Podcasts about Ecology

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Scientific study of the relationships between living organisms and their environment

  • 2,710PODCASTS
  • 6,954EPISODES
  • 42mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 26, 2022LATEST
Ecology

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Best podcasts about Ecology

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Latest podcast episodes about Ecology

Maine Science Podcast
Anne Lichtenwalner

Maine Science Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 40:30


Anne Lichtenwalner, is an Associate  Professor of Cooperative Extension and the School of Food and  Agriculture, and cooperating faculty in the Honors College as well as  the School of Biology and Ecology at the University of Maine.  Since 2008, Anne has been the director and diagnostician  for the University of Maine Animal Health Lab (UMAHL), a member lab of  the Northeast Wildlife Disease Cooperative. She is involved in research  about, and service to, Maine animal industries.  ~~~~~~The Maine Science Podcast is a production of the Maine Science Festival. It was recorded at Discovery Studios, at the Maine Discovery Museum, in Bangor, ME. Hosted by Kate Dickerson; edited and produced by Scott Loiselle; financial support from Central Maine Power; production support by Maranda Bouchard; and social media support from Next Media.The Discover Maine theme was composed and performed by Nick Parker.If you want to support the Maine Science Podcast and/or the Maine Science Festival, you can do so at our website mainesciencefestival.org either at our donation page OR by getting some MSF merchandise through our online store. Find us online:Website - Maine Science FestivalMaine Science Festival on social media: Facebook    Twitter     InstagramMaine Science Podcast on social media: Facebook    Twitter     InstagramMaine Science Festival Store - https://bit.ly/MSF-store © 2022 Maine Science Festival  

Agave Road Trip
Another Drink Towards Oblivion

Agave Road Trip

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 25:33


Okay, we really liked our conversation with renowned food journalist Dan Saladino, author of Eating to Extinction. In last week's episode, we talked about the importance of consuming a diversity of options. This week, we talk with him about the importance of that diversity coming from a specific place. And maybe that place should be where you live. We think about staying parked in place in this episode of Agave Road Trip!Find extra photos and related links at agaveroadtrip.com.Episode Art Courtesy of Ivan Vazquez Agave Road Trip is Powered by Simplecast.

For The Wild
K'ASHEECHTLAA - LOUISE BRADY on Restoring the Sacred [ENCORE] /288

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022


This week we are rebroadcasting our interview with K'asheechtlaa (Louise Brady) originally aired in April of 2021. Many of us have access to more choices than we ever thought imaginable, in fact, it is quite easy to find ourselves amidst an abundance of products, eating foods cultivated across the world, or selecting from a myriad of variations of the same “thing”. But this “abundance” of choice masks ecological depletion, and as we gain access to that which is far from our homes, actual place-based abundance is often jeopardized. This week on the podcast we explore this in context to herring in Southeast Alaska with guest K'asheechtlaa (Louise Brady). Everything from chinook, seals, whales, eagles, halibut, and dolphins, all depend on herring directly or indirectly. In addition to nourishing so much of the Pacific marine ecosystem, these kin are embedded in the culture and spirit of  Sheetʼká (Sitka). But as herring have been utilized in pet food, fertilizer, fish meal for aquariums and salmon farms, and marketed as a delicacy abroad - fisheries have been mismanaged by the state of Alaska and overfished to near extinction. K'asheechtlaa is a woman of the Tlingit nation in Sheetʼká Ḵwáan, an island off the coast of Southeast Alaska. She is Raven-Frog or Kiks.ádi Clan, Kiks.ádi women are known as the herring ladies, they have a story or original instruction that connects them spiritually, culturally, and historically to herring. K'asheechtlaa is the founder of the Herring Protectors, a grassroots movement of people that share concerns that the herring population in Sheetʼká Ḵwáan, and the culture tied to it, are under threat.  Music by Lake Mary, The Ascent of Everest, Alexandra Blakely, and Fountainsun.  Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

Science (Video)
CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Human Transformation From Environmental Managers to Ecosystem Damagers with Jessica Thompson

Science (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 20:45


Beginning with Homo erectus at least a million years ago, hominins have used fire to engineer the world around them. The earliest uses of fire surely included cooking, changing the energy yields of foods. Such innovations altered the course of our evolution, facilitating the evolution of species that could adapt quickly using tools and social ingenuity. After 200,000 years ago, hominins also used fire to change the material properties of stone, pigments, sap, and wood. Although these changes represent a fundamental shift in the role of humans as dominant shapers of their environments, ecosystems adjusted as early humans remained embedded within them. Although we built our ability to bend environments to our needs on millions of years of evolution and innovation, humans are not now simply shifting to another sustainable balance. Rather, we continue to push environmental thresholds across one tipping point after the next. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37907]

#itsawildlife
Write a kickass CV in ecology

#itsawildlife

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 7:32


6 tips to consider when writing a kickass CV to land your dream job in wildlife conservation… AND of course we have a free template to use when writing your very own so sink your teeth into this bad boy!Structure your CVTransferable skillsKeep the presentation simple: font, spacing, spellingReferences on requestCollect referees before you need themCall first  #ITSAWILDLIFE #itsawildlife is a podcast and blog, sharing the great work being done for wildlife conservation worldwide and solving problems for ecologists by ecologists. If you're a fellow wildlifer, whether you're just starting out or you've been about the traps for a while, you're in the right place! Tune in each week to talk all things nature: amazing projects, inspiring ecologists, and step-by-step advice to land your dream job in wildlife conservation. Read a transcript of this episode here.FREE RESOURCES:Feel like you've tried everything to land your dream job in wildlife conservation? We got you! Here's a whole bunch of free resources to inspire your next move and hand you some tricks of the trade.·         FREE guide: 10 steps to land your dream job in wildlife conservation·         FREE guide: 3 ways to stay confident whilst “stuck” applying for jobs·         FREE guide: How to get clear on your dream job in 3 easy steps·         FREE template: How to write a kickass CVFor more information, check out our website www.itisawildlife.com for more free resources, blog posts and more. SUPPORT & CONNECT:If you like what you hear, please subscribe, rate and review to support the show and share the love with your network.Check out the website to get on board and subscribe for #itsawildlife updates– we send monthly emails with fresh tips and fun updates! We'd love to hear from ya! Get in touch by email itsawildlife3@gmail.com or connect on Instagram @itisawildlife or Pinterest.

The Dissenter
#629 Robert Pennock - An Instinct for Truth: Curiosity and the Moral Character of Science

The Dissenter

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 67:24


------------------Support the channel------------ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thedissenter PayPal: paypal.me/thedissenter PayPal Subscription 1 Dollar: https://tinyurl.com/yb3acuuy PayPal Subscription 3 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/ybn6bg9l PayPal Subscription 5 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/ycmr9gpz PayPal Subscription 10 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/y9r3fc9m PayPal Subscription 20 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/y95uvkao ------------------Follow me on--------------------- Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheDissenterYT This show is sponsored by Enlites, Learning & Development done differently. Check the website here: http://enlites.com/ Dr. Robert Pennock is University Distinguished Professor at Michigan State University, where he is on the faculty of Lyman Briggs College, the Departments of Philosophy and Computer Science & Engineering, and the Ecology, Evolution and Behavior program. His research involves empirical and philosophical questions that relate to evolutionary biology, cognitive science, and the scientific character, such as the evolution of altruism, complexity, and intelligence. He is the author of books like An Instinct for Truth: Curiosity and the Moral Character of Science. In this episode, we focus on An Instinct for Truth. We go through some of the traits that characterize (or should characterize) scientists, like curiosity, honesty, skepticism, and intellectual humility. We talk about moral values that orient science, and the importance of failure. We discuss the scientific method, the demarcation problem, and pseudoscience. We talk about the relationship between science and ethics. Finally, we ask if science is a cultural construct. -- A HUGE THANK YOU TO MY PATRONS/SUPPORTERS: KARIN LIETZCKE, ANN BLANCHETTE, PER HELGE LARSEN, LAU GUERREIRO, JERRY MULLER, HANS FREDRIK SUNDE, BERNARDO SEIXAS, HERBERT GINTIS, RUTGER VOS, RICARDO VLADIMIRO, CRAIG HEALY, OLAF ALEX, PHILIP KURIAN, JONATHAN VISSER, JAKOB KLINKBY, ADAM KESSEL, MATTHEW WHITINGBIRD, ARNAUD WOLFF, TIM HOLLOSY, HENRIK AHLENIUS, JOHN CONNORS, PAULINA BARREN, FILIP FORS CONNOLLY, DAN DEMETRIOU, ROBERT WINDHAGER, RUI INACIO, ARTHUR KOH, ZOOP, MARCO NEVES, COLIN HOLBROOK, SUSAN PINKER, PABLO SANTURBANO, SIMON COLUMBUS, PHIL KAVANAGH, JORGE ESPINHA, CORY CLARK, MARK BLYTH, ROBERTO INGUANZO, MIKKEL STORMYR, ERIC NEURMANN, SAMUEL ANDREEFF, FRANCIS FORDE, TIAGO NUNES, BERNARD HUGUENEY, ALEXANDER DANNBAUER, FERGAL CUSSEN, YEVHEN BODRENKO, HAL HERZOG, NUNO MACHADO, DON ROSS, JONATHAN LEIBRANT, JOÃO LINHARES, OZLEM BULUT, NATHAN NGUYEN, STANTON T, SAMUEL CORREA, ERIK HAINES, MARK SMITH, J.W., JOÃO EIRA, TOM HUMMEL, SARDUS FRANCE, DAVID SLOAN WILSON, YACILA DEZA-ARAUJO, IDAN SOLON, ROMAIN ROCH, DMITRY GRIGORYEV, TOM ROTH, DIEGO LONDOÑO CORREA, YANICK PUNTER, ADANER USMANI, CHARLOTTE BLEASE, NICOLE BARBARO, ADAM HUNT, PAWEL OSTASZEWSKI, AL ORTIZ, NELLEKE BAK, KATHRINE AND PATRICK TOBIN, GUY MADISON, GARY G HELLMANN, SAIMA AFZAL, ADRIAN JAEGGI, NICK GOLDEN, PAULO TOLENTINO, JOÃO BARBOSA, JULIAN PRICE, EDWARD HALL, HEDIN BRØNNER, DOUGLAS P. FRY, FRANCA BORTOLOTTI, GABRIEL PONS CORTÈS, URSULA LITZCKE, DENISE COOK, SCOTT, ZACHARY FISH, TIM DUFFY, AND TRADERINNYC! A SPECIAL THANKS TO MY PRODUCERS, YZAR WEHBE, JIM FRANK, ŁUKASZ STAFINIAK, IAN GILLIGAN, LUIS CAYETANO, TOM VANEGDOM, CURTIS DIXON, BENEDIKT MUELLER, VEGA GIDEY, THOMAS TRUMBLE, AND NUNO ELDER! AND TO MY EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS, MICHAL RUSIECKI, ROSEY, JAMES PRATT, MATTHEW LAVENDER, SERGIU CODREANU, AND BOGDAN KANIVETS!

New Books in Environmental Studies
Cleo Wölfle Hazard, "Underflows: Queer Trans Ecologies and River Justice" (U Washington Press, 2022)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 44:45


Rivers host vibrant multispecies communities in their waters and along their banks, and, according to queer-trans-feminist river scientist Cleo Wölfle Hazard, their future vitality requires centering the values of justice, sovereignty, and dynamism. At the intersection of river sciences, queer and trans theory, and environmental justice, Underflows: Queer Trans Ecologies and River Justice (U Washington Press, 2022) explores river cultures and politics at five sites of water conflict and restoration in California, Oregon, and Washington. Incorporating work with salmon, beaver, and floodplain recovery projects, Wölfle Hazard weaves narratives about innovative field research practices with an affectively oriented queer and trans focus on love and grief for rivers and fish. Drawing on the idea of underflows--the parts of a river's flow that can't be seen, the underground currents that seep through soil or rise from aquifers through cracks in bedrock--Wölfle Hazard elucidates the underflows in river cultures, sciences, and politics where Native nations and marginalized communities fight to protect rivers. The result is a deeply moving account of why rivers matter for queer and trans life, offering critical insights that point to innovative ways of doing science that disrupt settler colonialism and new visions for justice in river governance. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

New Books Network
Cleo Wölfle Hazard, "Underflows: Queer Trans Ecologies and River Justice" (U Washington Press, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 44:45


Rivers host vibrant multispecies communities in their waters and along their banks, and, according to queer-trans-feminist river scientist Cleo Wölfle Hazard, their future vitality requires centering the values of justice, sovereignty, and dynamism. At the intersection of river sciences, queer and trans theory, and environmental justice, Underflows: Queer Trans Ecologies and River Justice (U Washington Press, 2022) explores river cultures and politics at five sites of water conflict and restoration in California, Oregon, and Washington. Incorporating work with salmon, beaver, and floodplain recovery projects, Wölfle Hazard weaves narratives about innovative field research practices with an affectively oriented queer and trans focus on love and grief for rivers and fish. Drawing on the idea of underflows--the parts of a river's flow that can't be seen, the underground currents that seep through soil or rise from aquifers through cracks in bedrock--Wölfle Hazard elucidates the underflows in river cultures, sciences, and politics where Native nations and marginalized communities fight to protect rivers. The result is a deeply moving account of why rivers matter for queer and trans life, offering critical insights that point to innovative ways of doing science that disrupt settler colonialism and new visions for justice in river governance. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

COMPLEXITY
Ricardo Hausmann & J. Doyne Farmer on Evolving Technologies & Market Ecologies (EPE 03)

COMPLEXITY

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 80:49


As our world knits together, economic interdependencies change in both shape and nature. Supply chains, finance, labor, technological innovation, and geography interact in puzzling nonlinear ways. Can we step back far enough and see clearly enough to make sense of these interactions? Can we map the landscape of capability across scales? And what insights emerge by layering networks of people, firms, states, markets, regions? We're all riding a bucking horse; what questions can we ask to make sure that we can stay in the saddle?Welcome to COMPLEXITY, the official podcast of the Santa Fe Institute. I'm your host, Michael Garfield, and every other week we'll bring you with us for far-ranging conversations with our worldwide network of rigorous researchers developing new frameworks to explain the deepest mysteries of the universe.This week on Complexity, we speak with two SFI External Professors helping to rethink political economy: newly-appointed Science Board Co-Chair Ricardo Hausmann (Website, Wikipedia, Twitter) is the Director of the Harvard Growth Lab and J. Doyne Farmer (Website, Wikipedia) is Director of the Complexity Economics program at the Institute for New Economic Thinking at the Oxford Martin School. In this episode we zoom wide to try and find a way to garden all together, learning limits that can help inform discussion and decisions on the shape of things to come…If you value our research and communication efforts, please subscribe, rate and review us at Apple Podcasts, and consider making a donation — or finding other ways to engage with us — at santafe.edu/engage. You can find the complete show notes for every episode, with transcripts and links to cited works, at complexity.simplecast.com. Heads up that our online education platform Complexity Explorer's Origins of Life Course is still open for enrollment until June 1st! We hope to see you in there…Thank you for listening!Join our Facebook discussion group to meet like minds and talk about each episode.Podcast theme music by Mitch Mignano.Follow us on social media:Twitter • YouTube • Facebook • Instagram • LinkedInMentions and additional resources:The new paradigm of economic complexityPierre-Alexandre Balland, Tom Broekel, Dario Diodato, Elisa Giuliani, Ricardo Hausmann, Neave O'Clery, and David Rigbyin Research PolicyHow production networks amplify economic growthJames McNerney, Charles Savoie, Francesco Caravelli, Vasco M. Carvalho, and J. Doyne Farmer in PNASProductive Ecosystems and the arrow of developmentby Neave O'Clery, Muhammed Ali Yıldırım, and Ricardo Hausmann Horrible trade-offs in a pandemic: Poverty, fiscal space, policy, and welfareRicardo Hausmann and Ulrich Schetterin ScienceDirectHistorical effects of shocks on inequality: the great leveler revisitedBas van Bavel and Marten Schefferin Nature Humanities & Social Sciences Communications(Twitter thread)Complexity 56 - J. Doyne Farmer on The Complexity Economics RevolutionThe Multiple Paths to Multiple LifeChristopher P. Kempes and David C. Krakauer in Journal of Molecular EvolutionScaling of urban income inequality in the USAElisa Heinrich Mora, Cate Heine, Jacob J. Jackson, Geoffrey B. West, Vicky Chuqiao Yang and Christopher P. Kempesin Journal of The Royal Society InterfaceComplexity 12 - Matthew Jackson on Social & Economic NetworksComplexity 81 - C. Brandon Ogbunu on Epistasis & The Primacy of Context in Complex SystemsPitchfork Economicsby Nick Hanauer (podcast)Complexity 15 - R. Maria del-Rio Chanona on Modeling Labor Markets & Tech UnemploymentWill a Large Complex System be Stable?by Robert Mayin NatureInvestigationsby Stuart KauffmanThe Collapse of Networksby Raissa D'Souza (SFI Symposium Talk)

KCBS Radio In Depth
Updating Covid safety best practices (again)

KCBS Radio In Depth

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 30:54


Bay Area health officials are warning of rising Covid case counts, but still have yet to order new restrictions. So, facing this new wave of infections without new mandates in place, what precautions should average residents be keeping front of mind, and how careful is careful enough? On this edition of KCBS In Depth, we check in with two Bay Area health experts to get their take.  Guests:  Dr. Marm Kilpatrick, infectious disease expert, UC Santa Cruz's Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Dr. Monica Gandhi, infectious disease physician, UC San Francisco Host: Keith Menconi 

KZYX Public Affairs
Trail Stewards Radio Hour: Redwood Ecology with Will Russell and Teresa Sholars

KZYX Public Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 59:37


May 17, 2022- Paul Schulman and Chad Swimmer take you on a walk in the forest above Jughandle Creek with Professor Emeritus and California Native Plant Society Rare Plant Specialist Teresa Sholars, and Zoom with San Jose State University Environmental Scientist Will Russell--talking about redwood forest ecology, unique plant communities and forest practices.

For The Wild
InTheField: NUSKMATA (Jacinda Mack) on the Gold Rush That Never Ended [ENCORE] /287

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022


This week we are rebroadcasting our interview with Nuskmata (Jacinda Mack) originally aired in February of 2020. From roller coaster rides at Disney World to museums dotting the Pacific Northwest, symbols of mining and the Gold Rush remain deeply enshrined in the collective imagination of the mythic West. Hidden beneath this cultural veneer, the material realities of today's superscale mining are often out of sight, out of mind. In this week's In The Field episode, we trace the historical contours and material legacy of the mining industry across so-called British Columbia, unearthing stories from a region that bears an estimated 1,100 abandoned mines, 150-year-old mining laws, and more mining exploration companies than anywhere else on Earth. Guided by the raw testimony of mother, water protector, and organizer Nuskmata (Jacinda Mack), this episode braids together the history of the Gold Rush and colonization in B.C., the state of salmon, the practice of free, prior, and informed consent, dirty mining for a “clean” energy revolution, and the urgent necessity of reform. Music by Cary Morin, Compassion Gorilla, Lynx and the Servants of Song, The Mynabirds, The Melawmen Collective, and The Honey Tongues. Please visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

KZYX Public Affairs
The Ecology Hour: California Spiders with Dr. Marshal Hedin

KZYX Public Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 59:19


May 10, 2022--Hosts Tim Bray and Bob Spies talk with Dr. Marshal Hedin of San Diego State University, about the amazing diversity and evolutionary history of Spiders. With more than fifty thousand species known and probably twice that many yet to be discovered, they have plenty to talk about.

The Nocturnists
Conversations: Rupa Marya, MD and Raj Patel

The Nocturnists

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 56:17


In this episode, Emily speaks with physician Rupa Marya and political economist Raj Patel about their recent book Inflamed: Deep Medicine and the Anatomy of Injustice, which explores the impact of oppressive systems on our health, and how deep medicine can facilitate collective healing. The Nocturnists is partnering with VCU Health Continuing Education to offer FREE CME credits for healthcare professionals. Visit ce.vcuhealth.org/nocturnists to claim credit for this episode. Find show notes, transcript, and more at thenocturnists.com.

Science (Video)
CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Humans vs. Humankind: Are Human-Made Chemical Pollutants Impacting Global Fertility? with Patricia Hunt

Science (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 19:04


Human-made chemicals with the unexpected ability to interfere with our body's endocrine system have become prominent contaminants in daily life. Because the hormones produced by our endocrine system create complex signaling networks that control our growth, maturation, fertility, immunity, behavior, and sleep, these endocrine disrupting chemicals, or EDCs, can exert powerful biological effects. Declines in human fertility evidenced by falling sperm counts and increases in the incidence of infertility raise concern that daily exposure to EDC contaminants already is impacting human fertility. By design, all species are responsive to their environment. In humans, this responsiveness means that changes in our environment can affect the production of eggs and sperm, the growth and development of the fetus, and adult susceptibility to disease. Thus, in a 21st century world characterized by environmental crises, EDCs represent a planetary health problem with the potential to affect future generations. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37912]

Jordanville Readings
Orthodox Ecology: The Biblical Roots

Jordanville Readings

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 8:54


Today's reading is taken from The Spiritual Roots of the Ecological Crisis,by Jean-Claude LarchetISBN: 978-0-88465-481-0pp. 5 - 7Show notes and full archive at OrthodoxLife.org/podcast© 2022 Holy Trinity Monastery, Inc.

The Academic Minute
Casey Coomes, SUNY Oneonta – Songbirds and Climate Change

The Academic Minute

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 2:30


On SUNY Oneonta Week:  The struggles of adapting to climate change are affecting everyone. Casey Coomes, visiting instructor and prodig fellow, discusses one small animal that is in great peril. Casey Coomes is a recent graduate of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Tennessee Knoxville. Her research examines the effects […]

All Around Science
Phytomining - Plants Can Mine For Metal

All Around Science

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 67:20


On today's episode: What if we could make fuel out of lunar soil and sunlight? You can't wear sunscreen to the beach anymore, because coral reefs don't like it. Plants are being used to mine metal. All that and more today on All Around Science. LINKS: [ARTICLE] Lunar soil has the potential to generate oxygen and fuel -- ScienceDaily [ARTICLE] Corals convert sunscreen chemical into a toxin that kills them THEME MUSIC by Andrew Allen https://twitter.com/KEYSwithSOUL http://andrewallenmusic.com

Gom Jabbar: A Dune Podcast
Pardot Kynes and the Dream of a Green Arrakis

Gom Jabbar: A Dune Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 88:55


Abu and Leo explore the life of iconic planetary ecologist Pardot Kynes and examine his extraordinary impact on Arrakis, the Fremen, and the entire galaxy through his dream of terraforming Dune.This episode contains SPOILERS for only the first half of Dune.Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/GomJabbarCheck out our merch: https://www.gomjabbarshop.comThis podcast is part of the Lore Party Podcast Network. Visit our site to learn more about all our great shows: https://loreparty.com/Sponsors:Grab your EXCLUSIVE NordVPN Deal by going to https://nordvpn.com/lore to get a huge discount off your NordVPN Plan + Free Threat Protection + 1 additional month for free! It's completely risk-free with Nord's 30-day money-back guarantee!

Jordanville Readings
Jean-Claude Larchet on Ecology and Theology

Jordanville Readings

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 37:08


Christ is Risen! Truly He is Risen!Today's episode concludes our interview with Professor Jean-Claude Larchet. In this final installment, Dr Larchet discusses his new book on Ecology, another recent book that we hope to publish in the future as What is Theology?, and how he views his own legacy as a transmitter of “the mind of the Fathers,” to borrow a phrase from Fr. George Florovsky, the subject of another of Larchet's books.Before we turn to the conclusion of our conversation, two quick reminders: the book you'll hear discussed in the first 10 minutes of this episode is The Spiritual Roots of the Ecological Crisis and it will be officially published next Tuesday, May 17th. It's available to order now as a paperback or ebook, wherever you get your books. You can also order directly from our online store, HTP Bookstore, or from the monastery's retail shop, Holy Trinity Church Supplies. Links to both will be in the show notes.And you may have seen an announcement about a lecture Dr. Larchet gave in the seminary hall during his visit last week. The talk was titled, “Divinization as the Christian Project and Model of True Transhumanism.” I'm happy to report that a video recording of the lecture has now been posted on Holy Trinity Seminary's Youtube page. It runs for about an hour and a half and I'm sure you will not be dissapointed. We'll also put a link tothat video in the show notes.Show notesThe Spiritual Roots of the Ecological CrisisPublisher listing: https://www.holytrinitypublications.com/larchet-ecologyHTP Bookstore: https://bookstore.jordanville.org/9780884654810Holy Trinity Church Supplies: https://churchsupplies.jordanville.org/9780884654810/What is Theology? (in Russian)https://sretenie.com/book/element.php?ID=89902Lecture: Divinization as the Christian Project and Model of True Transhumanismhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eL1PIdJqAyE

Big Biology
Fractals in the Foliage (Ep 84)

Big Biology

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 59:55


What do plants, animals and even river systems have in common? Branching networks are a universal element of life on Earth. Networks of veins, roots, xylem, phloem, and nerves – they all have large components that branch, usually repeatedly, into smaller and smaller components. The networks transport energy, materials, and information throughout the bodies in which they occur. Our guest today, Van Savage, is a professor in the department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and the department of Biomathematics at UCLA. We chat with Van about universal features of branched networks. We discuss how these networks are space filling and how their evolved structures facilitate rapid and energy-efficient transport. We also discuss why networks are fractals – branching structures that are self-similar across scales. You've seen the fractal nature of networks if you've noticed similarities between branching patterns of rivulets on a muddy bank and river connections viewed from a jet at 20,000 feet. We also discuss how differences in networks among taxa arise from the materials they transport. At the end of the conversation, Van explains how network theory illuminates what we know about metabolic scaling and how understanding branching can improve everything from artificial hearts to urban planning. Cover art: Keating Shahmehri

Backyard Ecology
Checking In After 50 Episodes of the Backyard Ecology Podcast

Backyard Ecology

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 3:47


I can't believe that I've been podcasting for a year and a half and that this is my 50th episode of the Backyard Ecology podcast! I am truly honored and humbled that so many people enjoy hearing what I have to say and are following the podcast. Looking back, we've covered such a wide range of subjects including: crayfish, land snails (I still laugh every time I think about that episode), lightning bugs, hummingbirds, grassland ecosystems, all kinds of topics related to gardening for pollinators, probably just as many topics related to gardening with native plants, vernal pools, invasive species, habitat management, and much, much more. I'm eternally grateful for all of the scientists, educators, and resource managers who have taken the time to talk with us. I've had so much fun learning from and geeking out with each of them. I also appreciate each of you who have taken the time to email me and share your own thoughts, experiences, and discoveries. Those emails always bring a smile to my face. As this 50th episode approached, I kept trying to think of the “perfect” topic to cover. After all, isn't 50 supposed to be a big milestone? Regardless of whether we're talking birthdays, anniversaries, or podcast episodes. But the more I thought about it, the more I realized that I really didn't want to do a typical episode this time. Instead, I wanted to stop a second and check in with you. I wanted to find out your thoughts. After all, I don't want to just be blabbering into the digital airwaves. I want the Backyard Ecology podcast to be valuable to you and that means I need to make sure it is meeting your needs. To allow me to more easily gather and distill everyone's thoughts and feedback I've created a short survey. The link to the survey will be in the show notes and on the webpage for this episode. Please take a few minutes to fill out the survey. Your answers will help guide me as I produce future episodes of the Backyard Ecology podcast. The survey will be available until June 12, 2022. As a thank you for sharing your thoughts with me, anyone who fills out the survey will have the option to enter a drawing to win 1 of 5 copies of my new book, Attract Pollinators and Wildlife to Your Yard: 15 Free and Easy Ways. Before I wrap up, I wanted to say once again how grateful I am to my Patrons on Patreon who help support this podcast, for everyone who listens to this podcast, and to the guests who have shared their knowledge and passion with us. Until next week, I encourage you to take some time to enjoy the nature in your own yard and community. Links: Survey: https://forms.gle/eh7mGD2wwx41g4SG6 Backyard Ecology's website: https://backyardecology.net Backyard Ecology's Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/backyardecology My email: shannon@backyardecology.net Survey about the Backyard Ecology podcast.

For The Wild
ALOK on Unruly Beauty [ENCORE] /286

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022


This week we are rebroadcasting our interview with ALOK, originally aired in August of 2021. “I validate the idea that survival is the ultimate act of creation in a world that has reduced us to fascist arithmetic, of being a quantitative statistic, not a human soul. So we still found a way to care, love, and create - isn't that art? I teach people to decipher the art that they're already doing, recognize the artistry and the everyday miracles of life around them, and create from that place.” This week we immerse ourselves in the aforementioned call to recognize the myriad of creations all around us from guest ALOK, who guides us in an ever-expansive dialogue around spiritual wellbeing, the importance of creative literacy, and the tremendous freedom that awaits us when we make gender unknowable. We begin our conversation by foregrounding the importance of moving out of the paradigm of understanding trans and queer as something that is exclusive to the body. Instead, ALOK shares how challenging the gender binary is not only in service to our collective wellbeing but is a reverential offering in acknowledging our true celestial expansiveness that has been dimmed under binarism, heteronormativity, and colonialism. ALOK is a gender non-conforming writer and performance artist. Their distinctive style and poetic challenge to the gender binary have been internationally renowned. As a mixed-media artist Alok uses poetry, prose, comedy, performance, fashion design, and portraiture to explore themes of gender, race, trauma, belonging, and the human condition. They are the author of Femme in Public (2017) and Beyond the Gender Binary (2020). Music by Soda Lite, Rising Appalachia, and Lady Moon & The Eclipse.  Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

BioScience Talks
Dams and Their Evolutionary Consequences

BioScience Talks

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 24:02


In this episode, we're joined by Liam Zarri, PhD student at Cornell University, and Dr. Eric Palkovacs, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. They discuss their recent BioScience article on evolutionary effects of dams and other anthropogenic water barriers, such as culverts, on riverine fishes. The impacts they highlight include rapid evolution affecting behavior, migration, behavior, temperature tolerance, and body type. Damming waterways can also lead to reductions in genetic diversity, with possibly harmful effects for fish populations.

Tuesdays with Merton Podcast
Gordon Oyer - Re-Visioning a Fragmented World: Learnings through Merton's Letters on Social Change

Tuesdays with Merton Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 58:51


Beyond his prolific publications, we know Thomas Merton for his vast, diverse readings and massive output of correspondence. This session explores perspectives on peace, race, and ecology that Merton shared in his apostolate of letters. It connects these views with reading materials that informed his thought and helped address his recipients' immediate concerns about those social dilemmas. It also highlights how his responses spoke beyond their immediate context and, as Daniel Berrigan stated, timelessly “unmasked the spiritual forces which lie under the appearances of things” and remain at play in our own time. Gordon Oyer is the author of Signs of Hope: Thomas Merton's Letters on Peace, Race, and Ecology and Pursuing the Spiritual Roots of Protest, which reconstructs Thomas Merton's 1964 retreat for peace activists. Over the past decade he has presented papers at several ITMS and Thomas Merton Society of Great Britain and Ireland conferences, and he has published articles in The Merton Annual and The Merton Journal as well as book reviews for The Merton Seasonal. Oyer received his MA in history from the University of Illinois—Urbana-Champaign. He currently resides in Louisville, Ky.

Legacy & Legends
Ecology of the Rust Monster Dragon #88

Legacy & Legends

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 15:29


We look at another Dragon Mag today in issue #88 at the article The Ecology of the Rust Monster. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/wobbliesandwizards/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/wobbliesandwizards/support

Discovering Darwin
Season 4 Episode 7: We are Many, We are One

Discovering Darwin

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022


 In this episode we finally confront Chapter 7 of Descent of Man,  entitled On the Races of Man. In this  chapter Darwin discusses the races of humans and outlines the scientific arguments of the time that questioned if humans are more than one species.  These arguments, of course, were based upon racist European views of the people from the lands their countries had colonized. Race is a social construct, not a biological identity, and we discussed why that is the case in this episode.  https://angelicadass.com/photography/humanae/James Wagner's daughter participated in this awesome art project and she is included in the images above.At one point we noted that Darwin reintroduced the idea of a range of varieties of organisms that can interbreed along a geographical range, but the ends of the ranges were reproductively isolated. We introduced that idea, often called a ring species, in Season 1 Episode 3, which can be found here. Sarah loves her ectoparasites and their evolution and discussed Darwin's 30 year obsession with that issue. Here is a link to a wonderful series of articles about Descent of Man and that obsession.The opening theme to Discovering Darwin is "May" by Jared C. Balogh. http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Balogh/Revitalized_Eyes/MAY Interlude music is We are Many, We are One a song from Up With People, a group of musicians who "stage song and dance performances promoting themes such as religion, racial equality, and positive thinking." Our own Mark Jackson played trumpet with Up With People before pursuing his career in psychology.

Herpetological Highlights
109 Accelerating Python Research

Herpetological Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 31:35


We find out what Burmese pythons get up to when no one is watching.  Become a Patreon Full reference list available here Main Paper References: Whitney, N. M., White, C. F., Smith, B. J., Cherkiss, M. S., Mazzotti, F. J., & Hart, K. M. (2021). Accelerometry to study fine-scale activity of invasive Burmese pythons (Python bivittatus) in the wild. Animal Biotelemetry, 9(1), 1–13. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40317-020-00227-7 Other Mentioned Papers/Studies: Studd, E.K., Derbyshire, R.E., Menzies, A.K., Simms, J.F., Humphries, M.M., Murray, D.L. and Boutin, S., (2021). The purr‐fect catch: using accelerometers and audio recorders to document kill rates and hunting behaviour of a small prey specialist. Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 12(7), pp.1277-1287. Carroll, G., Slip, D., Jonsen, I. and Harcourt, R., (2014). Supervised accelerometry analysis can identify prey capture by penguins at sea. Journal of Experimental Biology, 217(24), pp.4295-4302. Music: Intro/outro – Treehouse by Ed Nelson Species Bi-week theme – Mike Mooney Other Music – The Passion HiFi, www.thepassionhifi.com

The Plant a Trillion Trees Podcast
Episode 80 - Dan Herms is Vice President of Research and Development for The Davey Tree Expert Company.

The Plant a Trillion Trees Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 45:15


Dan Herms is Vice President of Research and Development for The Davey Tree Expert Company. Prior to joining Davey, Herms served on the faculty in the Department of Entomology at The Ohio State University from 1997 to 2017, serving as Department Chair from 2012 to 2016. His research and outreach programs focus on the ecology and management of trees in forests, urban forests, and ornamental landscapes, including interactions with insects, soils, and climate. He received his B.S. in Landscape Horticulture from Ohio State University in 1982, his M.S. in Horticulture and Entomology from Ohio State University in 1984, and his Ph.D. in 1991 from Michigan State University in Entomology with a specialization in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Major recognition for this work includes the L.C. Chadwick Award for Arboriculture Research and the Richard W. Harris Author's Citation Award from the International Society of Arboriculture, and election as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Entomological Society of America. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/plantatrilliontrees/support

The Root Of The Science Podcasts
EP 99: Tsumbedzo Ramalevha- PhD Student in Plant Functional Ecology

The Root Of The Science Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 37:28


Tsembedzo is a PhD student in plant functional ecology he tells us about this research and its importance. He shares about his academic journey and the ROOT of his science. Further, he shares about the importance of taking care of his mental health and MORE.Twitter: matari_tsumbeLinkedIn  & Facebook: Tsumbedzo L. RamalevhaSupport the show

San Francisco Zen Center Dharma Talks
Practicing 50 Years at Green Dragon Temple

San Francisco Zen Center Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 47:27


05/08/2022, Eijun Linda Cutts, dharma talk at Green Gulch Farm. A tribute— with origin stories— to Green Dragon Temple - Green Gulch Farm Zen Center, on the occasion of the 50th Anniversary.

Ockham's Razor - ABC RN
Sex in a changing world

Ockham's Razor - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 10:03


Sexual selection is a potent evolutionary force responsible for much of the weird and wonderful diversity of life on our planet. So what happens when it's disturbed by human-induced environmental change?

treehugger podcast
Rethinking Invasive with Jenny Liou

treehugger podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 79:32


treehugger has bounced from Julia Plevin's offer “what message might invasive species have to share for you” to the Just Language invitation to pay more respect and humility to them. Now Jenny Liou leads us through a critical rethinking of invasive species. This is the episode where we tell shories about identity/politics, our entanglement with weeds, the invasive vs. native ideology and more. Jenny Liou is an English professor at Pierce College and an avid naturalist and ecological restorationist. She likes thinking and writing about bodies – bodies of thought, the mineral body of the loess-covered plains where she grew up, bodies of water – the rivers along whose banks she has explored the Pacific Northwest and her family's history in China, the body of the Pacific which divides her from that part of her family. She lives and writes near that ocean in Tacoma, Washington. “Am I an Invasive Species?” in Hight Country News from July 9, 2020 Washington Native Plant Society South Sound Chapter – “The Invasion that Sustains Us: Himalayan Blackberries and Invasive and National Discourses in Native Plant Conservation” https://www.wnps.org/events/1527 Samples of Jenny's work and more on her website https://www.jennyhwayuliou.com Muscle Memory from Kaya Press https://kaya.com/authors/jenny-liou It takes a community to keep a podcast going. Donate to the show via Paypal and Venmo and CashApp Music on the show was from DJ Freedem, Chris Haugen and DJ Williams. Tell a few friends about the show and follow the podcast on Instagram and Twitter @treehuggerpod Review treehugger podcast on iTunes

Tree Speech
Tree of Life with Dr. Stephanie Kaza

Tree Speech

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 38:14


We at Tree Speech and Alight Theater Guild are incredibly grateful to Stephanie Kaza for joining us today. Dr. Stephanie Kaza is Professor Emerita of Environmental Studies at the University of Vermont and former Director of the UVM Environmental Program. She co-founded the Environmental Council at UVM and served as faculty director for the Sustainability Faculty Fellows program. In 2011 Dr. Kaza received the UVM George V. Kidder Outstanding Faculty Award for excellence in teaching. Kaza received a prestigious Religion and Science course award from the Templeton Foundation for her course on Buddhism and Ecology. She lectures widely on topics of Buddhism and the environment. Kaza is a long-time practitioner of Soto Zen Buddhism, with training at Green Gulch Zen Center, California, and further study with Thich Nhat Hanh, Joanna Macy, and John Daido Loori. She was lay ordained by Kobun Chino Ottogawa in the late 1980s and applied her understanding of Buddhism as a member of the International Christian-Buddhist Theological Encounter group. She is the author of the books A WILD LOVE FOR THE WORLD, GREEN BUDDHISM: PRACTICE AND COMPASSIONATE ACTON IN UNCERTAIN TIMES, CONVERSATIONS WITH TREES, MINDFULLY GREEN: A PERSONAL AND SPIRITUAL GUIDE TO WHOLE EARTH THINKING, and others. Also much gratitude and endless love to our mothers, Miriam Robinson, Anne-Marie Roach and Jackie Vandenberg for sharing their sapling stories, and for everything. If you've enjoyed this episode, please like us on social media, and rate and review us on apple podcasts. Every kind word helps. To learn more about the episode see our show notes and visit us at treespeechpodcast.com, and on instagram @ treespeechpodcast. Tree Speech's host, Dori Robinson, is a director, playwright, dramaturg, and educator who seeks and develops projects that explore social consciousness, personal heritage, and the difference one individual can have on their own community. Some of her great loves include teaching, the Oxford comma, intersectional feminism, and traveling. With a Masters degree from NYU's Educational Theatre program, she continues to share her love of Shakespeare, new play development, political theatre, and gender in performance. Dori's original plays have been produced in New York, Chicago, and Boston. More information at https://www.dorirobinson.com This week's episode was written and recorded in Massachusetts on the native lands of the Wabanaki Confederacy, Pennacook, Massachusett, and Pawtucket people, in New York on the land of the Lenapee tribes, as well as the lands of the Confederate Tribes of the Siletz Indians, and the Grand Ronde Cowlitz. Logo design by Mill Riot. Special thanks to the Western Avenue Lofts and Studios for all their support. Tree Speech is produced and co-written by Jonathan Zautner with Alight Theater Guild. The mission of the guild is to advance compelling theatrical endeavors that showcase the diversity of our ever-changing world in order to build strong artists whose work creates empathy, challenges the status quo and unites communities. For more information about our work and programs, please visit www.alighttheater.org. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/treespeech/message

New Books in Critical Theory
Dhanveer Singh Brar, "Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century" (Goldsmiths Press, 2021)

New Books in Critical Theory

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 69:24


Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century (Goldsmiths Press, 2021) uses three Black electronic musics – footwork, grime, and the work of the producer Actress – to provide a theory of how Black musical experimentation has disrupted the circuits of racialized domination and exclusion in the 21st Century city. The book carefully attends to the unique ‘sonic ecologies' produced by these three musical forms in South/West Chicago; East London and South London respectively, steering a course between uncritical celebration narratives of ‘resistant' cultural production and dystopian analyses of urban decay. Brar instead theorises these musics as forms of popular experimentalism which are not just inseparable from questions of space, race and class, but are productive of social and spatial relations. The book draws upon, and intervenes in, Black Studies literature to contribute a set of examples, questions and provocations that help readers to think about how the ‘Blackness of Black electronic dance music' has produced (and continues to produce) a fugitive urban aesthetic sociality that has flourished in spite of the degradations of state and capital. At the end of the interview, Dhanveer recommended some music as good entry points into the three musical worlds that we discuss and that he analyses in the book: Actress – Splazsh (2010) DJ Rashad – Just a Taste Vol. 1 (2011) Slimzee/Wiley/Dizzee Rascal and more – Sidewinder sessions (2002-2004) Gummo Clare is a PhD researcher in the School of Media and Communications, University of Leeds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

New Books Network
Dhanveer Singh Brar, "Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century" (Goldsmiths Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 69:24


Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century (Goldsmiths Press, 2021) uses three Black electronic musics – footwork, grime, and the work of the producer Actress – to provide a theory of how Black musical experimentation has disrupted the circuits of racialized domination and exclusion in the 21st Century city. The book carefully attends to the unique ‘sonic ecologies' produced by these three musical forms in South/West Chicago; East London and South London respectively, steering a course between uncritical celebration narratives of ‘resistant' cultural production and dystopian analyses of urban decay. Brar instead theorises these musics as forms of popular experimentalism which are not just inseparable from questions of space, race and class, but are productive of social and spatial relations. The book draws upon, and intervenes in, Black Studies literature to contribute a set of examples, questions and provocations that help readers to think about how the ‘Blackness of Black electronic dance music' has produced (and continues to produce) a fugitive urban aesthetic sociality that has flourished in spite of the degradations of state and capital. At the end of the interview, Dhanveer recommended some music as good entry points into the three musical worlds that we discuss and that he analyses in the book: Actress – Splazsh (2010) DJ Rashad – Just a Taste Vol. 1 (2011) Slimzee/Wiley/Dizzee Rascal and more – Sidewinder sessions (2002-2004) Gummo Clare is a PhD researcher in the School of Media and Communications, University of Leeds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Dance
Dhanveer Singh Brar, "Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century" (Goldsmiths Press, 2021)

New Books in Dance

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 69:24


Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century (Goldsmiths Press, 2021) uses three Black electronic musics – footwork, grime, and the work of the producer Actress – to provide a theory of how Black musical experimentation has disrupted the circuits of racialized domination and exclusion in the 21st Century city. The book carefully attends to the unique ‘sonic ecologies' produced by these three musical forms in South/West Chicago; East London and South London respectively, steering a course between uncritical celebration narratives of ‘resistant' cultural production and dystopian analyses of urban decay. Brar instead theorises these musics as forms of popular experimentalism which are not just inseparable from questions of space, race and class, but are productive of social and spatial relations. The book draws upon, and intervenes in, Black Studies literature to contribute a set of examples, questions and provocations that help readers to think about how the ‘Blackness of Black electronic dance music' has produced (and continues to produce) a fugitive urban aesthetic sociality that has flourished in spite of the degradations of state and capital. At the end of the interview, Dhanveer recommended some music as good entry points into the three musical worlds that we discuss and that he analyses in the book: Actress – Splazsh (2010) DJ Rashad – Just a Taste Vol. 1 (2011) Slimzee/Wiley/Dizzee Rascal and more – Sidewinder sessions (2002-2004) Gummo Clare is a PhD researcher in the School of Media and Communications, University of Leeds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/performing-arts

New Books in African American Studies
Dhanveer Singh Brar, "Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century" (Goldsmiths Press, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 69:24


Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century (Goldsmiths Press, 2021) uses three Black electronic musics – footwork, grime, and the work of the producer Actress – to provide a theory of how Black musical experimentation has disrupted the circuits of racialized domination and exclusion in the 21st Century city. The book carefully attends to the unique ‘sonic ecologies' produced by these three musical forms in South/West Chicago; East London and South London respectively, steering a course between uncritical celebration narratives of ‘resistant' cultural production and dystopian analyses of urban decay. Brar instead theorises these musics as forms of popular experimentalism which are not just inseparable from questions of space, race and class, but are productive of social and spatial relations. The book draws upon, and intervenes in, Black Studies literature to contribute a set of examples, questions and provocations that help readers to think about how the ‘Blackness of Black electronic dance music' has produced (and continues to produce) a fugitive urban aesthetic sociality that has flourished in spite of the degradations of state and capital. At the end of the interview, Dhanveer recommended some music as good entry points into the three musical worlds that we discuss and that he analyses in the book: Actress – Splazsh (2010) DJ Rashad – Just a Taste Vol. 1 (2011) Slimzee/Wiley/Dizzee Rascal and more – Sidewinder sessions (2002-2004) Gummo Clare is a PhD researcher in the School of Media and Communications, University of Leeds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

CultureKlatsch
Ep 10 - Marketing Mountains: Denver's Urban & Nature Balance

CultureKlatsch

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 59:03


This episode of CultureKlatsch dives into the complex relationship between Denverites and their environment. Specifically, this work explores the dynamic between Colorado's cultural values towards the outdoors versus the actions done to preserve the environment. It looks at the language used to promote "green" culture and the steps being taken (or that have been taken) to show an appreciation for the Rocky Mountains and plains. We talk to several CU Denver professors--Dr. Rachel Gross from the History Department, Professor Kirsten Christensen and Dr. Benjamin Crawford from the Environmental Science Department, and Dr. Michelle Comstock from the English Department--for their expert opinion on the concepts of green marketing, environmental rhetoric, and urban sustainability or resilience. We explore the history of environmental consciousness and pursue an understanding in our present-day relationship with our environment. References Anderson, Corinne. “A Glimpse into Denver's Sustainable Future.” 303Magazine, 16 March 2021. Cammack, Becca., Bekins, Lynn K., & Krug, Allison., “From Concept to Action: Do Environmental Regulations Promote Sustainability?” Environmental Rhetoric and Ecologies of Place edited by Peter N. Goggin, 2013, 174-186. Christensen, Kirsten. Personal Interview. 2 March 2022. City and County of Denver. “Climate Action, Sustainability, & Resiliency.” 2022. Comstock, Michelle. Personal Interview. 11 April 2022. Crawford, Benjamin. Personal Interview. 16 March 2022. Finley, Bruce. “As development eats away at Denver's green space, the ‘city within a park' is becoming a concrete metropolis.” The Denver Post, 13 Jan 2019. Gross, Rachel. Personal Interview. 16 March 2022. Kirsch, Gesa E. “A Land Ethic for Urban Dwellers.” Environmental Rhetoric and Ecologies of Place edited by Peter N. Goggin, 2013, 69-83. Kohler, Judith. “How green is Colorado? News report says middling at best.” The Denver Post, 16 April 2021. Senda-Cook, Samantha., & Endres, Danielle., “A Place of One's Own.” Environmental Rhetoric and Ecologies of Place edited by Peter N. Goggin, 2013, 143-154. Williams, Deborah. L., & Brandt, Elizabeth. A., “Sense of Place, Identity, and Cultural Continuity in an Arizona Community.” Environmental Rhetoric and Ecologies of Place edited by Peter N. Goggin, 2013, 42-53.

Gatty Lecture Rewind Podcast
Episode 69: Kathryn Fiorella, Assistant Professor of Public and Ecosystem Health, Cornell University

Gatty Lecture Rewind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 31:34


In our newest episode, Michael and Unaizah chat with Kathryn Fiorella, Assistant Professor of Public & Ecosystem Health at Cornell University, about her research on the impact of environmental changes on fishing practices and livelihoods in Cambodia.  Research and lecture summary: 01:40 Advice for researchers and recommendations: 20:10 Katie Fiorella's Top Recommendations: From the Land of Green Ghosts by Pascal Khoo Thwe (link) The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien (link)

Finding Genius Podcast
The Fish Ecology of California and Efforts to Preserve the Environment for Freshwater Fish with Andrew Rypel

Finding Genius Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 26:51


Why is the preservation of freshwater habitats so crucial? With the abundance of unique populations of fish that utilize these ecosystems, the destruction of freshwater environments could be devastating. Press play to learn: The function of a natal stream Why the Chinook salmon population has been reduced Possible solutions that could help stop population reduction Offer: This episode is sponsored by Bowmar Nutrition. To receive a 5% discount, use the code GENIUS5 at checkout. Go to BowmarNutrition.com to shop now! Andrew Rypel, an associate professor and Peter B. Moyle & California Trout Chair, shares his efforts to preserve the freshwater environments of California. Many species rely on the unique environments offered in the California landscape. One of the most prominent wildlife groups is freshwater fish, which has faced conservation challenges for much of recent history. With a booming population and agriculture industry, conservation efforts may not be as effective as many would like. However, with an improving understanding of these freshwater environments, population reduction may be slowed, and the unique groups of fish that rely on such bodies can continue to be protected. Visit https://sites.google.com/view/rypel-lab/home to learn more. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/30PvU9C

Ologies
Acoustic Ecology (NATURE RECORDINGS) with Eddie Game

Ologies

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 61:38


Insects humming. Birds squawking. Chainsaws buzzing? What does the rainforest sound like? Or the oceans outside of port cities? Is the world getting louder? And what can recording devices detect that our ears – especially mine, Alie's – can't? Acoustic Ecologist Dr. Eddie Game of the Nature Conservancy has asked conservation questions over decades of work in 20 countries, and even though his microphone for this interview sucked, his stories and wisdom are a pleasure to hear. Also: is it okay to talk to owls? How much of timber harvesting is legal? And how do communities come together to protect the lands around them? Also: the most elusive and coolest midnight parrot. Dr. Eddie Game is on TwitterA donation was made this week to The Nature ConservancySponsors of OlogiesTranscripts and bleeped episodesSmologies (short, classroom-safe) episodesBecome a patron of Ologies for as little as a buck a monthOlogiesMerch.com has hats, shirts, masks, totes!Follow @Ologies on Twitter and InstagramFollow @AlieWard on Twitter and InstagramSound editing by Jarrett Sleeper of MindJam MediaTranscripts by Emily White of The WordaryWebsite by Kelly R. DwyerTheme song by Nick Thorburn

Conversations
The hunt for the world's largest owl

Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 51:06


Wildlife biologist Jonathan Slaght on his adventurous quest to save the rare, shaggy fish owls of Russia's Far East (R)

For The Wild
Dr. BAYO AKOMOLAFE on Slowing Down in Urgent Times [ENCORE] /285

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022


This week we are rebroadcasting our interview with Dr. Bayo Akomolafe, originally aired in January of 2020. Our hearts and minds are set to work by the urgent eco-social crises of this time. Caught in a cultural twitch of frenetic production and the sticky paradigms of modernity, we've penned vocabulary and designed technologies, manufactured frameworks and crunched numbers in an effort to diagnose and “treat” planetary collapse. We are invited by this week's guest, Dr. Bayo Akomolafe, to pause and abandon solutionism, step back from the project of progress, and dance into a different set of questions: What does the Anthropocene teach us as a destabilizing agent that resists our taming? How can we show up in our movements of justice if “the ways we respond to crisis is part of the crisis”? What happens when we unfurl into a space of slowness and relinquish human mastery to a wider cosmic net of relations?  Bayo Akomolafe (Ph.D.) considers his most sacred work to be learning how to be with his daughter and son, Alethea Aanya and Kyah Jayden—and their mother, his wife and "life-nectar,” Ijeoma. An author, speaker, renegade academic, and proud father, Bayo is Chief Curator and Director of The Emergence Network, a constellation of humans and nonhumans working together trans-locally to curate projects, rituals, conversations and events that nurture senses of the otherwise via practices that trouble the traditional boundaries of agency and possibility. Bayo is also a visiting professor at Middlebury College, Vermont, and has taught in universities around the world. He is a consultant with UNESCO, leading efforts for the Imagining Africa's Future (IAF) project. Bayo has authored two books, We Will Tell Our Own Story! and These Wilds Beyond our Fences: Letters to My Daughter on Humanity's Sea