Podcasts about Uzbekistan

Sovereign state in Central Asia

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Latest podcast episodes about Uzbekistan

Hackberry House of Chosun
Undercover Disciple-Makers

Hackberry House of Chosun

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 7:00


A group of hard-working and persecuted women in Uzbekistan has banded together to bring disciples and future leaders into the Kingdom of God.

Podcast: Majlis - Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty
The Difficulties Of Marking Kyrgyzstan's Borders With Tajikistan And Uzbekistan - November 06, 2022

Podcast: Majlis - Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 56:38


The recent detentions of politicians, activists, and journalists in Kyrgyzstan and the two conflicts the country has fought in the last 18 months with neighboring Tajikistan have one thing in common -- they stem from attempts to finally demarcate disputed areas of Kyrgyzstan's borders with Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. Marking Kyrgyzstan's borders with its southern and western neighbors has not only been difficult, it has been risky. Joining host Bruce Pannier to discuss the situation are Viktoria Akchurina, author of the recently released book Incomplete State-Building In Central Asia: The State As Social Practice, and Bakyt Beshimov, formerly a member of the Kyrgyz parliament, a Kyrgyz ambassador to India and to the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe.

Hackberry House of Chosun
Honor Your Father and Mother

Hackberry House of Chosun

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 9:00


When a Muslim mother becomes a Christian, is she still worthy of honor by the children- A sad but true story from Uzbekistan.

Doug's Front Porch
61 - David Hunsicker

Doug's Front Porch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 54:13


In this episode I welcome David Hunsicker up on the Front Porch. We discuss his very PA Dutch childhood, his conversion to Islam, his time spent in Turkey and Uzbekistan, and close talking about his job working in the Palestinian and Israeli conflict. A fascinating conversation to say the least! Click to learn more about Uzbekistan!Get your Front Porch Merch! Support the show

Podcast: Majlis - Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty
Kyrgyz Government Jails Opponents, Blocks RFE/RL - October 30, 2022

Podcast: Majlis - Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 43:27


After Kyrgyz officials announced the terms of a proposed border agreement with Uzbekistan in early October, there were protests and a committee was established to oppose the border deal. Kyrgyz authorities have detained more than 20 opponents of the agreement, many of them well-known figures in the country with many supporters. The authorities also blocked the website of RFE/RL's Kyrgyz Service. Tensions are high again in Kyrgyzstan, a country that has seen three revolutions since 2005. Joining host Bruce Pannier to discuss the situation in Kyrgyzstan are Leila Nazgul Seiitbek, a lawyer and chairwoman of the NGO Freedom for Eurasia, and Saniia Toktogazieva, a constitutional lawyer and associate professor teaching international law at the American University of Central Asia in Bishkek.

The John Batchelor Show
#Kazahkstan: #Uzbekistan, #Turkmenistan: #Tajikistan: #Kyrgyzstan: Between two dominating capitals. Kamran Bokhari, Geopolitical Futures.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 11:30


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow #Kazahkstan: #Uzbekistan, #Turkmenistan: #Tajikistan: #Kyrgyzstan: Between two dominating capitals. Kamran Bokhari, Geopolitical Futures. https://geopoliticalfutures.com/daily-memo-testy-north-korea-21st-century-marshall-plan/

The History of Computing
The Silk Roads: Then And Now...

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 10:07


The Silk Road, or roads more appropriately, has been in use for thousands of years. Horses, jade, gold, and of course silk flowed across the trade routes. As did spices - and knowledge. The term Silk Road was coined by a German geographer named Ferdinand van Richthofen in 1870 to describe a network of routes that was somewhat formalized in the second century that some theorize date back 3000 years, given that silk has been found on Egyptian mummies from that time - or further. The use of silk itself in China in fact dates back perhaps 8,500 years. Chinese silk has been found in Scythian graves, ancient Germanic graves, and along mountain ranges and waterways around modern India gold and silk flowed between east and west. These gave way to empires along the Carpathian Mountains or Kansu Corridor. There were Assyrian outposts in modern Iran and the Sogdia built cities around modern Samarkand in Uzbekistan, an area that has been inhabited since the 4th millennium BCE. The Sogdians developed trading networks that spanned over 1,500 miles - into ancient China. The road expanded with he Persian Royal Road from the 5th century BCE across Turkey and with the conquests of Alexander the Great in the 300s BCE, the Macedonian Empire pushed into Central Asia into modern Uzbekistan. The satrap Diodotus I claimed independence of one of those areas between the Hindu Kush, Pamirs, and Tengri Tagh mountains, which became known as the Hellenized name Bactria and called the Greco-Bactrian and then Into-Greek Kingdoms by history. Their culture also dates back thousands of years further.  The Bactrians became powerful enough to push into the Indus Valley, west along the Caspian Sea, and north to the Syr Darya river, known as the Jaxartes at the time and to the Aral Sea. They also pushed south into modern Pakistan and Afghanistan, and east to modern Kyrgyzstan. To cross the Silk Road was to cross through Bactria, and they were considered a Greek empire in the east. The Han Chinese called them Daxia in the third century BCE. They grew so wealthy from the trade that they became the target of conquest by neighboring peoples once the thirst for silk could not be unquenched in the Roman Empire. The Romans consumed so much silk that silver reserves were worn thin and they regulated how silk could be used - something some of the Muslim's would do over the next generations.  Meanwhile, the Chinese hadn't known where their silk was destined, but had been astute enough to limit who knew how silk was produced. The Chinese general Pan Chao in the first century AD and attempted to make contact with the Roman's only to be thwarted by Parthians, who acted as the middlemen on many a trade route. It wasn't until the Romans pushed East enough to control the Persian Gulf that an envoy was sent by Marcus Aurelius that made direct contact with China in 166 AD and from there, spread throughout the kingdom. Justinian even sent monks to bring home silkworm eggs but they were never able to reproduce silk, in part because they didn't have mulberry trees. Yet, the west had perpetrated industrial espionage on the east, a practice that would be repeated in 1712 when a Jesuit priest found how the Chinese created porcelain.  The Silk Road was a place where great fortunes could be found or lost. The Dread Pirate Roberts was a character from a movie called the Princess Bride, who had left home to make his fortune, so he could spend his life with his love, Buttercup. The Silk Road had made many a fortune, so Ross Ulbricht used that name on a site he created called the Silk Road, along with Frosty and Attoid. He'd gotten his Bachelors at the University of Texas and Masters at Penn State University before he got the idea to start a website he called the Silk Road in 2011. Most people connected to the site via ToR and paid for items in bitcoins. After he graduated from Penn State, he'd started a couple of companies that didn't do that well. Given the success of Amazon, he and a friend started a site to sell used books, but Ulbricht realized it was more profitable to be the middle man, as the Parthians had thousands of years earlier. The new site would be Underground Brokers and later changed to The Silk Road. Cryptocurrencies allowed for anonymous transactions. He got some help from others, including two that went by the pseudonyms Smedley (later suspected to be Mike Wattier) and Variety Jones (later suspected to be Thomas Clark). They started to facilitate transactions in 2011. Business was good almost from the beginning. Then Gawker published an article about the site and more and more attention was paid to what was sold through this new darknet portal. The United States Department of Justice and other law enforcement agencies got involved. When bitcoins traded at less than $80 each, the United States Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) seized 11 bitcoins, but couldn't take the site down for good. It was actually an IRS investigator named Gary Alford who broke the case when he found the link between the Dread Pirate Roberts and Attoid and then a post that included Ulbricht's name and phone number. Ulbricht was picked up in San Francisco and 26,000 bitcoins were seized, along with another 144,000 from Ulbricht's personal wallets. Two federal agents were arrested when it was found they traded information about the investigation to Ulbricht. Ulbricht was also accused of murder for hire, but those charges never led to much. Ulbricht now servers a life sentence. The Silk Road of the darknet didn't sell silk. 70% of the 10,000 things sold were drugs. There were also fake identities, child pornography, and through a second site, firearms. There were scammers. Tens of millions of dollars flowed over this new Silk Road. But the secrets weren't guarded well enough and a Silk Road 2 was created in 2013, which only lasted a year. Others come and go. It's kinda' like playing whack-a-mole. The world is a big place and the reach of law enforcement agencies limited, thus the harsh sentence for Ulbricht.

The Art of Asymmetrical Warfare
Episode 44 – The Russian Civil War: Abdurauf Fitrat

The Art of Asymmetrical Warfare

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 36:37


Learn about Abdurauf Fitrat, a giant in Central Asian literature and a statesman who played a key role in creating the modern state of Uzbekistan and its language. If you enjoyed this episode, please donate to our Patreon References: Making Uzbekistan: Nation, Empire, and Revolution in the Early USSR by Adeeb Khalid Reviewed Work(s): Evading […]

MedicalMissions.com Podcast
Mentoring Christ Followers in Healthcare

MedicalMissions.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022


Despite the recognition that successful mentoring experiences are usually the result of intentional and committed relationships between mentor and mentee, there are still challenges in achieving consistent, positive outcomes for mission driven Christ followers in healthcare. Healthcare missionaries, whether domestic or foreign, face unexpected challenges, failures, and disappointments, both on and off the field of service, across a broad spectrum of life, work, and ministry. This talk will focus on the essential commitments of both mentor and mentee during the early career of cross-cultural workers who serve in diverse living and working environments.

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Nomad Futurist
Taking Risks

Nomad Futurist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 45:21


Elya McCleave has been taking risks her whole life. In this fascinating Nomad Futurist podcast, McCleave shares her inspiring journey from Uzbekistan to Canada where she is now the Founder of Innovorg, a SaaS company dedicated to helping businesses optimize employee and customer success. McCleave's journey was fueled by her vision and determination to actualize her potential. She discusses with Phil and Nabeel the many challenges she faced including assimilation into a foreign culture, learning the nuances of English, and finding her voice as a female leader in a male-dominated industry. The daughter of engineers, McCleave was encouraged by her parents to pursue her goals. Initially obtaining a degree in civil engineering, she shifted her focus to other aspects of contemporary tech, emigrated to Canada and secured a position as a first line engineer, moving up through the ranks as she became focused on customer success — something she is passionate about. “I'm not your typical technical leader, technical founder. I'm more focused on customer relationships, the operations, the customer success, the sales elements.” McCleave talks about the challenge of achieving an authentic communication style, of finding her voice as a woman in business. Some mentors suggested that she not share personal details of her life with her staff, others suggested that she was too direct. “Now I realize the only way forward is just to be yourself…especially with your staff…letting them get to know who you really are makes things much more fun and much more enjoyable in the workplace.” McCleave talks about the emotional rollercoaster she has experienced as a founder, negotiating the ups and downs of her own business. Her biggest challenge is the loneliness she faces after having worked in companies with large teams, alongside VPs, directors, and managers. “All of a sudden I'm a solo founder in my little office, with my laptop doing my thing. Trying to build a product and rally the people around me.” McCleave talks about the importance of having friends and family to counterbalance the loneliness that can come with entrepreneurship.  But she clearly thrives on taking chances and is extremely upbeat about the necessity of living with risk. “You need to rely on the universe, know that it has your back, and everything will work out in the end.” Her advice to people starting out, especially immigrants who are pursuing a corporate career: “Companies do not nurture authenticity. There's the notion of your being a great soldier and producing great results. But producing great results can also mean having your own personality, having your own great style…so don't be afraid to be yourself and let your colleagues and your boss get to know you.” Elya McCleave has two decades of global leadership experience in IT Service Management and Customer Success. She is a vibrant, veteran leader of the Cloud industry, responsible for pioneering and reshaping the customer experiences of many successful organizations.  Since leaving the corporate world, McCleave founded a SaaS company, Innovorg, to help more businesses focus on employee and customer growth. Innovorg is an ambitious, ground-breaking analytics and skills building solution that has been refined from years of listening to customers, the employees that serve them, product managers and executives who build their business around achieving complete customer satisfaction. 

Perfect Strangers
When going Home means being an outsider again

Perfect Strangers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 21:16


What can go wrong when you have an American accent, an American passport and your parents tell you you are going home after living 7 years in Uzbekistan? You will totally fit in, finally! At least that's what Jessi thought. I discovered her story while reading a blog she wrote for Families in global Transition, an NGO which serves as a forum for mobile individuals. I was touched by the very authentic way  she described her 13 years old self facing difficulties she didn't expect.  I also discovered that she created a company named Kaleidoscope to help kids that go through the same type of difficult transitions. trailer's music: Paris Gipsy Swing By Dieter Van der Westen music ending episode: Danse macabre by Kevin Mac Leod

The Omni-Win Project Podcast
Our Media & Politicians Prevent Us From Lasting Change

The Omni-Win Project Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 60:34


Welcome to the Omni-Win Project Podcast.It's time to upgrade our democracy. If you're fed up with the status quo and want to catalyze political and societal change, you're in the right place. The Omni-Win Project Podcast is ready to shed light on the many opportunities we have to revolutionize our political culture. We're all in this together, so join us in co-creating the future of democracy. “Everybody's talking, but they're not listening.”This week, Duncan welcomes Guy and Heidi Burgess onto the show. They talk about how people have a moral obligation to get involved in solving our problems, and that our current way of thinking isn't working for us. Climate change and conflict have many similarities, and Heidi explains what they are.Uncover why our political system simply isn't working for us, and how we can start changing that. We're deeply polarized, and our media and politics play into this issue. It stops us from coming together to create lasting change, and we need to fight back against bad actors.Are you ready to be a force for good in our world? Episode Highlights: Discover how a man in Uzbekistan inspired the Burgesses to make their content accessible to all.Heidi explains the similarities between climate change and conflict. Guy talks about the issue with watching our favorite news channel. Understand why it's imperative we bring people together from different disciplines. (Maybe that's you!)Heidi calls for people in the field to get involved in teaching people how to deal with polarization.Guy explains why we need to solve problems the same way doctors do. Uncover why our political system just doesn't work. Duncan explains why issues aren't as simple as yes or no or this or that About this episode's guest: Guy and Heidi Burgess are a husband-and-wife team of Ph.D. social scientists. They have been studying, teaching, and practicing conflict resolution for 40+ years. They co-direct the Conflict Information Consortium and its underlying projects, Beyond Intractability and the Constructive Conflict Initiative. Their biggest focus is creating an online resource library on  www.beyondintractability.org about peacebuilding, strengthening democracy, and conflict resolution. Connect with Heidi & Guy:WebsiteEmail: burgess@beyondintractability.orgSubstack Here are some resources mentioned in the show. Beyond IntractabilityThings you can do to helpConstructive Conflict InitiativeThe Hyper-Polarization Crisis: A Conflict Resolution Challengefeature article, published in the Conflict Resolution Quarterly (https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/crq.21334).For more resources and content from this episode go to the episode page HERE Where Else can you find this episode?  Watch On Youtube On SubstackEpisode PageLooking to learn more about how we can change the future of our democracy? Connect with Duncan & the Omni-Win Project: FacebookInstagramTwitterLinkedInYouTubeSubstack

VOMOz Radio
UZBEKISTAN: Prayer Emboldens Persecuted Christians

VOMOz Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 21:53


Last week, Brother Max shared his testimony of seeking God through following Islam then, when he met Jesus, finding a peace he'd never experienced before. After finding that peace, Max wanted to tell everyone he knew, but he was not prepared for how his community would react with anger and persecution. Max found it very natural to talk about Jesus with people who had known him before his salvation. They could see his life was drastically different, and they wanted an explanation. Brother Max was eager to share God's Word with those who asked. He told them he'd found the ‘passport to heaven.' But leaving Islam is not permitted, and his family and community persecuted him for his faith in Christ. His father could see how Max's life had changed for the better—but still urged him to return to Islam. Max explained, “If I take Jesus from my heart, I will become the old Max again.” He challenged his father to read the New Testament. Persecuted first by those he knew, Max and his witness for Christ soon drew the attention of the government. He was arrested and interrogated by several police. It was a frightening experience; his legs shook with fear as the police questioned him and forced him to write a “confession” that would be used against him, dictating the words he was supposed to write. Christians gathered outside the police station, praying for Max during the interrogation. The presence and prayers of his Christian brothers and sisters encouraged Max, and a holy boldness came over him. He turned the table on the police, asking them questions instead of answering theirs. Listen as Brother Max shares how the Lord worked through that situation and later brought Max face to face with the one who prosecuted him—now a follower of Christ! He'll also share about training new believers in Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan and Azerbaijan to withstand Christian persecution after they leave Islam to follow Jesus. “Our time is short,” he says, “so we should be ready to meet Jesus.” Max will also equip listeners to pray for Christians in the region—including those facing persecution.

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment
Kyrgyzstan's walnut forests dwindle with increased cattle farming, climate change

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022


On a crisp October afternoon, Bakhadir Fazilov approached a tall walnut tree, wrapped his legs and arms around the trunk and began climbing toward the top — more than 40 feet above ground.At the top of the tree, Fazilov nimbly stepped out onto a flimsy branch and began shaking the limbs until the walnuts came crashing down to the ground.Kyrgyzstan is home to the largest natural walnut forest on Earth. It's a unique ecosystem with more than 30,000 acres that rises above the bustling town of Arslanbob, not far from the Uzbekistan border. But climate change and increased cattle farming have created intense pressure on the walnut forest. Bakhadir Fazilov, 44, climbs a walnut tree and shakes the nuts off the branches. In southern Kyrgyzstan, locals harvest walnuts by climbing the trees themselves or waiting until storms blow the precious nuts onto the ground. Credit: Levi Bridges/The World Every fall, locals like Fazilov camp out in the ancient, shadowy walnut forest in southwestern Kyrgyzstan for up to two months. In a good year, harvesters can pick literally a ton of nuts, and buyers come from as far away as Turkey and Russia to purchase the crop. But this year, the harvest was so poor that few locals even bothered to lug their tents up into the mountains to pick the walnuts. “Last summer, the weather was really hot, so all the nuts fell off,” Fazilov said.The walnut forest where Fazilov sets up camp with his wife and four children each fall is government land. Fazilov rents about 10 acres for about $80. In a good year, he can earn more than $1,200 for the season. But this year, he might only make of half that. Bakhadir Fazilov and Nuribat Fazilova spend up to two months camped out in the walnut forests of southern Kyrgyzstan each fall harvesting the nuts with their four children. They shell the nuts during the cold winter months when work becomes scarce and sell them to wholesalers. Credit: Levi Bridges/The World Livestock present an even more pressing challenge to the walnut forests than climate change. Many Kyrgyz make a living herding cows and sheep that graze on pastures in the nearby mountains that rise above the walnut trees. Most of those pastures also belong to the government, but authorities don't put many limits on livestock grazing.In the region surrounding the walnut forest, livestock numbers have been increasing by 3% to 4% annually, and the pastures are getting depleted. Now, herders let animals roam the walnut forests in search of food.The thick forest also provides a shade for animals and herders during the sweltering summer months. Cows eat the little walnut saplings, which means there's no new growth. And horses roaming through the forests also eat the bark, which kills the old trees.“Just look at all the wounds on this tree,” Fazilov said, pointing at the yellow wood where a horse had stripped the bark. “We can't pick a good harvest because of this [damage].” A cow searches for food in the walnut forests of southern Kyrgyzstan. As the summers become hotter because of climate change, herders increasingly spend the hot months in the shade of the walnut forests with their cattle. The cows eat up the new saplings so the forests no longer rejuvenate.  Credit: Levi Bridges/The World Fazilov said he would like to put up fencing in this stretch of forest that he rents to keep the animals out, but he said that he can't afford it.In rural Kyrgyzstan, many have few economic opportunities besides migrating to Russia or staying at home and working the land — which often means herding animals.Environmental workers there say that many Kyrgyz are distrustful of banks, so people invest what savings they have in animals. The idea is that selling animals for meat is a better investment than the meager interest earned in a savings account.But herding animals has led to severe environmental problems, such as increasing desertification and a loss of plant diversity.On a hill in the pastureland high above the walnut forest, livestock have eaten all the plant life down to the dirt. The only vegetation that remains is bits of dry chaff and grass lying on the ground above black dust.“This hill is naked, the animals ate everything,” said Nurgazy Nurbaev, a manager at the Kyrgyz environmental organization CAMP Alatoo, as he gazed out at the desiccated pasture. “There's 2 ½  times more animals grazing here than the pasture can support,” Nurbaev said. Dust trails up behind a line of cattle. In some parts of Kyrgyzstan, cattle have overgrazed the land so much researchers believe they are contributing to desertification. Credit: Levi Bridges/The World At the top of the hill, CAMP Alatoo has installed two big metal cages secured with padlocks. Inside there's grass and shrubs growing.“This is what the pasture would look like if there were no animals,” Nurbaev said, gesturing toward the cages. CAMP Alatoo's researchers collect data in these cages to gauge how much grazing the land can actually support. They make recommendations to herders about how to better manage the land. But CAMP Alatoo's project manager, Jyrgal Kozhomberdiev, said that not enough herders are following their advice. “Many people are just continuing [on], [with] business as usual,” Kozhomberdiev said. The environmental organization CAMP Alatoo uses cages to monitor Kyrgyzstan's pastureland. Livestock can't graze inside the cages, allowing researchers to monitor plant life and form plans to better manage the pastures. Credit: Levi Bridges/The World Kozhomberdiev hopes that technology can be part of the solution. CAMP Alatoo helped to digitize different pasture management programs around the country. Local pasture committees can use this information to figure out where to move herds to less congested pastures and gauge their environmental impact. And this year, CAMP Alatoo helped develop a new smartphone app called Pasture Monitoring that herders and researchers can use to document the changing environment.Available in Kyrgyz, Russian and English, the app requires users to take a picture of the landscape they see and then select from checklists that describe characteristics, such as plant species and soil quality. Users also tag their location and can choose to link the information they collect to a server that scientists can access.“This type of information was not collected since the Soviet Union collapsed, due to a lack of funding, so we think that this mobile app can facilitate the process [of data collection],”  Kozhomberdiev said.Scientific research on Kyrgyzstan's pastureland has been virtually nonexistent for several decades. It's the herders who have some of the most in-depth knowledge about how the changing climate is affecting local ecosystems. While they have exacerbated recent environmental problems, they can now be a key part of the solution. During harvest time in southern Kyrgyzstan, walnuts are served in dishes alongside most meals. Credit: Levi Bridges/The World There are actually two ways to harvest a walnut in Kyrgyzstan — some may wait until a strong storm blows through and knocks the nuts to the ground. But many locals hope to continue to camp out in the walnut forest, climbing up the trees to shake the nuts free each fall.

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment
Kyrgyzstan's walnut forests dwindle with increased cattle farming, climate change

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022


On a crisp October afternoon, Bakhadir Fazilov approached a tall walnut tree, wrapped his legs and arms around the trunk and began climbing toward the top — more than 40 feet above ground.At the top of the tree, Fazilov nimbly stepped out onto a flimsy branch and began shaking the limbs until the walnuts came crashing down to the ground.Kyrgyzstan is home to the largest natural walnut forest on Earth. It's a unique ecosystem with more than 30,000 acres that rises above the bustling town of Arslanbob, not far from the Uzbekistan border. But climate change and increased cattle farming have created intense pressure on the walnut forest. Bakhadir Fazilov, 44, climbs a walnut tree and shakes the nuts off the branches. In southern Kyrgyzstan, locals harvest walnuts by climbing the trees themselves or waiting until storms blow the precious nuts onto the ground. Credit: Levi Bridges/The World Every fall, locals like Fazilov camp out in the ancient, shadowy walnut forest in southwestern Kyrgyzstan for up to two months. In a good year, harvesters can pick literally a ton of nuts, and buyers come from as far away as Turkey and Russia to purchase the crop. But this year, the harvest was so poor that few locals even bothered to lug their tents up into the mountains to pick the walnuts. “Last summer, the weather was really hot, so all the nuts fell off,” Fazilov said.The walnut forest where Fazilov sets up camp with his wife and four children each fall is government land. Fazilov rents about 10 acres for about $80. In a good year, he can earn more than $1,200 for the season. But this year, he might only make of half that. Bakhadir Fazilov and Nuribat Fazilova spend up to two months camped out in the walnut forests of southern Kyrgyzstan each fall harvesting the nuts with their four children. They shell the nuts during the cold winter months when work becomes scarce and sell them to wholesalers. Credit: Levi Bridges/The World Livestock present an even more pressing challenge to the walnut forests than climate change. Many Kyrgyz make a living herding cows and sheep that graze on pastures in the nearby mountains that rise above the walnut trees. Most of those pastures also belong to the government, but authorities don't put many limits on livestock grazing.In the region surrounding the walnut forest, livestock numbers have been increasing by 3% to 4% annually, and the pastures are getting depleted. Now, herders let animals roam the walnut forests in search of food.The thick forest also provides a shade for animals and herders during the sweltering summer months. Cows eat the little walnut saplings, which means there's no new growth. And horses roaming through the forests also eat the bark, which kills the old trees.“Just look at all the wounds on this tree,” Fazilov said, pointing at the yellow wood where a horse had stripped the bark. “We can't pick a good harvest because of this [damage].” A cow searches for food in the walnut forests of southern Kyrgyzstan. As the summers become hotter because of climate change, herders increasingly spend the hot months in the shade of the walnut forests with their cattle. The cows eat up the new saplings so the forests no longer rejuvenate.  Credit: Levi Bridges/The World Fazilov said he would like to put up fencing in this stretch of forest that he rents to keep the animals out, but he said that he can't afford it.In rural Kyrgyzstan, many have few economic opportunities besides migrating to Russia or staying at home and working the land — which often means herding animals.Environmental workers there say that many Kyrgyz are distrustful of banks, so people invest what savings they have in animals. The idea is that selling animals for meat is a better investment than the meager interest earned in a savings account.But herding animals has led to severe environmental problems, such as increasing desertification and a loss of plant diversity.On a hill in the pastureland high above the walnut forest, livestock have eaten all the plant life down to the dirt. The only vegetation that remains is bits of dry chaff and grass lying on the ground above black dust.“This hill is naked, the animals ate everything,” said Nurgazy Nurbaev, a manager at the Kyrgyz environmental organization CAMP Alatoo, as he gazed out at the desiccated pasture. “There's 2 ½  times more animals grazing here than the pasture can support,” Nurbaev said. Dust trails up behind a line of cattle. In some parts of Kyrgyzstan, cattle have overgrazed the land so much researchers believe they are contributing to desertification. Credit: Levi Bridges/The World At the top of the hill, CAMP Alatoo has installed two big metal cages secured with padlocks. Inside there's grass and shrubs growing.“This is what the pasture would look like if there were no animals,” Nurbaev said, gesturing toward the cages. CAMP Alatoo's researchers collect data in these cages to gauge how much grazing the land can actually support. They make recommendations to herders about how to better manage the land. But CAMP Alatoo's project manager, Jyrgal Kozhomberdiev, said that not enough herders are following their advice. “Many people are just continuing [on], [with] business as usual,” Kozhomberdiev said. The environmental organization CAMP Alatoo uses cages to monitor Kyrgyzstan's pastureland. Livestock can't graze inside the cages, allowing researchers to monitor plant life and form plans to better manage the pastures. Credit: Levi Bridges/The World Kozhomberdiev hopes that technology can be part of the solution. CAMP Alatoo helped to digitize different pasture management programs around the country. Local pasture committees can use this information to figure out where to move herds to less congested pastures and gauge their environmental impact. And this year, CAMP Alatoo helped develop a new smartphone app called Pasture Monitoring that herders and researchers can use to document the changing environment.Available in Kyrgyz, Russian and English, the app requires users to take a picture of the landscape they see and then select from checklists that describe characteristics, such as plant species and soil quality. Users also tag their location and can choose to link the information they collect to a server that scientists can access.“This type of information was not collected since the Soviet Union collapsed, due to a lack of funding, so we think that this mobile app can facilitate the process [of data collection],”  Kozhomberdiev said.Scientific research on Kyrgyzstan's pastureland has been virtually nonexistent for several decades. It's the herders who have some of the most in-depth knowledge about how the changing climate is affecting local ecosystems. While they have exacerbated recent environmental problems, they can now be a key part of the solution. During harvest time in southern Kyrgyzstan, walnuts are served in dishes alongside most meals. Credit: Levi Bridges/The World There are actually two ways to harvest a walnut in Kyrgyzstan — some may wait until a strong storm blows through and knocks the nuts to the ground. But many locals hope to continue to camp out in the walnut forest, climbing up the trees to shake the nuts free each fall.

VOMRadio
UZBEKISTAN: Prayer Emboldens Persecuted Christians

VOMRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 25:32


Last week, Brother Max shared his testimony of seeking God through following Islam then, when he met Jesus, finding a peace he'd never experienced before. After finding that peace, Max wanted to tell everyone he knew, but he was not prepared for how his community would react with anger and persecution. Max found it very natural to talk about Jesus with people who had known him before his salvation. They could see his life was drastically different, and they wanted an explanation. Brother Max was eager to share God's Word with those who asked. He told them he'd found the ‘passport to heaven.' But leaving Islam is not permitted, and his family and community persecuted him for his faith in Christ. His father could see how Max's life had changed for the better—but still urged him to return to Islam. Max explained, “If I take Jesus from my heart, I will become the old Max again.” He challenged his father to read the New Testament. Persecuted first by those he knew, Max and his witness for Christ soon drew the attention of the government. He was arrested and interrogated by several police. It was a frightening experience; his legs shook with fear as the police questioned him and forced him to write a “confession” that would be used against him, dictating the words he was supposed to write. Christians gathered outside the police station, praying for Max during the interrogation. The presence and prayers of his Christian brothers and sisters encouraged Max, and a holy boldness came over him. He turned the table on the police, asking them questions instead of answering theirs. Listen as Brother Max shares how the Lord worked through that situation and later brought Max face to face with the one who prosecuted him—now a follower of Christ! He'll also share about training new believers in Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan and Azerbaijan to withstand Christian persecution after they leave Islam to follow Jesus. “Our time is short,” he says, “so we should be ready to meet Jesus.” Max will also equip listeners to pray for Christians in the region—including those facing persecution. Listen to the first part of Max's story here, and learn more about Max's ministry, Global Teams, here. Never miss an episode of VOM Radio! Subscribe to the podcast.

Lofi Poli Sci Podcast
"Central Asia News: Lo-Fi Regional Edition"

Lofi Poli Sci Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 5:47


Today's Topics: Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan. Always remember that Lofi Poli Sci is more than just me, it's the “we”, that we be. Episode Link: https://youtu.be/11deqGObv74 Episode 43 Season 6 (series 561) Official Website: www.lofipolisci.com Instagram: lofi_poli_sci_podcast YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/LofiPoliSciPodcast LinkedIn: Michael Pickering #lofipolisci #lofi #politicalscience #news #worldnews #globalnews #lofiGlobalNews #alwaysHope #podcast #lofipoliscipodcast #Top10 #GoodNewsFriday #PickeringUnplugged #LettersOfTheLofiPoliSci #Kyrgyzstan #Kazakhstan #Uzbekistan #Tajikistan #Turkmenistan

The Dark Side of Seoul Podcast

Olga Kim is a Koryo-Saram artist from Rome. Olga is joining us to discuss Koryo-saram, a unique group of Korean diaspora who migrated to Uzbekistan in the late 19th century.Olga's InstagramJoin our Patreon to get more stuff!https://patreon.com/darksideofseoulBook a tour of The Dark Side of Seoul Ghost Walk at https://darksideofseoul.comListener Mail! Send us a message (Instagram, Facebook, email) and we might read it on air.CreditsProduced by Joe McPherson, Shawn Morrissey, and Mia RoncatiMusic by SoraksanTop tier PatronsAngel EarlJoel BonominiShaaron CullenDevon HiphnerMinseok LeeAlix RadillaRyan BerkebileAshley RigbyGabi PalominoSteve MarshChad StruhsMitchy Brewer Sarah FordToni ASean 진헌 BraunLaura CaseyReba PriceAndrea McDermottSupport the show

VOMOz Radio
UZBEKISTAN: Adopted Into a New Family

VOMOz Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 24:04


As a boy in Uzbekistan, Brother Max couldn't imagine a God that cared about his life or had a plan for him. His biological parents didn't want him. In his Islamic culture, he felt shame because he was adopted. He was consumed with the idea of getting revenge against his birth parents, who had abandoned him. Every day was dark. He felt hopeless and prayed every night that he would not wake up the next morning. When the Soviet Union collapsed, radical Muslim missionaries entered Uzbekistan to encourage young people raised under communism to pursue Islam. Max began training under an imam, seeking God, and learning more about how to pray to Allah in the required way and the history of Islam. But those lessons, and his increasing knowledge, never brought the peace he craved. Max had many questions about Islam. Why couldn't Allah understand his native language? Did Prophet Mohammed's life match his teachings? But Max was told to just accept the teachings, that his questions had no answers, and he should stop asking. Max first learned about the God who loved him from a friend whose life had been changed. Max wrestled with this new idea. How could God love me if my biological parents didn't? If God loves me, why didn't he help me achieve all the goals I had for my future? After wrestling spiritually for several months, Max came to fully trust Christ and seek forgiveness for his sin. Instantly, he felt differently. He finally felt peace in his heart, and from that moment his life changed completely. He started sharing his testimony with people who remembered how angry Max had been before Christ, explaining that he was a new creation! He even forgave his biological mother. As a new Christian, Max wasn't worried about Christian persecution; he simply wanted to share what Jesus had done for him. Today Brother Max is serving the Lord with Global Teams, where he helps train others to evangelize Muslims and plant churches in hostile and restricted nations.

MedicalMissions.com Podcast
Medicine, Missions, and Motherhood

MedicalMissions.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022


Balancing too many roles, wearing too many hats. It's tough to be a missionary doctor mom...is it even really possible? Some helpful discussion to guide us into the life God wants for each of his daughters.

god united states canada australia europe china mental health france japan mexico germany russia research africa ukraine italy united kingdom medicine ireland new zealand north america spain afghanistan south africa brazil nutrition turkey argentina iran vietnam sweden medical portugal thailand motherhood colombia iraq chile cuba singapore netherlands nigeria balancing switzerland greece indonesia philippines venezuela reunions kenya poland peru south america taiwan norway denmark public health costa rica finland south korea belgium missions haiti syria pakistan jamaica austria saudi arabia north korea iceland ghana guatemala uganda counseling ecuador malaysia lebanon nepal qatar nursing ethiopia sri lanka romania congo panama hungary el salvador bahamas zimbabwe dentists psychiatry honduras bolivia morocco dominican republic rwanda bangladesh nicaragua cambodia tanzania uruguay croatia pharmacy monaco malta physical therapy mali bulgaria czech republic sudan belarus chiropractic serbia yemen pediatrics dental senegal estonia libya somalia greenland madagascar neurology fiji kazakhstan infectious diseases cyprus barbados zambia mongolia paraguay kuwait lithuania armenia angola allergy bahrain belize macedonia luxembourg internal medicine plastic surgery sierra leone slovenia namibia liberia oman mozambique slovakia united arab emirates tunisia malawi cameroon oncology laos latvia botswana midwife emergency medicine surgical papua new guinea south pacific albania burkina faso azerbaijan tonga family medicine guyana algeria togo cardiology guinea niger south sudan moldova dermatology bhutan maldives dieticians uzbekistan mauritius naturopathic burundi andorra occupational therapy gambia eritrea benin radiology social services grenada anesthesia kyrgyzstan vanuatu gabon physician assistants endocrinology ophthalmology san marino suriname gastroenterology health education palau solomon islands athletic trainers environmental health liechtenstein brunei lesotho tajikistan turkmenistan seychelles swaziland optometry djibouti rheumatology hematology mauritania central african republic timor leste marshall islands healthcare administration nephrology nauru kiribati general surgery cape verde preventative medicine french polynesia new caledonia international health guinea bissau speech pathology dental hygienists orthopaedic surgery tuvalu allied health osteopathic equatorial guinea saint lucia trinidad and tobago cardiac surgery french guiana comoros pulmonology dental assistants bosnia and herzegovina western samoa democratic republic of the congo lab medicine surgical tech laboratory technician epidemology
VOMRadio
UZBEKISTAN: Adopted Into a New Family

VOMRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 25:27


As a boy in Uzbekistan, Brother Max couldn't imagine a God that cared about his life or had a plan for him. His biological parents didn't want him. In his Islamic culture, he felt shame because he was adopted. He was consumed with the idea of getting revenge against his birth parents, who had abandoned him. Every day was dark. He felt hopeless and prayed every night that he would not wake up the next morning. When the Soviet Union collapsed, radical Muslim missionaries entered Uzbekistan to encourage young people raised under communism to pursue Islam. Max began training under an imam, seeking God, and learning more about how to pray to Allah in the required way and the history of Islam. But those lessons, and his increasing knowledge, never brought the peace he craved. Max had many questions about Islam. Why couldn't Allah understand his native language? Did Prophet Mohammed's life match his teachings? But Max was told to just accept the teachings, that his questions had no answers, and he should stop asking. Max first learned about the God who loved him from a friend whose life had been changed. Max wrestled with this new idea. How could God love me if my biological parents didn't? If God loves me, why didn't he help me achieve all the goals I had for my future? After wrestling spiritually for several months, Max came to fully trust Christ and seek forgiveness for his sin. Instantly, he felt differently. He finally felt peace in his heart, and from that moment his life changed completely. He started sharing his testimony with people who remembered how angry Max had been before Christ, explaining that he was a new creation! He even forgave his biological mother. As a new Christian, Max wasn't worried about Christian persecution; he simply wanted to share what Jesus had done for him. Today Brother Max is serving the Lord with Global Teams, where he helps train others to evangelize Muslims and plant churches in hostile and restricted nations. Never miss an episode of VOM Radio! Subscribe to the podcast.

The ReLaunch Podcast
ReLaunch to the Top of Your Game: Secrets from a High-Performance Coach

The ReLaunch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 55:56


What would happen if your mind could operate at the highest level imaginable? Dave Austin, an international best-selling author and speaker, works with people to "get in the zone" and stay there longer. Join Hilary and Dave as they discuss his "mental performance" training methods, leveraging "game-ready" visualizations, and how these tips can help during your own ReLaunch. About Our Guest: As an international bestselling author and speaker, Dave Austin has lectured at Harvard, the United Nations, and the U.S. Pentagon, as well as in Uzbekistan and Chennai, India fulfilling his mission of going “where he is needed most.” Raised by a Navy Chaplain who stormed beaches during WWII without a gun and gave communion on his belly while machine-gun fired overhead, he's inspired by his father's courage and faith; and carries that forward in his work.Co-author of International Bestseller, “BE A BEAST: Unleash Your Animal Instincts for Performance Driven Results” and founder of personal development company Extreme Focus, Dave's “mental performance” training methods are not only endorsed by the Pentagon and used by U.S. Army Rangers, Navy Seals, but also with NFL, MLB, PGA, Olympic athletes, Fortune 500 companies, CEOs, sales teams and entrepreneurs as well.Dave certainly helps his clients get “in the zone” and stay there longer, however, it is his trademark “game ready” visualizations that help elite athletes and professionals in business allow their true talents to rise up and shine. He has worked with the LA Dodgers, Texas Rangers, an U.S. Olympic Field Hockey team, the Cleveland Cavaliers front office staff and executives of USAA Insurance; proving that these unique and specialized coaching methods work equally both on and off the field. From the locker room to the boardroom, he's passionate about training his clients to “think less” and allow their minds to operate at the highest levels imaginable.Living a rich life filled with a variety of experiences, one of his most honored achievements, apart from his 34-year marriage to his wife Cathy and raising four incredible boys together, was back in 1991 when he received the Presidential Merit Award from the Grammy's for his efforts in helping to launch their foundation's programs, Grammy in the Schools and Musicares. https://www.extremefocus.com/ (https://www.extremefocus.com/) https://www.facebook.com/daveaustinXF (https://www.facebook.com/daveaustinXF)

China Global
China, the SCO, and Central Asia

China Global

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 27:44


[2:21] Shanghai Five and the SCO [6:22] Takeaways from Xi Jinping's Visit to Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan[10:16] Russia-China Dynamic in Central Asia[15:07] Public Attitudes Toward China[17:34] Xinjiang and Government Responses[19:08] China's Approach to Central Asia's Energy Resources[21:33] Turkey and Expanding SCO Membership