Podcasts about Ecology

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Scientific study of the relationships between living organisms and their environment

  • 2,306PODCASTS
  • 5,891EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 21, 2021LATEST
Ecology

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Best podcasts about Ecology

Show all podcasts related to ecology

Latest podcast episodes about Ecology

New Scientist Weekly
#90: COP26 climate playlist; the science of Dune; life-saving treatment for children without immune systems; covid sweeps Iran

New Scientist Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 28:34


In rare cases children can be born without an immune system, and sadly their chances are very bad. Fortunately the team brings news of a life-saving implant which has now been approved for use in the US. If you're thinking of seeing the new film adaptation of Frank Herbert's epic novel Dune, you'll want to hear the insights of ecosystem professor Yadvinder Malhi. Herbert was amazingly ahead of his time, anticipating the work of James Lovelock and the Gaia hypothesis, for example.  The team hears about the world's largest artificial intelligence - the Megatron-Turing Natural Language Generation model - and finds out what it is capable of. They also discuss how hard Iran has been hit by the coronavirus pandemic: new data shows nearly every person in the country has had covid, some twice or even three times. And in the build up to COP26, the team is getting in the party spirit, and shares details of a climate-inspired Spotify playlist they've put together. You can listen to it here. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Chelsea Whyte, Alice Klein, Bethan Ackerley and Matt Sparkes. To read about these stories and much more, subscribe at newscientist.com/podcasts.

Biosphere 2 Podcast
#021: Microbial Ecology - Dr. Steve Allison

Biosphere 2 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 47:35


In this episode we are joined by microbial ecologist and climate scientist, Dr. Steve Allison. Dr. Allison is a Professor of Ecology in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at University of California Irvine. He holds a PhD in Biological Sciences from Stanford University and in 2013, Dr. Allison was named an Early Career Fellow of the Ecological Society of America.  His research addresses the resilience of microbial communities to drought and climate change in southern California ecosystems. His lab studies how microbes function in ecosystems by using both experiments and mathematical models to predict what might happen to microbes as the climate gets warmer and drier.   Steve talks about micro-biomes, climate change, and how his lab group studies microbial communities in a variety of field sites across California with a focus on climate and drought.    https://allisonlab.bio.uci.edu/

For The Wild
SAMUEL GENSAW III on the Restorative Revolution /256

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021


The abundance of the Klamath River has been severely restricted since the late 1700s by way of mining, logging, and damming. Once home to the third-largest salmon run in the lower 48, now Northern California is risking the collapse of its entire salmon population. After two decades of activism, the Klamath River dams will finally be removed by 2023, restoring salmon access to more than 400 miles of habitat. However, this is merely one example of the ways in which land has been chronically mismanaged across the so-called United States. This week we speak to Yurok fisherman and activist, Samuel Gensaw III, on the ways in which Northern California has served as a continuous extraction site for colonial development. This expansive conversation begins by looking at resource extraction, but moves into a larger dialogue on our collective responsibility to world renewal, bringing back balance to our relationships, how to instill new values without appropriating cultural traditions, and the Ancestral Guard's Victorious Gardens program featured in the film Gather. Samuel Gensaw III is the founding director of the Award-winning Ancestral Guard program. Currently, he is the youngest person to serve as the vice-chairman of the Yurok tribe's natural resources committee. He and fellow Ancestral Guard members are featured in the documentary, Gather, which focuses on the growing movement among Native Americans to reclaim their spiritual, political, and cultural identities through food sovereignty. Music by Lake Mary, All The Queen's Ravens, Jess Williamson. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

Curiosity Daily
Animals Shapeshifting to Stay Cool, Albert Einstein's Brain

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 9:48


Learn about how animals are “shapeshifting” in response to a warming climate; and the story of Albert Einstein's brain. Animals are "shapeshifting" in response to a warming climate by Grant Currin Zeldovich, L. (2021, September 7). Animals Are Changing Shape to Cope With Rising Temperatures. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/animals-are-changing-shape-cope-rising-temperatures-180978595/  ‌Ryding, S., Klaassen, M., Tattersall, G. J., Gardner, J. L., & Symonds, M. R. E. (2021). Shape-shifting: changing animal morphologies as a response to climatic warming. Trends in Ecology & Evolution. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2021.07.006  The strange afterlife of Albert Einstein's brain by Cameron Duke Blitz, M. (2015, April 17). How Einstein's Brain Ended Up at the Mütter Museum in Philadelphia. Smithsonian Magazine; Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/how-einsteins-brain-ended-mutter-museum-philadelphia-180954987/ Hughes, V. (2014, April 21). The Tragic Story of How Einstein's Brain Was Stolen and Wasn't Even Special. Science; National Geographic. https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/the-tragic-story-of-how-einsteins-brain-was-stolen-and-wasnt-even-special Kremer, W. (2015, April 17). The strange afterlife of Einstein's brain. BBC News; BBC News. https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-32354300 Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Gone Medieval
Vikings & Mice: The Reach of Norse Explorations?

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 30:27


The Azores, an autonomous region of Portugal in the middle of the Atlantic, was said to be discovered in 1427 by Portuguese explorer Diogo de Silves. However, new studies of the land suggest the Portuguese may not have been the island's first inhabitants. The key to these studies? Mice. Similarities have been found between Azorean and northern European mice. In this episode, Cat is joined by Ecology and Evolutionary Biologist Dr. Jeremy Searle from Cornell University. We delve into this unexpected location of Viking occupancy, exploring Jeremy's research on the land and the mice who can tell us more about our complex history. What can mice tell us about the movement of people in the past? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Discovering Darwin
Season 4 Episode 3: Civilised as much as a dog

Discovering Darwin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


 In this episode we discuss Chapter 3: The Mind from Darwin's Descent of Man. We are joined by a very special guest - Dr. Ellen Furlong from Illinois Wesleyan University who studies cognition in dogs. In this chapter Darwin spends some time going through a litany of traits that he associates with intelligence. His goal is to get the reader to recognize that humans, although very intelligent, are only different in degree and not in kind when compared to other animals. The list of traits Darwin thought indicated intelligence were:CuriosityImitationAttentionMemoryImaginationReasonProgressive ImprovementTools and weapon useAbstractionSelf-consciousnessLanguageSense of BeautyComplex emotions Belief in God, superstition, etc.Darwin started off the discussion clarifying the difference between instinct and intelligence and noted some researchers proposed that instinct and intelligence are an inverse ratio to each other, the more your behaviors are dictated by instinct the less intelligence, as defined by the traits above, you exhibited. Mark discussed instinct in humans when he was a special guest of the Podcast nearly 6 years ago from when we recorded this podcast. He was a special guest in October 2015 and we recorded this episode October 2021. You can find Mark's inaugural appearance here.Ellen explained how nest building behavior is different from other behaviors we may do without thinking and why nest building is an instinct and bike riding is not.Ellen made it clear that intelligence can only be compared within a species and in comparison to other individuals within a species. It is incorrect to make cross species comparisons when it comes to intelligence, since each species is a genius for its own domain. Ellen notes people love to make claims about how smart their dogs are, but they often ignore the failings of their dogs in those comparisons. Ellen noted a short essay she wrote about how dogs do love us has been very popular as people are very interested in knowing what is going on in the minds of their pets. We ended the conversation about the classic marshmallow test which purported to measure patience and delayed gratification in young children. Children were offered a single marshmallow and told if they waited and not eat it, they would be given a second one later. It is the idea that can we resist our desire for instant gratification now for some possible bigger gratification in the future. Ellen discussed her own efforts to replicate that experiment using dogs and a variety of treats.  Unfortunately COVID has disrupted her research.The opening and closing theme to Discovering Darwin is "May" by Jared C. Balogh.Interlude music is "Who let the dogs out?" by the Baha Men 

Journaling With Nature
Episode 60: Miriam Morrill – Pyrosketchology

Journaling With Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 69:06


Miriam is a fire management specialist who promotes place-based fire education. Miriam uses nature journaling as a tool for tuning into the environment before, during and after fire. When we are aware of our environment in this deep way, we are better able to make decisions about fire awareness and management.Listen to hear more about:How nature was a refuge for Miriam during childhood.The story of how Miriam came to make fire management and education her career.The history of fire exclusion and how this practice has changed the landscape.How Miriam helped bring nature journalers together to journal a prescribed fire and cultural burn.Why Miriam considers nature journaling fire a ‘full-brained and full-bodied experience'.Trauma informed approaches to fire education.How Miriam uses metadata to understand the fire environment.What information we can add to our nature journals before, during and after fire.Integrating fire into our sense of place. Learn more about Miriam and her work at www.pyrosketchology.com. You can also find Miriam on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter.To learn more about Indigenous fire management and cultural burning, check out the podcast Good Fire.One of my previous podcast guests, Robin Carlson, also uses nature journaling to document fire. You can listen to that episode here.-----------------Sign-up for Journaling With Nature's Newsletter to receive news and updates as well as the Nature Journaling Inspiration List each month!You can support Journaling With Nature Podcast on Patreon, Your contribution is deeply appreciated.Thanks for listening!

Soul Search - ABC RN
Sacred Landscapes: solastalgia and spirituality in a melting world

Soul Search - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 53:52


Glaciers matter to the people who live near them – but how do these communities respond as more and more ice melts away? A priestess of the Icelandic religion of Ásatrú explains how ancient Norse mythology orients her towards nature, and a professor shares how her experiences on the Himalayan glaciers revealed a deep connection between spirituality and the lived reality of climate change.

The Fisheries Podcast
144 - All About Blue Catfish and Alligator Gar Ecology with Zach Moran

The Fisheries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 45:30


In this week's episode, Zach Crum talks with Zach Moran about his PhD research at Baylor University studying Longnose and Alligator Gar ecology in the Brazos River, Texas. Also discussed is Zach's undergraduate research at Virginia Tech using DNA Barcoding to identify Blue Catfish stomach contents as well as his master's work investigating Blue Catfish ecology at Arkansas Tech University. Give it a listen! Zach's contact info: zach_moran1@baylor.edu ___________________________________________________________________________ Get in touch with us! The Podcast is on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook: @FisheriesPod  Become a Patron of the Fisheries Podcast here: https://www.patreon.com/FisheriesPodcast Buy podcast merch: https://teespring.com/stores/the-fisheries-podcast-fan-shop Thanks as always to Andrew Gialanella for the fantastic music. The Fisheries Podcast is a completely independent podcast, not affiliated with a larger organization or entity. Reference to any specific product or entity does not constitute an endorsement or recommendation by the podcast. The views expressed by guests are their own and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Views and opinions expressed by the hosts are those of that individual and do not necessarily reflect the view of any entity with with those individuals are affiliated in other capacities (such as employers).

Acres U.S.A.: Tractor Time
Tractor Time #62: André Leu, Vandana Shiva and Ronnie Cummins

Acres U.S.A.: Tractor Time

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 52:43


On this episode we're listening in on a recent virtual event for André Leu's new book, Growing Life: Regenerating Farming and Ranching. And he's getting a little help from his friends, Vandana Shiva and Ronnie Cummins. Leu, Shiva and Cummins go way back and co-founded Regeneration International back in 2015. The organization promotes food, farming and land-use systems that regenerate and stabilize climate systems, the health of the planet and people. In addition to being the international director for that group, Leu is also a farmer in Australia and the author of The Myths of Safe Pesticides and Poisoning Our Children. We here at Acres U.S.A. are proud to be the publisher of all of his books. I should also mention that he's speaking at our Eco-Ag Conference in Columbus Ohio in December. Go to ecoag.acresusa.com for more information on that. Vandana Shiva is a world-renowned environmental thinker, activist, feminist, philosopher of science, writer and science policy advocate. She is the founder of Navdanya Research Foundation for Science, Technology and Ecology in India and President of Navdanya International. She is a prolific writer, speaker and author, and recipient of numerous awards. Find her books Food, Farming & Health and Oneness vs the 1% in the Acres U.S.A. bookstore. Ronnie Cummins is co-founder and International Director of the Organic Consumers Association (OCA) and its Mexico affiliate, Via Organica. Cummins has been active as a writer and activist since the 1960s. Over the past two decades he has served as director of US and international campaigns dealing with sustainable agriculture issues including food safety, genetic engineering, factory farming, and global warming. You can find his book, Grassroots Rising: A Call to Action on Climate, Farming, Food and Green New Deal in the acresusa.com bookstore.

The Laura Flanders Show
Building Concrete Ecological Solutions That Go Beyond Concrete

The Laura Flanders Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 29:03


Check out the full episode notes and become a member at Patreon.com/theLFShowIn the midst of yet another year of climate catastrophe, the U.S. Senate is negotiating a $3.5 trillion infrastructure package.  President Biden, among others, is calling for extensive investment to lower emissions and combat the effects of climate change. But what sort of investment? In this episode, Laura interviews environmental lawyer Colette Pichon Battle in Louisiana about the strategies organizers there have developed since Hurricane Katrina for equitable green development and climate justice. Then, she speaks in depth with MacArthur “Genius” award-winning landscape architect Kate Orff about her innovative work on oyster reefs, living breakwaters and regenerative infrastructure. Recently profiled in the New Yorker Magazine, Orff insists that ecology is the infrastructure of the future. Her work restores and harnesses—rather than resists—natural systems to ensure the livability of our rapidly changing world. Plus, Laura shares some thoughts about community vs. concrete.  Music in the Middle:  “Makin' Waves” by Baba Brinkman featuring  Gaia's Eye, from his album The Rap Guide to Climate Chaos.Guests:-Colette Pichon Battle, Founder and Executive Director of the Gulf Coast Center for Law & Policy, co-chairs the national Water Equity and Climate Resilient Caucus with PolicyLink and anchors the five-state, multi-issue initiative Gulf South for a Green New Deal.-Kate Orff, Founding Principal of SCAPE; And Director & Professor, Urban Design Program, Columbia University.  SCAPE creates positive change in communities by combining regenerative living infrastructure and new forms of public space.  She is also the Director of the Urban Design Program, Co-Director of the Center for Resilient Cities and Landscapes (CRCL), and Professor at Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP). 

Focus on Europe | Video Podcast | Deutsche Welle

On the French Atlantic coast, fishermen are protesting against the construction of a wind farm. They claim it would destroy important fishing grounds.

Imaginary Worlds
The Ecology of Dune

Imaginary Worlds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 32:03


Frank Herbert's Dune has been hailed as a pioneer of environmental science fiction, where the Fremen on the planet of Arakkis, have had to adapt to extreme weather conditions through technology and culture. I talk with Ian Schoenherr, the son of illustrator John Schoenherr, about how his father and Frank Herbert bonded over their love of nature. Although Veronika Kratz explains that Frank Herbert would be out of step with today's environmental movement. We'll also hear from two entrepreneurs in water conservation that were inspired by Dune, Peter Yolles from the company WaterSmart and Daniel Fernandez of California State University Monterey Bay, whose fog catchers are similar to the type of technology the Fremen would use, if they lived on the West Coast. This episode is sponsored by BetterHelp. Our ad partner is Multitude. If you're interested in advertising on Imaginary Worlds, you can contact them here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

For The Wild
DALLAS GOLDTOOTH on Responding to Toxic Masculinity [ENCORE] /255

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


This week we are rebroadcasting our interview with Dallas Goldtooth, originally aired in December of 2018. Dallas Goldtooth joins Ayana in a conversation around toxic masculinity, accountability, and dismantling patriarchy. So often, conversations around gender wounds quickly deteriorate into oversimplifications of, and accusations towards, one gender or another – failing to realize how we are all hurting under patriarchy. Toxic masculinity, settler colonialism, and white supremacy are impelling us to a point of no return. If you are coming to this conversation as an environmental advocate, understand that in order to shift our relationship from that of domination over “nature” to one of reciprocity and understanding of the ecosystem we are a part of, we must examine our values with one another. “Dallas Goldtooth is the Keep it in the Ground Campaign Organizer for the Indigenous Environmental Network. He is also the co-founder of the Indigenous comedy group The 1491s. Dallas is Dakota and Diné, a loving husband, dedicated father, comedian, public speaker, recovering exotic dancer, plastic shaman extraordinaire, and body double for that guy who plays Thor in them Thor Movies.” Music by Lyla June Johnston. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

BioScience Talks
Empowering Communities through Local Monitoring

BioScience Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 48:35


Over recent decades, community-based environmental monitoring (often called "citizen science") has exploded in popularity, aided both by smartphones and rapid gains in computing power that make the analysis of large data sets far easier.             Publishing in BioScience, handling editors Rick Bonney, of Cornell University, Finn Danielsen, of the Nordic Foundation for Development and Ecology (NORDECO), and numerous colleagues share an open-access special section (already downloaded thousands of times) that highlights numerous community-based monitoring programs currently underway.             In an article on locally based monitoring, Danielsen and colleagues describe the potential for monitoring by community members—who may have little scientific training—to deliver "credible data at local scale independent of external experts and can be used to inform local and national decision making within a short timeframe."             Community-based monitoring efforts also have the potential to empower Indigenous rightsholders and stakeholders through their broader inclusion in the scientific process, writes Bonney in a Viewpoint article introducing the section. Moreover, he says, "Indigenous and local peoples' in situ knowledge practices have the potential to make significant contributions to meeting contemporary sustainability challenges both locally and around the globe."             In this episode of BioScience Talks, Bonney and Danielsen join us to discuss the special section as well as the broader future for community-based monitoring.

GES Center Lectures, NC State University
#7 – Sumit Dhole - The missing ecology in gene drive research

GES Center Lectures, NC State University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 55:31


Genetic Engineering and Society Center GES Colloquium - Tuesdays 12-1PM (via Zoom) NC State University | http://go.ncsu.edu/ges-colloquium GES Mediasite - See videos, full abstracts, speaker bios, and slides https://go.ncsu.edu/ges-mediasite Twitter - https://twitter.com/GESCenterNCSU The missing ecology in gene drive research Dr. Sumit Dhole, Research Scholar in Mathematical Biology, NC State LinkedIn | Google Scholar A discussion about some of the ecological aspects of population suppression using gene drives, and areas that need more research. Abstract Gene drives are rapidly emerging as a potential tool for controlling populations of disease vectors, invasive species and agricultural pests. The molecular research to create new and improved gene drives based on the CRISPR technology has progressed rapidly. While this research has been encouraging from the perspective of developing these tools, there remain large gaps in our understanding of how natural populations would respond to the release of gene drives. Dr. Dhole will discuss some of the ecological processes that will play an important role and that need more research in natural pest populations. Related links: Rajagopalan PK, Curtis CF, Brooks GD, Menon PK. The density dependence of larval mortality of Culex pipiens fatigans in an urban situation and prediction of its effects on genetic control operations. Indian J Med Res. 1977. North, A., Burt, A. & Godfray, H. Modelling the potential of genetic control of malaria mosquitoes at national scale. BMC Biol 17, 26 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12915-019-0645-5 James J Bull, Christopher H Remien, Stephen M Krone, Gene-drive-mediated extinction is thwarted by population structure and evolution of sib mating. Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health, Volume 2019, Issue 1, 2019, Pages 66–81, https://doi.org/10.1093/emph/eoz014 Speaker Bio Dr. Sumit Dhole is an evolutionary ecologist who uses mathematical models to study how genes can spread through natural populations. For the past few years at NC State his focus has been on understanding how synthetic gene drives might behave if introduced into natural populations. While gene drives, which are highly invasive genetic constructs, may provide a solution for rapid and species-specific management of disease vectors and agricultural pests, a major concern is the potential of their unchecked spread to non-target populations. Through his work, Sumit tries to understand what factors and design features may allow synthetic gene drives to spread in safe, contained manners. GES Center - Integrating scientific knowledge & diverse public values in shaping the futures of biotechnology. Find out more at https://ges-center-lectures-ncsu.pinecast.co

The Morning Scroll
Parashat Noah, Oct. 6th

The Morning Scroll

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 3:56


The Morning Scroll is your weekly, bite-sized parsha study with Rabbi Deena Cowans.  We're on Season 2 of The Morning Scroll - cycling back through the Torah but this time with new insight and a blessing to end the episode!This week, we read Parashat Noah. Check out upcoming Shabbat services and programs here.  Follow us on Instagram and like us on Facebook. And be sure to like and subscribe to our podcast for updates on new episodes!Want more torah? Check out Shabbat Replay on Contact Chai with Rabbi Lizzi.Produced by Mishkan Chicago.  Music composed, produced, and recorded by Kalman Strauss.

Scientific Sense ®
Prof. Gianluca Carnabuci of ESMT Berlin on Innovation

Scientific Sense ®

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 67:35


Knowledge Specialization, Knowledge Brokerage and the Uneven Growth of Technology Domains, The Ecology of Technological Progress: How Symbiosis and Competition Affect the Growth of Technology Domains, Where do firms' recombinant capabilities come from? intra-organizational networks, knowledge, and firms' ability to innovate through technological recombination, Social networks, cognitive style, and innovative performance: a contingency perspective, Risky Recombinations: Institutional Gatekeeping in the Innovation Process, and Categories, attention, and the impact of inventions. Scientific Sense ® by Gill Eapen: Prof. Gianluca Carnabuci is a professor of organizational behavior at ESMT Berlin. Gianluca's research interests revolve around the analysis of inter- and intra-organizational networks, with particular regard to the generation and recombination of technological knowledge. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/scientificsense/message

All Things
4. Precedented 4 - Worship, the Climate, and the End of the World

All Things

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 46:47


This time, in the face of constant news of ominous threats to the climate and ecosystems, we look at a precedent that could help form us into people who see the world rightly, and live accordingly. www.shemasd.org Script by Wilson Ryland Original Score by Julius Obregon Jr.

Soul Search - ABC RN
Sacred landscapes: snow and the high country

Soul Search - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 54:06


Soul Search returns to our Sacred Landscapes series that explores the connections between spirituality and place. We turn to the cool climates with our guides – Dr Jonica Newby and Professor Jakelin Troy – taking us into the coldest regions of Australia and deepening our understanding of the spiritual importance of snow.

Today's Voices of Conservation Science
Kadie Heinle — Fish are awesome: a dive into Yellowstone cutthroat trout research

Today's Voices of Conservation Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 29:54


Kadie Heinle, a graduate student in the Department of Ecology at Montana State University, discusses her career trajectory and research on how drought and brown trout influence Yellowstone cutthroat trout.

Native Plants, Healthy Planet presented by Pinelands Nursery
Rooted Discussion - Women in Ecology

Native Plants, Healthy Planet presented by Pinelands Nursery

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 120:40


Welcome to Rooted Discussions, our roundtable conversations featuring top minds in the field of the topic at hand. On this episode, hosts Fran Chismar and Tom Knezick are joined by Carolyn Klaube (Stewardship Director) from Sourland Conservancy, Debbie Dekleva (Monarch Maverick) of Monarch Flyway, Amy Greene (Professional Wetland Scientist and Certified Senior Ecologist) former President of Amy Greene Environmental, and Dr. Randi Eckel (Owner) of Toadshade Wildflower Farm to discuss women in the field of Ecology. Conversations include choosing the road of Ecology as a profession, challenges for women in a male dominated industry, how the industry has changed over the decades and advice for anyone looking to choose this profession.  As an added bonus, the video will be available on the Pinelands Nursery YouTube channel. Music by RJ Comer.  Have a question or a comment?  Call (215) 346-6189. Want links from this podcast?  Visit www.nativeplantshealthyplanet.com Buy a T-shirt, spread the message, and do some good.  Visit https://native-plants-healthy-planet-2.creator-spring.com/ 

Poetry Unbound
Tishani Doshi — Species

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 15:27


In a fantastical poem about the future, Tishani Doshi explores the present. She imagines a future where agriculture, forestry, and cultivation are things of the past, distant memories learned by humans existing on other planets, or on intergalactic spaceships. That distant future is reflecting on how it should have learned from the grass, abundant, generous, sustainable. This poem of dystopian magic-realism is more real than magic, offering advice on thriving, while noting the knife-edge of self-destruction so familiar to human behavior.Tishani Doshi was born in the city formerly known as Madras in 1975. She has published seven books of poetry and fiction. Her essays, poems and short stories have been widely anthologized. She is Visiting Associate Professor of Practice, Literature and Creative Writing at New York University, Abu Dhabi.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

For The Wild
JOSEFINA SKERK on Sámi Lifeways /254

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021


When one thinks about iron, copper, and gold mining, Sweden is not the first place that comes to mind, but in the past few years the country has granted roughly 500 mining exploration permits as it positions itself to become one of the largest mining centers for all of Europe. The price of mining in Sweden has largely been paid by the Sámi, whose lifeways are permanently changed once the government and multinational corporations seek to extract so-called natural resources from their traditional territory of Sápmi. In this week's episode, we look at extractive mining in Sápmi and how Sweden's colonial government exploits their very limited definition of Sámi indigeneity to further land grabs and resource extraction with guest Josefina Skerk. Josefina Skerk is a Sámi politician with a background in law. She is the General Manager of Sijti Jarnge, a Sámi Language and Culture Centre in Norway. Skerk has been a member of the Sámi Parliament in Sweden since 2013, and has held office as its former Vice President. Indigenous rights, especially connecting to land and language rights, are key issues that she is passionate about. Music by Andy Tallent, Dana Anastasia, and West of Roan. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

World Spirituality
The Ecology of Self with Blake Hestir, Ph.D.

World Spirituality

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 55:15


How to stay connected and flourish in difficult and divisive times with Texas Christian University philosophy professor, meditation teacher, and author Blake Hestir, Ph.D.

Intoxecology
Episode 17: F This, I'm a Bear

Intoxecology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 112:09


We're BACK, and we're sorry for the hiatus; we'll never leave you again, we promise. In this episode, Ellie tells Katie all about the polar bear before Katie discusses the giant tube worm. For some reason, talking about polar bears leads to a lengthy discussion about Neanderthals and how Ellie has more Neanderthal DNA than the general populous. Also, if you brought a giant tube worm up to the surface, a polar bear could probably smell it from a mile away. Lots of swearing and tangents, as always. Website: intoxecology.comTwitter: @intoxecologyInstagram: @intoxecologyGmail: intoxecologypodcast@gmail.com(Please) find us on Patreon!

The Field Guides
Ep. 54 - Can't Touch This: A Deep Dive Into Touch-me-not

The Field Guides

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 69:00


Jewelweed. Spotted touch-me-not. Orange Balsam It's a plant known by many names, and, even if you don't recognize any of them, you've probably popped one of its exploding seed pods. A favorite of hummingbirds and nature-lovers young and old, it's a species with many stories to share. Listen in as the guys dive deep into the jewelweed patch, eating some seeds, trying to find the source of the “jewel” in jewelweed's name, and getting to the bottom of the age-old claim that jewelweed is a cure for poison ivy. This episode was recorded on September 26, 2021 at Birdsong Park in Orchard Park, NY Episode Notes:Which species is more common in North America: yellow (aka pale) jewelweed or orange jewelweed? While it may vary from place to place, orange jewelweed seems to be the more common species. Nearly every site we visited referred to it as “common” or “more common” and to the yellow jewelweed as “less common”. Orange jewelweed's North American range is also broader than yellow jewelweed's (yellow is absent from most of the Gulf states and most Canadian provinces). When do the Witch hazel seeds explode out of their capsules? Steve and Bill were both confused on the timing. Witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana) is a forest understory tree that blooms in the fall. The seeds take a year to develop and are forcibly expelled (because of dehiscence) from the seed capsules the following fall or winter. Check out our episode on witch hazel!Are there any plants that produce only cleistogamous (closed, self-pollinating) flowers? Not that we could find. Most sources make reference to the fact that cleistogamous flowering is a behavior that appears to have evolved to ensure reproduction under unfavorable conditions. These conditions usually limit or prevent cross pollination of the typical, chasmogamous (open) flowers. How many species of jewelweed do we have in North America? The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center lists 4 species of Impatiens native to North America. I. capensis and I. pallida are the ones found in the east (although, as mentioned in this episode, some sources list I. capensis as native in the Pacific northwest, as well). Five nonnative Impatiens species have also been introduced to the continent. Steve wondered what the Latin term ecalcarata means. This came up when Bill was discussing the western species of jewelweed, specifically, Impatiens ecalcarata. Turns out that ecalcarata means spurless, and the common name of this species is, appropriately enough, spurless touch-me-not or spurless jewelweed (AKA western jewelweed). FYI: The Latin name has been updated recently, and this species is now Impatiens ecornuta.Schizomyla impatientis is the Latin name of the midge that makes a gall on jewelweed. Steve recognized the genus, Schizomyla, and wondered if this insect was related to any of the gall-making insects we mentioned way back in our goldenrod episode (episode 1!). Bill checked, and the answer is no. Books Mentioned During This Episode100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names – Diana WellsHow Plants Get Their Names by LH BaileyThe Book of Swamp & Bog: Trees, Shrubs, and Wildflowers of Eastern Freshwater Wetlands by John EastmanNational Audubon Society Birds of North AmericaNational Audubon Society: Trees of North AmericaUseful LinksGumleaf Boots, USA (free shipping for patrons)Thank you to Always Wandering Art (Website and Etsy Shop) for providing the artwork for many of our previous episodes! Support us on Patreon!Check out the Field Guides merch at our Teespring store. It's really a great deal: you get to pay us to turn your body into a billboard for the podcast! Works CitedCipollini, K. A. & Hurley, S. L. (2008) Variation in Resistance of Experienced and Naive Seedlings of Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis) to Invasive Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata). The Ohio journal of science. 108 (3), 47–49.Guin, Jere D., and Ruth Reynolds. "Jewelweed treatment of poison ivy dermatitis." Contact dermatitis 6.4 (1980): 287-288.Lipton, R. A. "The use of impatiens biflora (jewelweed) in the treatment of rhus dermatitis." Annals of allergy 16.5 (1958): 526.Long, David, Noel H. Ballentine, and James G. Marks Jr. "Treatment of poison ivy/oak allergic contact dermatitis with an extract of jewelweed." Dermatitis 8.3 (1997): 150-153.Martin, L.J., Agrawal, A.A. and Kraft, C.E., 2015. Historically browsed jewelweed populations exhibit greater tolerance to deer herbivory than historically protected populations. Journal of Ecology, 103(1), pp.243-249.Motz, Vicki A., et al. "Efficacy of the saponin component of Impatiens capensis Meerb. in preventing urushiol-induced contact dermatitis." Journal of ethnopharmacology 162 (2015): 163-167.Motz, Vicki Abrams, et al. "The effectiveness of jewelweed, Impatiens capensis, the related cultivar I. balsamina and the component, lawsone in preventing post poison ivy exposure contact dermatitis." Journal of ethnopharmacology 143.1 (2012): 314-318.Schmitt, J., Ehrhardt, D. and Swartz, D., 1985. Differential dispersal of self-fertilized and outcrossed progeny in jewelweed (Impatiens capensis). The American naturalist, 126(4), pp.570-575.Travers, S.E., Temeles, E.J. and Pan, I., 2003. The relationship between nectar spur curvature in jewelweed (Impatiens capensis) and pollen removal by hummingbird pollinators. Canadian journal of botany, 81(2), pp.164-170.

Palaeocast
Episode 129: Penguins

Palaeocast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 73:34


Whether it be because of their unique shape, comical walking or extreme ecology, there can be no denying that penguins are incredibly popular and charismatic animals. But what actually makes a penguin a penguin and how are they different from other birds? Have penguins always been, well, 'penguiny'? Joining us for this interview are Simone Giovanardi and Daniel Thomas who have just described a new species of giant penguin from New Zealand. Together, we explore penguin evolution and how their new species Kairuku waewaeroa fits into this story.

Future Cities
Defining Resilience (Rebroadcast)

Future Cities

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 50:43


We hear the term used all over the place: in music, on TV, in books– but what IS resilience? In this episode, we discuss resilience from the Social-Ecological-Technological Systems (SETS) perspective. To understand what resilience means from this perspective, we interviewed urban resilience experts from each of these three disciplines. Dr. Nancy Grimm is a professor of ecology in the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University (ASU) and a co-director of the Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network (UREx SRN). Dr. Marta Berbes is a professor in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at ASU, but is transitioning the University of Waterloo where she'll work on their Future Cities Initiative. Dr. Dan Eisenberg is a Research Assistant Professor of Operations Research at the Naval Postgraduate School. Learn more about and connect with our hosts and guests by checking out these links:Hosts:Stephen Elser: Twitter, LinkedInSam Markolf: Twitter, UC-Merced website, Google ScholarGuests:Nancy Grimm: Twitter, lab webpageMarta Berbes: Twitter, Future Cities InitiativeDan Eisenberg: Personal faculty page, research group page––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––If you have questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes, e-mail us at futurecitiespodcast@gmail.com or find us on Twitter @FutureCitiesPod.

Talk Design
Paula Baker-Laporte

Talk Design

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 75:10


Paula Baker-Laporte FAIA, BBNC, BBEC is an architect, Building Biologist, author, healthy building consultant and educator. Graduating from the University of Toronto School of Architecture in 1978 and from the Institute of Building Biology and Ecology in 1994. She founded her own award-winning architectural practice in Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1986-2009. She was honored for her work in healthy architecture and made a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects in 2007. She is currently the president of EcoNest Architecture Inc. based in Ashland Oregon est. 2010.Paula's first-hand experience with Multiple Chemical Sensitivities in the 1980's was the impetus behind her search for healthier ways to build that has resulted in her unique architectural practice with a specialty in construction for health based on the principles of Building Biology. She has designed, specified and administered the construction of many projects for the sublimely sensitive and has worked in various alternative building envelop systems including, light straw clay, adobe, pumice-crete, rammed earth, Aerated Autoclaved Concrete,and Wood Insulated Concrete FormsIn addition Paula and her team consult widely, throughout North America and beyond, working with Owners, Architects and Builders to achieve construction that is optimal for health. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

For The Wild
VALARIE KAUR on the Ancient Call to Love /253

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021


“What might happen if we saw a migrant child at the border as our own daughter? Or George Floyd gasping for breath as our own brother? Or Brianna as sister? Or the Asian American women slaughtered in Atlanta as our own aunties? What might happen? What would we risk? What movements would we build? What would we demand? How would we harness our rage? How would we reimagine a world in which all of us are safe? What might happen if we made love the ethic that guided all of our actions?” This week we ground down in visioning our shared survival with guest Valarie Kaur, who reminds us that for millennia prophetic voices have been trying to remind us that we belong to each other, here on Earth, and if we were to recognize this simple truth, what would the world look like? Valarie shares that in recognizing this reality of inherent belonging, we might have to “love beyond what evolution requires.” A revolutionary love for each other, our opponents, and ourselves. Valarie Kaur is a seasoned civil rights activist and celebrated prophetic voice. Valarie now leads the Revolutionary Love Project to reclaim love as a force for justice in America. As a lawyer, filmmaker, and innovator, she has won policy change on multiple fronts – hate crimes, racial profiling, immigration detention, solitary confinement, Internet freedom, and more. She founded Groundswell Movement, Faithful Internet, and the Yale Visual Law Project. A daughter of Sikh farmers in California's heartland, Valarie earned degrees at Stanford University, Harvard Divinity School, and Yale Law School. Valarie's new book is See No Stranger: A Memoir and Manifesto of Revolutionary Love. Music by AMAARA and Madeleine Sophia. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

Progressive Commentary Hour
Progressive Commentary Hour - Guest Guy McPherson

Progressive Commentary Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 56:06


Update on new evidence of human activity fueling climate change   Dr. Guy McPherson is a professor emeritus of Natural Resources, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Arizona.  He has specialized in forest resources, energy decline and climate change and its economic consequences. In the past he has also taught at Texas A&M and University of California at Berkeley. Having become disillusioned with the American university environment and academia, and after attempts by university officials to silence his outspokenness about the human causes of climate change, Guy abandoned his tenured position as a full professor for ethical reasons of conscience. He is the author of several books, the latest co-written with Carolyn Baker entitled “Extinction Dialogs: How to Live with Death in Mind.”  He hosts a website, Nature Bats Last, with articles, commentaries, personal videos with science updates addressing topics related to climate change, human issues and philosophy. His website is  GuyMcpherson.com      

Life is Hard, God is Good

Just as with fire, when we come in contact with God, we do not change Him, but He changes us. Fire destroys, delivers, and purifies. Through the fire we can see what is meant to pass away and what is meant to last for eternity.Scripture: Psalm 104:4, Psalm 105:37-39, Exodus 3, Exodus 13:21-22, Hebrews 12:28-29, 1 Corinthians 3:10-15Poem: Fire Regime by Veronica Bryant

Everyone Is Right
Ken Wilber Goes to High School: Sex, Ecology, Spirituality

Everyone Is Right

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 117:16


In this very special episode of The Ken Show we are joined by Aissatou Diallo, Zoe Tray, and Noah Delorme, students at Choate Rosemary Hall who have been studying Ken Wilber's seminal book, Sex, Ecology, Spirituality for their senior year project. Watch as Ken, Aissatou, Zoe, and Noah unpack many of the core insights of SES and discuss the unique value Integral work holds for a new generation of thinkers, leaders, artists, and scholars. We were absolutely blown away by the depth, care, and curiosity that shone through these students' questions, as well as the obvious enthusiasm they have for the integral project. We are always trying to find new ways to bring integral ideas to new generations, and presenting these ideas in a way that speaks more directly to the unique life conditions each generation is facing. Seeing these young faces light up behind their masks as they engaged with Ken was a pure delight, and offers a new source of hope for the ongoing unfolding of integral ideas, as well as for our shared future on this planet. Topics include: 0:00 – Ken's writing process while working on SES 10:43 – Why is spirituality important to the integral model? 26:52 – How do we know how many people are at each stage? 42:09 – How important is community for spiritual awakening? 53:45 – How can Integral help people become better activists? 1:10:22 – How do we integrate relativity? 1:16:01 – Can Integral help people with poverty and substance abuse? 1:29:37 – How does emotion influence our development? 1:40:36 – How do we communicate integral spirituality to non-religious people? 1:43:24 – How does awakened love influence our relationships? 1:52:00 – How does Ken manage fear?

Deer University
Episode 054 - What's So Special About Kansas?

Deer University

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 67:26


Over the past couple decades Kansas has turned into a destination state for deer hunters chasing big whitetails. But what exactly about the Kansas landscape promotes the growth of large antlers?  Dr. Drew Ricketts is an Assistant Professor and Extension Wildlife Specialist for Kansas State University and is an expert on habitat management in Kansas.  In this episode Drew, Steve, and Bronson crack the code on why Kansas produces so many record-book bucks.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Shape shifting animals to cope with climate change

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 6:59


An Australian study recently published in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution has shown some animals' body shapes are adapting and changing to cope with climate change. Sara Ryding of Deakin University led the research team which used 3D scanning to investigate how birds are responding morphologically to warmer temperatures.

For The Wild
RUTH ŁCHAV'AYA K'ISEN MILLER on Relations of Reciprocity /252

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021


In this magnetic conversation, Ruth and Ayana consider where a politics of love can breathe, radical softness, mindsets of abundance, climate justice advocacy, and the steps we can take to create systems of wellness. In recognition of what might feel like a painful transition for many, Ruth guides us to think about what practices and acts of care we can implement with each other as a way of willing a more beautiful world back into existence. 

Sausage of Science
SoS 137 - Discovering "How Men Age" with Dr. Richard Bribiescas

Sausage of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 45:29


In this episode Dr. Richard Bribiescas discusses his book "How Men Age: What evolution reveals about male health and mortality". He covers it all from natural variations in testosterone to why women live longer than men and how science fiction captures the absurdity of doing science. Dr. Bribiescas is a Professor of Anthropology, Ecology, and Evolutionary Biology at Yale University. He is the primary investigator of the Yale Reproductive Ecology Laboratory, which you can check out at https://reproeco.yale.edu You can contact Dr. Bribiescas at richard.bribiescas@yale.edu and on Twitter @RGBribiescas Purchase "How Men Age" at https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691160634/how-men-age Contact the Sausage of Science Podcast and Human Biology Association: Facebook: www.facebook.com/groups/humanbiologyassociation Website:humbio.org/, Twitter: @HumBioAssoc Cara Ocobock, Website: sites.nd.edu/cara-ocobock/, Email:cocobock@nd.edu, Twitter:@CaraOcobock Chris Lynn, HBA Public Relations Committee Chair, Website: cdlynn.people.ua.edu/, Email: cdlynn@ua.edu, Twitter:@Chris_Ly Delaney Glass, Website: dglass.netlify.app/, Email: dglass1@uw.edu, Twitter: @GlassDelaney Alexandra Niclou, Email: aniclou@nd.edu, Twitter: @fiat_Luxandra

The Mushroom Hour Podcast
Ep. 97: Mushrooms of the Mountain Ranges & High Meadows of California (feat. Thea Chesney)

The Mushroom Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 86:27


Thea Chesney is a lifelong Sierra Nevada foothill resident and naturalist. She has had an interest in mushrooms (and plants, and the rest of the natural world) since early childhood, which gradually became an obsession. She holds a B.S. in forestry from UC Berkeley, with an emphasis in botany and natural sciences. During her time at Berkeley, she spent plenty of time working and hanging out in the Berkeley mycology labs and continues to return to campus to provide specimens for and aid in teaching their mushroom ID course. She worked on a mushroom survey crew for the U.S. Forest Service around Mt. Shasta for several seasons, which allowed her to become intimately familiar with the fungal inhabitants and ecology of the area. Since then, she has continued with the Forest Service as a botanist for a long-term California-wide meadow monitoring project. She teaches occasional workshops in mushroom and plant identification, both for work and independently. She has also been involved with the California Rare Fungi Working Group since its inception. Her fieldwork and her own studies of plants and fungi are centered in the Sierra Nevada and other mountains of California, and she is currently working on a field guide to mushrooms of these understudied regions with Noah Siegel and Christian Schwarz.   TOPICS COVERED:   Mycology Lineage & Childhood Immersion in Nature  Underexplored Mountain Ranges of California  Diversity of Bioregions in Mountain Ranges  Mycorrhizal Mushrooms & Tree Hosts  Montane Water Cycles, Plant Ecology & Fungal Diversity  High Meadows Ecosystems & Their Mushrooms  California Rare Fungi Working Group  The Future of Documenting Fungal Diversity  Fire-Following Fungi  Morel Habitat & Ecology in California  Tips for Finding Morels  Thea's Lifelong Connection to the Sierras  Klamath Mountains – The Most Biodiverse Pocket of California?!  Future Work with Christian Schwarz & Noah Siegel  EPISODE RESOURCES:   Thea Chesney iNaturalist: https://www.inaturalist.org/people/theachesney   Thea's Talk on Fire Fungi: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8V9Irj0GtTE   Thea's Talk on Mycorrhizal Fungi: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PISk9C6FAds   Prof. Ralph Emerson: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Emerson_(botanist)   Klamath Mountains: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klamath_Mountains   Rare Fungi of CA National Forests: https://www.scribd.com/document/432145073/Rare-Fungi-of-California-National-Forests   William Bridge Cooke: https://www.mykoweb.com/articles/PDF/William%20Bridge%20Cooke,%201908-1991.pdf   Caloscypha fulgens (fungus): https://www.mushroomexpert.com/caloscypha_fulgens.html   Hygrophorus goetzii (fungus): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hygrophorus_goetzii

Native Plants, Healthy Planet presented by Pinelands Nursery

Hosts Fran Chismar and Tom Knezick talk with Shannon Trimboli (Founder and Host) of Backyard Ecology about being acceptive and nurturing towards those entering the native plant spectrum.  They discuss approaching ecology from a place of wonder and education, the beginnings of Backyard Ecology, and the paths we all take to ecological enlightenment.  Stop and smell the Sassafras.  Music by Egocentric Plastic Men. Have a question or a comment?  Call (215) 346-6189. Want links from this podcast?  Visit www.nativeplantshealthyplanet.com Buy a T-shirt, spread the message, and do some good.  Visit https://native-plants-healthy-planet-2.creator-spring.com/ 

The Laura Flanders Show
Uncut Full Conversation: Colette Pichon Battle, Climate Activist and Lawyer

The Laura Flanders Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 23:07


The following is the full uncut conversation with Colette Pichon Battle, Lawyer & Founder and Executive Director, Gulf Coast Center for Law & Policy, from our episode "Ecology: The Infrastructure of the Future?" In the midst of yet another year of climate catastrophe, the U.S. Senate is negotiating a $3.5 trillion infrastructure package.  President Biden, among others, is calling for extensive investment to lower emissions and combat the effects of climate change. But what sort of investment? In this episode, Laura interviews environmental lawyer Colette Pichon Battle in Louisiana about the strategies organizers there have developed since Hurricane Katrina for equitable green development and climate justice. Then, she speaks in depth with MacArthur “Genius” award-winning landscape architect Kate Orff about her innovative work on oyster reefs, living breakwaters and regenerative infrastructure. Recently profiled in the New Yorker Magazine, Orff insists that ecology is the infrastructure of the future. Her work restores and harnesses—rather than resists—natural systems to ensure the livability of our rapidly changing world. Plus, Laura shares some thoughts about community vs. concrete.  Music in the Middle:  “Makin' Waves” by Baba Brinkman featuring  Gaia's Eye, from his album The Rap Guide to Climate Chaos. If you're a listener or a viewer, you spend time with us. Many of you have for years. So how about taking a few minutes to give us the support we need to keep doing what we do… Only a few minutes from you, pledging $3 or $5 or $11 a month, will keep us going all year. Go to Patreon.com/theLFShow and join our media team and support movement building.  Thanks!

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
Regeneration: The Key To Healing Humans And The Planet with Paul Hawken

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 103:24


Regeneration: The Key To Healing Humans And The Planet | This episode is brought to you by ButcherBox, BiOptimizers, and PaleovalleyMost people are overwhelmed when it comes to the thought of climate change, which is preventing us from taking action. An estimated 92% of people are disengaged from the topic and feel they don't know what to do. But today, I want to share some good news with you that will leave you feeling hopeful instead of hopeless in terms of saving our planet. Just like we use Functional Medicine to get to the root cause of disease in our bodies, we can come up with an actionable, results-oriented plan when we look at the root cause of our climate crisis. On this episode of The Doctor's Farmacy, I was thrilled to sit down with Paul Hawken to talk about his framework for healing the planet in a way that dramatically changes the outlook of our world for future generations. Paul Hawken starts ecological businesses, writes about nature and commerce, and consults with heads of state and CEOs on climatic, economic, and ecological regeneration. He has appeared on numerous media including the Today Show, Talk of the Nation, Bill Maher, CBS This Morning, Charlie Rose, and others, and his work has been profiled or featured in hundreds of articles including the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Newsweek, Washington Post, Forbes, and Business Week. He has written eight books, including five national and New York Times bestsellers: Growing a Business, The Next Economy, The Ecology of Commerce, Blessed Unrest, and Drawdown, The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming. He is the founder of Project Drawdown, which worked with over two hundred scholars, students, scientists, researchers, and activists to map, measure, and model the one hundred most substantive solutions that can cumulatively reverse global warming. He is the founder of Regeneration.org, and his latest work, Regeneration, Ending the Climate Crisis in One Generation, was just released. This episode is brought to you by ButcherBox, BiOptimizers, and Paleovalley.For a limited time, new subscribers to ButcherBox will receive ground beef for life. Sign up today and ButcherBox will send you 2 lbs of 100% grass-fed, grass finished beef free in every box for the life of your subscription. Just go to ButcherBox.com/farmacy.You can try BiOptimizers Magnesium Breakthrough for 10% off by going to magbreakthrough.com/hyman and using the code HYMAN10. For a limited time, BiOptimizers is also giving away free bottles of their bestselling products P3OM and Masszymes with select purchases. Paleovalley is offering 15% off your entire first order. Just go to paleovalley.com/hyman to check out all their clean Paleo products and take advantage of this deal.Here are more of the details from our interview: Reframing the climate crisis from a focus on the problem to a focus on solutions and regeneration (8:00)The current reality, speed, and impact of the climate crisis (14:29)Solutions to cut energy emissions by 50% by 2028 (22:23)What you can do in your own life to support the regeneration of our climate (31:30)The role that governments and corporations are playing to promote solutions to the climate crisis at scale across the world (40:07)Transforming our food and agricultural systems for regeneration of the climate (50:00)Regeneration of human society and natural environments (1:00:32)The economics of regeneration and regenerative practices (1:03:57)Why the climate problem is not a science problem but a human problem (1:19:09)Ending the climate crisis in one generation (1:27:17)Learn more about Paul Hawken at https://paulhawken.com/ and follow him on Facebook @PaulHawkenAuthor, on Instagram @paulhawken, and on LinkedIn @paulhawken.Get a copy of Regeneration: Ending the Climate Crisis in One Generation at https://www.amazon.com/Regeneration-Ending-Climate-Crisis-Generation/dp/0143136976/Learn more about Regeneration at https://regeneration.org/ and on Facebook @Regenerationorg, on Instagram @Regenerationorg, and on LinkedIn @Regenerationorg. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

New Books Network
Ihnji Jon, "Cities in the Anthropocene: New Ecology and Urban Politics" (Pluto Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 45:18


Climate change is real, and extreme weather events are its physical manifestations. These extreme events affect how we live and work in cities, and subsequently the way we design, plan, and govern them. Taking action 'for the environment' is not only a moral imperative; instead, it is activated by our everyday experience in the city. Based on the author's site visits and interviews in Darwin (Australia), Tulsa (Oklahoma), Cleveland (Ohio), and Cape Town (South Africa), Ihnji Jon's Cities in the Anthropocene: New Ecology and Urban Politics (Pluto Press, 2021) tells the story of how cities can lead a transformative pro-environment politics. National governments often fail to make binding agreements that bring about radical actions for the environment. This book shows how cities, as local sites of mobilizing a collective, political agenda, can be frontiers for activating the kind of environmental politics that appreciates the role of 'nature' in the everyday functioning of our urban life. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

StarTalk Radio
Cosmic Queries – Animal Outlaws with Mary Roach

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 48:35


What happens when nature commits a crime? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Paul Mecurio discuss law-breaking animals with Mary Roach and her new book Fuzz: When Nature Breaks The Law. Can we hack nature?NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/show/cosmic-queries-animal-outlaws-with-mary-roach/Thanks to our Patrons Hunter Cutone, Roman Cain, Yoshi Wiklund, Tec MySelf, Jonathan Harries, Net Identification, and William Davis for supporting us this week.Photo Credit: Muhammad Mahdi Karim/http://www.micro2macro.net The making of this document was supported by Wikimedia CH. For all the files concerned, please see the category Supported by Wikimedia (GFDL 1.2 - http://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/fdl-1.2.html or FAL), via Wikimedia Commons

Lead With We
Paul Hawken, Environmentalist, Entrepreneur and Author of Regeneration: Ending the Climate Crisis in One Generation

Lead With We

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 42:36


It's hard to overstate Paul Hawken's contribution to transforming the relationship between humanity, business and the natural world. His books and leadership have built the foundation and laid out the roadmap for how we work together to address the climate crisis. It was a privilege to speak with him about his new book: Regeneration: Ending the Climate Crisis in One Generation. In this episode of Lead With We, Paul and I talk about what “regeneration” means, the actions business and humanity must take to end the climate crisis in one generation, and where we stand as a business community when it comes to authentically embracing the practices that will regenerate and nurture life on earth.  Paul Hawken Paul Hawken starts ecological businesses, writes about nature and commerce, and consults with heads of state and CEOs on climatic, economic and ecological regeneration. He has appeared on numerous media including the Today Show, Talk of the Nation, Bill Maher, CBS This Morning, Charlie Rose, and others, and his work has been profiled or featured in hundreds of articles including the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Newsweek, Washington Post, Forbes, and Business Week. He has written nine books including five national and New York Times bestsellers: Growing a Business, The Next Economy, The Ecology of Commerce, Blessed Unrest and Drawdown. He is published in 30 languages and his books are available in over 80 countries having sold more than two million copies. His last book, Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming debuted on April 18, 2017 as a New York Times bestseller and is currently in seventeen other languages. He is the founder of Project Drawdown, which worked with over two hundred scholars, students, scientists, researchers, and activists to map, measure, and model the one hundred most substantive solutions that can cumulatively reverse global warming. He is the founder of Regeneration.org and his new book, Regeneration: Ending the Climate Crisis in One Generation, is published by Penguin Random House launching September 21st, 2021. Simon Mainwaring: Simon Mainwaring is a brand futurist, keynote speaker, and bestselling author. He is best known as the author of We First: How Brands and Consumers Use Social Media to Build a Better World and his upcoming book, Lead With We: The Business Revolution That Will Save Our Future; as the Founder and CEO of We First, an award-winning strategic consultancy that works with purpose-led companies to build their brand strategy, company culture, and impact storytelling; and as the author of the influential ‘Purpose At Work' column in Forbes and host of the podcast, Lead With We. This episode of Lead With We was produced and edited by Goal 17 Media and is available on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, and Spotify. You can also watch episodes on YouTube at WeFirstTV. Resources Learn more about Paul's work at regeneration.org Connect with Paul on LinkedIn For case studies and other free resources about purposeful business, go to WeFirstBranding.com Simon's new book, Lead With We, is now available for pre-order on Amazon, Google Books and Barnes & Noble. Check it out!

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers
623: Examining the Migration of Marine Animals to Inform Management and Conservation - Dr. Autumn-Lynn Harrison

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 47:19


Dr. Autumn-Lynn Harrison is Program Manager of the Migratory Connectivity Project and a Research Ecologist at the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center. She is also an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Duke University and an Affiliate Professor at George Mason University. Her research focuses on the migration of marine animals such as seabirds and seals. In order to help manage and conserve these animals, she uses data from small tracking tags to understand where these animals go, the habitats they depend on, and the places that are important to them. When she's not working, Autumn-Lynn loves to be out on the water paddling in a canoe or kayak. She also enjoys watching college football as well as playing the flute and piccolo in a community band. Autumn-Lynn received her B.S. degrees in Environmental Science and Fisheries and Wildlife Science from Virginia Tech, a Graduate Diploma of Science in Tropical Marine Ecology and Fisheries Science from James Cook University in Australia, and her Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She worked for the Society for Conservation Biology for 11 years prior to accepting a postdoctoral fellowship with the Institute for Parks at Clemson University. Next, Autumn-Lynn joined the team at the Smithsonian Institution in 2014. In our interview, she shares more about her life and science.

The Laura Flanders Show
Ecology: The Infrastructure of the Future?

The Laura Flanders Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 30:35


In the midst of yet another year of climate catastrophe, the U.S. Senate is negotiating a $3.5 trillion infrastructure package.  President Biden, among others, is calling for extensive investment to lower emissions and combat the effects of climate change. But what sort of investment? In this episode, Laura interviews environmental lawyer Colette Pichon Battle in Louisiana about the strategies organizers there have developed since Hurricane Katrina for equitable green development and climate justice. Then, she speaks in depth with MacArthur “Genius” award-winning landscape architect Kate Orff about her innovative work on oyster reefs, living breakwaters and regenerative infrastructure. Recently profiled in the New Yorker Magazine, Orff insists that ecology is the infrastructure of the future. Her work restores and harnesses—rather than resists—natural systems to ensure the livability of our rapidly changing world. Plus, Laura shares some thoughts about community vs. concrete.  Music in the Middle:  “Makin' Waves” by Baba Brinkman featuring  Gaia's Eye, from his album The Rap Guide to Climate Chaos.If you're a listener or a viewer, you spend time with us. Many of you have for years. So how about taking a few minutes to give us the support we need to keep doing what we do… Only a few minutes from you, pledging $3 or $5 or $11 a month, will keep us going all year. Go to Patreon.com/theLFShow and join our media team and support movement building.  Thanks!

Big Picture Science
Animals Being Jerks

Big Picture Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 50:31


They're cute and cuddly. But they can also be obnoxious. Science writer Mary Roach has numerous tales about how our animal friends don't always bow to their human overlords and behave the way we'd want. The resulting encounters, such as when gulls disrupt the Vatican's Easter mass, make for amusing stories. But others, such as wolves threatening farmers' livestock, can be tragic. We hear what happens at the messy crossroads of human and wildlife encounters. Guest: Mary Roach – Author of bestselling nonfiction books, most recently “Fuzz: When Nature Breaks the Law.”