhazzard.com. To learn more about this podcast and a full archive of episodes, visit https://sdcompose.com/moveabledo. Keep the Music Moving! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/moveabledo/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/moveabledo/support

MeSearch: Feat. Filipino American Perspectives
Was "Easter Sunday" A Flop For Filipinos? (Ft. Nino Llanera)

MeSearch: Feat. Filipino American Perspectives

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 29:51


MESEARCH reconnects with returning guest, Nino Llanera, to discuss the performance of Joy Koy's film, "Easter Sunday," which centers a Filipino American family. Nino is the Director of Content and Programming at Myx Global of ABS-CBN. In this role, he is immersed in the entertainment industry and has thoughts to share on the cultural impact of Joy Koy and "Easter Sunday." Connect with Nino Llanera: Twitter: https://twitter.com/NinoLlanera Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/NinoLlanera/ Website: http://www.ninollaneratv.com/ Stay connected with us at https://www.mesearchpodcast.com/ and via social media (@mesearchpodcast): Twitter: https://twitter.com/MeSearchPodcast Instagram: https://instagram.com/MeSearchPodcast Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mesearchpodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mesearchpodcast/message

Living in Your Passion Place
Navigating Being Queer & Christian w/ Jenna Kim & Tristan Cabral

Living in Your Passion Place

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 128:01


I have the most heart-opening and vulnerable conversation with my friends Jenna Kim and Tristan Cabral about navigating the unknown, coming out, and family relationships as queer Christians with an evolving concept of and relationship to faith. It's the longest podcast conversation I've ever had and one of the most impactful. Every part of it is so intentional and necessary to share. We talk about how challenging it was to grow up seeing zero representation of people who are like us, and how we bravely had to be the examples we wish we saw around us and create a life for ourselves as queer humans. Jenna and Tristan openly share the pressures they faced and still face of feeling like they need to be “perfect” as the oldest children in Asian households of faith. We also dive into why it was so hard for us to come out to our parents. In the last 20 minutes of this conversation, we share ways you can become a better actionable ally to the LGBTQIA+ community.Jenna is proudly Korean-American. She's the oldest of four girls and a pastor's kid. Jenna works as a production supervisor at Disney TV Animation. Tristan is a first generation Filipino-American working as a storyboard artist at Nickelodeon. He is very proud of his identity as a Filipino immigrant story teller and dreams to one day be a TV Director on a cartoon that heavily focuses on cultural intersections. This is a trigger warning. We do talk about suicide in this episode. If you're struggling right now, please know that you are so freaking loved, and the world is more magical and vibrant with you in it. If you need direct support, call the national suicide and crisis lifeline at 988. This lifeline provides free and confidential emotional support to people in suicidal crisis or emotional distress 24 hours a day, 7 days a week in the United States.ResourcesJedidiah Jenkins' Like Streams to the Ocean: The book I read from at the beginning of our conversation.The Queerology Podcast Jenna refers to that shares stories of humans at the intersection of being part of the LGBTQIA+ community and having faith in God or something bigger than themselves.Learn more about my Marketing Masterclass on 12.1.22!Organizations that support the LGBTQIA+ community and its youth: The Trevor Project, PFLAG, GLAAD, Born This Way Foundation.Connect with me @lucca_petrucci on Instagram or TikTok.

The Filipino American Woman Project
147: "There's no standing still or being done with self-awareness. It's an ongoing process." Expressing thanks with Jen and Nani

The Filipino American Woman Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 42:21


147: "There's no standing still or being done with self-awareness. It's an ongoing process." Expressing thanks with Jen and NaniSeasons Greetings! While Nani has already decorated her home for the holidays, Jen shares her upcoming plans to run a turkey trot -- her first running event in her 30s! Together, they share what they are thankful for, tease at their Instagram 5-Day Reflection Series, reflect on their latest book club, plan for December events, encourage potential advertisers to reach out to them before the new year, and much more.This conversation is also available on YouTube: https://youtu.be/zf7kvfOEDvQRead our latest newsletter, published Thursday, November 24, 2022: https://mailchi.mp/735631d4ae6b/tfawproject--LOVE OUR SHOW? Show your support at http://www.buyusboba.com/ Supporting us with a minimum of one cup of boba gets you access to our monthly book club. A monthly or annual support gets you access to our monthly book club and exclusive access to our private podcast: Tsismis with Jen & Nani! FREE ONLINE COMMUNITY: Chat with Jen and Nani, along with your fellow podcast listeners on Discord https://discord.gg/2hSaHK9CpsNEWSLETTER: Receive the latest stories, updates and media coverage by subscribing to our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/cO0bifABOUT US: Welcome to the Filipino American Woman Project - A Podcast Show that shares stories and life lessons told by individuals living (or have lived) in America, that are of Filipino descent and are cisgender female. For Season 4, Jen and Nani pivot the show to focus on their journey as podcasters, content creators, and entrepreneurs -- with a focus on advocating for Filipino American women storytellers and authors.UPCOMING BOOK: Special thanks to the Bulosan Center for Filipino Studies at UC Davis for the opportunity to present our academic paper, Pinay Podcasters: Building a Self-Sustaining Community Through Storytelling, Collective Healing & Learning, and Collaboration. The initial draft is now available! Read more at http://pinaypodcasters.com/RECOGNITION: In December 2020 and December 2021, we received an Honorable Mention at the Asian American Podcaster's Golden Crane Podcast Awards. August 2020, Jen Amos participated as a speaker on behalf of TFAW Project for PodFest Global, which now holds the GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS™ title for Largest Attendance for a Virtual Podcasting Conference in One Week. May 2020, we were recognized as “Amplifying Asian Women Voices” on Spotify during AAPI Heritage Month.We've also been featured in Realtime Community Oakland, Mochi Magazine, Ossa Collective, SUPERBANDS, Chopsticks Alley, FoundHer by Entrepinayship, Spotify, PodFest Expo, Philippine American Foundation for Charities, When In Manila, You Are Collect;ve, San Diego Union Tribune, NBC 7 San Diego, and much more! Read more at: https://linktr.ee/tfawproject.featured CONTACT US: Find us on social media: Instagram @thefilipinoamericanwoman, Facebook @thefilipinoamericanwoman, Twitter @thefilamwoman, YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-IzWjkLCof3Pf7TW8ExyXwLearn more about our co-hosts Jen at

Subscribing to Wellness
Episode #60: Sandro Roco, Sanzo

Subscribing to Wellness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 25:45


Today on Subscribing to Wellness we are joined by Sanzo founder and CEO, Sandro Roco. The idea for Sanzo originated when Sandro, a queens-born Filipino American, was walking through an Asian Super-market in Manhattan's Koreatown and he noticed there was a gap between American brands and the legacy Asian brands. Sanzo is a Asian-inspired sparkling water made with real fruit and zero added sugar. We talk to Sandro about the crowded beverage market, educating his consumer and so much more! Episode Fun Facts: 1) Sanzo raised a $10M Series A in early 2022 led by CircleUp Growth Partners. 2) Sanzo recently executed an amazing LTO partnership with Jeremy Lin. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/subtowellness/support

Therapeutic Perspective
Episode #55: Speaking Up: Culture and assertiveness in and out of the therapy office

Therapeutic Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 68:06


We know our childhood and family culture play an important role in who we become as adults. Dr. Abby Hamilton, two-time TEDx speaker, Filipino-American industrial/organizational psychologist, and author of Amazon Bestseller Speak Up, Anak, dives deep into the intersection between culture and assertiveness. Dr. Abby helps others find their voice so they can be more and do more in life.In this episode, we discuss how traditional cultural values impact our self-perception, various theories and anecdotal examples, and practical assertiveness techniques we can teach to our clients. 

The Filipino American Woman Project
146: "The direction that we take the show is always a result of what our community needs." Spending more time in community with Jen and Nani

The Filipino American Woman Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 36:44


146: "The direction that we take the show is always a result of what our community needs." Spending more time in community with Jen and NaniJen and Nani are excited to continue expanding their offerings for our growing community! They discuss how they prioritize TFAW Project into their busy lives, the latest happenings within the Reflection Series groups, family members that served in the military (this episode was recorded on Veterans Day - Nov. 11), Nani's visit to the California Museum with Stacey Salinas as her personal tour guide, what to expect for today's book club session (Nov. 18) with Dr. Abby, and much more.This conversation is also available on YouTube: https://youtu.be/bNVh8wum_4sTo watch the full Instagram Live version of this conversation: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/jenandnani/tfawp-e146-jen-nani-unfiltered-instagram-liveShout out to two of our Reflection Series members: @panchiecanton @angel_dmiro!Community Engagement:Partake in our FREE 5-Day Reflection Series by direct messaging us on https://www.instagram.com/thefilipinoamericanwoman/Want to continue the conversation beyond our 5-Day Reflection Series? Join us for FREE on our Discord community https://discord.gg/2hSaHK9CpsLet's collaborate and help you get your message out there! Contact Jen and Nani today to discuss our new advertising packages: jen@tfawproject.com and nani@tfawproject.comJoin our Book Club TODAY, November 18th @ 12 PM (PST) / 1 PM (MST) / 2 PM (CST) / 3 PM (EST). We will discuss Chapters 1-6 of the book Speak Up, Anak: Assertiveness Strategies for Filipino Americans by Dr. Abby Hamilton https://www.buymeacoffee.com/jenandnani/reminder-next-book-club-fr-11-18-12-pm-pst-1Resources (in the order mentioned):SD Voyager Article ft. Jen and Nani http://sdvoyager.com/interview/inspiring-conversations-with-jen-amos-of-the-filipino-american-woman-tfaw-project-by-buyusboba-com/Family Memories: A Military Father's Legacy of Love & Community by Jen Amos https://scalar.usc.edu/works/fpahm-timeline-project/family-memories-military-fathers-legacyFamily Memories: Remembering My Lolo Ruping, A Personal Narrative of an Apo and Her Lolo by Nani Dominguez Smith https://scalar.usc.edu/works/fpahm-timeline-project/family-memories-remembering-my-lolo-rupingLearn more about Jen's business, US VetWealth https://usvetwealth.com/Learn more about Jen's other podcast show, Holding Down the Fort by US VetWealth

Exit Spring Mountain
Remittances, A Homeland Connection

Exit Spring Mountain

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 17:50


For the Season 2 Finale of Exit Spring Mountain, we're talking about the care packages we send and receive to offer help and hope to our families and friends abroad. Balikbayan boxes are also a topic of conversation, as they have helped float the Phillippine country for decades. Many Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders also send remittances - funds transferred from migrants or recent immigrants to their home countries. What does the money pay for? Why do AAPI communities continue this practice? And how can this be a lifeline for families and governments in other countries?Professor Constancio Arnaldo, an assistant professor in the Department of Interdisciplinary Gender and Ethnic studies and Asian and Asian American Studies at UNLV discusses the historical context of why remittances and balikbayan boxes are important for Filipino and Filipino American communities. Bernardo Blanco, who has been participating in sending remittances to family in the Phillippines for decades, explains why he feels it is his duty to continue to help his family abroad for as long as he lives. JD Reyes, a first-generation UNLV student and Chamorro from Saipan, explains why he loves staying connected with his family back home  through the care packages he receives and sends. Exit Spring Mountain is a podcast from Nevada Public Radio. Our team includes senior producer Nessa Concepcion, academic research consultant Mark Padoongpatt and assistant producer, researcher and social media manager, Isabelle Chen Rice. Joe Schoenemann oversees podcasts as news director at Nevada Public Radio, and our sound editing, mixing, and mastering is by Christopher Alverez.

The Filipino American Woman Project
145: "Your voice matters here." Community engagement with Jen, Nani and Caitilin Damacion

The Filipino American Woman Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 53:53


145: "Your voice matters here." Community engagement with Jen, Nani and Caitilin DamacionJen and Nani, joined with Caitilin Damacion, hop on Instagram Live once again -- and plan on doing so every first Friday on the month! Together, they talk about their experiences with the Tsimis with Jen and Nani Book Club thus far, how their Discord community helped them decide on the best book to read, more background on Caitilin's relationship with her late father, why Jen and Nani decide to keep the name 'The Filipino American Woman Project,' their recent feature on SDVoyager.com, their observations on the Instagram 5-Day Reflection Series, and much more!This conversation is also available on YouTube: https://youtu.be/gPaGdgq3DZAResources (in the order mentioned):Join us for Instagram Live or our 5-Day Reflection Series https://www.instagram.com/thefilipinoamericanwoman/RSVP for our upcoming book club https://www.buymeacoffee.com/p/1442815Join our Discord community https://discord.gg/2hSaHK9CpsCheck out Jen and Nani's recent feature on SD Voyager http://sdvoyager.com/interview/inspiring-conversations-with-jen-amos-of-the-filipino-american-woman-tfaw-project-by-buyusboba-com/Read our latest newsletter, published Friday, November 4, 2022: https://mailchi.mp/651e8dfcb855/tfawproject--LOVE OUR SHOW? Show your support at http://www.buyusboba.com/ Supporting us with a minimum of one cup of boba gets you access to our monthly book club. A monthly or annual support gets you access to our monthly book club and exclusive access to our private podcast: Tsismis with Jen & Nani! FREE ONLINE COMMUNITY: Chat with Jen and Nani, along with your fellow podcast listeners on Discord https://discord.gg/2hSaHK9CpsNEWSLETTER: Receive the latest stories, updates and media coverage by subscribing to our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/cO0bifABOUT US: Welcome to the Filipino American Woman Project - A Podcast Show that shares stories and life lessons told by individuals living (or have lived) in America, that are of Filipino descent and are cisgender female. For Season 4, Jen and Nani pivot the show to focus on their journey as podcasters, content creators, and entrepreneurs -- with a focus on advocating for Filipino American women storytellers and authors.UPCOMING BOOK: Special thanks to the Bulosan Center for Filipino Studies at UC Davis for the opportunity to present our academic paper, Pinay Podcasters: Building a Self-Sustaining Community Through Storytelling, Collective Healing & Learning, and Collaboration. The initial draft is now available! Read more at http://pinaypodcasters.com/RECOGNITION: In December 2020 and December 2021, we received an Honorable Mention at the Asian American Podcaster's Golden Crane Podcast Awards. August 2020, Jen Amos participated as a speaker on behalf of TFAW Project for PodFest Global, which now holds...

The Filipino American Woman Project
144: "I got you. We are a team. Together we rise." Going Live on Instagram with Jen and Nani

The Filipino American Woman Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 28:37


144: "I got you. We are a team. Together we rise." Going Live on Instagram with Jen and NaniLast Friday, Jen and Nani surprise their Instagram followers by going Live! They explain why they want to revitalize their Instagram community, reflect on their third year of celebrating Filipino American History Month, invite listeners to join their free 5-Day Reflection Series, hint at focus group for an upcoming coaching program, and much more.This conversation is also available on YouTube: https://youtu.be/QcGFhEq50-4Watch the unedited video recording of this episode on Instagram Live https://www.instagram.com/tv/CkRZRPHpG-o/Read our latest newsletter, published Friday, November 4, 2022: https://mailchi.mp/651e8dfcb855/tfawproject--LOVE OUR SHOW? Show your support at http://www.buyusboba.com/ Supporting us with a minimum of one cup of boba gets you access to our monthly book club. A monthly or annual support gets you access to our monthly book club and exclusive access to our private podcast: Tsismis with Jen & Nani! FREE ONLINE COMMUNITY: Chat with Jen and Nani, along with your fellow podcast listeners on Discord https://discord.gg/2hSaHK9CpsNEWSLETTER: Receive the latest stories, updates and media coverage by subscribing to our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/cO0bifABOUT US: Welcome to the Filipino American Woman Project - A Podcast Show that shares stories and life lessons told by individuals living (or have lived) in America, that are of Filipino descent and are cisgender female. For Season 4, Jen and Nani pivot the show to focus on their journey as podcasters, content creators, and entrepreneurs -- with a focus on advocating for Filipino American women storytellers and authors.UPCOMING BOOK: Special thanks to the Bulosan Center for Filipino Studies at UC Davis for the opportunity to present our academic paper, Pinay Podcasters: Building a Self-Sustaining Community Through Storytelling, Collective Healing & Learning, and Collaboration. The initial draft is now available! Read more at http://pinaypodcasters.com/RECOGNITION: In December 2020 and December 2021, we received an Honorable Mention at the Asian American Podcaster's Golden Crane Podcast Awards. August 2020, Jen Amos participated as a speaker on behalf of TFAW Project for PodFest Global, which now holds the GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS™ title for Largest Attendance for a Virtual Podcasting Conference in One Week. May 2020, we were recognized as “Amplifying Asian Women Voices” on Spotify during AAPI Heritage Month.We've also been featured in Realtime Community Oakland, Mochi Magazine, Ossa Collective, SUPERBANDS, Chopsticks Alley, FoundHer by Entrepinayship, Spotify, PodFest Expo, Philippine American Foundation for Charities, When In Manila, You Are Collect;ve, San Diego Union Tribune, NBC 7 San Diego, and much more! Read more at: https://linktr.ee/tfawproject.featured CONTACT US: Find us on social media: Instagram @thefilipinoamericanwoman, Facebook @thefilipinoamericanwoman, Twitter @thefilamwoman, YouTube

KPFA - APEX Express
APEX Express – 11.3.22 – A Tale of 2 Professors

KPFA - APEX Express

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 59:58


A weekly magazine-style radio show featuring the voices and stories of Asians and Pacific Islanders from all corners of our community. The show is produced by a collective of media makers, deejays, and activists. Host Miko Lee speaks with two women professors Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu and Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez about their approach to education, activism, motherhood and moving forward.   Show Transcript A Tale of Two Professors Story [00:00:00] Swati: Tonight on APEX Express, we have a piece highlighting the work of two professors with a lot in common, both Filipino scholar, activists, and grieving mothers who are approaching their work in similar and different ways. Listen in on Miko's interview, exploring both of their amazing backstories, their current work and where they see their futures. Also editorial side note Miko and Robyn's audio got a little funky at times. So it might be a little bumpy. [00:00:59] Miko Lee: Welcome Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu and Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez to APEX express. Dr. Robyn is the first Filipino American to serve as chair of the UC Davis Asian American Studies Department, the first one in 50 years. She also became the founding director of the Bulosan Center for Filipino studies and has authored so many books. Dr. Celine scholar filmmaker, and the new Dean of the Division of Arts at UC Santa Cruz. You worked at my Alma mater San Francisco State University in the School of Cinema. You were a professor of Asian-American feminist film and media studies at UC Santa Barbara. I mean, you've, you've been like through the whole California system. We are so happy to have you on APEX express. I believe you were the first Asian-American Dean in this position. And how does this feel for you to be at UC Santa Cruz during this work? [00:01:51] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: As the first woman of color Dean at UC Santa Cruz, as well as the first Asian American woman. Of course, it feels weighty, to hear that the lived experience of it is very much about prioritizing subjugated knowledges, making sure that we have an abundance of voices and abundance of traditions and knowledges that we are teaching so that students can really have access to you know what they want to study as well as be situated, and a long tradition of inquiry and method. It's really wonderful to be at the helm of a division that really takes seriously, people who want to practice art, people who want to study art historically, critically theoretically and we all have defined. Our role, and helping to make this world A place where everyone has a role, [00:02:48] Miko Lee: and art is just being part of who you are that it's just part of being human. Um, Robyn, I want to go way back and talk with you about when you first became politically active. [00:02:59] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: I would say that the beginnings of my political activism started when I was in either my freshman or sophomore year of high school. And it started with a letter. I was concerned about what we now call racial profiling of young Filipino American men in my neighborhood. I grew up in Union City, California in the east bay. And there was a supposed kind of gang problem in Union City and I recall young boys really in our neighborhood at school, who I thought were being unfairly targeted, not only by police, but also mistreatment really from other authority figures at school, I felt really concerned about that and wrote a letter. I was encouraged by my mom to express my opinions or my kind of concern about how my peers are being treated by writing a letter. And so I wrote the letter and I addressed it to the mayor of Union City, the chief of police, and the superintendent of the school district. And in the letter, I expressed how I felt that my peers were being unfair ly treated and proposed that they introduce what I was calling, multicultural education. The idea I thought was that if our teachers and authority figures really understood us better, and at the same time, if we encountered a stories and histories of our community that somehow this so-called gang problem could be somewhat addressed. So that was my first, I think, kind of a political act or act of activism. And I would then go from there really getting involved in electoral politics. And then after that when I'm in college is really when I started to get more involved in other kinds of organizing work community organizing work. [00:05:10] Miko Lee: I love that. What do you think, was it your parents' upbringing or your peers? What do you think rose up your feisty nature to be able to write back to the school board at such a young age? [00:05:22] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: I think it was a couple of things. I think one was actually my mother modeling a modeling sort of letter writing in particular as a mode of calling out issues of inequity or injustice and what had happened and I remember this very clearly. I think it probably was my earliest observation or experience of racism and it was at church. I just remember I grew up Catholic and somehow I just remember sitting in the pew and fidgeting and sort of halfway listening to the priest's sermon and I recall the priest saying something about how Filipinos were not contributing sufficiently enough to the parish. And I remember that very clearly. And I remember feeling that tension rise because there's so many people in mass who are Filipino and I could feel, my mother bristling at that. My father, I just, the tension was just so palpable. My mother was feeling after mass talking about how insensitive the priest had been. Didn't quite say racist, that it was just really wrong and a mis-characterization of the Filipino community. And she was going to write a letter and address it. And I remember observing that and that had a real impact on me. I think the influence again, via my mother is the fact that my middle name, which actually translates into ‘to be angry' comes from an ancestor on a maternal ancestor. It was a made up name by one of my ancestors who decided to change his name to Magalit it as an expression of defiance against the Spanish colonial rule in the Philippines and actually ended up joining the anti-colonial revolutionary cause himself. And so that was that's an important story that is passed on through my mom's, through my mom's family. We're very proud of that revolutionary history. I was always very proud of it always insist on using my middle name everywhere and anywhere. And so I think there's also that, that, that feeling, or I think I was encouraged to, we were encouraged to really be those people who would be critical of any circumstances where people are oppressed, exploited, marginalized. Even my father. Growing up he would tell me, you're so fortunate that I left the day before martial law was declared in the Philippines, because otherwise I would have been, I would have stayed and I would have been part of the movement to topple the dictatorship. And I wouldn't be able to be here and be your dad. And I recall to, with my father he drew really a hard and fast lines between himself and people in the community, even friendships would think, he walked away from friendships if he felt a friend was sympathetic to the dictatorship. So there's just all of these ways that might. Both, exhibited as anti-authoritarian kind of, the sort of critique of structures of power that I grew up with and I observed and was inspired by. So I think that's what explains why I would end up doing what I did as a freshman in high school. [00:08:39] Miko Lee: Wow. The power of being angry, built into your DNA and your name and your love it. We love to hear that. Dr. Celine What do you think Drove you into ethnic studies [00:08:54] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: I came to the United States with my family, in the early to mid eighties and I moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts. I was one of three Filipino Americans in my high school of 3000 people. And the others were my siblings, and education for me was really sanctuary, like being at school because there was food because we were so poor and, we were the center of our worlds, my multicultural set of friends and I loved, learning about my new country, and when I moved to Berkeley as an undergrad, there were many questions that I had, like, why is it that, my parents, even though they were hyper educated in a way, had to work low wage jobs, as immigrants and they had to work two jobs and they were never around then why was I, and my sister, we were 14, 13 years old. We were already working, in order to help put food on the table for our large immigrant family. So I had so many questions. What was this about, why are we here? And. I loved ethnic studies at UC Berkeley, it was a way to really understand subjugated knowledges, and it was really understanding why we no longer ate together as a family because my parents had to work. At UC Berkeley, ethnic studies was such a wonderful place because it was an interdisciplinary approach to history, to cinema, to literature. It was the time where so many amazing people were there. Not only was it Trinh Min-ha, June Jordan, Cherrié Moraga. I learned in their classrooms and also created my own classrooms by becoming an activist, because there was so much in our experiences that I needed to see on paper. Like what it means to walk around with a large Asian American family, what it means to, grow up with a white mom, but be seen as a woman of color, like your closest intimate as this white woman who may or may not see you. So these were stories that my classmates were telling me. We did a lot of organizing, you know, a woman of color magazine named, ‘Smell This', a woman of color film festival, a woman of color retreat. We were really trying to figure out how can we be effective advocates in a world, using our education, using the power and weapons of our education in order to, make significant, impactful cultural contributions that will change the world. And I realized I wanted to really capture the historical moment of how there were so many women of color writing professors there, Maxine Hong Kingston, June Jordan, Cherrié Moraga. Were all there and we were all doing spoken word and poetry slams, and the tradition of women of color literature, with ‘This Bridge Called My Back' Audrey Lorde, Chrystos, Pat Parker and more, this was a vibrant, legacy growing all of us, all of these books were seeds, and I came up with the name, ‘Smell This' in the hallways of the co-op in which I lived in at the time. I think I didn't even really think about it sexually, even though, I'm a sexuality scholar and I'm a porn study scholar, I really didn't. I really thought of it as a multisensorial experience that you enter when you are exposed to writing. That's so truthful, that's so brutal and it's confrontation with, what it means to be a multiply subjugated person, just walking down the street, for me at the time you're growing up as a young adult and you're blossoming, your interests are blossoming, your sexuality is blossoming, and so it was for me, just this multi-dimensional kind of growth, and I wanted this name to assert that multisensorial experience of what it means to grow up in a world. And at the time, give yourself the permission to say my voice is important, my perspective is important, and that's why I called it that. I think somewhat innocently. And I remember just being on Sproul Plaza, blasting, hip hop music, and just roping in as many women of color as we could, to contribute to the magazine. And we had these gigantic parties and we had the band Yeasty Girls perform. And so we had these legendary epic parties that were all about validating the cultural production of a women of color. [00:13:13] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: I suppose you know, that early act of defiance or that act of resistance writing that letter was the beginnings of my journey towards ethnic studies .I think intuitively I knew that there was something problematic about the fact that I grew up in a predominantly community of color and that there was and most of the students, most of my peers were people of color. And yet most of the figures of authority, teachers, administrators were not people of color. And that the books that we were reading typically had scant mention of our community. So there's some, I think intuitively I knew that that could not be right. When I. First took an ethnic studies course after I transferred to Santa Barbara, my third year after a stint at community college. We're actually, I first encountered sort of women of color writers. But it was a class where I was introduced to This Bridge Called My Back, very important anthology by a co-edited by Cherrié Moraga. So that, was sort of my initial foray into kind of women's studies and ethics studies and then by my junior year at UC Santa Barbara, I had this opportunity to take all these classes to class and Chicano studies, a class in Black studies, but the class that really set me on this path toward academia was a class by Dr. Diane Fujino, it was her very first quarter teaching at UC Santa Barbara and Asian-American studies as an assistant professor. It was really the first time I had encountered a Asian American woman professor who also was unapologetically an activist. And that class seeing her just really changed my life. I was so inspired by Diane by what she was doing in the classroom, which she was inviting us to do students, I felt really challenged and really important in good ways by her and I thought, I think that's the way that I want to that, that's what I want to do. I knew I wanted to choose a career of service, I wasn't quite sure what that was going to be. I thought being a lawyer might be it then I changed my mind, then I thought, oh, maybe I should work as a lobbyist for some of these progressive causes. And then I changed my mind thought I even wanted to be an elected. Maybe then changed my mind. And then professor seemed like something that I could get into. I love learning, I love reading, I love research, I also got introduced to other options that could have been a possibility of me being a labor organizer, so yeah, professor felt like a potential way to actually be at the university lectern, but also to be able to write books that students might be able to encounter in other university classrooms and, Diane embodied this very real possibility for me and I chose to follow that path. She represented and continues to represent to me an approach to Asian-American studies that I want to see more of, I think that As much as Asian-American studies was born out of these movements for liberation, the Ethic Studies movement, the Third World Liberation Front, the Asian-American movement, Black Power movement. I think there is a way that I feel as if Asian American studies and Ethics Studies more broadly has become so institutionalized. And I understand that, some of the reasons for this hyper, this institutionalization of Asian-American studies or Ethnic Studies had everything to do with just the backlash against it and just survival. I think that to survive different kinds of decisions were made such that Asian-American studies are at the end, even ethics studies as a field, had to look and feel more the other disciplinary and interdisciplinary formations in the university and less this insurgent site for knowledge production and dissemination that it it had started off as, and Diane for me, always felt like, still feels like one of the few scholars who continues to see Asian-American studies and Ethnic Studies as the site for insurgent knowledge production and dissemination, as the site where we as scholars use our platforms use our training use the kinds of resources we have access to, to amplify the issues of our communities and to also work in partnership with the community in trying to reimagine everything as Grace Lee Boggs invites us to do, to do the critical work of the thinking and the dreaming and strategizing to achieve a better world for all of us. We created a scholar activist affinity group or section is what we call it. And then we'd, frequently organized panels where we would invite activists to come and engage our colleagues because, we recognize that activists and organizers are also thinkers and theoreticians who have really important frameworks and analysis of the world. And that we as scholars could benefit just as much as we as scholars are, doing full-time work and kind of thinking and teaching that we can also extend different kinds of insights to our organizer colleagues. [00:18:42] Miko Lee: For folks that want to hear more about this. There's actually an entire APEX express episode that covers a reading done by both Robin and Diane at Eastwind Books. Last year you both received a mentorship award. Can you share about how important it is to be a mentor and how you combine being both a mentor, an activist. And a scholar. How do you combine those elements? [00:19:12] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: you know, Mentorship is so important to me, I think on one hand, I benefited from mentorship clearly, I wouldn't have even been able to pursue this path, this career path if I hadn't had a mentor like Diane, Dr. Fujino to not just exist, but actually to see who cultivated a relationship with me who was willing to take the time to help me understand the world of academia which was a world that was completely foreign to me. Dr. Fujino, along with other mentors that I had as an undergraduate really helped guide me. On one hand I got research experience. So they both, they all helped me gain a real understanding of what an academic life actually feels like. I knew I wanted to be a professor, but I didn't quite know what getting a PhD would require and getting a PhD requires research and I needed the research experience and they guided me through that process by giving it to me helping me to cultivate my own research questions and carry out my own research project. And all of that not only exposed me to this world to confirm for me that yeah, absolutely that is a path I want to pursue. And they were very frank and honest about what kinds of challenges I might face. I don't know that I fully understood some of their kind of cautionary kind of tales about academia. It took having to actually get into a program and go through it for me to fully understand what I think they were trying to advise me about, and namely that is just, the elitism of academia the ways in which, you know, academia can be limited especially if you're a kind of an activist or committed to social justice and that there are ways that, academia isn't always necessarily the place for that sort of work. Mentorship was so valuable for me individually, and then as I finished my doctorate the mentors I had, helped me just provide that emotional support. Even sometimes it's not even about the nuts and bolts of how do you do research and how do you finish a dissertation? It's simply just supporting you and making you feel like you belong in a space that makes you feel like you don't more often than not. And so just having that community of support was important from mentors. But, there are still too few people of color as more senior professors, a lot of my mentors were my peers who were just a couple of years ahead of me, and I vowed that, as soon as I was in a position that I would be that person who would throw the gate open and keep it open and and support people. But I also approach mentorship in in my own sort of way. I think, I have always tried to be just very transparent with my students about what, the challenges of academia can feel like for a woman of color, for a person of color. I also, I had a child when I was in grad school. So that also created other challenges that other people didn't necessarily have to have. And I, I wanted to be able to, again, to support women who might make choices in graduate school, around, having families or, all of that so mentorship is so vital I think to ensuring that academia continues to be open to alternative voices and particularly folks of color like academia sometimes it's like a long hazing process. I feel like this isn't any different than being in a fraternity or sorority, I feel like, it's all just this huge hazing process. It's not fully transparent about what goes on and nobody really wants to let on. And , that prevents us from moving forward. You get stuck in grad school, you end up not finishing your doctorate and, dropping out or you get a job, but then you can't get tenure. And there's just so much that I feel like is so shrouded in secrecy sometimes about academia and I wanted to be able to be that person if I got through that, I would keep the gate wide open and give folks, as much information as possible and support in, moving forward and through through academia and all of the hoops that, you have to jump to get to a place where I am now. [00:23:24] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: Mentorship and activism to me are all so interrelated. When I went to UC Berkeley as an undergrad, and I think you can say this about the UC system as a whole, it's usually an experience of disorientation when you get different kinds of pressures around you saying that your history is unimportant. Your voice is unimportant. Your perspective is unimportant, and this is why ethnic studies exists. And this is why programs like the minority summer research program and various other programs are designed. So as to lift up people who otherwise feel like they don't belong and they don't deserve to study, and they don't deserve the time that is the gift of mentorship. And so I was given the gift of mentorship by so many faculty members who really looked me in the eye and said, what did you make of this material that you read? And to say that, my perspective based on, the knowledge I was learning, the methods I was learning mattered really meant that we could have important places in the world as cultural thinkers, as people who can make an intervention in how we interpret things that we experience. That's what criticism is about. I think a lot about how 88% of critics are white. It means that even the material that we looked at are dissected from such a limited demographic, what a rip off. What would it mean if cultural critics were more diverse, what a robust enriching debate that would be more, and so when a student walks into my office, for the past 20 plus years of teaching, I wanted to share that gift of mentorship to let them know that the university needs their perspective in order for it to do its job. Because if we hear from too few people, then we don't know as much as we should. If it's true that over 90% of the most popular films are made by white men. And it is true, according to the Annenberg Studies at USC and UCLA, then what we know about love, marriage, sexuality, immigration, families more, comes from such a limited place. And it takes away from our understanding of each other. It becomes such a limited imprisoning understanding of each other. If we don't hear from more people, and people who are really critical people who say that, what we shouldn't know, we should know, and the university is a place to dig up those stories. And so for me as a Dean, it's not only about the mentorship I give, but the structures of mentorship that we implement. I think we all need mentors, even for me as a Dean, I have mentors who are Presidents, mentors who are Provosts, so that I have a better understanding of the institution. And I think about this a lot for my, for the faculty in my division. I hope that everyone has a network where you run your ideas by, because you only become stronger for it. You, you have a larger perspective of how institutions work and what your strengths are and then you realize, oh my goodness, all those people who gave me that time. What a big deal that was, that they recognized that you were worth the time that you were worth, the space and the knowledge, and I recognized how good it felt, to be the recipient of that. And then once you start doing it, you realize that. Oh, it's so amazing to be able to give it back, because you're really shaping the next generation. I learned so much from them. That's really the goal for me, not only am I a Dean, but I'm also a grieving mother. And I think a lot about that, about how. All of us are going to confront inevitably, the death of a loved one and so I think about. What our students are doing is really, preparing to have a role in the world that a significant, that really takes advantage of their passion, their strength, their commitment, so that they can, find a purpose that will enable them to get through, this inevitable pain. [00:27:24] Miko Lee: Thank you for sharing that. That really makes me think about your latest film, the Celine Archive, which is such a beautiful personal documentary that, combined so much of your pain and also just uncovering this history of Filipina American. I wonder if you can talk more about what inspired your film. [00:27:45] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: So in the mid nineties, 1994, through 1996, I believe around that time the community historian Alex Fabros was teaching a Filipino American history class, Filipino American experience class. There were about 200 students who were going through that curriculum and they found the story that he had grown up with about a Filipino American immigrant woman who was buried alive by her community in the 1930s Stockton Jersey island area. I myself was discovering the story at the Bancroft Library at UC Berkeley. And I made this film, in the era of the Me Too and Time's Up movements and really wanted to dig deeply into our capacity to suppress the violent experiences that women undergo in our communities. There's so little known and studied about Filipino American history in our curriculum K through 12. And when we do hear about it, we primarily hear men's stories, the late great historian, Dawn Mabalon and talks quite a lot about this and like her and like many other historians and community organizers, cultural workers and the Filipino American community. I wanted to amplify her story. So as to invite us to think about our female past and how Asian American women continue to endure violent silencing we see this, especially, today, not only in the Atlanta shootings, but in the murder of Christina Yuna Lee in New York. [00:29:32] Miko Lee: Can you share a little bit more about how you decided to weave both. Adding this Filipino woman's story into our broader awareness but also weaving in your personal story, sharing a name with the woman who was murdered and your personal story of your tragedy in your family. How did you decide to weave those stories together? [00:29:54] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: You know, when people undergo. An unexpected, very sudden death of a loved one, in my case, it was the death of my eight year old son from a common virus that attacked his heart, and in the case of Celine Navarro in the 1930s, she was abducted tortured and punished by her community, supposedly for committing an act of infidelity. Even though she was undergoing violence for quite some time within the community. The death happened, very suddenly her family did not know what had happened or where she was. So when you undergo a sudden and unexpected death, the meaning of your own life, really comes to the, fore. You become, I think, intensely alive because your loved one cannot have their life. So the question then emerges, what do you do with your life? And I had to turn to making the film as an act of creativity in the face of devastation, you know, my own demise because the death of a child. Could really have meant my own death, even though I was still alive. And in the act of filmmaking, you're really bringing together a community, in my case, it's bringing together not only community historians and Filipino-American scholars in the academy, but also my students, I think I opened up a way of speaking with my students that acknowledged, the pain that they also undergo, and it became for us a collective effort of looking into history and I'm making it come alive by becoming close to Celine Navarro's family. So when the articles first came out about her, it became such an affirmation of this unbelievable thing really did happen and we carry it with us. This is something that flows, within multiple generations of her family. And it's a question for me I think that I really think about a lot, like my son was eight, but he had a community, he had a huge impact in our own family about the way, he lived this life. So the question for me was how do you remember someone you love, who died but continues to live almost like in a very physical way, I feel his presence. And so I. Take the love that I continue to feel for my son and use that to make something in this world. I'm so happy to be alive, to be able to make this film. For example, that I can make this gift through the film for Celine Navarro's family, but then also to invite Filipino American women to say, you can be the center of your own story, and that your story is multilayered and it's worth investigation, because of course, what I found out in digging up Celine Navarro's story was that she herself was a very courageous woman who spoke up against domestic violence, that led her to testify against men who were protecting another violent man. I can't even imagine what that was like, and so to be able to pull up that story and to ask the question that began the film where are Filipino women in American history? I wanted to start the movie in that way because I want everyone to care about Filipino women so I wanted that to also be a courageous act that honored the subject of my film. [00:33:21] Miko Lee: Thank you so much. I'm one, just so sorry for the loss of your son. And so appreciative of the fact that you utilize your grief to funnel it into a beautiful work of art. Thank you so much for that [00:33:34] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: You're welcome and I also wanted to say, that my new film 80 years later, is about my family on my husband's side. It explores the racial inheritance of Japanese American family incarceration during World War II. As you may know, this year is the 80th anniversary of executive order 9066 that imprisoned 120,000 Japanese Americans, and my film shows. Conversations between survivors and their descendants as they continue to grapple with their legacy and I asked the question, how do we care for our stories? What stories do we feel responsible for carrying or admonishing or living? What is that ongoing legacy and how do we live it? [00:34:23] Miko Lee: Well, I'm looking forward to seeing it. That's very exciting. So much of what you're saying around adding women's stories are hidden stories. How we care for our stories. It reminds me of a Dr. Jamaica Heolimeleikalani Osorio talks about this idea of Koana, which is a Hawaiian word for many perspectives that we have all these layers. For so many white Americans, we see all those different layers, but for our people, for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, we don't get the multitude of stories. I'm wondering if you cover some of this in your upcoming book, The Movies of Racial Childhoods: Screaming, Self Sovereignty in Asian America. [00:35:05] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: Yes. So my new book that's forthcoming from Duke University Press “The Movies of Racial Childhoods” it's motivated by two very powerful forces that I can't deny. The first is it's a book that really explores who my son would be now, if he were alive, I think about, the independence of one who was in middle childhood, one who is in adolescence, when my son died, I was so stunned by the world that he owned apart from me. When you think about a child, you think, oh, I control what they're exposed to, who they talk to, but when they're in school, they meet so many people and they create their own world. So I found out things that I didn't know, that how he was the judge of handball in the recess, world, so if something happened, he would adjudicate what was fair or unfair. I had no idea that he was doing this, and he had been doing it for years. And when I look at the films that I'm studying, I'm always stunned by, how the subjectivity of people of color are eclipsed. So that's the second motivation of the book is when I think about childhoods, you always think about an innocent kind of white childhood. Oh, they don't work because they're children. But we think about people of color from the beginning they, they work, they enslaved children had to work and they had no right to play for example, when you're looking at the scholarship of, African-American childhoods, so what does it mean to talk about an Asian or Asian American childhood? Like people say, oh, there's going to represent our family. So you're forever a baby, in that vision. But there's also this premature, adultification that co-exists with this intense infantilization and you also see the college admissions process. It's oh, you can't play around because you have to get into an amazing school. Therefore you have to disavow play and you have to become, the future lawyer of America while you're 12, and you can also see this in the, sexualization of youth as well. So I'm trying to figure out, know those two questions. I've just finished the book and hopefully it'll be out next year. [00:37:16] Swati: You are tuned in to APEX Express at 94.1 KPFA and 89.3 KPFB in Berkeley. And online@kpfa.org. [00:37:28] Miko Lee: Dr. Robyn is the academic elitism that you talk about why you founded the Women of Color, Non-binary People of Color Scholars Inclusion Project? [00:37:36] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: Oh, yeah, absolutely. , I could tell you stories about my experiences of just racism in academia. So WACSIP or the Women of Color Scholars Inclusion Project, it's really a space primarily for those who identify as women of color or non-binary of color, both graduate and faculty. And it's really meant as a safe space for us to be able to convene and support one another. It started off as simply a support group where we could all gather from across campus and all the various places where we are. If you're a woman of color, a non binary, a person of color, the likelihood is that there's just always one or two of you in a particular department or program, and so part of what we wanted to simply do is just get everybody together from across campus, in a space that felt safe where we could literally break bread with one another and be very honest with one another and transparent about what we were struggling with. There is a way that sometimes you feel like you're being gaslighted or you're not really certain that what you've experienced is actually some form of racism or sexism. And sometimes all you need is just, a space where people who have experienced what you've experienced can just affirm that yes, your experience is a real thing and it's not okay and we're here to simply be there as support. We also would organize more formal programs, of course organizing people to come and provide tips and tricks, I guess, to approach teaching and how to, negotiate the challenges of teaching, but especially sometimes the challenges of teaching as women of color. Teaching about race and gender and sexuality as women of color and, contending with sometimes the undermining of our authority as professors in the classroom or by our peers. We'd also organize more formal workshops like that. Writing workshops even, to provide folks with support on publishing because that adage, publish or perish is a very real thing when you're at a major research university, if you do not publish, you cannot secure tenure, you cannot move up in the academic kind of pecking order. So yeah, that was what the intention of the space was, is to create this space of support and it was also to engage as we could in institutional change, trying to document our collective experiences and offer up recommendations to higher ups around shifts that needed to happen to transform institutional culture. That is the piece that was always the struggle. And perhaps what's fed into my frustration with academia, among many other things, but we were successful in providing a space of support for one another. To what extent these groups that I've founded, helped to really shift institutional culture less clear. [00:40:20] Miko Lee: I'm wondering, because WACSIP was has been focused on networking around Critical Race and Ethnic Studies has the anti- CRT fervor that sort of going on by right wing propaganda. Has that impacted your work? [00:40:34] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: Yeah, I think anti-CRT fervor it's interesting. I don't know, to what extent that actually has impacted my work at the university in the sense that I feel as if academia has been effectively anti-CRT and anti-Ethnic Studies for a very long time. And it doesn't have to be articulated in the ways that the current movement that's engaged primarily at banning CRT in the K through 12 levels, it's never taken that kind of vitriolic kind of tone at the university, but we know it by the failures of investments, in our departments, in faculty of color who do work on race. So we've been dealing with, I feel like I, along with my colleagues who do this sort of work, we've been subject to “anti- CRT” campaigns at the university level for quite some time now. But again, how they've manifested has been in the form of, a failure of investments whether it's we can't get new hires, we can't get funding support for our research, whether we're not being recruited to take leadership positions, how many times have I been in conversation with people administrators who I know barely encounter women who look like me, on the faculty and can never get my name right. Or know who I am at all. This is just what we're contending with. So in some ways, what's happening outside the university doesn't affect us because we've already been under attack certainly it doesn't help us either. [00:42:09] Miko Lee: Dr. Celine You have so many things in the works right now at the same time. How are you balancing all this? [00:42:15] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: As Dean, I have to take care of so many people not to take care of the institution, and I think a lot about how there's very few Asian-American women in this role and I think a lot about how, we live such a intensely sexualized, life. There is that force of sexualization that I've felt growing up, throughout my childhood, throughout my early adulthood and as a full grown woman, this intense sexualization, and I don't think that's compatible with our understanding of who is a leader. There's an amazing book by Margaret Chin called “Stuck”, which identifies how very few Asian Americans there are in C-suites, but also in executive leadership roles, but just stunning considering how many Asian-Americans are in these, leading higher ed institutions, but so few of us are leaders of higher ed institutions, right? So it's important, every day to think about how I'm refashioning, what is a popular understanding of what leadership looks like. It is one that is a compassionate and empathetic. And also, how I have to take care of myself through it because you're so in service of others. And I actually go to my own work in order to always remember what is the purpose of my life? What is it that I am protecting in the enterprise of the university, which is, the freedom to inquire. With courage about the most challenging issues of our day, so yeah, it's working out for me, going to my own work, even in the most demanding moments of leadership. It's a reminder, you know what I want to make sure our faculty and students and staff have access to, which is, the excellence of inquiry and debate that is truly available in the university unlike other places, in our world right now you have so many reactionary uneducated, superficial perspectives, but what we do in the university is so special. The seminar is so special where you come into a room and you would have read, material deeply, closely together. You figure out the questions that you have that have been asked by generations before you, you stand on the shoulders of people who have done the work in order to produce your own. There's no greater pleasure. So I'm so happy to be the guardian of that, I'm so happy to lead the arts division that UC Santa Cruz, because that is our enterprise and what's amazing about it is that it produces beautiful work, impactful work, needed work in our world today. I think about empowering every single voice, in our university and to be open, to be surprised by it. And I think the abundance of voice, doesn't just mean the background, that you carry the cultural inheritances that you're trying to grapple with, but it's really also working with people who are different from you, across class, across nation, across region, to see what you can come up with together. And so the students really feel like, oh my God these films are really going to make an impact, and so I think a lot about what we can do on university campuses that really train the next generation of students to be ready for a truly, multiracial world, in 2045, we're going to be a majority people of color country, and so our students need to be educated as, as widely and broadly as possible not only in terms of what they know, but also how they take care of themselves. And we're doing so much here. That's so exciting we're saying these are the people who are coming to this campus and trying to figure out their voices, trying to learn their craft. And what we're going to do is to give them a space in order to get. share their experiences, whether it's with policing or prison abolition, the university is a place where we can do all of that. [00:46:11] Miko Lee: Robyn, I've heard you talk about being a people's professor. Can you share what that means? [00:46:17] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: Sure for me, people's professor it means that the university pays me, but I work for my community. And what that means is that I have always seen my work, whether it's my research and scholarship, you know what I decide to research who I'm writing for when I do, when I write what I teach, how I teach it what I do, but recognizing kind of the stature that comes with being a university, professor, all of my research, my teaching, how I move in the world is driven by and rooted in my community organizing and activist commitments. It comes out of my personal interest, true, but I've been very attuned, always to the issues that emerge in the organizing spaces that I am part of. I've always been a member of a community organization wherever I've been. So I have commitments, it's not simply that I have my ear on the ground and I see issues that pop up in the media. I have commitments, I'm part of the community, I joined organizations, I know what our communities are grappling with and all of that is always shaped my research agenda and found its way in my teaching. That's what I mean by people's professor that, my allegiance is not to the university, my allegiance is not even to my career and advancing my career. It's really to, using my skills, using my training, using my platform to advance the work of social justice. I think that's the role I feel like I want to play. That's why I entered academia to begin with. [00:48:00] Miko Lee: So your next iteration of the people's professor after you leave UC Davis next year, will be the School for Liberating Education. [00:48:09] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: The School for Liberating Education is quite simply a platform that allows anybody in the community to be able to access Ethic Studies knowledge, I think it's just so vital and healing and transformative to take Ethnic Studies courses. And yet, as you mentioned earlier, we are under attack. We've had many important Ethnic Studies victories, but there've been sufficiently forces who've managed to water down the kind of curriculum that many of us who fought for Ethnic Studies and continue to fight for Ethics Studies really want. And so among the things that the pandemic offered us is new kinds of technologies to connect virtually and, I myself, was taking virtual courses as part of my own healing process in the wake of the loss of my son in August of 2020. And it occurred to me that, these courses were amazing for my own healing journey and that I could possibly use these same platforms that were helping me to be able to offer Ethnic Studies to a broader audience of folks, especially in a context where Ethnic Studies or CRT was being viciously attacked. So yeah, that's really what it started off as, and in its first phase it's been a series of online courses first in, Asian American studies, which is really in my wheelhouse, and in Filipinx Studies specifically, I'd like to expand even more of the offerings that dive deep into the Chicanx experience and Latinx experience the Black experience, Native studies, Native and Indigenous studies and interracial kind of examinations as well, just in terms of the online courses. I guess the 2.0 version of this School for Liberating Education is the courses that I'm hoping to offer here on site at the new farm that we've just purchased. We want to be able to host intensive learning retreats and kind of educational workshops that center land-based and Indigenous knowledges. So in other words, either doing in-person short courses that are somewhat based on the current offering of courses online or extensions of them or just kind of new courses. There's a lot of new work in advancing healing justice that I also want to help to organize and curate here at the farm. Definitely want to center these land based and Indigenous knowledges and I'm super excited about the possibilities of what I can do as a people's professor outside of the space of academia outside of also the space of, the politics of it all and here. We're just at the beginnings of setting up the farm proper we're beginning to break ground because we have some seeds in the ground. I have my Hmong father and mother-in-law are helping us and already passing on generations of wisdom about the land and how to till the land and how to, just be in community with the land, just, in the work that they've been doing and helping us to cultivate it, but yeah, this is the next phase and I'm just really excited about the possibilities for learning that I can extend, but also for myself, I don't see myself as only being the professor actually in this space. I see myself more as an organizer and a curator who has some knowledge to impart, but also as somebody who can gathered together other people with other forms of expertise. [00:51:27] Miko Lee: It's a combination of a lot of your wheelhouse, a lot of your strengths as an educator and doing cross solidarity work and bringing in this sense of connecting to the land and healing and wellness. It's very beautiful. I'm looking forward to learning more and we will post a link to School for Liberating Education in the show notes for APEX Express. You spoke about healing and wellness. And I know 2020 was a really hard year and I am so sorry for the loss of your son. I really appreciate how you are turning that just tragic loss into a powerful foundation. Can you speak about the foundation and what that's all about? [00:52:08] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: Yeah. Absolutely. I'm still struggling. The healing process is ongoing for me. And people often talk about how there are different kinds of losses one can experience, and I've experienced a lot of those kinds of losses. I've lost a dear grandparent, my grandmother who helped raise me, I've lost a parent. I lost my father in 2014. And all of those losses, hurt in deep ways, of course, but there is something acute about the loss of a child. And though, he was a young man so full of promise though, just at the young age of 22 to have lost his life. And the foundation is an opportunity for me to ensure that his legacy and everything that he was so passionate about and that he lived and fought and died for lives on. And, so the Amado Khaya Foundation is meant to be a space that will support the causes that , was so passionate about. Clearly indigenous people's struggles, that's where he spent the last few months of his life, he was serving the Magguangan and Maduro in the wake of terrible typhoons that had hit the island. He was also very passionate about Ethnic Studies, that was an issue he was very involved in before leaving for the Philippines. He was passionate about housing justice. He really came of his own as a community organizer and activist. And I want to just ensure that, the work that he started can continue, but I also want to center mental health and wellness in the work that Amado Khaya does because he really acutely understood the ways that community organizers and activists hold the collective trauma of our people. His father who I am no longer with, was an anti-apartheid activist in South Africa. Had really experienced the violence of the apartheid regime was witness to the violent clashes between activists and the police and the state, and that had a major impact on Amado's father. And deep mental health impacts that Amado recognized, so that's something I really want to also center in the Amado Khaya Foundation is not just continuing to support the organizations or the issues he fought for, but to support the mental health and wellness of organizers themselves, who are doing all this great work and kind of providing them the support and care that they also really require to continue the work of social justice and among the things that we've we've done through Amado Khaya, we're still finishing up our 501c3 process. But we have a home that we purchased in honor of Amado called Amado's Kaia, which translates into Amado is home. Kaia actually also means home in Zulu. But we have a home that we offer as a gift to organizers as a sanctuary refuge for rest. We've been able to get some grants and in the process of setting up a digital media lab, Amado was a aspiring filmmaker. So we want to be able to also use media film in particular, which was what he was passionate about, and video as a way of also supporting activists causes. Part of what I'm also hoping that Amado Khaya does , and this is what the connection comes back to the school, I'm very inspired by Grace Lee Boggs, so Re-Imagination Lab is the social enterprise that holds all of my kind of entrepreneurial initiatives and the idea is that we want to get to a place where we generate a surplus revenue that we would reinvest into Amado Khaya, other non-profits. Somebody who's worked in alongside nonprofits we know how much our, a nonprofit organizations struggle to hustle for funding. And they're often beholden to foundations, that, oftentimes relate to non-profits in what amounts to a very colonized and very white supremacist, relationship and which constrain the kind of work that nonprofit organizations can do in service of the community. And so I want to be able to get to a place where Amado Khaya will either draw sufficient donations from individuals or revenues from Re-Imagination Lab so that we can help fund movements without constraints so they can do the work that they need to do without any limitation. I think that there are a lot of us who are trying to figure out how do we redistribute resources in our community and not have to be beholden to foundations that may very well be responsible for creating the very problems that nonprofits are forced to have to address. [00:56:56] Miko Lee: Dr Robyn, the people's professor. Thank you so much. Dr. Celine thank you both for turning your grief into positive action and thank you for just continuing to share your work with by and for the broader community. I really appreciate what you're doing. [00:57:12] Miko Lee: Please check out our website, kpfa.org backslash program, backslash apex express to find out more about the show tonight and to find out how you can take direct action. We thank all of you listeners out there. Keep resisting, keep organizing, keep creating and sharing your visions with the world. Your voices are important. Apex express is produced by Miko Lee Jalena Keane-Lee and Paige Chung and special editing by Swati Rayasam. Thank you so much to the KPFA staff for their support have a great night. The post APEX Express – 11.3.22 – A Tale of 2 Professors appeared first on KPFA.

The Voncast Show
Ep. 153 Filipino American History Month ft. Allan Aquino

The Voncast Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 37:14


In honor of Filipino American History Month, i had my former Asian American Studies Professor / Kuya - Allan Aquino on the podcast. Allan drops knowledge on the history of Filipino Americans, our experience in the States, why so many Filipinos are nurses, Filipino spaghetti & more! This conversation is but a preview of what was taught to me. Thank you Kuya Allan, without your encouragement along with other professors, i would not be pursuing my path in music & podcasting. Salamat!

The Filipino American Woman Project
143: "We are not just excavating our past, but we are actively writing our future." Wrapping up Filipino American History Month with Jen and Nani

The Filipino American Woman Project

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 39:36


Note: This conversation is also available on YouTube https://youtu.be/_uf33cSUOq0 (https://youtu.be/_uf33cSUOq0) 143: "We are not just excavating our past, but we are actively writing our future." Wrapping up Filipino American History Month with Jen and Nani And that's a wrap for Filipino American History Month! Jen and Nani share some fun facts about Filipino American National Historical Society (FANHS), Stacey Salinas' upcoming California Museum Exhibit "California Is In The Heart," and ways to continue engaging with TFAW Project. Finally, they have a candid check in with one another about their journey as business partners thus far. Remember to private message us on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/thefilipinoamericanwoman/ (@thefilipinoamericanwoman) to inquire about the 5-Day Reflection Series. To join the waiting list for our mastermind focus group, contact Jen and Nani at jen@tfawproject.com and nani@tfawproject.com Resources Learn about the history of Filipino American History Month http://fanhs-national.org/filam/about/ (http://fanhs-national.org/filam/about/) “California Is in the Heart,” presented in partnership with the Bulosan Center for Filipino Studies and with support from the Filipino American National Historical Society Museum, underlines the critical role Filipino Americans have played in our state's history. This exhibit will be available October 29, 2022 - April 9, 2023 https://www.californiamuseum.org/california-heart (https://www.californiamuseum.org/california-heart) Learn about the non-profit, The Price of Freedom Foundation, that's working with Jen's family and other Gold Star families in writing the biographies of our fallen heroes https://priceoffreedomfoundation.org/ (https://priceoffreedomfoundation.org/) Read the Asian American History and the Filipino American Woman Project academic paper written by Stacey Salinas back in November 30th, 2017 https://tr.ee/JJqARFEG-M (https://tr.ee/JJqARFEG-M) Read our latest newsletter, published Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2022: https://mailchi.mp/45004c877c68/tfawproject (https://mailchi.mp/45004c877c68/tfawproject) -- LOVE OUR SHOW? Show your support at http://www.buyusboba.com/ (http://www.buyusboba.com/) Supporting us with a minimum of one cup of boba gets you access to our monthly book club. A monthly or annual support gets you access to our monthly book club and exclusive access to our private podcast: Tsismis with Jen & Nani! FREE ONLINE COMMUNITY: Chat with Jen and Nani, along with your fellow podcast listeners on Discord https://discord.gg/2hSaHK9Cps (https://discord.gg/2hSaHK9Cps) NEWSLETTER: Receive the latest stories, updates and media coverage by subscribing to our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/cO0bif (http://eepurl.com/cO0bif) ABOUT US: Welcome to the Filipino American Woman Project - A Podcast Show that shares stories and life lessons told by individuals living (or have lived) in America, that are of Filipino descent and are cisgender female. For Season 4, Jen and Nani pivot the show to focus on their journey as podcasters, content creators, and entrepreneurs -- with a focus on advocating for Filipino American women storytellers and authors. UPCOMING BOOK: Special thanks to the Bulosan Center for Filipino Studies at UC Davis for the opportunity to present our academic paper, Pinay Podcasters: Building a Self-Sustaining Community Through Storytelling, Collective Healing & Learning, and Collaboration. The initial draft is now available! Read more at http://pinaypodcasters.com/ (http://pinaypodcasters.com/) RECOGNITION: In December 2020 and December 2021, we received an Honorable Mention at the Asian American Podcaster's Golden Crane Podcast Awards. August 2020, Jen Amos participated as a speaker on behalf of TFAW Project for PodFest Global, which now holds the GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS™ title for Largest Attendance for a Virtual Podcasting Conference in One Week. May 2020, we were recognized as “Amplifying Asian Women Voices” on

This Filipino American Life
Episode 177 – Celebrations vs Commemorations vs Complications: How Should We Honor Filipino American History?

This Filipino American Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 60:43


Happy Filipino American HISTORY Month!  How did you celebrate?  Why did you celebrate? The past month here in Southern California was filled with numerous events and moments where Filipino and Filipino American culture and heritage were celebrated, but only a handful seemed to spotlight and focus on Filipino American History itself.  And while it may...

Radio Cherry Bombe
The Future Of Food Is You With Abi Balingit Of The Dusky Kitchen

Radio Cherry Bombe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 36:20 Very Popular


Welcome to the second episode of The Future Of Food Is You mini-series in which host Abena Anim-Somuah introduces us to emerging voices and innovative creatives in the world of food, drink, and social media. Today's guest is Abi Balingit, also known as The Dusky Kitchen. Abi is a Filipino-American baker with a day job in the music industry who has raised money and awareness for national and local causes through her pasalubong dessert boxes. Abi and Abena talk about her baked goods, her upcoming cookbook, and her predictions for the food world. Don't miss Abi's message for herself 10 years from now on The Future Of Food Is You voicemail. Thank you to Cypress Grove, maker of award-winning American goat cheese, for supporting The Future Of Food Is You. For recipes, pairings, and a store locator, head to cypressgrovecheese.com. Check out Cherry Bombe's 2nd annual Cooks & Books festival line-up here, happening Nov. 5th & 6th at Ace Hotel Brooklyn!The Future Of Food Is You is a production of Cherry Bombe magazine. Subscribe to our newsletter and check out past episodes and transcripts here. This mini-series is recorded at CityVox Studio in New York City. Our theme song is by the band Tralala.More on Abi: Instagram, Links, Website, Pre-order her book hereMore on Abena: Instagram, The Eden Place

KPFA - APEX Express
APEX Express – 10.27.22 Cathy Ceniza Choy

KPFA - APEX Express

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 59:59


A weekly magazine-style radio show featuring the voices and stories of Asians and Pacific Islanders from all corners of our community. The show is produced by a collective of media makers, deejays, and activists. Tonight on APEX Express Host Miko Lee interviews Cathy Ceniza Choy author of Asian American Histories of the United States. Show Transcripts [00:00:00] Opening: Asian Pacific expression. Unity and cultural coverage, music and calendar revisions influences Asian Pacific Islander. It's time to get on board. The Apex Express. Good evening. You're tuned in to Apex Express. [00:00:18] Jalena Keane-Lee: We're bringing you an Asian American Pacific Islander view from the Bay and around the world. [00:00:22] Miko Lee: This is Miko Lee. And in August, I had the wonderful opportunity of hosting a live event. One of the first live events. That KPFA was offering at the back room in Berkeley. And it was an interview with Catherine Cinzia Choi on her new book Asian-American histories of the United States. So take a listen to the interview. You're going to hear some clapping and some noise because it was a live audience. we hope you enjoy it and find out more information at our website kpfa.org. take a listen welcome to KPFAS live virtual event. I'm Miko Lee from apex expressed in your host for tonight. A big round of applause to our producers of K PFA events that are here. Kevin Hunt, Sanger, and Brandy Howell in the back of the room. Wow, it's so great to be in front of a live audience. Thank you to Sam Rudin and the back room. This amazing glorious space for hosting us this live evening. Okay. Y'all we're coming back. We're coming out. We're still pandemic land. People are in their beautiful masks, but we're coming back and KPFA has a few more upcoming events. I wanna do a land acknowledgement, and I want to acknowledge that K P F a is located on unseated, Cho Chino speaking, Lonni land known as the Huk, as journalists and community members. We have the responsibility to engage critically with the legacy of colonists. Colonialist violence and to uplift the active and ongoing indigenous struggles connected to the land that we are gathered on tonight. If you wanna check out more, go to native land dot California, and if you live in the east bay, I'm asking, do you pay the Shmi land tax, which is led by indigenous women, find out more about Ante's work of reation and returning in indigenous lands to the people establishing a cemetery to reinter stolen alone, ancestral remains and building urban gardens, community centers and ceremonial spaces. So current and future generations of indigenous people can thrive in the bay area. Thank you so much for joining us. We are honored tonight to welcome author Cathy Cenzia Choy. Cathy is currently a professor of ethnic studies at our own UC Berkeley, and she has published multiple books around Asian American identity. And is here tonight to chat with us about her latest book, Asian American histories of the United States. Welcome Cathy. Yes. Thank you. Okay. I'm gonna do anode to the great poet Chinaka Hodges, and ask, who are your people and where do you come from? [00:03:19] Cathy Cenzia Choy: I am the daughter of Filipino immigrants born and raised in New York city. I've been in Berkeley since 2004, and UC Berkeley has been a very important institution and community for me. And it's just such an honor to be. Your presence today and tonight I wanna thank you Miko for taking the time to, to host this. I wanna acknowledge my family and friends who are in the audience, my husband and my daughter are here. And I'm so pleased about that. And I feel like I'm with my people right now. [00:04:03] Miko Lee: what are the legacies that you carry with you from your ancestors? [00:04:11] Cathy Cenzia Choy: Wow. These are really Deep questions. I know. I feel like I care, even though sometimes I'm not aware. All the details. I feel like I carry the histories of my ancestors, even though, as I write in the book. So many of us in including myself didn't grow up knowing much about Asian American history because it wasn't taught to us in our schools. And even with that I feel my ancestors' presence with me. And I especially thank my mother Petri, za and other family members for also making that presence alive in so many ways while I was growing [00:04:57] Miko Lee: up in New York city. And are there certain elements that you carry with you on the daily? [00:05:05] Cathy Cenzia Choy: I don't know. In terms of the daily, because now I'm at this point in my life where I've had many experiences and I. Learned more to own my voice. And I feel owning that voice like through speaking and through writing is something I've learned and carried from them. But it took me also some time to, to get to this point. And even though I've talked to so many people in public spaces I always feel still some, some. nerves every time. [00:05:50] Miko Lee: So maybe it's self-expression and passing on the torch to the next generation around storytelling, around [00:05:56] Cathy Cenzia Choy: teaching. Absolutely. I think one of the things that I try to impart in, in my teaching at UC Berkeley at university of Minnesota twin cities, where I had taught for six years prior to coming to Berkeley, I try to impart that, that lesson of learning to, to cultivate your confidence and to own your voice. [00:06:19] Miko Lee: Your book is such an interesting collection because you're talking about some deep Asian American history stories, and then you're intertwining it with your own personal stories. And I wonder if you could speak a little bit more about your personal family story and your her story and how that intertwines with Asian American, her story. [00:06:39] Cathy Cenzia Choy: One of the things that is different from in terms of this book compared to my previous two books, is that it was intended for a very broad audience. And given what Asian Americans have been going through in this country since 2020 in many ways it was also born out of some very difficult, challenging circumstances. And I've experienced like many Asian Americans have experienced since 2020, a level of fear and anxiety and grief, at what has been happening with the surgeon anti-Asian violence, its relation to coronavirus related anti-Asian racism and. all of this has infused a different approach to writing in this book. And I write in the first person, the second person in one chapter on, on world war II. And I write in the more traditional third person which is typical and scholarly history books. So when I write in the first person, I share personal experiences that are intertwined to these histories. And this includes some of the fear and anxiety I was already mentioning. And that concern about the surge in anti-Asian violence and that when I see those stories on the media I see my family members, I see my elders and. in the book. I talk about how I've talked to my children and I realize that they see me. And so that's one personal experience, but my husband is. And his family's history is also on the, in the book. There's one chapter titled 19, 19 declaration of independence and 1919, that declaration of independence is referring to the declaration of. Korean independence, both in Korea against Japanese imperialism but also a Korean Congress that came to Philadelphia in April 19, 19. And my husband's parents on his father's side were among those Korean independence activists in the early 20th century. And I share experiences also how we've tried to pass on Asian American history to our children. And I talk about a moment where we brought our son to the Japanese American Memorial garden in tan Farran, which is now a shopping mall, but used to be a horse racing track and then was converted into an assembly center or what they would call a relocation center which forcibly relocated Japanese Americans here in, in the bay area there before. Forcibly incarcerating them in internment camps during world Wari. So there's quite a bit of my history, my family's history in this, even though the, of, it's not the, all of the histories that I talked about, you're [00:09:50] Miko Lee: telling part of your family stories, but then you're also telling a bunch of personal stories, small stories of people to help really illuminate a moment in history. And I'm wondering how you went about the process of selecting those individual stories to help shed light on a bigger [00:10:03] Cathy Cenzia Choy: issue. Yeah that's a great question. I think that's one of the challenges with history, which has story in it history and is about communicating stories and the choices we make matter. So I chose stories that I felt reflected key moments events, groups in Asian American histories over the past almost 200 years. And the idea also was that in selecting these stories, many of which came from research, I had done in the past and also my teaching. But I also wanted to create this feeling in the book of engaging and inviting readers to think about what stories would they want to include and not to cut it off and say, these are the stories we need to know, but rather these are the stories of. People's families and communities. And what are the stories of your families and communities? [00:11:09] Miko Lee: So in a way, it's an invitation for the readers and the audience members to look at your personal stories and how they intertwine with Asian American [00:11:17] Cathy Cenzia Choy: history. Yes. I hope that one of my hopes is that the book is as accessible as possible and that it is shared across an incredibly diverse audience. Also multi-generational and it would mean a great deal to me, for people to share the histories in this book with their elders and people of their generation and younger generations. [00:11:44] Miko Lee: And speaking of stories and connections, one of the biggest connections of a API community is around our food. people. It doesn't matter where you are, people know about Asian food and Asian Pacific Islander food. And you have a whole section in your book that is an interlude around food. And I'm wondering if you can just read the bolded sections of the interlude to the audience as a teaser, and then we'll talk about it some [00:12:08] Cathy Cenzia Choy: more. Okay. Yes. I'd love that. Okay. We, [00:12:13] Miko Lee: so for those of you that haven't read the book, , here's a little bit of a teaser of what the book has to offer Yes. And just the fact there, there's an interlude in the book. Which is also do you wanna talk about that now or after you pretty different? [00:12:19] Cathy Cenzia Choy:  It's just it was, getting at a point that I had made earlier about how I wanted to write differently. I also felt compelled to write differently. And there's an interlude in the book and it's entitled 1965 reprise the faces behind the food. And I'm going to read an abridged version because this way of reading, it makes it like a shout out poem.yeah. So 1965 reprise the faces behind the food. This is for the Asian American faces behind the food that nourishes Americans and enriches American cuisine. The general public knows. So little about Asian American people, but our food is everywhere at one's exotic and mainstream. This is for Larry. I Italy on the Filipino American farm workers who started the grape strike in Delano, California in 1965. This is for Dawn Baan and those who champion labor history. This is for the over 300,000 Asian migrants, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Filipino, whose labor made sugar production, Hawaii top industry. This is for the Chinese workers who transformed tens of thousands of acres of California, swamp land into airable land, and who applied their ingenuity to orchards from Oregon to Florida. This is for the Chinese, Japanese and Filipino workers in the canned salmon industry of the Pacific Northwest. This is for the Japanese fruit and vegetable farmers. This is for the Asian, Indian, agricultural workers. Many of whom found work in California's fields in the early century. This is for the restaurant workers like chinch wing, who started working at an Americanized Chinese restaurant in 1936 in New York city. This is for the food service workers in cafeteria. This is for the writer and migrant worker, Carlos bloon. This is for de leaping sound who in 1956 became the first person of Asian descent elected to serve as a us representative and champion the farmers of his Southern California district. This is for Thai American. Who have a complicated relationship with Thai food because they are often conflated with it. This is for the monos. Mono is a term that conveys respect for Filipino elders in the 1920s and 1930s, they followed the crops from California to the Pacific Northwest. The Mons demonstrated their militancy. The 1965 grape strike was not an exception, but rather a singular point on a continuum. In the age of COVID 19 Asian Americans continued to be the many faces behind the food, using their creativity and leadership to promote communal care during a critical time. This is for Hannah DRA, a self-identified Pakistani American Muslim, and the co-founder of transformation. A technology platform that redistributes leftover, prepared food from restaurants and companies to places that need them like homeless shelters. This is for heart of dinner, whose mission is to nourish New York, city's Asian elders with love and food every week, the irony of Asian Americans producing America's food and enlivening, the overall food experience and the context of hate and violence has not been lost on them historically. And in the present day in March, 2021, people gathered at North Dakota state university in Fargo to protest against anti-Asian hatred. One poster red love us. Like you love our food. [00:16:51] Miko Lee: Thank you so much. Yes. Can make some noise. That's good. And if I may add, this is for. Adding all of your stories so that our Asian American history and tapestry can become richer and deeper. Thank you so much, Kathy, for sharing that. Now talk about why you wanted a kind of musical interlude in the middle of the book. [00:17:15] Cathy Cenzia Choy: It had to do with the histories the multiplicity that I emphasize in the book that there are multiple origins of Asian American history. And we should refer to these as Asian American histories, because my approach in the book is less about a linear, a traditional linear approach which can sometimes suggest causality or. Progress all the time and rather than take a linear approach. One of the things that's distinctive about the book is that the first substantive chapter begins with the year 2020. And the book concludes with 1869 and then each of the chapters. So it goes back in time and each of the chapters moves forward and back in time. So one of the chapters is titled 1965. And it's about the faces of post 1965 Asian America. And it's referring to the immigration and nationality act of 1965, which dramatically changed the democratic the demographics of our country. And. Yet, it was difficult to weave in seamlessly the story of Larry Italy and the Filipino farm workers and how important that grape strike was in, in Delano, California. And I thought to myself I don't ne I, I don't wanna put a, another chapter entitled 1965. So I'm gonna do, I'm gonna do this interlude and then, and write in a different way to give people a break from the style and then encourage you to give shout outs of your own. [00:18:57] Miko Lee: Thank you. Speaking of Larry Iley who in a bunch of your book, you talk about erasure or as Helen Z talks about missing in history. What are those moments that are MIH? And Larry I. Long is one of those many stories we always hear about Cezar Chavez and the great boycott when it was actually a Filipino man, Larry Ile that you write about. And I'm wondering after doing this exhaustive research for your book and as a professor, what are some kind of key missing in history moments? Do you think stand out in Asian American Pacific Islander history? [00:19:30] Cathy Cenzia Choy: There are key moments in every chapter in this book. In the first chapter on, on 2020 I talk about the disproportionate toll of COVID 19 on Filipino nurses in this country. And so one of the things that's MIH, which I've tried to address in my own research and was the topic of my first book was why and how the Philippines became the world's leading sending country of professional nurses and a specifically to, to the United States. And so in, in every chapter, the chapter after 2020 is one on 1975, and it's about Southeast Asian Americans and the refugee experience, but also the descendants of refugees in Southeast Asian immigrants. And so much of their stories are MIH because we are familiar with the Vietnam war, but often from the American perspective. And we, the. Participation of and Laosian Americans were part of a secret army and a secret war. So there's so many instances of that in every single chapter where this I, ideas of erasure secrecy being overlooked like Larry Ile who worked closely with Suor Chavez for years, they were director and assistant director of the U F w but many of us yes, know that story. [00:20:58] Miko Lee: I'm wondering if you could talk a little bit about the great former photojournalist quirky Lee and his impact, because I think one of those things about missing a history are those that have stood up to try and tell that story again, and you profile quirky. Can you tell a little bit the audience about Corky Lee and what he did. [00:21:14] Cathy Cenzia Choy: Yeah, well, thanks for giving me the opportunity Corky Lee was one of the most important, I think photo journalists of the late 20th and early 21st century and is such a pioneer in Asian American journalism. And he is just one of the over 1 million people we have lost in the United States as a result of COVID 19. And I wanted to honor his memory in the book. He was well known for taking a photograph of a sick American after nine 11 and so many sick Americans in our country after nine 11 were targeted for anti-Asian violence, they were conflated with the stereotypical image of what a terrorist might, might look like in our country. And so we took this photograph of a sick man wearing a red turban with the United States flag draped around his shoulders. And the other thing he's also very well known for is something that is a major theme in this book, which is the theme of erasure of Asian American history and experience in the overall us experience and that era. one of the key moments is in 1869 with the completion of the building of the first transcontinental railroad, which took place at a Ary summit in Utah. And this is a very important moment in, in the history of our nation as a symbol of our modern progress that, enabled us expansionism across the continent. And eventually also into the Hawaiian islands and Asia and Chinese workers at were. About 90% of the labor force of the central Pacific here in the Western region of building [00:23:17] Miko Lee: my family that railroad. Yes. Yeah. My ancestors built that railroad. [00:23:21] Cathy Cenzia Choy: Yes. I re we talked about that briefly and there might be other descendants here too of the railroad workers. And when they finally met at Promentory summit, there was a celebratory photo it's quite known and there was not a single Chinese worker in this photo. Not a single Chinese worker and quirky Lee. When he was in grade school, he remembered, learning about Chinese participation in the building of this railroad. And so he looked at that photo and he noticed that absence and erasure. And so I believe it was the hundred and 45th anniversary of the building of. that railroad. And he rest staged that iconic photograph. And this time he included the descendants of the Chinese railroad workers and other Asian Americans. And it was a joyous moment. And he referred to these moments, photographic justice. [00:24:24] Miko Lee: I love that whole even ethos of photographic justice. And you wrote in your book that was a 2014, that's so recent that this has happened. It's just this and also one person. And it also shows the power. Hello, ethnic studies, professors in the house, the power that he, this one, man heard this story and said, why isn't this being told, right? [00:24:46] Cathy Cenzia Choy: Yes. And that's the, one of my hopes for the book is you'll notice that in, throughout the book in the various chapters, I oppose these questions. No questions for us to think about. It's not solely about here's the experience and here are the dates and the years and the events, but it's the way we all participate in history, but by what we choose to remember to reflect upon and how we use that historical knowledge to, to move forward, [00:25:20] Miko Lee: next up listen to girl gang by Rubia barra That was girl gang by the amazing Ruby Abara. [00:27:26] Miko Lee: You are tuned into apex express on 94.1 K PFA and 89.3 K P F B. Now let's get back to my interview with author Kathleen. Cinzia joy. [00:27:41] Miko Lee: Keeping on with this conversation about erasure and representation, you quote this study by Nancy Angwin, who is amazing. That is it really recent last year, 2021 study that says 40% of films have no zero Asian American Pacific Islander representation and of the films that do have representation over 25% of the characters die, violent. talk to us a little bit more about what does that say? How is that connected to erasure? What does that mean to the broader multicultural universe? What does it say about Asian Americans? [00:28:19] Cathy Cenzia Choy: In that chapter I'm gonna paraphrase since I'm not directly reading from it, but in that chapter, I reflect on that study and those statistics. And one of the things that if you wanna look directly at that study because in the notes, there's the URL to it. You, you will read that those statistics are juxtaposed with statistics about anti-Asian violence in 20, 20 and 2021. And I posed the question in that chapter. Are you, are we human? If we're not portrayed in a dignified and humane way. in popular culture. And if the only representations or the major representations of you are as, one dimensional flat stereotypes. And if it gets to the point where you're so used to the narrative on screen, that you can expect that Asian or Asian American character to die and not make it, what does that do to our psyche and how we view real world Asian Americans. So I didn't share this in the book, but when my children were younger, I actually had this experience. We, we brought them to this action film and this Asian American character was on screen. and I remember putting my head down thinking, oh I really hope this character doesn't die. and I turned to my son who was quite young at the time, and I tried to like, prepare him for that. And then the character did die in, in, in the film. So it's that feeling of why are we seeing such similar stories over and over again? And how can we begin to change that narrative? [00:30:14] Miko Lee: Connected to that and connected to your earlier book about Filipino nurses. One of my pet peeves, I love watching doctor shows as just totally fluff. And one of my pet peeve is that there are never enough Asian doctors and I am in the bay area. Every single one of my doctors is Asian. So I've always been like, this is such I don't understand. And especially with how many Filipinos are in the medical profession. So can you expand a little bit more of that and bringing in your last book, which is empire of care, nursing and migration and Filipino American history? [00:30:50] Cathy Cenzia Choy: Yes, I oh the present the past present and future of American nursing is inextricably linked to the presence of Filipino American nurses in this country. And Filipino American nurses have been in the United States for six. Decades. Many of them are immigrants, so they were born and raised in the Philippines, but the United States has been their home and they have made this incredible contribution to us healthcare delivery. And California we are one of the beneficiaries of their labor they're in hospitals, they're in elder care. And in the book I mentioned the Emmys, I forgot what year that was, but one of the co-host Michael Shay actually, said can you believe, Hollywood is a diversity problem and can you believe they did 15 seasons of ER without one single Filipino nurse? And have you been to a hospital in this country? And I feel also that frustration and that irony and it's, I have to say it's. It was especially painful since 2020 because Filipino nurses and other Asian American healthcare workers were also among the targets of anti-Asian violence. And hate in this country, even while they were wearing medical scrubs. For example, there was testimony given and there's one hospitalist in, in New York who I I quote in, in the book who, who talked about this paradox that here they are contributing to the health of our nation and putting their lives on the line yes. Through exposure and dealing with this hate and violence. And he said, it's really challenging being. celebrated and villainized at the same time. And that's the problem when so much of our common understanding or what we think is an understanding of Asian Americans is based on stereotypes. Because stereotypes are flat. They're one dimensional. They dehumanize even the most seemingly positive ones. [00:33:13] Miko Lee: Okay. I wanna talk about a different topic, which is in 1997, time magazine released this cover and on the cover where all these cute Asians, and it said the model minority. And I remember being in school and my teacher bringing that in and showing that magazine cover the class and pointing to me and I just had this like visceral gut reaction to it. Can you talk about how the model minority, the whole ethos of model minority has been used as a tool for white SuPM. [00:33:49] Cathy Cenzia Choy: I, I appreciate you phrasing the question that way. The model minority stereotype, which is a myth is such a complex stereotype. And some people might say, the model minority is about Asian Americans being smart and economically successful. And what's wrong with that? Isn't that positive? Isn't that the best kind of branding any group or could ask for. And it is a tool of divide and conquer. It is a tool of white supremacy which is, I think the way I understand. You're phrasing of the question because it too has a history. And part of that history is emerging in the late 1960s during civil rights and other, social movement protests, and having media stories quoting academics as experts contrasting Asian Americans as successful model minorities who don't complain. Don't ask for government help pull themselves up by their bootstraps in contrast to black Americans. And it was really direct like that now in, in contrast to African Americans who are protesting and demanding justice and change from the government this is a. Strategy of divide and conquer and prevent us from seeing. So in some ways it's another form of erasure that I talk about in the book that there's this longer history of Asian American and black solidarity and friendship living in neighborhoods together, working together in organizing [00:35:39] Miko Lee: together, [00:35:39] Cathy Cenzia Choy: organizing together work, interracial relationships and families. And we're [00:35:45] Miko Lee: talking about you, Grace Lee [00:35:46] Cathy Cenzia Choy: Boggs yes, I right. Grace Gracely BOS is certainly, part of that, one of many right. One, one of many who was married to James Boggs, a a black auto worker and author and activist. And they were married for a long time and together created. Summer which was this community, youth based organization and out of that love and marriage and mutual activism created something which is relating to another main theme in the book of resistance. It's like that creative spark like Detroit summer to create community gardens and to paint murals and to have intergenerational dialogues and to move forward in, in the most hopeful and an inclusive. Possible. And that's just one example. [00:36:42] Miko Lee: Yeah. I appreciate how in the book you're talking about erasure, you're having resistance stories, and then you did bring up talking about mixed race and global adoption. And I know your former book was around global families. So I am you share some really lovely tidbits in there, like about Punjabi Mexican communities that I think maybe folks don't know about, or maybe folks in the bay area went to go see the amazing Bonura ballet folk, Loco production that told that whole story in dance that Joti sing and Zenon Beon did. But you also talk about Kip full books' book about Hopper's mixed race folks. So do you feel that and your own kids are mixed race? My own kids are also mixed race different Asian ethnicities together. I'm wondering. Okay, sorry, this is a long question, but I'm thinking back to years ago, the amazing performer David photo Moto did a production where he came out, dressed in Scottish. It came out, dressed in entire Kabuki outfit with a kimono and a face, and he did a whole entire Kabuki dance and then picked up his bagpipe and played a Scottish bagpipe. And it was such a great combo of his two cultures that he meshed together and that he was sharing about himself with the audience. So with that being said, and with your both personal family story, and you're having written this book, what is your take on cross racial adoption and mixed race folks being a bridge to the future? [00:38:17] Cathy Cenzia Choy: well, so it's an interesting way of saying that because I think in that chapter, which is titled 1953 mixed race lives I don't necess, I do say they're about our future because our future is multiracial. And we know that since the 2000 census and in the most recent 20, 20 census we know that an exponential number. The largest growing group are of people who I identify as more than one racial category. But one of the key things I key points that I make in that chapter is that being a mixed race and multiracial is not solely about our future, but it's also about our past and our present. and we have a multiracial past. And that includes some key examples in the, in that chapter are early 19th century Chinese and Irish marriages and in New York city and east Bengali Puerto Rican, African American, west Indian families and communities in Harlem and Filipino and Irish multiple generational families in new Orleans. And you had mentioned, P Punjabi Mexican Americans from Texas to California and MES Filipino, Mexican family is especially in Southern California. That is just as much about our past and our present as, as well as our future and the adoptees also figure in, in, in that chapter and 1953 each year serves as a touchstone for going back and forth in time. 1953 is referring to the end of the Korean war and how foundational the international adoption, especially by American families of mixed race Korean and American children, born of us servicemen and Korean women. How important that group was in terms of transforming the United States into an international adoption nation to. Which, which leads the world in terms of internationally adopting children. And even though Russia, Guatemala Romania, Ukraine are also major sending countries of adoptive children to the United States. Most of those adoptive children are from Asian countries and Korea plays an important role in that history, but so does Japan and Vietnam as, as well. And they're an important part of Asian American history that I also think tends to be marginalized in our understanding of the Asian American experience. [00:41:09] Miko Lee: Okay. My last questions before we open it up to our lovely audiences, juicy questions is what would you like readers to walk away with after reading your book? [00:41:20] Cathy Cenzia Choy: I would love for readers to walk away with a more. nuanced and deeper understanding of Asian American histories and to reflect upon how relevant that is for this moment. This is a moment when so many of us are confronting so many different existential crises from climate to economic insecurity, but since 2020 for Asian Americans, this this dual crises of the pandemic and the surge in anti-Asian hate has really made an impact on so many of us and our communities. And I believe that understanding Asian American histories, understanding them as multidimensional human beings, who are part of the American experience Is one important step to, to reduce and end this violence. Thank [00:42:24] Miko Lee: you. Okay. We're passing out cards. Do we have, oh, we have some collected. Rolling. Does anybody have any questions? Does anybody have any questions? Oh, wow. [00:42:34] Cathy Cenzia Choy: Yeah, jump in the [00:42:35] Miko Lee: card. Okay. I read this. Can you talk a little bit about medical scapegoating, which you mentioned in your book? [00:42:44] Cathy Cenzia Choy: Yes. One of the things that we are observing since 2020, and since COVID 19 has become a pandemic, is that medical scapegoating of Asian Americans. And in the book, I talk about how there's a long history of anti-Asian medical scapegoating that is as old as the oldest migration. Oldest mass migration of Asians to, to the United States. And in the second half of the 19th century Chinese and by extension Chinese American bodies were blamed for smallpox outbreaks. Japanese immigrants were blamed for typhoid. South migrants were associated with hookworm. And what this does is that it scapegoats people, it dehumanizes them and makes them targets for egregious forms of violence. And that what we are experiencing today is not new. And this relates to that point about kind of one of my hopes for the book is that learning and engaging about these histories is really important. To end this medical scapegoating and the violence that accompanies it. [00:44:02] Miko Lee: I think people don't even realize that China towns were burned down during those times, too. [00:44:07] Cathy Cenzia Choy: Yes, I in addition to erasure and resistance violence is a third major theme, of the book and violence means many different things. We, in the media, it often focuses on the most egregious forms of violence like mass shooting. But the anti-Asian hate incidents and violence have ranged from bullying and harassment in schools, spitting on Asian Americans name calling I'm telling Asian Americans to go back to where they, they came from and you were referring to arson and burning down of Chinatowns and , this was something here in California and in, in the Pacific Northwest the method of anti-Asian violence was all often in the form of expulsion of Chinese from their communities through arson shooting stoning threats, [00:45:04] Miko Lee: right. You talked a little bit in the beginning, and this is an audience question. You talked a little bit in the beginning about the order of the book and we had you read the interlude and you said that it was done in a different order, starting with, 20, 20. Can you talk a little bit more about your thought process in creating the book in this kind of non-linear time structure? [00:45:24] Cathy Cenzia Choy: In the preface I write and also in the acknowledgements I give thanks to my students over so many years at university of Minnesota UC Berkeley especially but also other institutions that earlier in, in my career, I've learned so much from my students, from listening to them from engaging in dialogue about what we're reading. And in spring of 2021, I taught this class on Asian American history in the age of COVID 19. And some of the students were telling me that they really appreciated having taken previous courses in Asian American history, but how sometimes the courses they would go in that linear approach and then primarily end. Maybe in like the 1980s or maybe the, the glass class would be here, are these contemporary issues now related to all the things that we've talked about. And they were just voicing, some concern about how is history relevant today. And so I played with the chronology using a non-linear approach to make this point that Asian American history is relevant. Now, it's relevant in 2020, it's relevant in 1975. It's relevant in 1953. It's relevant in 1869. And it's relevant right now. And we're all we're all a part [00:46:59] Miko Lee: of it. So I'm gonna combine a few questions here. And this one is really about the different waves of Asian American immigration and how those impacted the storytelling. And I think. The different, there's different immigrant communities have gone into really specific fields for instance, Chinese laundries and, Vietnamese nail salons, Cambodian donut shops. Can you talk a little bit about how the storytelling is connected to the different waves of immigration first generation second, third generation? [00:47:35] Cathy Cenzia Choy: Yes that's a great question. And the book is not organized that way in the sense, like this year represents a particular wave and so does the next year. But there are particular chapters in the book that refer to immigration waves. And one of the chapters not the 1965 reprise, but there is a chapter 1965 about the faces of post 1965 Asian America and 1965 referring to the immigration act. Of 1965 is often considered this a major wave and a new kind of immigration that was different from late 19th and then early 20th century waves of immigration. Because by that point, immigration policy had created preferences for highly educated persons with needed skills. And one of the reasons why we are seeing so many Asian immigrant professionals in the United States is not an outcome of our innate ability in stem. But is also an outcome of but is an outcome of immigration policy. It's not in any ability there's quite a bit of training, that, that goes into it. And I actually didn't have much talent in the stem fields, even though I write sometimes about them like, like nursing but in the chapter, 1975 trauma and transformation, I talk about waves theory and how there's often the conceptualization of three different kinds of waves to describe Southeast Asian refugees to the United States with. the first wave beginning immediately after the fall of psych on in 1975 tended to be this wave of people who Southeast Asians who had connections to the us military there, I had worked with them and were more highly educated. And that was part of the first wave. And then the second wave, which is sometimes referred to as the boat people, even though a number of Asian American studies scholars have criticized the use of that term because it obscures their heroic will to live, but more, more, much more di diverse, ethnically a lot of Chinese Vietnamese people of farming backgrounds from rural areas in contrast to the first and then like this third wave that, that came later that involved groups like ations and even later than that also immigrants through immigration policy as opposed to, to refugee policy. And what I also point out is that these kinds of conceptualizations are important. They help us, understand historically some major changes in terms of Southeast Asian American demographics in this country. But I wanted to emphasize, so I write in the book, waves are constantly moving and taking different shapes. And in 2000 there was a new group of refugees who were resettled in Minnesota. And this is a living history and that newer waves of refugees are coming from Myanmar and Butan and who are working in places like. The state of Iowa and working in our meat packing plants and who also have been exposed disproportionately to COVID 19 because then president Donald Trump had invoked the defense production act to keep meat, packing plants open. So waves are important, but they're not set and they're always moving and flowing like our histories [00:51:16] Miko Lee: as a follow up to that. One of our audience members has a question about how many immigrants have when they first arrive have been exploited in their labor positions. And they're wondering if you could share some positive stories and I M I wonder if you could share with the audience about uncle Ted and what he did with donuts [00:51:35] Cathy Cenzia Choy: well, I think. it isn't it isn't as though there are positive and negative stories, oftentimes when you are really deeply engaging with these histories and these stories, there's often these moments that might be negative and then others that are more positive. And I think that adds to the humanity of people. And so just to give an, the example of the Filipino healthcare workers, some of 'em are nurses, but are also working in elder care. And some of those conditions that they're working in are very challenging. It's very challenging to be a caregiver. And at the same time, so many of them also take pride in their. I don't wanna portray them as just solely being, having a negative experience. They're proud of their caregiving and we need to care for our caregivers a bit more in this country. In terms of positive stories, so one thing I'll share is there's this and this is an example. I, I feel of resistance and that creative spark there's something called the south Asian American digital archive SAA D and they have this project called the first day's project. And it's a project where immigrants, regardless of immigrants from around the world can share their story on this digital platform to describe their first days in, in the United States. And. Even though these first days have a mix of like positive and negative aspects. I have to say while reading these stories it brought just smile and joy. For me and reading these stories that are so unique and universal at the first time, same time. And so one of the stories was of this young girl who was nine years old back in, in the early 2000 tens and she was from Nepal. And so she came from Nepal and she was. I imagine they were, they landed at SFO and then they had to go to San Pablo and she wrote she said I was disappointed that what I saw wasn't like, TV shows of New York city with all those tall buildings and all that fun stuff, but she took her first Bart ride. And she said that was just so amazing. She had never been on this kind of faster public transportation that brought them from San Francisco to San Pablo and something like 40 minutes. And then she said, she was working really hard. She was like nine years old. And then she became, because her, both her parents were working, I believe in the fast food industry. And she had a younger sister, so she had to learn how to cook for her parents and her. Her sister and even some extended family. And so she said I learned English from like watching, watching the joy of painting with Bob Ross. Wow. Yes. And then she said she watched shows with Rachel Ray and em, Emerald Lagosi like on food network and, and she said like she wanted to become, she learned from those shows. She wanted to become really famous. And so she would do the cooking in like she was on her own food network show in front of the audience. Her younger sister, [00:55:00] Miko Lee: so cute. So cute and shout out to VIN G and bar go, who founded that and also run the Berkeley south Asian radical history walking tour. If you haven't been on that, you should because it's amazing. I am sad to say that this brings our evening to a close. Thank you so much for joining us. I wanna just say that back in the corner, we have the most amazing east wind books, our local bookstore, yay. East wind books. And we didn't touch on one of the questions that I wanted to ask, but about Asian American, the terminology, Asian American Pacific Islander actually. Expressed a whole episode on that interviewing Harvey, Don, who is the founder of east wind books and is a fellow professor of ethnic studies at UC Berkeley. [00:55:49] Cathy Cenzia Choy: And one of the veterans of the strike is also here from the late 1960s both that took place in San Francisco state college as it was then as, as well as UC Berkeley. And that's part of the reason why I have my livelihood and is it part of the legacy? This book is part of that legacy. [00:56:09] Miko Lee: So check out our legacy Asian American history is of the United States by our amazing guest, Kathy Cena Cho, you can get the books and get autographed back in the corner. We thank you for supporting independent bookstores. [00:56:24] Cathy Cenzia Choy: Thank. [00:56:31] Miko Lee: Thank you so much for joining us, please check out our website, kpfa.org backslash program. Backslash apex express. To find out more about our show tonight and to find out how you can take direct action. We thank all of you listeners out there. Keep resisting, keep organizing, keep creating and sharing your visions with the world. Because your voices are important. Apex express is a proud member of the acre network, Asian Americans for civil rights and equality apex express is produced by Miko Lee, Jalena Keane-Lee, Paige Chung, Hien Nguyen and Nate Tan and with special editing by Swati Rayasaman. Thank you so much to the KPFA staff for their support. Have a great The post APEX Express – 10.27.22 Cathy Ceniza Choy appeared first on KPFA.

Gray Area Stories
26. Knowing It's Never Our Fault with Tess Bartholomew

Gray Area Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 49:47


In this episode, we discuss the way in which sharing our stories of sexual assault can help us to acknowledge our trauamas. Is there a difference between sexual assault and sexual trauma? Why do we blame ourselves for sexual violence that doesn't feel “bad enough”? Grab a cup of tea or some Halloween candy and join our conversation! [Content Warning]: This is a podcast where survivors share stories of sexual assault, sexual violence, and r*pe.  Tess is a Filipino-American actor, writer, producer, rollerskater, and horror film fanatic. Follow Tess at @tesssbartholomew on Instagram Follow us @grayareastories and visit www.grayareastories.com Created and hosted by Johanna Middleton and Erica M. Hart Edited by Sarah Kaplan Produced by Erica M. Hart Theme Song by Nailah Hunter Show logo by Brianna Guerra

Insight with Beth Ruyak
Gubernatorial Debate Analysis | Affordable Housing for LGBTQ+ Seniors | Filipino American Labor Activist Larry Itliong

Insight with Beth Ruyak

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022


Analysis following the only gubernatorial debate between Gov. Gavin Newsom and State Sen. Brian Dahle. Lavender Courtyard provides affordable housing for LGBTQ+ seniors. Remembering Filipino American labor activist Larry Itliong.   Gubernatorial Debate analysis

The Filipino American Woman Project
142: "I do a lot because I'm excited to still be alive." Recognizing Breast Cancer Awareness Month with Jaymee WINS

The Filipino American Woman Project

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 96:51


Note: This conversation is also available on YouTube https://youtu.be/yVgayJBOuZQ (https://youtu.be/yVgayJBOuZQ) 142: "I do a lot because I'm excited to still be alive." Recognizing Breast Cancer Awareness Month with Jaymee WINS Author, producer, and talent-in-progress, Jaymee WINS returns from Ep. 007 (three years ago!) to discuss Filipino American History Month and, for the first time on TFAW Project, Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Jaymee shares when she was first diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer on October 15, 2016, how she rechannels her personal journey into her books and upcoming documentary, her most recent (and almost fatal) trip to the Philippines, how she continues to appreciate the simple joys in life, what cancer survivors really need, and much more. Resources Connect with Jaymee at https://www.instagram.com/jaymee_wins/ (https://www.instagram.com/jaymee_wins/) To learn more about Jaymee's books, visit https://jaymeewins.com/books/ (https://jaymeewins.com/books/) To learn more about Jaymee's upcoming documentary, visit https://www.beautifulscars.info/ (https://www.beautifulscars.info/) Listen to Jaymee's first interview with us, Ep. 007 https://tfawproject.com/episode/007 (https://tfawproject.com/episode/007) Read our latest newsletter, published Tuesday, October 18, 2022: https://mailchi.mp/2b0de345dac5/tfawproject-9053670 (https://mailchi.mp/2b0de345dac5/tfawproject-9053670) -- LOVE OUR SHOW? Show your support at http://www.buyusboba.com/ (http://www.buyusboba.com/) Supporting us with a minimum of one cup of boba gets you access to our monthly book club. A monthly or annual support gets you access to our monthly book club and exclusive access to our private podcast: Tsismis with Jen & Nani! FREE ONLINE COMMUNITY: Chat with Jen and Nani, along with your fellow podcast listeners on Discord https://discord.gg/2hSaHK9Cps (https://discord.gg/2hSaHK9Cps) NEWSLETTER: Receive the latest stories, updates and media coverage by subscribing to our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/cO0bif (http://eepurl.com/cO0bif) ABOUT US: Welcome to the Filipino American Woman Project - A Podcast Show that shares stories and life lessons told by individuals living (or have lived) in America, that are of Filipino descent and are cisgender female. For Season 4, Jen and Nani pivot the show to focus on their journey as podcasters, content creators, and entrepreneurs -- with a focus on advocating for Filipino American women storytellers and authors. UPCOMING BOOK: Special thanks to the Bulosan Center for Filipino Studies at UC Davis for the opportunity to present our academic paper, Pinay Podcasters: Building a Self-Sustaining Community Through Storytelling, Collective Healing & Learning, and Collaboration. The initial draft is now available! Read more at http://pinaypodcasters.com/ (http://pinaypodcasters.com/) RECOGNITION: In December 2020 and December 2021, we received an Honorable Mention at the Asian American Podcaster's Golden Crane Podcast Awards. August 2020, Jen Amos participated as a speaker on behalf of TFAW Project for PodFest Global, which now holds the GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS™ title for Largest Attendance for a Virtual Podcasting Conference in One Week. May 2020, we were recognized as “Amplifying Asian Women Voices” on Spotify during AAPI Heritage Month. We've also been featured in Realtime Community Oakland, Mochi Magazine, Ossa Collective, SUPERBANDS, Chopsticks Alley, FoundHer by Entrepinayship, Spotify, PodFest Expo, Philippine American Foundation for Charities, When In Manila, You Are Collect;ve, San Diego Union Tribune, NBC 7 San Diego, and much more! Read more at: https://linktr.ee/tfawproject.featured (https://linktr.ee/tfawproject.featured) CONTACT US: Find us on social media: Instagram @thefilipinoamericanwoman, Facebook @thefilipinoamericanwoman, Twitter @thefilamwoman, YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-IzWjkLCof3Pf7TW8ExyXw...