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Latest podcast episodes about Guelph

OverDrive
Callahan on if Samsonov is the undisputed #1 goalie, Tavares playing in 1000 games & Guelph Storm jersey retirement

OverDrive

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 24:43


Former NHLer and ESPN NHL analyst Ryan Callahan joins the guys on Overdrive to chat about Matt Murray's injury, Samsonov playing well this season, Tavares playing in 1000 games, the great season that the Bruins are having, how Tampa learned to win games, E-Bug in Edmonton and how Chicago feels about that, his jersey retirement at Guelph and more!

The Current
Plans to end animal testing for cosmetics

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 23:31


The federal government is advancing a motion to ban cosmetic testing on animals. We talk to Camille Labchuk, executive director of the organization Animal Justice, which advocates for legal protections for animals; Charu Chandrasekera, executive director of the Canadian Centre for Alternatives to Animal Methods; and Michael Brunt, a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Guelph's Ontario Veterinary College.

Solving Healthcare with Dr. Kwadwo Kyeremanteng
Homeopathic medicine, spiritual journeys, and healing with Indigenous healer Asha Frost

Solving Healthcare with Dr. Kwadwo Kyeremanteng

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 51:43


In this episode we welcome Indigenous medicine woman and best selling author, Asha Frost, to speak with us about homeopathic medicine, spiritual journeys, healing, and more! Asha is a member of the Chippewas of Nawash First Nation and has a BA in Psychology from the University of Guelph and a degree in homeopathic medicine. Her book ‘You are the Medicine' is full of powerful teachings and has guided thousands. Today we learn about Asha's path through Indigenous medicine, racism, creative ways to heal yourself, spirit animals, and much more! Asha is an incredible mentor and she also leads us through a moving guided journey, and gives us some great perspective into mental health. SPONSORBETTERHELPBetterHelp is the largest online counseling platform worldwide. They change the way people get help with facing life's challenges by providing convenient, discreet, and affordable access to a licensed therapist. BetterHelp makes professional counseling available anytime, anywhere, through a computer, tablet or smartphone.Sign up today: http://betterhelp.com/solvinghealthcare and use discount code “solvinghealthcare"TRANSCRIPT KK: We are on the brink of a mental health crisis. This is why I'm so appreciative of the folks over at BetterHelp. The largest online counseling platform worldwide to change the way people get help with facing life's challenges by providing convenient, discreet, and affordable access to licensed therapists. BetterHelp makes professional counseling available anytime, anywhere through a computer, tablet, or smartphone. Sign up today go to betterhelp.com and use a promo code ‘solvinghealthcare' to get 10% off signup fees.SP: COVID has affected us all and with all the negativity surrounding it, it's often hard to find the positive, but one of the blessings it has given us is the opportunity to build an avenue for creating change. Starting right here in our community discussing topics that affect us most such as racism and health care, maintaining a positive mindset, creating change the importance of advocacy, and the many lessons we have all learned from COVID. If you or your organization are interested in speaking engagements, send a message to kwadcast99@gmail.com, reach out on Facebook @kwadcast or online at drkwadwo.caKK: Welcome to Solving Healthcare. I'm Kwadwo Kyeremanteng. I'm an ICU and palliative care physician here in Ottawa and the founder of ‘Resource Optimization Network'. We are on a mission to transform healthcare in Canada. We're going to talk with physicians, nurses, administrators, patients and their families because inefficiencies, overwork and overcrowding affects us all. I believe it's time for a better health care system that's more cost effective, dignified, and just for everyone involved.KK: Kwadcast nation, welcome back! We got a great episode with Asha Frost, and I tell you this, this one was extremely moving. We talked about ways of healing thyself, looking at creative ways to not only bank on conventional methods of healing, but also looking at spirituality, looking at our mental health, the mind body connection to create healing is tremendous. We go into some of the indigenous ways that could improve our overall health, we go through a guided journey, which as you'll hear was extremely moving from my perspective, I was a little verklempt after that one. Then we talked about we talked about racism, we talked about our own experiences within healthcare, she tells her story about being treated like an animal, within the emerge our own experience not that long ago, which I think a lot of people need to hear. It's tough to hear, but it's just another reinforcing message that we got work to do. So, looking forward to you guys hearing that. Before I forget, please check out our new substack kwadcast.substack.com. We have all our jam on there. We put all our jam on there,  our newsletter, previous episodes, we're all in on substack. Video, video messages, our community chat, you could chat we have a chat community on there too. So please check it out. You guys gonna love it. It's a better way of us staying connected. So, without further ado, check it – Asha Frost. Kwadcast nation, man this is a real privilege today, folks. It's a real privilege today because we got Asha Frost, who honestly, I just met in November. We were both that ‘Impact' live, amazing event put on by Meghan Walker. Your keynote, everybody was talking about this bad boy.  I got to connect with you backstage. Show me your book, all the magical things that you're doing. I was like, she's got to come on the show folks. Asha's got to come on the show. So welcome to the kwadcast.AF: Thank you. That's quite the introduction. Thanks for having meKK: Oh, man! It's the least I could do after all the magical stuff you're doing Asha. Seriously, this is an exciting show for me. So maybe, to give context to why you're doing all these workshops, the book, the essays, I think a lot of it comes from your personal experience. So maybe just tell us a little bit about how you've gotten here.AF: Sure. So, I'd say my healing journey started when I was 17. I was diagnosed with lupus. At that time, doctors didn't really know a lot about lupus and the antibodies that were positive in my bloodwork really were like quite serious. So, they were saying ‘You're gonna have to go on medication for the rest of your life, you're might not have children, you might not live a long life' and of course, as a 17-year-old, I was really scared. At that time, I lived in a really, I'd say, non diverse town. So, there weren't a lot of indigenous people. My grandparents had been in residential school, I had been colonized away from our medicine ways or away from our ways of healing and knowing and being. So of course, I thought, oh, we'll try the medication. So, I did, and I got so many side effects from the prednisone and the anti malarial drugs. So I knew there had to be a different way. I went to university and at that time, I got really sick because of the stress of university, and somebody said, why don't you go see naturopath. That sort of opened up everything for me, I saw naturopath at about 21. Then I thought, ‘Oh, my goodness, there's a remembering of myself and my blood and my bones calling me back to these ancestral ways of knowing and the earth' and I had to uncover that. That was like the beginning of my journey just going on this. It's always just been ‘How can I heal myself?' and then, of course, as I heal myself, I share that with the world. So that was the beginning.KK: Wow, wow. So really, unfortunately, having a relatively serious diagnosis at a very tender age of 17. Going through the conventional treatments, were you finding you were getting better when you were taking the conventional meds?AF: Not really, I'd say, no, it made me so much sicker. I just I've had new symptoms that I wasn't experiencing with the lupus symptoms. So, it wasn't making me better. I thought, well, this doesn't feel like it and maybe if I tried it longer it would have, but it just didn't feel like a really good exchange of I'm taking these and I'm feeling worse in my body. So, it wasn't helpful at the time, I have subsequently taken little small doses at times that have been helpful, definitely. But at that time, it wasn't helpful.KK: So you walk through this, this journey and will really having an incentive to heal thyself, like really looking at ways to heal thyself, and going through natural paths and so forth. What came of it? what was it mostly, nonconventional medications, was it meditation was a nutrition what changed for you? And was it effective?AF: Yes, so I saw a naturopath who was amazing at homeopathy. She prescribed a remedy. It was all so new to me and I thought, this is kind of neat and she told me ‘this is going to match your physical symptoms, but also your sort of personality, your essence, your emotional body' it really looked at the whole being, and it made sense to a part of me. I remember taking that that remedy, and my hair was falling and at the time really bad, and that got better. I remember my joints were really achy and not got better. So, I got really interested in lit up by homeopathy. It actually inspired me to go to school for homeopathic medicine, because it helped me so much in my own journey that I thought ‘I want to offer this to others'KK: Wow. So basically, you wanted to help create that magic for other people. You saw how the homeopathy improved your quality of life, and improved your symptoms, and wanted to create that. That loveliness for the greater for the greater masses. How has that journey been? when it came to getting people healthier - how's that been for you?AF: I loved having a private practice. I loved sitting with people, I loved holding space for their highest vision of who they were. Everybody I feel like we are sort of conditioned to feel like there's always something wrong with us, you know that everything over the messages are always coming at us that there's something wrong with us. I believe that my private practice held space for the truth that you have this vital force, you are divine, how can we just remind your body? how can we remind your spirit? so my practice ended up turning into like a homeopathic practice. But then of course, I started to weave in indigenous ways of being and knowing and indigenous healing because that's who I am at the core. That's what I was discovering about myself. So, it was a combination of spiritual healing and then the homeopathic medicine.KK: I think that's what really attracted me to what you were what you were throwing down, was this the ‘spiritual' component adding that indigenous side. Who you are to a healing practice and delivering it to patients. I must say, as ignorant as possible. I have no idea what that would look like. I have no idea not only what it would look like, and just the impact it can have. So, walk us through the potential and what treatment would look like, what the outcomes could be. I mean, I don't know if you need to give a specific case, but just give us a sense of what the potential is from your practice?KK: Well, I tend to attract a lot of people who had anxiety or depression. That was like a lot of mental health that tended to come through my practice. So, people would want to get off meds, like anxiety meds, or depression meds, and we would just do that with their doctor, they would be tapering, and then this homeopathy would support sort of their tapering off and bring them back to sort of that truth that they do have something within the MEK and help them balance themselves and come back to that healing. So, I saw a lot of a lot of folks with that. I saw a lot of folks with autoimmune conditions because that's what I lived. So, I tended to know a lot about that. I'd say that people's arthritis got better. Their fatigue got better. They their movement was better; they just had more ease and grace in their lives. I think, on the spirit level, they felt more connected to who they were, and for some reason, that just trickled down to their physical body. So, they would feel more connected to themselves through guided journeys, or meditations, or I would do hands on healing. They would come home to that truth, but they have power, they have presence, they have medicine, and for some reason that like switching on that light bulb really helped people.KK: That's amazing. We talk a little bit about on the show, that whole mind body connection, how it's all tied, how you feel, how you're doing upstairs affects your body and your ability to heal and to get better. I'm just really interested to hear what its like to walk through the term, how did you phrase it again, you're walking journey? Your guided meditation? what does that look like?AF: Yeah, so from an indigenous perspective we really believe in the power of dreaming and visioning and quiet because that's when you can hear spirit. So, getting somebody in that state of quietness, when they're listening to their own connection to spirit was so powerful. So, what maybe animal spirits might come in to help with medicine that they want to offer, or it might be their ancestors, or their grandmothers or their guides. So, there was a lot of spirits support, helping people and then some of the sorts of techniques that were used were of a shamanic. I've taken a lot of training around like shamanic enters, there's a lot of energy healing energy work, that would shift some of the blockages maybe for a vital force to flow through more effectively. It always came back to that person, again, like sort of seeing and remembering, oh, my goodness, I can do this, like, I have sovereignty in my own being and body. I have I have power, because I think sometimes in the medical system, we can sometimes feel like we don't. Our power, we kind of give it over to say, ‘well, you have all the answers' and that might be true. They might have answers, but we have answers to.KK: Yeah, we have an ability to call on to contribute to our own healing. Right. I mean, like I said, this is not the typical approach to medicine, I've been practicing almost for 20 years. We don't often add a spiritual component and, and, and so forth. Do you like how the results been in your practice? Asha, when you add these elements, on top of everything else that they're receiving? How do you feel the response has been?AF: Well, I no longer practice privately anymore, but I had a practice for 15 years, and it was really busy. So, the word of mouth was always really, really strong. I was booked solid with a waiting list. I would say the results were really, really amazing. People tend to leave my space, just feeling uplifted and feeling better. So, I wish I could quantify that with like, you know, we had this many cures or whatever that is, but I think that's the difference between being healed and being cured. I think we look for a cure, but we kind of forget about, what kind of healing leaps have we made? how much more satisfaction do we have in life? how much more peace do we have in our heart? how much more gratitude and joy is emanating from our system and ourselves? I think those things are maybe not measurable, but they are really important.KK: Oh, man. Absolutely. I think especially now, I feel like this is so valuable coming up, post pandemic where people were from a spirituality perspective, from a mental health perspective, just beat down. We're seeing the resurgence, unfortunately, of so many ailments, which is obviously very complicated because of lack of access to care, people weren't getting screenings, and so forth. This is something that I feel like could be so valuable to so many. I think one of the magical things that you're doing ashes is, is creating that at scale now, you're really trying to make this accessible to not just a patient in front of you, to everyone. So how are you doing that right now?AF: So, I closed my private practice maybe four years ago now. At that time, I wanted to bring all these teachings online. I created like a global membership with indigenous teachings and healing. I loved doing that. So that really like scaled up the folks I was able to touch. At that same time, I got a book deal by through Hay House, and that has just expanded my reach, I think, to all the people that I can touch with my words. Writing that book is just it's so interesting, because you write this book, and this little cocoon was in the pandemic, my littlest was two, and they were home. It was kind of a disaster, but I put myself in this little cave. I wrote this book. I didn't realize I didn't really think ‘Oh, these words might actually touch people, oh, these words might actually be shared by people' I just kind of thought I'm gonna write this, put this out there. Now it's rippling out way bigger than I could have ever imagined. It's just rippling out in so many ways. That's the most important thing for me is that people remember who they are. They're touched by my words and it kind of ignites something within them. That was my intention for the book was that they could see that that presence that they are, it's called ‘You are the medicine' that they are the medicine, they carry medicine. And they can share that with other people too because we need that message shared, I think.KK: Absolutely. Absolutely. Obviously, the book is out you do public speaking engagements. I saw also you're doing workshops amongst folks, walk us through that, is it small workshops? Is it organizations? who are you seeing?AF: Yeah. So, for the longest time, when I was in my private practice, I did healing circles. That was a way that my medicine was shared. I was doing a lot of those probably hundreds and hundreds of healing circles. Then when my book came out, actually last year, it came out last March. Folks begin to ask me to come and speak to bigger audiences. So, it's lit me up. So huge, so yeah, it's some like health conferences. People really need healing right now, so people are asking me to come and do like opening ceremonies as an indigenous person to offer some messages around like cyclical living. It's really the vibe of healing. Everybody just seems to need it. So, I've been invited to do that and it's something that I've always wanted to do in like a bigger scale. So, it feels so in alignment, I hope it continues, because it's really something that lights me up. But yeah, those workshops, you know, I do smaller workshops, during the pandemic online as such, that's how we connected so I was invited to a lot of people's programs to share, and to offer that healing component to their work too. So, I love being asked into spaces.KK: What are the principles that happen there? When we're doing a healing practice or speaking to the masses is it is it a matter of ‘Hey, folks take more time to be with yourself and, and or listen to this guided meditation' what's some of the take homes people leave with when they when they hear Asha throw down?KK: So many times I speak of the medicine meal because our traditional medicine meal speaks about the importance of the whole system. So, I'll take us through the way of living seasonally and cyclically and listening because we are Earth. All of us have been colonized away from that that truth that we are we do live seasonally, and we go through our highs and our lows, and the world wants to tell us ‘no, you have to be hustling all the time'  and then we end up in burnout. So many of my messages are around because I've had to do it myself. How do I come home to the medicine of rest? How do I come home to the medicine of listening? all the things that the world pulls us out of my message tends to be around that and I love working with animal spirit medicines. The animal teachings those are brought a lot into my teachings and then we always do a guided journey. I have done this with thousands of people. I can say that almost everyone that I've ever worked with has seen an animal spirit or they're able to see sensor I do believe that I can hold a space somehow that can get people visioning and get people into that space where they're connecting to something greater than themselves.KK: Wow. Wow. So how do how do people get in more in tune with resting and listening? How do we get more in tune with our seasonal aspects of life?KK: Such a good question, I think it's really hard. I think the first question to ask ourselves is about our relationship to the systems. how has colonization impacted us? How has the patriarchy How is capitalism? just feeling the impacts of that collective energy and how we've marinated in it, it's just sort of an acknowledgement and validating ‘Oh, right, we come by this honestly' because we were born into it. And this is like the, the energy that's up all the time. There's a lot of unwinding. Especially if you have ancestral wounding, or generational trauma that is connected to a lot of the folks that I work with do have. So, we have to dive deep into that healing and say, ‘our ancestors did this so we don't have to anymore' We can take that like labor off of our back. We're allowed to invite in rest and ease and abundance and it's hard for folks of color to really lean into that, because our cells are telling us something different. It's a lot of journeying, reflecting, going into our dream time, I think it's like simple of just like rest actually going to bed earlier to say ‘Oh, my dream time is here, It's going to offer me some medicine and some wisdom' Can I allow myself to have that? So might be like sound kind of strange but to me, going to bed early during this winter season is a way that I receive so much wisdom.KK: I mean, it makes sense. It's a time to hibernate, recharge, with the sun going down that much earlier there's a lot of a lot of things pointing towards being more restful during that time. The other question? this might be a tough one. I'm putting you on the spot here. What's the guided journey? I don't know if we could do one or if that's too difficult. I want to get a sense; I think our listeners will get the chance to showcase Asha skills. You know?AF: I would love to.KK: Yeah. If you're interested, let's drill down.AF: Definitely, we're talking about rest, we're gonna set the intention for this journey, to connect with an animal being so you know, we talk about spirit animals or animal spirits. We want to do this in an appropriate way where we're appreciating this animal. So, I'm just going to start by saying whatever comes forward to you, to trust what you get, to trust if we've not worked together before, your spirit knows. Then in a way after, when the animal comes to honor it with deep gratitude, because it's an important practice and teaching. We're gonna start with closing our eyes and if you're seated, you can just feel your feet on the ground. We acknowledge the earth beneath us, the land beneath us. Just feel the land beneath you. I'm going to acknowledge that I'm on the lands of the Anishinaabe. We are still here. Feel the spirit of the land and all that it's seen and experienced, rising up through your feet, warming you comforting you, grounding you, with every breath you take. Today we ask for all of the beings that wish to support and guide and surround us to be present here. We call upon the sacred door an opening to the spirit world. The store is shining with golden light and around the light. There's this rainbow light. We feel this rainbow light spark ling and shining so bright. But as you walk towards it today, it flushes and washes upon you. Washing over you and you begin to feel sparkles of reds and purples and violets, greens and golds, pinks and turquoises in your own cells and tissues for you our prismatic being shining and sparkling here.  As you walk through, you see the land beneath your feet, your feet are bare, and you sink your feet into the soil, squishing your toes with every step. You continue walking, feeling yourself being led down this path and in the distance, there is an ancient forest. The forest looks so inviting the trees and the plants that are here are familiar to you in some way. You walk yourself over to this forest. As you step in, you breathe and the medicines that are here. The medicines that are perfect for your body and your spirit today surrounds you. With every step, you walk in deeper, the forest gets a bit darker, surrounding you with care, holding you with love. As you walk deeper, we set that intention.  That intention for the animal spirit that is helping us the most right now to appear in some way. As you are closer, there's a clearing where the sun is peeking down through the trees. As you walk closer, we asked for that animal to become clearer, more powerful, and to appear for us in some way. Notice what you see, listen to what you sense or feel. who arrives for you? Trust this animal gets closer to you. You ask them ‘why are you appearing for me right now? What are you here to remind me of that I have forgotten about myself?' and do you listen. You ask this animal ‘What is the word that I need to carry with me in my heart? The word that will remind me of who I am this year?' and you listen. This animal becomes really sparkly, it wishes to align with your energy. You step into this light, and you feel this rush of light source through your mind body and spirit. The medicine of this animal dropping in tear being you feel that message in your heart that it was just to offer you. You feel yourself walking back out of that forest with that message from that animal making your way all the way back to that path where you started carrying that animal medicine with you, honoring it with gratitude and love and moving it all the way back to the door. Taking a breath here, the animal places a gift in your hands so that you may remember them that you are walking with them. You walk through that door and then you breathe yourself back into your space. Feeling your feet on the floor feeling the lands beneath your body and when you feel ready you can open your eyes. Welcome back.KK: Wow. Wow, that was quite an experience.AF: what did you see? if anything?KK: It was some form of bird, a hawk or something like that. The message was like love, just focus on love.  Past me in terms of an object image just some rocks, but yeah, love. Bird, love, rocks. That was moving.AF: Yeah, it's always is different based on the energy that I'm sitting with. But today, the animal really said, ‘I want to come into your heart' So when you doubt your path, or you forget who you, place your hands there and just activate that energy there. I got a big moose. I got a moose. So, that was beautiful, but it was just really to remember that like they are here for us, to remind us to come home to ourselves. You can honor that Hawk in some way. Get your kids to make a little altar for it.KK: Absolutely. It's funny as you were saying, animal I was thinking Lion. I don't know why I've been thinking about lions lately. A lot, too. I thought that's where I was gonna go. But the image that came to me as you were speaking was a hawk. It was a bird was substance.AF: You know, for the listeners, I know everybody the questions ‘what does it mean?' Right? And there are different ways you can look up. The first question I'd ask myself is ‘what does it mean to you?' Right? What does that animal? How does that animal move in the wild? What strengths do you think that animal has? How does it carry itself? All those things are the medicines it's bringing you. Then of course, you can look up on Google if you want to see like, what is the animal spirit? Next year, I'm doing an Oracle deck that will have all the animal cards in it so that I can say you can look at my Oracle deck and see what they mean. But right now, there's a couple of books ‘Animal Speak' by Ted Andrews is really good, too.KK: Wow. It must be pretty powerful. Doing this in a group setting. I'm curious to hear what people like the feedback that you get after having such a amazing, guided journey.AF: Yeah, people always, it's something I know because I've practiced so many times and edit so many times that it's opening up some sort of portal to some sort of different understanding and people always come back touched. So that's a common people say they feel touched or like part of their spirits moved.KK: I mean, I'll be honest with you, that's how I'm feeling at this time. Touched. Something changed. So, thank you, Asha, for allowing me to be part of that. That was something. If you hear a little bit me being a little off. It's because I am a little off. After that, was emotion. It's a bit vulnerable. Why love? Why the hawk? It's, it's clearly something that was needed. Once again, thank you. Asha.AF: You're welcome.KK: I can't remember if it was at the conference, at the conference or, or another time, but, you know, we often talk about systemic racism and the experience of being a person of color when it comes to being treated as a patient. I wonder if some of this ties into your experience, and I don't know if you've had any, any experience that made you really concerned about how systemic racism affects our people?KK: Yes, I had one incident. It's so interesting, because I doubted myself for so long, I gaslighted myself for so long thinking of that was nothing but then when I had the capacity to think about it, it was it was definitely something.  My eldest was two at the time. I remember just, he wasn't a good sleeper. So, I was really overwhelmed and burnt out and I got a really bad pneumonia. I was caring for him, I kind of left it a little bit too long. By the time I got to the hospital, I couldn't breathe at all. It was very serious. In the wintertime, I always wear my mukluks because that's what I wear. I think I probably had beaded earrings on when I went to the hospital. They put me in a corner, which I understand lots of people have had that experience. There's not room and all of the things but I was there for a really long time considering I couldn't breathe and I was really, really struggling. Then when the doctor finally came in in the middle of  the night he said to me, he looked at me and he said to me, he knew I couldn't breathe. And he said, ‘How much alcohol have you had to drink? And do you have a home?' Those were the first things he said to me. So, he didn't ask me how I was doing or what I was struggling with. I think I was so shocked by that, that I just I froze, I said ‘Yes, I have a home with my husband and my son, and I haven't drank any alcohol' I sat with that probably for a good six months, not really knowing what that meant. Then, you know, it sticks with you. So, I started speaking about it, because at that time, that was like 2014. But indigenous, I feel like we've been so invisible across Turtle Island. That continues to happen. So, it wasn't really until the children were found her in the residential schools that people released her talking about some of these issues. So, I held on to it for quite a while before I really started writing about it and sharing about it. Of course, people are shocked and they say ‘how, like, how does this happen?' the truth is, it happens all the time, every single day. Oftentimes, I think indigenous people just feel like we just suck it up, like, well, that's just part of who we are. That's what everybody thinks we are all about. So, we don't speak on it, because it's, nobody's gonna hear and listen to us.KK: What you're describing I'm sorry, you experienced that. I've seen it firsthand. Okay, folks, I've seen this s**t firsthand whether I was med student in Edmonton, whether it was being a trainee or staff person in Ottawa, you name it. This, unfortunately, that attitude towards racialized folks was, but especially when I'm talking about with indigenous population is a reality. I talked many times, the episode we did with Mike Curlew about Sioux Lookout, not that long ago, have segregated hospitals, running out of medication, running out of sedative medications, antibiotics in our own country. Yes, we have been increasing the awareness, which is great. In terms of these issues, like George Floyd, the residential schools, you're hearing a movement and you're seeing that push towards diversity, inclusion, and equity, and so on. But I'll tell you this, this is not enough. I'll just say, we're moving in the right direction, but it is not enough. These attitudes are deep seated. They're systemic. From my perspective, maybe I've got a little bit of edge here, but it's like no more. No tolerance for this s**t. I am just done. I've been in those experiences to Asha, where you, you question? ‘Oh, maybe it's not really me, or maybe its what I was wearing' I'm now at this stage. F**k that. I'm sorry. No, enough, is enough. I hear these stories and it just breaks my heart. Folks this is one example. Picture yourself. You're relatively new mother is right, with your two-year-old. You've been fighting off going into a hospital because you want to be there for your family, you can't breathe because you have pneumonia, and some cat comes in and asks you how much you drink? Do you have a home? what part of me is screaming ‘I have a problem?' Just by the way I look you make these assumptions. How are you feeling at that time? How vulnerable do you feel you bring your life in somebody's hands, that is judging you out of the gate? This is this is not right and I hear these, I hear the naysayers ‘who gives a s**t about D&I and all that stuff' If I'm being honest, there's ways to approach it and there are ways not to approach it, and I think people are trying, but this is why diversity matters. This is why it matters. This is why you need people at the table, at your boardroom, in your exec room that look like us. So, they could so they could address these needs, they could put awareness to these needs and do all we can to prevent it from happening to some of our most vulnerable folks, enough of abandoning these people. I'm just so sick of it. I'm so tired of it. I know I'm making this about me a little bit I'm sorry, a few months ago my kid got my eldest kid got called the N word at school. I gotta say, it was very triggering for me, I look at my nine-year-old son and knowing now that his innocence to a certain degree has been taken away from him. He knows now get that sense that we've many of us have had, you and I have had that we're being judged by our appearance. He now knows what that's all about. I don't want that for my kids. I don't want that for my boys. I know it's a reality. I know are gonna have to go through talking to them about how they conduct themselves with police. I will have that conversation. But you and I shouldn't need to have that conversation. It's just heartbreaking hearing like this not that long ago. How old is he now?AF: He's ten so that was eight years ago.KK: Eight years ago, but s**t. Like enough? I just went off there unexpectedly. But it's just like I said, I get triggered by this s**t. How did that frame your practice? Do you feel like that change the way you deliver? Care? Did you like it? Was that motivating in any way? How's that shaped you?AF: Well, something I was really, really present with was the fact that I am in a privileged indigenous woman, and I have a ton of support family friends.  I have a home; I have a ton of that and it impacted me so deeply. I just think about folks who don't have that type of support system, to even go bring it to a therapist, or to even like, you know, it just keeps building up building up building up. So, it really struck me in that way. It really struck me that I need to be a voice for those who don't have a voice or a voice who don't have those who don't have the capacity to speak up. That's when I started speaking up on social media, I can't not do this. So. And then I wrote this letter called ‘Dear White woman that wants to be like me' because at the time, I would just see a ton of whiteness. I know people hate this term, white women, but it was white women, it wasn't black women, it wasn't South Asian women, it was white women taking our teachings and our beautiful things and then using them for their profit or using them for their advancement. Obviously, all these white women rising in the spiritual places on social media and in their online businesses, and I thought ‘I've been in business for 20 years. Why is this? How, like, why is this happening? What like, why am I so invisible?'  it just hurt to have these things taken and no acknowledgement of where you're taking it from, of the history of our country of indigenous people. So, when I wrote that letter, I wrote it on my blog, and I thought, oh, maybe like 20 people will read it. It went viral. And I think 25,000 people shared it. I think it was at hospital incident that just kind of led to this, like, speak up, let your voice be heard, even if it's scary, all those things. Then when that went out really wide. I said ‘there's no turning back now'. This is this is the truth. This is the truth about how our country doesn't see us. I want to be a voice for those who cannot speak it.KK: I want to really commend you Asha for being that voice, because it's not easy. You have to go to a difficult place anytime you speak up. When we speak to issues such as this, go to your own experiences. It's great to have that courage and to have that will and it's what we need. It's what we need. That's why we have a mentorship program for black youth that are aspiring to be physicians and then go into the medical field and one of the things that I'm trying to do instill in these guys is it's okay to be authentic, I want you to be you, I want you guys to be you, for your mental health your overall wellness. There are a lot of messages that being you is not safe, but I'll tell you, we're gonna change that.  We're gonna be our authentic selves walking through the door, so that you could thrive. It's similar to the Impact event just like enough of just surviving people. I want you cats to thrive. When y'all excel, I want you to get a seat at the table and realize that you could achieve your dreams. When I give that example of walking into a hospital and a young black kid was a patient and he saw me he's like ‘Wow, that's incredible. There's a black doctor here' at the time, I thought it was awesome. I'm being a role models to folks. At the same time, I was like, how? Why am I a unicorn? I shouldn't be special. There's no way I should be special. So like a lot of you know, racialized community members don't even think this is a reality. Us doing what we do, they don't think it's a reality. So, you know, putting ourselves out there being an examples, being a voice to say like enough is enough to important.AF: I realized how long I carried sort of so much responsibility over responsibility. When the, the children were discovered, I said ‘If every Canadian could take one piece of like, what's on my shoulders, you know, if you could just carry some of this with us, and really be allies for our voices' Yes, we do this and it's important and we have to and we're so tired of always having to do this. I'd rather just go dance in my living room to be honest, I want to call him that grace, ease, joy, abundance. Speaking the truth doesn't always do that. I know I'm making huge changes for the next generations. I feel like it's so impactful and also I'm tired. So, I would love to like invite folks to like, can you also just like, you know, spread some awareness and care. Just care.KK: Yeah, more importantly be that ally. I mean, just sit with it, think of the kids in that school. Think of a kid who is alone, away from their people, abused and dying alone. How can you not have compassion? Most of us are our parents, think of your own child. Really sit with it. Think of your own child being away from you and being abused and neglected. This happening in our own country, these attitudes persist, that we could treat people like animals. Still to leave that and not have a lens of compassion or not want to be an ally. Screw that, man. It's time. It's time. I'm, I'm ready to drop kick some of this racism stuff in the pelvis. I've always been a bit. You know, we need to do better but George Floyd, residential schools, seeing it in my own child. You know, for me we have no choice but to speak up. We really don't. Oh my God, this is an emotional episode, Asha. Going from love, the anger to sadness. I'm exhausted. This that's a sign of an amazing interview. So, I wholeheartedly want to thank you for all that you're doing - your courage, your voice. The ability to reach so many folks is what we need and just being creative to like, to you thinking outside the box on how I can reach more and more folks. I really want to commend you. Can you give folks the best ways of connecting with your book? ‘You are the medicine' , your website, I also want them will have a link to ‘Dear White women' tooAF: Yeah, my websites ashafrost.com and if folks are open to looking at oracle decks, I have my Oracle deck coming out the end of February. It's called ‘Sacred Medicine' Oracle. It is so beautifully illustrated. You get to choose a medicine for your day, every day. So, I invite folks into that next part of my work and then follow me on Instagram asha.frost.  I'm there most often.KK: Your IG is fresh and growing. Listen, thank you so much for joining us on the show today. You've truly moved me. I know you're gonna move many of our listeners too, thank you so much.AF: Thanks for having me.KK: Thank you so much for joining us. I hope you enjoyed that episode. Please check out all our content on Instagram YouTube, Tik Tok, Facebook, Twitter @kwadcast. Check out our Substack that's where we have everything housed now. I'm telling you changing the bogey. Leave any comments at kwadcast99@gmail.com. Leave that five-star rating. Everyone would give some love to your loved ones. Let's start healing together.Solving Healthcare Media with Dr. Kwadwo Kyeremanteng is a reader-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber.Thank you for reading Solving Healthcare Media with Dr. Kwadwo Kyeremanteng. This post is public so feel free to share it. Get full access to Solving Healthcare Media with Dr. Kwadwo Kyeremanteng at kwadcast.substack.com/subscribe

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
Private Member's Bill: Building More Homes

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 6:40


Ontario does have its share of problems but there may be no more vexing one than housing. How do we create enough places to live for all the people who want to live here? Mike Schreiner has some ideas and he's put them in two private members' bills currently before the legislature. The leader of the Green Party and MPP for Guelph explains.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RealAgriculture's Podcasts
Corn School: What are ‘tip back’ ears telling you?

RealAgriculture's Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 7:49


Corn yields in Ontario have been increasing 2 bu/ac, or one per cent per, year over the past 40 years. Where is that yield increase coming from? University of Guelph associate professor David Hooker says genetics (65 per cent) and agronomy (35 per cent) are the key contributors to bigger corn crops. Corn breeders can... Read More

Ask Dr. Drew
Dr. Byram Bridle Files $3m Lawsuit For Harassment After Warning of mRNA Dangers w/ Dr. Kelly Victory – Ask Dr Drew – Episode 165

Ask Dr. Drew

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 82:02


In late 2022, Dr. Byram Bridle filed a $3 million lawsuit against his university for a “targeted and vicious campaign of personal attacks and harassment” that began after he told a radio interviewer that the potential dangers of mRNA should compel the government to stop giving COVID vaccines to children until more studies could confirm their safety. Dr. Bridle says “the spike protein produced by the mRNA vaccines does not remain in the shoulder muscle upon injection, but rather gets into the blood — and can, in some cases, lead to clotting, bleeding, heart problems, neurological damage…” Part of the alleged harassment of Dr. Bridle involves anonymous online squatting under his name: both byrambridle[.]com and @byrambridle on Twitter are unaffiliated with the doctor and appear to be part of a campaign to harm his reputation. Dr. Byram Bridle is an associate Professor of Viral Immunology at the University of Guelph's Ontario Veterinary College in Canada. 「 SPONSORED BY 」 • BIRCH GOLD - Don't let your savings lose value. You can own physical gold and silver in a tax-sheltered retirement account, and Birch Gold will help you do it. Claim your free, no obligation info kit from Birch Gold at https://birchgold.com/drew • GENUCEL - Using a proprietary base formulated by a pharmacist, Genucel has created skincare that can dramatically improve the appearance of facial redness and under-eye puffiness. Genucel uses clinical levels of botanical extracts in their cruelty-free, natural, made-in-the-USA line of products. Get 10% off with promo code DREW at https://genucel.com/drew 「 MEDICAL NOTE 」 The CDC states that COVID-19 vaccines are safe, effective, and reduce your risk of severe illness. Hundreds of millions of people have received a COVID-19 vaccine, and serious adverse reactions are uncommon. Dr. Drew is a board-certified physician and Dr. Kelly Victory is a board-certified emergency specialist. Portions of this program will examine countervailing views on important medical issues. You should always consult your personal physician before making any decisions about your health.  「 ABOUT the SHOW 」 Ask Dr. Drew is produced by Kaleb Nation (https://kalebnation.com) and Susan Pinsky (https://twitter.com/firstladyoflove). This show is for entertainment and/or informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 「 WITH DR. KELLY VICTORY 」 Dr. Kelly Victory MD is a board-certified trauma and emergency specialist with over 30 years of clinical experience. She served as CMO for Whole Health Management, delivering on-site healthcare services for Fortune 500 companies. She holds a BS from Duke University and her MD from the University of North Carolina. Follow her at https://earlycovidcare.org 「 GEAR PROVIDED BY 」 • BLUE MICS - Find your best sound at https://drdrew.com/blue • ELGATO - See how Elgato's lights transformed Dr. Drew's set: https://drdrew.com/sponsors/elgato/ 「 ABOUT DR. DREW 」 For over 30 years, Dr. Drew has answered questions and offered guidance to millions through popular shows like Celebrity Rehab (VH1), Dr. Drew On Call (HLN), Teen Mom OG (MTV), and the iconic radio show Loveline. Now, Dr. Drew is opening his phone lines to the world by streaming LIVE from his home studio. Watch all of Dr. Drew's latest shows at https://drdrew.tv

RealAgriculture's Podcasts
Help for growers managing multiple herbicide resistant waterhemp

RealAgriculture's Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 9:21


Waterhemp that’s resistant to multiple herbicide groups continues to march across Ontario, but growers still have options to control the weed. There’s also emerging proof that integrated management could help growers take the fight to the spreading yield robber, says University of Guelph weed scientist Dr. Peter Sikkema. At the Ontario Agricultural Conference earlier this... Read More

RealAgriculture's Podcasts
Success is driving expansion of the wheat yield enhancement network (YEN)

RealAgriculture's Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 6:40


Highly engaged wheat growers wanting to learn how to grow better wheat are driving expansion of the Great Lakes Yield Enhancement Network (YEN). Coordinated by the Grain Farmers of Ontario, Michigan State University, Michigan Wheat Program, the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, and the University of Guelph, the Great Lakes YEN project... Read More

Behind Greatness by Inspire North
137. Jim Estill – CEO, Danby / Tech Entrepreneur / Philanthropist – Leading an Integrated Life

Behind Greatness by Inspire North

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 52:40


Jim joins us from his home in Guelph, a city just west of Toronto. Jim is currently the owner and CEO of Danby Appliances, a leader in their industry in North America with 2 million small large appliances produced each year. Prior to this Jim founded and ran a $2 billion technology company and retired early at age 53 - only to come back to run and then purchase Danby 7 years ago. We learn from Jim about painting houses in order to make ends meet while he worked on his tech start-up, studying engineering while his heart wasn't in it and having parents who feared for his inclination to run his own business. But, we also learn about his thoughts on the philosophy of failure, employing manners (from his mother) as a comparative advantage, being an active agent through the power of “while”, gratitude journaling – and shovelling driveways while running a billion dollar company. We discuss his lived experience on leveraging a lack of focus, his profound need to help his fellow human beings and the anonymous gift that he wishes to keep giving. Hear also what creativity means to him and what he imagines as his dying words when his time comes. Salt of the earth. And if this talk floats your boat, have a listen as well to Doug Putman (ep 119), Carol Stewart (ep 86) and Mike Fata (ep 77). To DONATE to the Behind Greatness podcast, please visit here: https://behindgreatness.org. As a charity, tax receipts are issued to donors.  Jim, LI: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jimestill/?originalSubdomain=ca TEDx Talk : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMdTyRms5no TW: @jimestill FB: https://www.facebook.com/jimestill/ Blog: http://www.jimestill.com/ Danby: https://www.danby.com/

Shaye Ganam
Today's show: Chaos in the U.S. Congress, is Canada heading towards radicalization & why are COVID variants being named after monsters?

Shaye Ganam

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 31:52


On today's show, what's going on in U.S. Congress? We find out from Lauren Bell, a scholar of the U.S. Congress at Randolph-Macon College in Virginia. Plus, a new report from the Eurasia Group says Canada needs to be on guard from radicalization in the U.S. creeping up north. We chat with Evan Solomon, publisher of GZERO media and senior management team of Eurasia Group. And why is the new COVID-19 variant called the Kraken? We ask T. Ryan Gregory, a professor in the department of integrative biology at the University of Guelph. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Current
Rural Canadians often can't access high-speed internet

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 19:29


Reliable, high-speed internet remains out of reach for many rural communities in Canada, despite our ever-increasing reliance on the web in many aspects of life. Matt Galloway discusses equitable internet access with Helen Hambly, project leader of the regional and rural broadband project at the University of Guelph; and Alfred Loon, president of Eeyou Communications Network, a not-for-profit broadband network in northern Quebec.

Remodeler Stories
Episode 64: Jasmine & Marc of Otis Interiors

Remodeler Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 36:02


This week we welcome a husband and wife team all the way from Guelph, Canada. Jasmine and Marc are the owners of Otis Interiors, a design-build firm. Otis Interiors is driven by quality and craftsmanship to create beautifully layered spaces that help tell your story. Each project is developed with the client at the center and Jasmine and Marc use a full-service, design-build approach to truly transform homes. Start listening to their story now!

Orchard Outlook
E1 S4. From Windstorms to Windbreaks: Guest Jenny Liu

Orchard Outlook

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 32:56


On this episode of the Orchard Outlook podcast we're taking shelter from the wind. I've witnessed some impressive windstorms since I moved to Nova Scotia. Whether it's a nor'easter, post-tropical storm, or just your typical gusts and gales. Our guest Jenny Liu explains the value of windbreaks, species composition, design tips, and maintenance. She's going to blow you away with helpful information. Jenny Liu is the Maple, Tree Nut, and Agroforestry Specialist at the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs. She completed her forestry undergraduate degree at the University of British Columbia and then set her sights on agriculture, earning a Master's in agricultural entomology at the University of Guelph. Show notes: http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/neworchard/english/apples/16windbreak.html http://omafra.gov.on.ca/english/environment/facts/windbreaks.htm Website: www.perennia.ca Host: Michelle Cortens, Tree Fruit Specialist Follow us on Twitter: @nsperennia @nstreefruit Connect with us on: Instagram: @nsperennia @nstreefruit Facebook: @nsperennia Music: A Sunny Day by J. Tones Logo Created by: Perennia Food and Agriculture Inc. Email us at: info@perennia.ca

The Conversation, Cannabis & Christianity podcast
S2 E64: Part II Expert Horticulturist & Founder/Director of GanjaPapa Solutions, Brendon Roberts

The Conversation, Cannabis & Christianity podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 53:37


Brendon Roberts brings over 20 years of progressive horticulture experience throughout North America, Latin America, and the Caribbean region and he is the Founder and Director of GanjaPapa Solutions. Brendon played a leading role in Canada's forest renewal programs by growing over 20 million trees annually, in collaboration with federal and provincial governments and private forest companies in Ontario, Canada. A former secondary school agricultural science teacher within the Ministry of Education, Brendon has held senior management positions at many cannabis organizations including Vida Cannabis, Zenabis Global, BZAM Management & Nymera Holdings. He also serves as the Master Grower and Quality Assurance Manager at Sugar Cane Cannabis. He has completed an Applied Agricultural Science diploma as well as a degree in International Agricultural Development from the University of Guelph, Canada's premier institute for Agricultural Sciences. #cannabisandchristianitypodcast #religions #EarthIngredients #Marijuana #Creation #Jesus #Love #Peace #NewCovenant

The Conversation, Cannabis & Christianity podcast
S2 E63: Part I Expert Horticulturist & Founder/Director of GanjaPapa Solutions, Brendon Roberts

The Conversation, Cannabis & Christianity podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 81:39


Brendon Roberts brings over 20 years of progressive horticulture experience throughout North America, Latin America, and the Caribbean region and he is the Founder and Director of GanjaPapa Solutions. Brendon played a leading role in Canada's forest renewal programs by growing over 20 million trees annually, in collaboration with federal and provincial governments and private forest companies in Ontario, Canada. A former secondary school agricultural science teacher within the Ministry of Education, Brendon has held senior management positions at many cannabis organizations including Vida Cannabis, Zenabis Global, BZAM Management & Nymera Holdings. He also serves as the Master Grower and Quality Assurance Manager at Sugar Cane Cannabis. He has completed an Applied Agricultural Science diploma as well as a degree in International Agricultural Development from the University of Guelph, Canada's premier institute for Agricultural Sciences.

The Veterinary Life Coach Podcast with Dr. Julie Cappel
Episode #205 - An Interview with Dr. Aaron Massecar

The Veterinary Life Coach Podcast with Dr. Julie Cappel

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 66:02


Dr. Aaron Massecar has a PhD in Philosophy from the Uniersity of Guelph.  He is an author, speaker, and the executive director of the Veterinary Innovation Council.  Dr. Massecar is the author of one book and one co-edited book, seven journal articles, and eight book reviews. He has presented at seventeen international conferences and nine public and professional conferences. He helped to establish the Office of Innovation and Entrepreneurship that created the Veterinary Innovation Summit and the Veterinary Entrepreneurship Academy.

#ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench
”If I can't eat it, or read it, I don't need it!” with Harold Quinn

#ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 35:27


Episode #50 - Harold Quinn, a resident at The Village of Arbour Trails in Guelph, joins Erin Davis & Doug Robinson to share his story from the Green Bench.  As a person who loves to bring people together, we chat about the importance of community, wisdom, and sharing of stories. Speaking of the Peer Learning group, an activity group at The Village by the Arboretum community.  Harold was a facilitator, featuring talks from those who live in the community.   Currently watching a course called, 'The Worlds Greatest Geological Wonders' with her peers in a program created to learn together. “I lived 64 years without a computer, now I can't live without one” - Harold Quinn Book and Author recommendations given in this conversation on the green bench as all three enjoy reading.  We would love to hear your recommendations, and encourage you to share with us on social media using the #ElderWisdom tag. Not only an avid reader, Harold has written a memoir for his grandchildren.  An idea that came to him as he reflects on not knowing his parents and grandparents stories.  The recreation department at The Village of Arbour Trails does a phenomenal job, there is almost no day in the week where something isn't happening.  "There are two types of residents: those who wait to be entertained, and those who make their own entertainment and make things happen."  Noticing there was a vacancy on Saturday evening, he bagan the Saturday Night Comedy Hour featuring Carol Burnett, Bob Hope, Red Skelton, Wayne & Shuster, Dean Martin Roasts and more. "Life without laughs is not life." - Harold Quinn Doug shares a story about dancing with Carol Burnett during Elizabeth Taylors 50th Birthday party. "For us now, this is home.  When we come home, we come back to Arbour Trails." - Harold Quinn "Quality of life revolves around still being able to participate in things of interest to you." - Harold Quinn Thanks for listening to our golden 50th episode of #ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench, we will be back soon with season 5.   Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast on any network and share your thoughts on social media using the #ElderWisdom tag to help others find us. ----more---- The Green Bench is a symbol of elder wisdom. Physically or virtually, the bench invites us all to sit alongside a senior, share a conversation, or give and offer advice. It challenges the stigma seniors face; the ageism still so prevalent in society. It reminds us of the wealth of wisdom our elders offer and in doing so, helps restore them to a place of reverence. "The greatest untapped resource in Canada, if not the world, is the collective wisdom of our elders." -Ron Schlegel This podcast is brought to you by Schlegel Villages, retirement & long-term care homes in Ontario, Canada. #ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench is produced by Memory Tree Productions Learn more about our host, Erin Davis, at erindavis.com Learn more about #ElderWisdom at elderwisdom.ca

The Current
An unusual, but disastrous outbreak of avian flu

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 20:05


The latest outbreak of avian flu is affecting birds from Europe to South America to Canada — and it's not only impacting poultry supply, but it's also killing seabirds. For more on why things are so bad this year, Matt Galloways speaks with Amanda Brittain, chief information officer for the BC Poultry Association; Alastair MacGrugan, who works with the Scottish nature agency NatureScot; and Shayan Sharif, a professor of immunology at the University of Guelph in Ontario.

Sport Horse Podcast
Understanding Osteoarthritis in Horses and Future Treatments

Sport Horse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 39:43


How is osteoarthritis defined and diagnosed? Why do sport horses struggle with this condition? What next-generation tools are being developed to allow horse owners to catch osteoarthritis in the early stages or to potentially reverse the disease? In this episode, we discuss these topics and more with Dr. Thomas Koch from the University of Guelph.Sport Horse Podcast Guests and Links Episode 21:Hosts:  Nicole Lakin and Dr. Tim Worden of the Equine High-Performance Sports GroupPodcast Website:  Sport Horse PodcastPresenting Sponsor:  Equine High Performance Sports GroupGuest: Thomas Koch, eQcell Inc.Link: https://www.eqcell.com/_files/ugd/5814b5_8be5507c6ccb4ed5928ab8079e0eede2.pdfLink: https://thehorseportal.ca/2022/03/encapsulating-stem-cells-for-treating-equines-with-osteoarthritis/

All Shows Feed | Horse Radio Network
Sport Horse Podcast 21: Understanding Osteoarthritis in Horses and Future Treatments

All Shows Feed | Horse Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 39:43


How is osteoarthritis defined and diagnosed? Why do sport horses struggle with this condition? What next-generation tools are being developed to allow horse owners to catch osteoarthritis in the early stages or to potentially reverse the disease? In this episode, we discuss these topics and more with Dr. Thomas Koch from the University of Guelph.Sport Horse Podcast Guests and Links Episode 21:Hosts:  Nicole Lakin and Dr. Tim Worden of the Equine High-Performance Sports GroupPodcast Website:  Sport Horse PodcastPresenting Sponsor:  Equine High Performance Sports GroupGuest: Thomas Koch, eQcell Inc.Link: https://www.eqcell.com/_files/ugd/5814b5_8be5507c6ccb4ed5928ab8079e0eede2.pdfLink: https://thehorseportal.ca/2022/03/encapsulating-stem-cells-for-treating-equines-with-osteoarthritis/Support the show

The Food Professor
Food Inflation 2023, Sylvain Testifies and Special Guest Kelly Long, CEO, Noble Premium Bison

The Food Professor

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 43:41


An action-packed episode as we get the story behind the story of the latest edition, the 13th, of Canada's Food Price Report, plus hear all about Sylvain's day testifying in Ottawa in front of the parliamentary committee on the cost of food along with a whole cast of characters.Our special guest for this episode is Kelly Long, CEO of Noble Premium Bison.  https://noblepremiumbison.com/ A reminder to the people not to sleep on, as the kids would say, our most excellent interview with Christine Cruz-Clarke, CEO of Balzac's Coffee, recorded live in person at the Coffee Association of Canada's conference here in Toronto… We stop in with our good friends Gurth Pretty and Maelle Rey-Marechal from SIAL at Gurth's Lakeview Cheese - getting all geared up for SIAL here in Toronto in May - we are once again the official podcast of SIAL!We should also mention that once again, we are sponsoring the Canadian Grand Prix New Product Awards, presented by Retail Council of Canada, the deadline for submissions is December 31, 2022Canada's Food Price ReportCooking with Bison!About KellyIn 2004, Kelly Long introduced Canadian bison to an eager yet untapped European market. An award-winning agricultural entrepreneur and marketer, Kelly and her husband and partner, Pieter Spinder, grew the company and their business to ultimately become a valuable acquisition for one of the largest bison producers in North America.Fast forward to 2017 with a new brand, Noble Premium Bison, a new partner, producer Doug Griller, and a new mission - to position Canadian grass-raised bison as the meat to beat, and make Noble Premium Bison one of the most sought-after red meat products at both retail and foodservice in both Canada and Europe.Kelly brings a wealth of knowledge in the vertical integration of raising, producing, and exporting premium bison meat. As CEO of Noble Premium Bison, Kelly Long believes in elevating the bar in all aspects of business. As one of Canada's recognized female entrepreneurs, Kelly continues to be at the forefront of the bison industry—an industry trending towards species sustainability, land regeneration and consumer transparency.  About UsDr. Sylvain Charlebois is a Professor in food distribution and policy in the Faculties of Management and Agriculture at Dalhousie University in Halifax. He is also the Senior Director of the Agri-food Analytics Lab, also located at Dalhousie University. Before joining Dalhousie, he was affiliated with the University of Guelph's Arrell Food Institute, which he co-founded. Known as “The Food Professor”, his current research interest lies in the broad area of food distribution, security and safety. Google Scholar ranks him as one of the world's most cited scholars in food supply chain management, food value chains and traceability.He has authored five books on global food systems, his most recent one published in 2017 by Wiley-Blackwell entitled “Food Safety, Risk Intelligence and Benchmarking”. He has also published over 500 peer-reviewed journal articles in several academic publications. Furthermore, his research has been featured in several newspapers and media groups, including The Lancet, The Economist, the New York Times, the Boston Globe, the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, BBC, NBC, ABC, Fox News, Foreign Affairs, the Globe & Mail, the National Post and the Toronto Star.Dr. Charlebois sits on a few company boards, and supports many organizations as a special advisor, including some publicly traded companies. Charlebois is also a member of the Scientific Council of the Business Scientific Institute, based in Luxemburg. Dr. Charlebois is a member of the Global Food Traceability Centre's Advisory Board based in Washington DC, and a member of the National Scientific Committee of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) in Ottawa.Michael LeBlanc  is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice.   He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience, and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career.  Michael is the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts including Canada's top retail industry podcast,       The Voice of Retail, plus  Global E-Commerce Tech Talks  ,      The Food Professor  with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois and now in its second season, Conversations with CommerceNext!  You can learn more about Michael   here  or on     LinkedIn. Be sure and check out Michael's latest venture for fun and influencer riches - Last Request Barbecue,  his YouTube BBQ cooking channel!

All The Kings Men
A Chat w/ Sean Durzi & A Jim Fox Road Report

All The Kings Men

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 41:57


Sean Durzi joined Jesse Cohen and Zach Dooley to talk about growing up a Leafs fan and what it will mean to play his first NHL game in Toronto. The Kings defenseman also discussed his OHL career in Owen Sound and Guelph. Then Jim Fox and Jesse Cohen discuss the Kings victory over the Ottawa Senators and the news that Brandt Clarke will be joining Team Canada soon.

The Peak Daily
Vertical farm

The Peak Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 8:44


We've come a long way since the 8.1% inflation rate seen in June (a near four-decade high), but if you ask the Bank of Canada (BoC), the economy still has some way to go. GoodLeaf, a Guelph-based indoor farm, raised $150 million from McCain and the investing arm of Quebec insurer Power Corp to expand its greens into a national brand. Canada has invested billions into the critical minerals mining sector this year with grand ambitions to become a major player in the global supply chain for electric vehicle (EV) batteries. Celebrating something? Let us know here: https://thepeak.typeform.com/to/MNdYA3TO The Peak Daily is produced by 306 Media Productions. Hosted by Brett Chang and Jay Rosenthal.

Baa's and Bleat's - The AASRP Podcast
Bacteria in the Bulk Tank - Case Studies

Baa's and Bleat's - The AASRP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 31:27


This extra special bonus episode from our chat with Dr. Cathy Bauman (Ontario Veterinary College, Guelph, Ontario, Canada) walks listeners through three real-life case investigations. Dr. Bauman describes how she and her team conducted the various outbreak investigations and puts into practice the information she shared with us in the previous two episodes.Helpful Links:Luminometer FAQhttps://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/food-safety/at-the-food-processor/luminometers.htmlSmall Ruminant Veterinarians of Ontariohttps://srvo.ca/Dr. Cathy Bauman - Ontario Veterinary Collegehttps://ovc.uoguelph.ca/population-medicine/faculty/Cathy-BaumanAmerican Association of Small Ruminant Practitioners - find a vethttp://www.aasrp.org/about/find_a_vet.aspThis podcast is sponsored by the American Association of Small Ruminant Practitioners as well as USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Agricultural and Food Research Initiative Competitive Program, Antimicrobial Resistance grant # 2020-04197.Questions or comments about today's episode can be directed to DairyGoatExtension@iastate.edu

ON Point with Alex Pierson
Food Prices To Rise 5-7% In 2023: Report

ON Point with Alex Pierson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 8:48


We're already at high foodflation rates across Canada and a recent report suggests that we could see another hike of 5-7% sometime in 2023 for food costs. Dr. Simon Somogyi is a Food Business Professor at the University of Guelph and also is one of said report's authors. He joined guest host Rubina Ahmed-Haq to discuss the report's findings. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Listing Agent Lifestyle - Real Estate Marketing
Ep169: Keeping in Touch with Dillon Fraser

Listing Agent Lifestyle - Real Estate Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 62:57


Today on the Listing Agent Lifestyle, we're talking with Dillon Fraser from Guelph, Ontario. Dillion and I have known each other for about a year and a half, ever since he became a member of our GoGoAgent community. He's been an agent for just over three years, and in that time, he has grown from focusing on one neighborhood with about 2000 homes to 4 with about 9000 homes in total.  Today we're following up on his success in dominating these areas and diving deeper into the opportunities he has to stay in touch with people and build an asset in the relationships he can develop across those 9000 homes. Don't forget to check out the show notes to watch the video.   Links: Show Notes GoGoAgent.com Be a Guest Listing Agent Lifestyle Book Listing Agent Scorecard  

Mostly Security
260: What's Opera Doc?

Mostly Security

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 38:36


Eric and Jon both have good Thanksgiving meals and breaks, Looney Tunes at the Oregon Symphony, and a recommendation for Glass Onion. iSpoof takedown in the UK, significant fines down under, and trusting your laptop to a repair shop may result in privacy violations. For fun we have a video teaching lockpicking to blind students, and Roal Road, an online portal for authors. 0:00 - Intro 13:00 - Glass Onion 14:39 - iSpoof No More 21:40 - That's not a Fine, this is a Fine 25:13 - Repair Shop Peeps 30:12 - Guelph in 72! 31:25 - Lockpicking Students 34:33 - Royal Road 36:40 - Path Of Ascension

Witness to Yesterday (The Champlain Society Podcast on Canadian History)
Brush, Floss, and Smile: A history of dental care, oral health, and social inequality

Witness to Yesterday (The Champlain Society Podcast on Canadian History)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 32:03


In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon interviews Catherine Carstairs about her newest book The Smile Gap: A History of Oral Health and Social Inequality. Carstairs presents the first cultural and social history of oral health in Canada and explores the ways in which society places high value on good teeth. For those Canadians without access to good, or any, dental care, there is a gap as they struggle with their general physical health and their self-image. Consequently, people without an “attractive smile” may be at a disadvantage professionally and socially. Carstairs further elaborates on the history of dental care, examining the improvements in the field over the past 100 years, in particular the use of fluoride, the focus on children's dental care, and the rise of cosmetic dentistry. Catherine Carstairs is Professor of History at the University of Guelph, where she specializes in the history of health and medicine, as well as gender history. This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt. If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society's mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada's past.

The Animals at Home Network
145: AAH Ball Pythons FAIL in Large Spaces? | Joob Joob & Friends

The Animals at Home Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 115:08


Caila Mailloux is the creator behind the popular Instagram account @JoobJoobtheSnek. In the episode, we discuss to major topics. First, we cover Caila's heartbreaking experience with Serpentovirus (nidovirus), a deadly respiratory virus that is currently plaguing the reptile trade. Caila walks us through the key components of dealing with the virus as well as a new testing facility at the University of Guelph that make viral testing more accessible to Canadians. The second half of the conversation revolves around the controversy that has been sparked by Caila keeping her Ball Pythons in large Freedom breeder racks designed to house boas. We discuss where both ball python breeders and traditional pet keepers get it wrong.   SHOW NOTES: https://www.animalsathomenetwork.com/145-joob-joob/ LINKS FROM THE EPISODE: CHECK OUT Custom Reptile Habitats HERE Follow Caila: @JoobJoobtheSnek Order Testing Kits: CANADA: https://fishheaddiagnostics.myshopify.com/en-ca/products/canada-nidovirus-testing-kit (USE PROMO CODE ‘JOOBJOOB' for 10% OFF Entire Order) USA: https://fishheaddiagnostics.myshopify.com/en-ca/products/nidovirus-testing-kit HBP Episode 20: https://youtu.be/sV6CAHDw19w Longitudinal and Cross-Sectional Sampling of Serpentovirus (Nidovirus) Infection in Captive Snakes… https://www.uoguelph.ca/ahl/services/serpentovirus-reptile-nidovirus-rt-qpcr Support, Subscribe  & Follow: CHECK OUT Custom Reptile Habitats CLICK HERE SUBSCRIBE TO THE PODCAST NETWORK: SPOTIFY► https://spoti.fi/2UG5NOI Support us on Patreon: patreon.com/animalsathome Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/AnimalsatHomeChannel Follow on Instagram: @animalsathomeca

Between The Rows
Ontario's Greenbelt gets squeezed, uncovering climate conferences

Between The Rows

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 35:25


A proposed bill by the Ontario government is poised to open up the province's Greenbelt, an area established for farmland and environmental protection, to urban development. Peggy Brekveld of the Ontario Federation of Agriculture speaks to what this decision could mean for Ontario farmers, and local food production. Wayne Caldwell with the University of Guelph discusses what Bill 23 means for land use planning and if the strategy can meet the province's housing needs. Plus, Manitoba Co-operator reporter Geralyn Wichers speaks with Naomi Johnson with the Canadian Foodgrains Bank about what it was like to attend the COP27 climate change conference. Hosted by Kristy Nudds.

Conscious Marketer
Accelerate Your Marketing with Sandra Tjoa

Conscious Marketer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 32:40


Qigong and Tai Chi instructor Sandra Tjoa was not interested in marketing her services outside her locality. She distanced herself from the idea of using the Internet and technology. But after joining The Conscious Marketer's Accelerator Program, she was awakened to the endless possibilities of serving her audience online. Tune in to this new episode of The Conscious Marketer podcast —  Accelerate Your Marketing with Sandra Tjoa. Key points covered in this episode: [00:19:15] Allow your audience to express their needs. Going the online route was a challenge for Sandra, but she discovered how she could create strong connections and encourage participation even through a screen. [00:23:24] Reach out to your target audience. Sandra began with fliers and had no interest in marketing. The Accelerator workshops guided her to the right path. [00:28:18] Know the true value of your offer. What do you really tap into? What transformation can you help cultivate with your clients? [00:31:37] Every change makes a difference. Take baby steps and seek guidance. Online marketing can be overwhelming, but trying it out will get you to your success. [00:32:56] Share your origin story. Your audience will feel closer to you and will be compelled to share their experiences as well, giving them a chance to be heard. In the modern day, marketers can be vulnerable. [00:38:42] Practice grounding. You can do this for 30-40 seconds daily in the morning and at night while sitting. This helps alleviate stress and tension. ———————————————————————————————— Sandra Tjoa graduated from the University of Guelph with a degree in Human Biology, Human Kinetics, and from the Michener Institute's Respiratory Therapy program. She met her husband in Saudi Arabia, and for 14 years their family lived in several countries in Asia. During that time, she trained in Qi Gong, Tai Chi, Sword Tai Chi, and Tan Tui with a master in Singapore and since then has studied with masters in British Columbia, Washington, and California. Website: https://qi-taichi.ca/ ———————————————————————————————— The Conscious Marketing Movement is all about building a community of conscious leaders, creators, and entrepreneurs.  CONNECT WITH US Join Richard and Kylie in their Facebook group so you can learn how to use conscious marketing in your business. The Marketers Path Facebook Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/themarketerspath

Best of the WWEST
Episode 8: Experiences of Individuals With Disabilities in STEM and Academia w/Dr. Naheda Sahtout & Dr. Nicole Brown

Best of the WWEST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 19:28


In this episode, Dr. Naheda Sahtout and Dr. Nicole Brown sit with us to discuss the experiences of individuals with disabilities in STEM and academia, and how we can make STEM more accessible for disabled individuals in the workplace, lab, and classroom! Dr. Naheda Sahtout (Ph.D) is an award-winning academic, researcher, scientist, and leader. Naheda completed her B.Sc. (Honours) in Biology from the University of Waterloo, M.Sc. in Molecular and Cellular Biology from the University of Guelph, and Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Saskatchewan. She is currently a Science Analyst in the Office of the Chief Science Operating Officer with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. Naheda developed a strong interest in STEM outreach and finding innovative and creative ways of bringing STEM to rural and Indigenous communities during her graduate programs. She also found her passion in enhancing graduate education, and as a student leader worked hard to strengthening the student-supervisory relationship, finding more resources for graduate students, increasing the networking opportunities for graduate students with non-academic partners, and working on initiatives that prepare graduate students for non-academic careers. Aside from all her efforts on campus, she also finds time to volunteer in the community and spent much of her time in Saskatoon helping refugees and newcomers with the Saskatoon Open Door Society. Currently, she is the Managing director of the Muslim Achieving Excellence Scholarships Fund program, a national program dedicated to supporting excellence in youth. Having herself tackled an academic journey with a visual impairment; she is passionate about advocating for inclusivity, diversity, equality and accessibility in science. She is committed to redefining the landscape and finding ways to support women and girls succeed. She continues to dedicate her time to these matters, whether it is in the workplace or at a global level. Her unique background and first-hand experience navigating academia, combined with her fierce and enthusiastic nature, have given her the tools to be an excellent advocate for the matters that are close to her heart. Dr. Nicole Brown is a writer, social researcher, and associate professor working on the cusp of research/practice/teaching. She is Director of Social Research & Practice and Education Ltd and Associate Professor at University College London. Nicole's creative and research work relate to physical and material representations of experiences, the generation of knowledge, the use of metaphors, and more generally, research methods and approaches to explore identity and body work. Her books include Lived Experiences of Ableism in Academia: Strategies for Inclusion in Higher Education, Ableism in Academia: Theorising Experiences of Disabilities and Chronic Illnesses in Higher Education, Embodied Inquiry: Research Methods, and Making the Most of Your Research Journal. Her next books are Creativity in Education: International Perspectives and Photovoice, Reimagined. Nicole's creative nonfiction has been published in the Journal of Participatory Research Methods, So Fi Zine and The AutoEthnographer. Nicole shares her work at https://www.nicole-brown.co.uk and she tweets as @ncjbrown and @AbleismAcademia Listen to the Best of the WWEST on Spotify, Apple, Google, Amazon, iHeart, Gaana, and Castbox Visit wwest-cwse.ca to learn more about WWEST and to listen to other available episodes.

RealAgriculture's Podcasts
Corn School: Weighing the risks of pushing hybrid maturities

RealAgriculture's Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 5:10


How does adding 100 crop heat units to the maturity of your corn hybrids impact the yield and profitability of the crop? Agronomist Peter Johnson tackles that question on this episode of the RealAgriculture Corn School with help from University of Guelph associate professor David Hooker. Earlier this year, Hooker took a deep dive into... Read More

Kreative Kontrol
Ep. #734: Bonnie Trash

Kreative Kontrol

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 64:56


Emmalia Bortolo-Vettor and Sarafina Bortolon-Vettor discuss the haunting new Bonnie Trash album, Malocchio, the state of Guelph music venues and ideas about improving musicians' lives, the supernatural stories within their family history that inform their new album, the voice of their late grandmother, Nonna Maria, goth, post-punk, and horror film scores, JAWS, future plans, and much more. Supported by you on Patreon, Pizza Trokadero, the Bookshelf, Planet Bean Coffee, and Grandad's Donuts. Support Y.E.S.S. and Black Women United YEG. Follow vish online.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/kreative-kontrol. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

One Planet Podcast
Highlights - Colin Steen - CEO of Legacy Agripartners - Pushing Farming Forward

One Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 9:47


"I think one of the things that we're trying to do is just, again, I think some firms come out and they go to the farmers and say, "You have to change all these things right now. If you're going to cut out your fertilizers, cut out your pesticides. Stop tilling your land." And the farmer's head explodes, right? They're like, "I can't change all that. I still have to feed my family, right? I still have to make a living on this thing." So, we kind of focus on the smaller incremental changes. You know, planting a crop like alfalfa that's in the soil for four or five years and brings some stability to the ground and fixes nitrogen back into the soil is really important, right? So that's a huge benefit for the farm. You know, farming with cover crops, again, a living root in the soil year-round is really important to keep the soil structure together and stop that erosion. And then it works better in no-till situations. So I think we're going to get there. Just, right now I think sometimes you like swing that pendulum in too far to one direction and then you lose all the people you hope to bring along the way. And that's where, when I was at Syngenta in the venture capital group, I always felt like I could help be that voice of the farmer. Now the group I'm with, we're all farm kids. We're all people that know what it's like and know how to talk to these important people in our ecosystem here. And so you know, I think we've got a chance to really make it work because we understand the language they're speaking and have solutions that are important for them. And at the end of the day, they have to make money, right? I think we sometimes forget that - no different than all of us - we have to feed our families. We have to do work that is important, but also if we're busking on the side of the road to feed our family, then we're probably...it's going to be tough, right?"Colin Steen is CEO of Legacy Agripartners. He has had a lifelong career in agriculture, spending over 25 years with Syngenta in a variety of commercial leadership and Venture Capital roles before joining Legacy Seed Companies (now Legacy Agripartners) in July 2020. His prior experience in running Golden Harvest Seeds has given him a deep understanding of the needs of the U.S. farmer. Colin grew up on a grain and cattle farm in Weldon, Saskatchewan, and holds a B.S. in Agriculture from the University of Saskatchewan and an MBA from the University of Guelph.https://legacyagripartners.comwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

One Planet Podcast
Colin Steen - CEO of Legacy Agripartners - Pushing Farming Forward

One Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 44:59


Colin Steen is CEO of Legacy Agripartners. He has had a lifelong career in agriculture, spending over 25 years with Syngenta in a variety of commercial leadership and Venture Capital roles before joining Legacy Seed Companies (now Legacy Agripartners) in July 2020. His prior experience in running Golden Harvest Seeds has given him a deep understanding of the needs of the U.S. farmer. Colin grew up on a grain and cattle farm in Weldon, Saskatchewan, and holds a B.S. in Agriculture from the University of Saskatchewan and an MBA from the University of Guelph."I think one of the things that we're trying to do is just, again, I think some firms come out and they go to the farmers and say, "You have to change all these things right now. If you're going to cut out your fertilizers, cut out your pesticides. Stop tilling your land." And the farmer's head explodes, right? They're like, "I can't change all that. I still have to feed my family, right? I still have to make a living on this thing." So, we kind of focus on the smaller incremental changes. You know, planting a crop like alfalfa that's in the soil for four or five years and brings some stability to the ground and fixes nitrogen back into the soil is really important, right? So that's a huge benefit for the farm. You know, farming with cover crops, again, a living root in the soil year-round is really important to keep the soil structure together and stop that erosion. And then it works better in no-till situations. So I think we're going to get there. Just, right now I think sometimes you like swing that pendulum in too far to one direction and then you lose all the people you hope to bring along the way. And that's where, when I was at Syngenta in the venture capital group, I always felt like I could help be that voice of the farmer. Now the group I'm with, we're all farm kids. We're all people that know what it's like and know how to talk to these important people in our ecosystem here. And so you know, I think we've got a chance to really make it work because we understand the language they're speaking and have solutions that are important for them. And at the end of the day, they have to make money, right? I think we sometimes forget that - no different than all of us - we have to feed our families. We have to do work that is important, but also if we're busking on the side of the road to feed our family, then we're probably...it's going to be tough, right?"https://legacyagripartners.comwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast
Highlights - Colin Steen - CEO of Legacy Agripartners - Farming, Rural America, Sustainability

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 9:47


"Farming was really important to him. My dad brought cattle into the farm. He didn't have a high school education at the time, went back in the late eighties to finish off his high school diploma, which was something I'm incredibly proud of him for doing that. And farming in the late eighties was tough. And tough for mom and dad. So, a lot of the land was borrowed at 18 to 21% interest rates. The old Volcker years, right? So, incredibly high interest rates. And then when it didn't rain in '88 and '89, that's a problem, right? When you don't have income coming in and large loan payments and high interest rates to be made was a real issue. So a lot of the land went back to the bank. We continued to farm half of it. Kept the cows. My mom went back to being a nurse, so she was a nurse when her and dad first met and a nurse throughout until my brother and I were born and then took some time off. So she went back to work. Worked incredibly hard to help make ends meet for everybody. So, it was good. I would say, while we didn't have a lot, I don't ever remember not having what I wanted. It's like we always had money to play hockey. We always had time to go, while we were at the cattle sales...you know, it was fun. I would never once go, Man, my childhood, there was so much missing. My parents provided so much for us around every corner, all the opportunities in the world to do what we needed."Colin Steen is CEO of Legacy Agripartners. He has had a lifelong career in agriculture, spending over 25 years with Syngenta in a variety of commercial leadership and Venture Capital roles before joining Legacy Seed Companies (now Legacy Agripartners) in July 2020. His prior experience in running Golden Harvest Seeds has given him a deep understanding of the needs of the U.S. farmer. Colin grew up on a grain and cattle farm in Weldon, Saskatchewan, and holds a B.S. in Agriculture from the University of Saskatchewan and an MBA from the University of Guelph.https://legacyagripartners.comwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast
Colin Steen - CEO of Legacy Agripartners - Farming, Rural America, Sustainability

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 44:59


Colin Steen is CEO of Legacy Agripartners. He has had a lifelong career in agriculture, spending over 25 years with Syngenta in a variety of commercial leadership and Venture Capital roles before joining Legacy Seed Companies (now Legacy Agripartners) in July 2020. His prior experience in running Golden Harvest Seeds has given him a deep understanding of the needs of the U.S. farmer. Colin grew up on a grain and cattle farm in Weldon, Saskatchewan, and holds a B.S. in Agriculture from the University of Saskatchewan and an MBA from the University of Guelph."Farming was really important to him. My dad brought cattle into the farm. He didn't have a high school education at the time, went back in the late eighties to finish off his high school diploma, which was something I'm incredibly proud of him for doing that. And farming in the late eighties was tough. And tough for mom and dad. So, a lot of the land was borrowed at 18 to 21% interest rates. The old Volcker years, right? So, incredibly high interest rates. And then when it didn't rain in '88 and '89, that's a problem, right? When you don't have income coming in and large loan payments and high interest rates to be made was a real issue. So a lot of the land went back to the bank. We continued to farm half of it. Kept the cows. My mom went back to being a nurse, so she was a nurse when her and dad first met and a nurse throughout until my brother and I were born and then took some time off. So she went back to work. Worked incredibly hard to help make ends meet for everybody. So, it was good. I would say, while we didn't have a lot, I don't ever remember not having what I wanted. It's like we always had money to play hockey. We always had time to go, while we were at the cattle sales...you know, it was fun. I would never once go, Man, my childhood, there was so much missing. My parents provided so much for us around every corner, all the opportunities in the world to do what we needed."https://legacyagripartners.comwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

The Creative Process in 10 minutes or less · Arts, Culture & Society
Colin Steen - CEO of Legacy Agripartners - Pushing Farming Forward

The Creative Process in 10 minutes or less · Arts, Culture & Society

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 9:47


"It's interesting, as I've gotten older, I've really started to reflect back on that early time growing up on a farm. And I'm fiercely, fiercely proud of where my roots are. And Weldon, Saskatchewan, it's a town of 160 people there today. And just being in a spot where every day you have cattle to feed, you've got a grain crop you're trying to grow, right? The things are subject to weather. The sort of ups and downs of farm life are so dependent on the 6 pm news and the weather forecast each night. It's at times very stressful, but most times incredibly rewarding, right? There's nothing like sitting in a combine at harvest time with all the fruits of your labors all coming in at the same time. It's a great experience. We had cattle, which is just a never-ending thing, right? You know, our vacations were tied around going to cattle shows, cattle sales, bull sales, cow sales, anything that revolved around the farm. And we had a ton of fun on our vacations going to these events and seeing sites in those areas where we went to. But at the end of the day, you know, your life revolves around the cattle on the farm. It revolves around the farm. There's no sort of, we'll take four months off and not worry about it, right? Those cows have to be fed twice a day and looked after. So it's a lot of responsibility, and it's a great way to get yourself ready for life as an adult."Colin Steen is CEO of Legacy Agripartners. He has had a lifelong career in agriculture, spending over 25 years with Syngenta in a variety of commercial leadership and Venture Capital roles before joining Legacy Seed Companies (now Legacy Agripartners) in July 2020. His prior experience in running Golden Harvest Seeds has given him a deep understanding of the needs of the U.S. farmer. Colin grew up on a grain and cattle farm in Weldon, Saskatchewan, and holds a B.S. in Agriculture from the University of Saskatchewan and an MBA from the University of Guelph.https://legacyagripartners.comwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Education · The Creative Process
Highlights - Colin Steen - CEO of Legacy Agripartners - Pushing Farming Forward

Education · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 9:47


"It's interesting, as I've gotten older, I've really started to reflect back on that early time growing up on a farm. And I'm fiercely, fiercely proud of where my roots are. And Weldon, Saskatchewan, it's a town of 160 people there today. And just being in a spot where every day you have cattle to feed, you've got a grain crop you're trying to grow, right? The things are subject to weather. The sort of ups and downs of farm life are so dependent on the 6 pm news and the weather forecast each night. It's at times very stressful, but most times incredibly rewarding, right? There's nothing like sitting in a combine at harvest time with all the fruits of your labors all coming in at the same time. It's a great experience. We had cattle, which is just a never-ending thing, right? You know, our vacations were tied around going to cattle shows, cattle sales, bull sales, cow sales, anything that revolved around the farm. And we had a ton of fun on our vacations going to these events and seeing sites in those areas where we went to. But at the end of the day, you know, your life revolves around the cattle on the farm. It revolves around the farm. There's no sort of, we'll take four months off and not worry about it, right? Those cows have to be fed twice a day and looked after. So it's a lot of responsibility, and it's a great way to get yourself ready for life as an adult."Colin Steen is CEO of Legacy Agripartners. He has had a lifelong career in agriculture, spending over 25 years with Syngenta in a variety of commercial leadership and Venture Capital roles before joining Legacy Seed Companies (now Legacy Agripartners) in July 2020. His prior experience in running Golden Harvest Seeds has given him a deep understanding of the needs of the U.S. farmer. Colin grew up on a grain and cattle farm in Weldon, Saskatchewan, and holds a B.S. in Agriculture from the University of Saskatchewan and an MBA from the University of Guelph.https://legacyagripartners.comwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Education · The Creative Process
Colin Steen - CEO of Legacy Agripartners - Pushing Farming Forward

Education · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 44:59


Colin Steen is CEO of Legacy Agripartners. He has had a lifelong career in agriculture, spending over 25 years with Syngenta in a variety of commercial leadership and Venture Capital roles before joining Legacy Seed Companies (now Legacy Agripartners) in July 2020. His prior experience in running Golden Harvest Seeds has given him a deep understanding of the needs of the U.S. farmer. Colin grew up on a grain and cattle farm in Weldon, Saskatchewan, and holds a B.S. in Agriculture from the University of Saskatchewan and an MBA from the University of Guelph."It's interesting, as I've gotten older, I've really started to reflect back on that early time growing up on a farm. And I'm fiercely, fiercely proud of where my roots are. And Weldon, Saskatchewan, it's a town of 160 people there today. And just being in a spot where every day you have cattle to feed, you've got a grain crop you're trying to grow, right? The things are subject to weather. The sort of ups and downs of farm life are so dependent on the 6 pm news and the weather forecast each night. It's at times very stressful, but most times incredibly rewarding, right? There's nothing like sitting in a combine at harvest time with all the fruits of your labors all coming in at the same time. It's a great experience. We had cattle, which is just a never-ending thing, right? You know, our vacations were tied around going to cattle shows, cattle sales, bull sales, cow sales, anything that revolved around the farm. And we had a ton of fun on our vacations going to these events and seeing sites in those areas where we went to. But at the end of the day, you know, your life revolves around the cattle on the farm. It revolves around the farm. There's no sort of, we'll take four months off and not worry about it, right? Those cows have to be fed twice a day and looked after. So it's a lot of responsibility, and it's a great way to get yourself ready for life as an adult."https://legacyagripartners.comwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

RealAgriculture's Podcasts
Corn School: Protecting grain quality in the disease nursery

RealAgriculture's Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 7:43


Why is there an irrigated corn crop growing in the middle of the University of Guelph’s Ridgetown campus? On this episode of the RealAgriculture Corn School, host Bernard Tobin takes a trip into the research maze to get a look at what happens in this corn misting nursery. Tobin first encounters University of Guelph associate... Read More

The Healers Café
Your Mental Health and Your Diagnosis Dont Define Who You Are with Dr Debbie Smrz ND on The Healers Caf with Manon Bolliger

The Healers Café

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 29:31


In this episode of The Healers Café, Manon Bolliger (facilitator and retired naturopath with 30+ years of practice) speaks with Dr Debbie Smrz, ND about Naturopathic Living. For the transcript and full story go to: https://www.drmanonbolliger.com/dr-debbie-smrz-nd   Highlights from today's episode include: Dr. Debbie Smrz, ND  07:39 And we're definitely seeing an increase in in mental health issues, as well as information issues. More so I think than before, when it comes to the brain, you know, since 2020, people are just feeling discouraged. People are feeling overwhelmed. And people don't know what's going to happen next. You know what I feel like everyone's walking around with a when's the next shoe going to drop sort of feeling? Dr. Debbie Smrz, ND  17:29 Why do you need the diagnosis? Why can't you just say, Yeah, you know, what, sometimes I have trouble focusing, and I'm kind of all over the place. That's just who I am. And isn't that great? Because I can get a lot of things done. Do you need the ADHD diagnosis? Dr. Debbie Smrz, ND  22:13 And then it can kind of be a trap as well, because now you have it, that you have whatever this is, and I always especially if you've got to be talking about anxiety, I'll always say to people, no, you don't have anxiety. Anxiety comes to visit you sometimes. But let's take away this idea that this is who you are.   ABOUT DR DEBBIE SMRZ, ND: Dr. Debbie is a certified Naturopathic Doctor, hypnotherapist, rugby coach and fitness instructor.  She studied meditation and Buddhism philosophy at the Suan Mokkh Monastery in Chiaya Thailand, German Biological medicine in Giessen Germany and has held numerous Mindbody retreats with her mentor and Mother Wendy Schie.   She is an avid lecturer and motivational speaker, created Neuro Health and Fitness, a brain training centre for kids, as well as being the co-founder and director of Naturopathic Living, a large multidisciplinary clinic in Markham, Ontario where she lives with her husband, 2 children and dog.  Her daughter was diagnosed with PANDAs in 2016, so she has experience with mental health from both sides of the couch. She has won numerous awards, including the ASPIRE award, Best Naturopath – Economist and Sun and was 1st runner up for entrepreneur of the Year award through the Markham board of trade. Dr. Debbie earned her Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Guelph in Genetics and Molecular Biology.  She worked in North Carolina's Research Triangle, as well as in Health Care Communication before returning to Toronto to complete her studies at the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine.  She spent 8 months backpacking the world before she settled down to try and change it. Core purpose/passion: I am on a mission to change the way the world looks at brain health. –  Website | Facebook |  Instagram |  Linktr.ee |  YouTube  |   ABOUT MANON BOLLIGER As a recently De-Registered board-certified naturopathic physician & in practice since 1992, I've seen an average of 150 patients per week and have helped people ranging from rural farmers in Nova Scotia to stressed out CEOs in Toronto to tri-athletes here in Vancouver. My resolve to educate, empower and engage people to take charge of their own health is evident in my best-selling books:  'What Patients Don't Say if Doctors Don't Ask: The Mindful Patient-Doctor Relationship' and 'A Healer in Every Household: Simple Solutions for Stress'.  I also teach BowenFirst™ Therapy through Bowen College and hold transformational workshops to achieve these goals. So, when I share with you that LISTENING to Your body is a game changer in the healing process, I am speaking from expertise and direct experience". Mission: A Healer in Every Household! For more great information to go to her weekly blog:  http://bowencollege.com/blog.  For tips on health & healing go to: https://www.drmanonbolliger.com/tips   ABOUT THE HEALERS CAFÉ: Manon's show is the #1 show for medical practitioners and holistic healers to have heart to heart conversations about their day to day lives. Follow on Social – Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn | YouTube | Twitter | Linktr.ee | Rumble   * De-Registered, revoked & retired naturopathic physician after 30 years of practice in healthcare. Now resourceful & resolved to share with you all the tools to take care of your health & vitality!   Remember to subscribe if you like our videos. Click the bell if you want to be one of the first people notified of a new release.

RBC Disruptors
The Growing Challenge Part 3: The Hidden Threat of Food Spoilage and Waste

RBC Disruptors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 34:00


It's an issue that's estimated to cost Canada more than $21 billion per year -- nevermind the environmental impacts. But how much thought have you really given to the problem of food waste and spoilage, and how it could be hampering our country's effort to reduce emissions? Whenever wasted or spoiled food ends up buried in a landfill instead of decomposing while exposed to air, it generates methane — a potent greenhouse gas with 86 times the warming power of carbon dioxide. And it just so happens that Canada is one of the worst countries on the planet when it comes to wasted food. So what can be done about it?On this episode of Disruptors, an RBC podcast, co-hosts John Stackhouse and Trinh Theresa Do wrap up their special, three-part series called “The Growing Challenge”, with an in-depth examination of how both food waste and spoilage represent a huge and often overlooked obstacle to our nation's sustainability efforts. They'll also discuss new technologies and tactics helping food producers to address the issue — as well as how we as consumers all need to change our attitudes when it comes to things like best before dates, portion sizes, and so-called “rescued food.” In addition to some familiar voices from earlier episodes in the series like Sonya Hoo, Evan Fraser, and Kristjan Hebert, John and Theresa will also hear from Meeru Dhalwala, author, chef, and the co-owner of Vij's and Rangoli restaurants in Vancouver; Randy Huffman, the Chief Food Safety and Sustainability Officer at Maple Leaf Foods; Kevin Groh, Senior Vice President of Corporate Affairs at Loblaw Companies Limited; as well as Jeremy Lang, the founder and Vice-President of Sustainability at Pela Earth, which makes a smart, countertop-based composting system called Lomi.  To learn more about Meeru Dhalwala you can visit her Wikipedia page or follow her on Instagram at @meerudhalwala. Maple Leaf Foods has much more information about its sustainability goals on its website. Loblaw Companies Limited has details on its efforts to reduce waste in both the textiles and food industries. Click here to learn more about the Lomi smart composter, and here for information about Pela's compostable phone cases. For more about BCG's work on food systems and food security—follow this link. And for details on The Arrell Food Institute at the University of Guelph, please click here.

The Richard Syrett Show
The Richard Syrett Show - Nov 11, 2022 - Citizen-Led Inquiry of Pandemic, Interference with Canadian Elections, & Segregated Yoga Classes

The Richard Syrett Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 79:55


Today on The Richard Syrett Show: Author at Epoch Times, Preston Manning talks about chairing the citizen-led inquiry of the pandemic. Chris Geratano, The Sofa Cinefile summarizes the 1995 film “Heat” while The LimRiddler gives you this week's riddle. Conservative Senator Leo Housakos shares his thoughts on the interference with Canadian elections. Commentator for the Mississauga Steelheads, Zack Bodenstein discusses the team & the season ahead. Elie Cantin-Nantel, journalist at True North brings up the University of Guelph defending racially segregated yoga sessions.

Millennials Are Killing Capitalism
"To Share Equally The Benefits of Living" - Dionne Brand on Nomenclature, Sanctioning All Revolts, and Registering Black Duration

Millennials Are Killing Capitalism

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 107:27


[Note: In the episode image the artwork behind Dionne Brand at the podium is by Torkwase Dyson, as is the cover art work for Nomenclature] In this conversation we are thrilled to welcome Dionne Brand to the podcast.  This is a conversation with her new book Nomenclature: New and Collected Poems and also with a number of her lectures, interviews, and dialogues over the years. If we reference something not in Nomenclature we have done our best to include a link to it in the show notes.  We ask questions about themes and ideas we hear or read Brand grappling with in her work, as well as questions that we grapple with in relation to her work. These include questions about time, epistemology, nature, the category of the human, Black thought, spectacle, narrative, capital, imperialism, socialism and liberation. If you find value in this conversation and others we publish, we encourage you to support the podcast at patreon.com/millennialsarekillingcapitalism, we are 100% supported by our listeners and you can be a part of that for as little as $1 a month. Dionne Brand is a renowned poet, novelist, and essayist. Her writing is notable for the beauty of its language, and for its intense engagement with issues of international social justice. Her work includes ten volumes of poetry, five books of fiction and three non-fiction works. She was the Poet Laureate of the City of Toronto 2009-2012. From 2017-2021 Brand was Poetry Editor at McClelland & Stewart- Penguin Random House Canada. Dionne Brand became prominent first as an award-winning poet, winning the Griffin Poetry Prize for her volume Ossuaries, the Governor General's Literary Award and the Trillium Book Prize for her volume Land to Light On. She's garnered two other nominations for the Governor General's Literary Award for the poetry volumes No Language Is Neutral and Inventory respectively, the latter also nominated for the Trillium and the Pat Lowther. She has won the Pat Lowther Award for poetry for her volume thirsty also nominated for the Griffin Poetry Prize and the city of Toronto Book Award.  Her 2018 volume, The Blue Clerk, was nominated for the Governor General's Literary Award for poetry and the Griffin Poetry Prize and won the Trillium Book Prize. Brand has also achieved great distinction and acclaim in fiction and non-fiction. Her most recent novel, Theory won the Toronto Book Award 2019 and the BOCAS fiction prize. Her novel, Love Enough was nominated in 2015 for the Trillium Book Award. Her fiction includes the critically acclaimed novels In Another Place, Not Here, At the Full and Change of the Moon, and, What We All Long For an indelible portrait of the city of Toronto which also garnered the Toronto Book Award. Her fiction has been translated into Italian, French and German. Dionne Brand's non-fiction includes Bread Out Of Stone, and A Map to the Door of No Return, which has been widely taken up by scholars of Black Diaspora and An Autobiography of The Autobiography of Reading. In 2021 Brand was awarded the Windham Campbell Award for fiction. Dionne Brand has published nineteen books, contributed to many anthologies and written dozens of essays and articles. She has also been involved in the making of several documentary films. She was a Distinguished Visiting Professor at St. Lawrence University in New York and has taught literature and creative writing at universities in both British Columbia and Ontario. She has also held the Ruth Wynn Woodward Chair in Women's Studies at Simon Fraser University. She holds several Honorary Doctorates, Wilfred Laurier University, University of Windsor, Simon Fraser University, The University of Toronto, York University and Thornloe/Laurentian University.  She lives in Toronto and was Professor in the School of English and Theatre Studies at the University of Guelph until 2022. She is a member of the Order of Canada. In every area of her work Brand has received widespread recognition through literary awards, honorary doctorates, and praise by the likes of Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, Kamau Braithwaite, and so many, many others. In the show notes we will include Dionne Brand's full bio which further details her award winning work in poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and film. As well as her distinguished work as an educator, documentary film maker, and poetry editor. Sources: Nomenclature: New and Collected Poems David Naimon's interview with Dionne Brand on Between The Covers Podcast  Adrienne Rich and Dionne Brand in Conversation  Dionne Brand: The Shape of Language (along with Torkwase Dyson)  “I Am Not The Person You Remember” - In Memoriam of MF DOOM with Hanif Abdurraqib “The Oppressed Have a Way of Addressing Their Own Conditions” - On Joshua Myers' Cedric Robinson: The Time of the Black Radical Tradition   Dionne Brand - “An Autobiography of the Autobiography of Reading”  

Canadian Podcast with Zak
Episode 150 | Reducing Community Harm by Gang Prevention with Toronto Police, Shawn Geris

Canadian Podcast with Zak

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 50:58


This episode is brought to you by: GRUBBED https://grubbed.com Detective Constable, Shawn Geris is a twenty-year veteran of the Toronto Police Service and holds a Bachelor's Degree from the University of Guelph. His practical and theoretical experience has given him an edge of understanding community issues related to gun and gang violence. Shawn's experience within the Toronto Police Service, includes working in: the Primary Response Unit, the Criminal Investigative Bureau, the Community Response Unit, Toronto Police Transit Unit the Neighbourhood Officer Unit, the Firearms section and the Use of Force section at the Toronto Police College, and currently in the Integrated Gang Prevention Task Force. Prior to becoming a police officer in Toronto, Shawn worked at the Elgin Middlesex Detention Centre and the Genest Detention Centre for Youth as a Correctional Officer three years in working with adult and young offenders. Detective Constable, Shawn Geris has been volunteering in various capacities, roles, and positions for over 20 years and is dedicated to various community initiatives, on and off the job. During his time in 31 Division, Detective Constable, Shawn Geris established an amateur wrestling program at Westview Centennial Secondary School and ran the Gang Resistance Education and Training (G.R.E.A.T.) program in several of the area's schools.