the morning shakeout podcast

Follow the morning shakeout podcast
Share on
Copy link to clipboard

Host Mario Fraioli gleans insight and inspiration from top athletes, coaches, and personalities in the sport of running.

Mario Fraioli


    • Oct 25, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekly NEW EPISODES
    • 1h 13m AVG DURATION
    • 183 EPISODES

    Listeners of the morning shakeout podcast that love the show mention: mario brings, thanks mario, mario's, fraioli, weekly newsletter, running content, listening to mario, mario is a great host, love mario, thank you mario, mario does a great, great interviewing style, lot of running, really listens, one of the best running, favorite running podcast, asks insightful questions, better runner, smart questions, best running podcast.



    Search for episodes from the morning shakeout podcast with a specific topic:

    Latest episodes from the morning shakeout podcast

    Episode 179 | George Hirsch

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 104:54

    “If there's stressful stuff, and who doesn't have that, the run eases it. It absolutely does. We hear this, of course, from lots of people, and more and more people are figuring out what's going on in terms of brain chemistry—it eases anxiety and stress, I'm talking about serious stress with people, clinical anxiety—but I feel that. And so years and years ago I kind of assumed a mantra, if you will, and that is you come home from work and haven't run, and it is, ‘When in doubt, do it.' And it's served me well, and it still doesn't mean I haven't missed some days, but if I'm kind of on the fence, I'm a little tired, I don't feel up to it, a lot on my mind—get out the door, get in some miles, and I always find that I'm better off for it.” The 50th running of the New York City Marathon is just a couple weekends away and who better to talk to about it than George Hirsch, chairman of the New York Road Runners, and someone who has been involved with the event to one degree or another since its beginnings. This conversation was a real treat for me. We spent half of it talking about the New York City Marathon, its history, its stories, its allure, and more. We also discussed how all of those things went into a new book called The New York City Marathon: 50 Years Running, which is a coffee table keepsake that I'm really enjoying right now. I also got George to tell me more about himself, his legendary career in publishing, which included a stint at Runner's World during its heyday, how he got his start in running back in the 1960s, what keeps him running six days a week at the age of 87, how his relationship to it has evolved over the decades, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Runderwear. Runderwear's mission is to eliminate the discomfort caused by ill-fitting underwear and to create seamless performance running underwear, base wear, bras and socks that are supremely comfortable, moisture wicking and chafe-free. Take a look at Runderwear.com and use the code TMS20 at checkout for 20% off your purchase.  — Precision Hydration. I've been a devotee to PH products for the past 4 years and my last few marathons wouldn't have gone as well without them. Go to precisionhydration.com and take their free online Sweat Test or use the Carb Calculator to get a personalized hydration and nutrition strategy to test in training. As a listener of the show you can get 15% off your first order by using the code TMS15 when checking out. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-179-with-george-hirsch/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: https://themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 178 | Dana Giordano

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 61:07

    “My goals and expectations when I joined the team was committing to the Olympic Trials…but we were all changed through the pandemic. Who I am as a 24-year-old joining a professional team versus me as a 27-year-old kind of living through this high-end running thing, one of my number one goals is I don't want to just be stuck on the domestic mile circuit. If I'm going to do this, I want to do it right. And I was pretty bummed that my body tipped the other end of the scale and couldn't quite figure it out…I think if I committed to keep going and training in the environment that I was in, it kind of would have been the same cycle, so I was like, ‘You know what, this might not be the most prudent move, but I'm going to end this and start a new chapter,' so that's kind of what I've been doing this summer, is figuring out what that chapter looks like.” My conversation this week is with Dana Giordano. She's a top middle distance runner on the track who competed in the 5000m at this summer's Olympic Trials. She also hosts the popular podcast More than Running with Dana, where she sits down and talks with some of the most inspirational and insightful women in running from athletes and coaches to insiders and advocates. In this episode, we talked about where she's at right now and rediscovering the love for running after feeling distraught following the Olympic Trials. She told me about living in Singapore as a kid and developing a love for travel. We spoke about the professional side of the sport and the challenges of making it as a top-level athlete today. We also discussed her podcast, connecting with people, sharing untold stories, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — New Balance. The Fresh Foam 1080 v11 is an absolute workhorse and it's been my go-to trainer for most of my non-workout runs in 2021. It's got great cushioning underfoot that's protective but not too soft, providing a responsive ride that I really enjoy and appreciate. Check it out at newbalance.com and consider adding a pair to your rotation today. — Precision Hydration. I've been a devotee to PH products for the past 4 years and my last few marathons wouldn't have gone as well without them. Go to precisionhydration.com and take their free online Sweat Test or use the Carb Calculator to get a personalized hydration and nutrition strategy to test in training. As a listener of the show you can get 15% off your first order by using the code TMS15 when checking out. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-178-with-dana-giordano/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: https://themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 177 | Bill Rodgers

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 67:38

    “Talent is an interesting question. What is it really? It means, can you avoid injuries? It means, can you back off? When you get crushed, will you come back? I didn't like that part. I think it's a lot of different things. It's not maybe a physical thing, but it's a mental thing. When you see a lot of these athletes—a lot of you are here because you have that wherewithal. And maybe you got beat up, because we all get beat up in this sport—it's part of it, it's like a rite of passage. It's just part of it. But it's OK, it's good.” This week on the podcast I'm excited to share a wide-ranging conversation I had this past Saturday with the legendary Bill Rodgers at Tracksmith's Trackhouse in Boston. Bill is a hero of mine and I've long wanted to have him on the show and Boston Marathon weekend turned out to be the perfect opportunity for it. In this conversation, we talk all things Boston, of course, but also get Bill's thoughts on his career, talent, training, how his own relationship with running has evolved over the course of his lifetime, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Tracksmith. Tracksmith crafts performance running apparel, inspiring publications, and distinct experiences that allow runners to indulge in the sport's rich culture. Tracksmith is offering new customers $15 off your first purchase of $75+. Just use code MARIO15 when you check out at tracksmith.com/mario. — Goodr: If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodr sunglasses, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for 15% off your order. Look good, run goodr! Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-177-with-bill-rodgers/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: https://themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 176 | Ask Mario Anything #8

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 60:23

    “I mean, the work's done at this point. I can't gain any appreciable fitness between now and race day. I could screw up a lot if I'm not careful and that's the biggest thing I'm trying to keep an eye on at this point, is when I have those moments where doubt sets in—because it happens to all of us, even if we're really well prepared—where you're like, ‘Should I do another mile or two?' or ‘Should I do another rep?' and that's where you have to have the confidence to say, ‘No, it's not going to make a difference.' The difference is in the last 10-12 weeks, it's not in 10 or 12 more miles, or 10 or 12 more minutes, or 1 or 2 more reps. You just gotta trust it at this point. And, I think having that attitude helps me carry the right amount of confidence into race day.” This week on the podcast I'm answering listener questions in the third Ask Mario Anything episode of 2021. (You can check out the first two here and here.) On the other side of the mic for this one—once again—is sponsorship director, Chris Douglas. We talked about my training for this year's Boston Marathon, how to know whether or not you've got too much left in the tank at the end of a race, training while on vacation, warming up for workouts, diversity and inclusivity in my work, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — New Balance. The new FuelCell RC Elite v2 is the best long-distance road racing shoe I've ever worn and I'll be using it for my upcoming marathon. They've got more FuelCell cushioning in the midsole than the previous model, which softens the blow underfoot, but they're still plenty responsive enough so that you can get into a good rhythm and rip some fast miles. The upper is incredibly lightweight, comfortable, and supportive. Check it out at newbalance.com and consider adding a pair to your rotation today. — Goodr: If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodr sunglasses, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for 15% off your order. Look good, run goodr! Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-176-ask-mario-anything/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: https://themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 175 | Peter Bromka

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 75:28

    “If all that mattered to me was [to run] the best time possible in two weeks then yes, I'd probably go into the other field and just run with some people who I know are right around my fitness level, but luckily I've had fun at Boston a couple times and I realize that's not all there is. It's not only about squeaking out every second, it's about having an awesome experience and I'm pretty pumped to compete. I think in the best way possible, when I think about that last stretch by BU and how horrible it is and how painful it can be to try to muster…you've got like two miles to go and you're like, ‘I just wanna be done.' My dream would be that there's someone ahead of me and they're another Masters runner that has a number on their back and I'm like, ‘I gotta catch that guy,' because that's what also makes it super fun.” Peter Bromka, who first appeared on Episode 92 of the podcast back in 2019, comes back on the show to geek out on all things Boston Marathon with me. Both of us will be competing in this year's race on Monday, October 11, and Peter will be in the elite field as one of the top-ranked Masters runners, which is super cool. A 2:19 marathoner who just missed qualifying for the 2020 Olympic Trials, Peter is also well known for his writing about running, and one of his more recent pieces, called “The Bubble of a Dream,” will be included in The Year's Best Sports Writing 2021, which is due out next month. Peter's also got a great newsletter called The Positive Split, which you can subscribe to at PeterBromka.com. We spent the entirety of this episode talking about Boston, how we're feeling in the final couple weeks of training leading up to the race, what we're most looking forward to—and anxious about—at this year's event, the return of major marathons in general, Boston being held in the fall for the first time, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Runderwear. Runderwear's mission is to eliminate the discomfort caused by ill-fitting underwear and to create seamless performance running underwear, base wear, bras and socks that are supremely comfortable, moisture wicking and chafe-free. Take a look at Runderwear.com and use the code TMS20 at checkout for 20% off your purchase.  — Precision Hydration. I've been a devotee to PH products for the past 4 years and my last few marathons wouldn't have gone as well without them. Go to precisionhydration.com and take their free online Sweat Test or use the Carb Calculator to get a personalized hydration and nutrition strategy to test in training. As a listener of the show you can get 15% off your first order by using the code TMS15 when checking out. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-175-with-peter-bromka/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: https://themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Re-run with Sanjay Rawal

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 51:39

    “It's really inspiring to see someone push themselves and challenge themselves…Bringing out the achievements of people who are fighting the odds, and really putting into context today's race, even for a pro, because even a pro is overcoming something tremendous each race they do—it's never rosy. And understanding that hardship, I think, will give people context into the meaning of a particular race for a particular runner, whether they're an amateur or the world's best.” Sanjay Rawal is a New York City-based runner and filmmaker. At the time of this conversation in 2018 he had just released a film called 3100: Run and Become, which takes an intimate look at one of the most unique foot races on the planet, The Sri Chinmoy 3100-Mile Self-Transcendence Race. That race—which is the longest certified road race in the world—is actually going on right now in Queens, New York. Participants are attempting to complete 3100 miles in 52 days (or less) around the same half-mile block of concrete in the city. In this re-run episode, we talked about the 3100 film, of course, but also about the idea of running as a spiritual practice throughout history, the connection between competition and spirituality, running as a cultural connector, and a lot more. Whether you're a competitive athlete or recreational runner, a miler or an ultramarathoner, this conversation will change the way you look at running and the role it plays in your life. This episode is brought to you by: — New Balance. The Fresh Foam 1080 v11 is an absolute workhorse and it's been my go-to trainer for most of my non-workout runs in 2021. It's got great cushioning underfoot that's protective but not too soft, providing a responsive ride that I really enjoy and appreciate. Check it out at newbalance.com and consider adding a pair to your rotation today. — Precision Hydration. I've been a devotee to PH products for the past 4 years and my last few marathons wouldn't have gone as well without them. Go to precisionhydration.com and take their free online Sweat Test or use the Carb Calculator to get a personalized hydration and nutrition strategy to test in training. As a listener of the show you can get 15% off your first order by using the code TMS15 when checking out. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-re-run-with-sanjay-rawal/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 174 | Jon Greene

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 138:56

    “My goal with coaching people is to teach them and have them understand why we're doing what we're doing so if I ever stop coaching them, or for whatever reason we part ways, that they are basically able to coach themselves the same way I was coaching them previously. My job is to eliminate my own job, I guess.” Jon Green is the 26-year-old coach of Olympic marathon bronze medalist Molly Seidel. He is also the head coach of Atalanta NYC, a New York City-based nonprofit that employs and supports professional female runners that are training to achieve their goals while also serving as core mentors for its youth mentoring program. As an athlete, Jon was an All-American at Georgetown University and ran professionally for a brief period of time before turning his attention to coaching. In this conversation, we go deep into Jon's background as an athlete, we talk about our shared Central Massachusetts roots, and then turn our attention to coaching, where we discuss working with Molly Seidel, of course, but also who has influenced his philosophy, how he views his role as a coach, where he has the most room to grow, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — New Balance. The Fresh Foam 1080 v11 is an absolute workhorse and it's been my go-to trainer for most of my non-workout runs in 2021. It's got great cushioning underfoot that's protective but not too soft, providing a responsive ride that I really enjoy and appreciate. Check it out at newbalance.com and consider adding a pair to your rotation today. — Goodr: If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodr sunglasses, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for 15% off your order. Look good, run goodr! Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-174-with-jon-green/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 173 | Sabrina Little

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 72:08

    “So in the classical tradition they often ask the question of what role athletics can play in the good life. And typically the way it is described is that it has a role in character development in sort of helping us to be more well-ordered such that we can flourish longterm. But they also express a concern that if you are having an outsized focus on athletics that it can be bad, both physically for your constitution, but also for your character. There are ways of participating in sport that don't form you in the right way and so I've wondered about my relationship with running in terms of the sort of life that I want to have, in terms of the sort of life that's suited to what it means to be a human and flourish, and I just don't think sports has been an unqualified good in my own formation. I mean, there are certain qualities that are reinforced that are not…I mean, envy is the big example that I give, or a kind of intemperance, having an outsized affection for sport that crowds out other features of my life or doesn't make me a good member of my community. So, in asking the question of what flourishing is, what a good life would be constituted of, I've started to inspect the role that running has on my life and I don't know how well—at least in the dosage that I do it in in ultrarunning—I don't know if it really supports that kind of life.” I've been wanting to have this conversation with Sabrina Little for a while now and I'll just say this: It was awesome. Sabrina is an amazing human being. She's a wife a new mom, she's a full-time professor of Philosophy and the Humanities at Morehead State University in Kentucky, she writes my favorite column for iRunFar called The Examined Run, and she's also a heck of runner in her own right: Sabrina has won 5 U.S. titles, she's represented the U.S. five times at international championships, she was the silver medalist at the 2013 world 24-hour championships, helping the U.S. win a team gold at that event, she previously held American records for 24 hours and 200K, and she finished 12th at the 2018 Trail World Championships in Spain to help the U.S. team take a bronze medal. In this conversation, we talked about how running came into her life, running her first 100 miler as a freshman in college as a grand gesture to her mom, who was in remission from ovarian cancer at the time, and how she eventually got into competitive ultrarunning and representing the U.S. at an international level. We also talked a bit of philosophy, why that field of study piqued her interest in college, how and where philosophy and running intersect for Sabrina, including how she “re-ordered her loves” after becoming a mom a little over a year ago, how she thinks about competition, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — New Balance. The new FuelCell Rebel v2 is my new favorite running shoe. It's super super light, it's incredibly responsive, and offers good protection underfoot. I think it's the perfect workout shoe and I'll be using it all the time. Check it out today at newbalance.com and consider adding a pair to your rotation today. — Goodr: If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodr sunglasses, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for 15% off your order. Look good, run goodr! Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-173-with-sabrina-little/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 172 | Brad Stulberg

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 72:11


    “So much of groundedness is about building a life that you want to live in right now and those things are often in opposition to striving, because when you're striving, when you're really going toward something, it's very easy to forget about watering the roots, tending to the base, whatever it is. But when you accomplish or you fail to do that thing, if you haven't been taking care of all this other stuff, then there's still nothing there and you still fill empty. So you could also argue it's just about really focusing on what is there right now, what's in front of you, and it's not to say you become a zen monk that's totally content. I would argue that it's still great to strive but the texture of the striving changes, so instead of striving from a pace of compulsion—‘I need to win this and if I don't I'm a failure' or ‘I need to hit the best-seller list and if I don't something's wrong'—it's much more that this is a great goal but it's a great goal because all the steps I'm gonna have to take to reach it are going to really fulfill me and give my life happiness, joy, and growth.” Brad Stulberg is a an author, speaker, and executive coach who researches, writes, and coaches on human performance, sustainable success, and well-being. His work has appeared in Outside magazine, The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Wired, and other publications. He's the best-selling author of Peak Performance and the Passion Paradox, both of which he co-wrote with Steve Magness, and he's got a new book coming out on September 7 called The Practice of Groundedness, which explores the foundation of peak performance, true wellbeing, and sustainable success. This conversation centers around Brad's new book and we dive into topics that I think are relevant to many of us: the pursuit of high achievement that seems pervasive in our society today, the fallacy of “arriving” in life and how that gets the best of so many of us, what Brad calls heroic individualism or an ongoing game of one-upmanship against ourselves and others, the differences between real vulnerability and performative vulnerability, and a lot more. Pre-order Brad's new book here before September 7, 2021 to get exclusive bonuses: https://www.bradstulberg.com/tpogpreorder This episode is brought to you by: — Runderwear. Runderwear's mission is to eliminate the discomfort caused by ill-fitting underwear and to create seamless performance running underwear, base wear, bras and socks that are supremely comfortable, moisture wicking and chafe-free. Take a look at Runderwear.com and use the code TMS20 at checkout for 20% off now through September 15. — Precision Hydration. I've been a devotee to PH products for the past 4 years and my last few marathons wouldn't have gone as well without them. Go to precisionhydration.com and take their free online Sweat Test to get a personalized hydration strategy to test in training. As a listener of the show you can get 15% off your first order of electrolytes that match how you sweat by using the code TMS15 when checking out. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-172-with-brad-stulberg/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout


    Re-Run with Mario Mendoza

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 76:26

    “I think for me it ties back to seeing myself as more than just a runner but [as] a complete person in mind, body, soul. I've just found that when all the parts of who I am are aligned and enjoying everything then really the results, they're going to come and you're more patient for them—you're not dependent on them to have this joy and this fun time being out there putting in the work. In my opinion, that become way more important than the fact that you're going to go and hit these certain paces and you're going to put in this certain amount of training to equal this sort of result. So there was definitely a transition there for me, where it's like, ‘Hey, if I have found complete joy in this whole process, then the results will come.' Some day they're going to come, some day I'm going to have that breakthrough, but at least I'm already now enjoying where I'm at today.” I've been taking a brief break from recording new episodes of the podcast these past two weeks but don't worry, starting next week we will have a fresh episode coming out every Monday through the end of the year, so be sure to stay tuned for those. That said, we're trying something new this week and for the first time, I'm re-publishing an episode from the early days of the podcast: this one is a conversation with mi tocayo, Mario Mendoza, who I sat down with almost exactly three years ago on Episode 29. It's one of my favorite episodes, and also one of the most under-appreciated ones, which is why I'm re-sharing it. Mario is a five-time national champion on the trails, a four-time USATF trail runner of the year, he's won races all over the globe, finished top-10 twice at world championships, set world records on the treadmill, and accomplished all kinds of things on the competitive side of the sport. Beyond that, however, he's one of the most genuine people I've ever met, we really connected over this conversation, and have kept in close touch ever since. Full disclosure: I started coaching Mario a few months ago but this episode was recorded years before we had a coach-athlete relationship. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-re-run-with-mario-mendoza Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Crossover Episode: Mario Fraioli on the Grounded Podcast with Dinée Dorame

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 78:53

    “The hardest step in anything is to start—that's the hardest step. The second hardest thing is to stay with it. That sounds really obvious but I think keeping those two things in mind—you can't stay with it until you start, so 1. Just get started, and then 2. When you stay with it, you'll have days when you want to quit, and you're like, ‘Is this worth it?' whether it's podcasting, whether it's continuing on with the run, whether it's being in a relationship. Staying with it is hard but that's the second hardest part and you've got to keep working through that and I think having people who can help you with that, whether it's in a mentorship role, whether it's a training partner, or a partner, find those people, because I think it's a lot easier to get through things—whatever it is—when you've got support from others.” Trying something a little different this week: I'm sharing a special crossover episode of the Grounded Podcast with Dinée Dorame featuring me as her guest. Dinée asked me questions no one has ever asked me in an interview before. We talked about my obsession with basketball, the early days of my journalism and coaching careers, diversity and inclusion in the running industry, and a lot more. I really enjoyed this conversation and I hope that you will too. You may remember Dinée from back on Episode 145 of the morning shakeout podcast, which came out earlier this year right before she launched her show, and I recommend checking that one out or revisiting it if you haven't already. Dinée and I got connected late last year through the Tracksmith fellowship program, I've been mentoring her over the past 8 months or so on her own podcast journey, and she's become like a younger sister to me—I think I've learned more from her than she has from me and she's someone I respect and admire so much. Dinée's podcast helps fill a huge gap in the running podcast space: Every week she explores the intersection between running, culture, land and community through long-form conversations with runners of all backgrounds and levels. You can find it in all the usual places you listen to podcasts if you search for the Grounded Podcast with Dinée Dorame, and you can also follow the show on Instagram and Twitter @groundedpod. She's had some awesome guests thus far, including Meb Keflezighi, Jordan Marie Daniel, Ric and Nell Rojas, and my personal favorite: Billy Mills. Dinee's voice is important. I am so proud of the work she's doing and the impact it's making in the running industry. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/crossover-episode-mario-fraioli-on-the-grounded-podcast-with-dinee-dorame Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 171 | Ask Mario Anything #7

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 80:17

    “A lot of athletes—especially when things are going really well—the last thing they want to do is take a break, even if their goal race is in the rearview. Trust me on this: You want to take your breaks as seriously as your training. It's much better to take a planned break and be a little grumpy about it at the beginning than be forced to take a break sometime down the road because you're injured, burned out, sick, overtrained, whatever it may be. I see this all the time, not only with athletes that I work with but people who reach out to me with questions, and people I train with—when things are going good, you want to keep them going, but we're human beings. It doesn't matter how experienced you are, how good you are, we all need breaks. You need breaks to absorb training, you need breaks to shut things down mentally as much as physically, especially if you're someone who's doing hard workouts and long runs and always building toward the next goal. That takes a lot of mental and emotional energy—you can't be on all the time, you've got to shut it off.” This week on the podcast I'm answering listener questions in the second Ask Mario Anything episode of 2021. (You can check out the first one here.) On the other side of the mic for this one—once again—is sponsorship director, Chris Douglas. We got some good questions about about me running Boston in the fall, the importance of taking breaks in training, the controversy around Timothy Olson's recent FKT on the PCT, channeling my own passion for running into a creative pursuit, what information you should include in your running log, and a lot more. Thank you to everyone who submitted questions and apologies for all the ones I wasn't able to answer in this episode. Got a question for the next Ask Mario Episode? Send it to me here. This episode is brought to you by: — New Balance. The new FuelCell Rebel v2 is my new favorite running shoe. It's super super light, it's incredibly responsive, and offers good protection underfoot. I think it's the perfect workout shoe and I'll be using it all the time. Check it out today at newbalance.com and consider adding a pair to your rotation today. — Goodr: If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodr sunglasses, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for 15% off your order. Look good, run goodr! Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-171--ask-mario-anything/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 170 | Noah Droddy

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 63:29

    “I think it's because we're always measuring ourselves—everything we do is measured. You go out for an easy run, you see your pace, you compare it to how fast you ran yesterday. You go to a race, you finish 10th, or you're a minute off your PB—or you PB by a minute and you're ecstatic. You're always comparing yourself to who you were yesterday and who you want to be in the future. And then while you're comparing yourself to you, you're also comparing yourself to other people who are doing the same things that you do. You see so and so run amazing and say, ‘Oh, that's great,' but [then] you ask yourself, ‘Why am I not running amazing?' You're just always asking yourself these questions and I think measuring yourself in that way really leads you to…yeah, it's not to prescribe too much self worth to the numbers. And just being like, ‘OK, if I could just run 2:10 in the marathon I'll be happier,” and it doesn't feel that way because then you run 2:10 and you were fifth and somebody else ran 2:09 or whatever, so it's hard—it's just the nature of our sport is that we're always measuring ourselves against each other and ourselves, and if you're not in a good place with that you can kind of go down a rabbit hole.” Noah Droddy is one of my favorite people in the sport and it was a treat to have him back on the podcast. Our last conversation was almost exactly 3 years ago on Episode 23 so be sure to give that one a listen if you haven't already. Noah is a blue-collar as they come and that's part of what I love about him. The Division 3 alum from Depauw University in Indiana ran 2:09:09 at The Marathon Project last December, making him the ninth-fastest American marathoner of all-time. He lives and trains in Boulder, Colorado with the Roots Running Project, which, as we talked about in this episode, has done more with less than any other elite level training group in the U.S. In addition to being a great athlete, Noah is also a big fan of the sport! We recorded this episode just a few days ago on Friday and spent the first few minutes of the show talking about the first day of action at the Olympic Games in Tokyo. From there, Noah told me why he's at an interesting point of his professional running career right now, what it was like to lose sponsorship after having a breakthrough race last fall, how he's thinking about the place competitive running holds in his life right now and moving forward, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — New Balance. The new FuelCell Rebel v2 is my new favorite running shoe. It's super super light, it's incredibly responsive, and offers good protection underfoot. I think it's the perfect workout shoe and I'll be using it all the time. Check it out today at newbalance.com and consider adding a pair to your rotation today. — Goodr: If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodr sunglasses, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for 15% off your order. Look good, run goodr! Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-170-with-noah-droddy/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 169 | Fred Huxham

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 114:23

    “If you get me talking about things that happened in college or I think about races in college I can just spiral in my own head and get frustrated and kind of disappointed with myself in the way things turned out. It's definitely in the back of my mind. I would like to prove to myself that I do belong, whether it be at the NCAA level or the professional level, I just believe inherently that I am talented enough to do it. I just have to be patient and let it kind of come to me rather than go searching for it…I think Peachtree, although it's just one result and doesn't mean all that much in the grand scheme of the running world, it has meant a lot for me and validating what I've been doing for the last year and half, two years.” This is Fred Huxham's first podcast and I am super excited to introduce him to you. Fred, who is 25 years old, just placed second at the Peachtree Road Race on July 4 in 28:45. That race was the 10K national championships and he finished just two seconds behind Sam Chelanga and a few places ahead of Galen Rupp, Jake Riley, and Abdi Abdirahman, the three men who will represent the United States at the Olympic Marathon in Tokyo. In this conversation, we talked about Peachtree, how it went down, and what that performance means to Fred at this point of his career. He told me how he ended up in New Hampshire, training with Ben True and Dan Curts, and what the next few months look like for him from a competitive standpoint. We talked about his high school career at Redwood in California and his relationship with coaches Laura and Jake Schmitt—both of whom I've had on this podcast, so check out those episodes if you haven't already. Fred described the process of overcoming periods of frustration and disappointment during his collegiate career, explained why he's got a chip on his shoulder, how he uses that to his advantage, and a lot more. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-169-with-fred-huxham/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 168 | Alison Desir

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 92:34

    “What the marathon experience—that first marathon experience—did for me, was it gave me a perspective shift on life, which, wow, that sounds really lofty hearing myself say it back, but truly, everything was like so muddied and I couldn't pull myself out. I had gone to really good schools and done all of the things I was supposed to do but I couldn't pull myself out of feeling terrible and feeling like I was a failure and there was no blueprint of, ‘What am I supposed to do with my life?' But the marathon gave me this very concrete training plan—like in 16 weeks, if you do this, you will get this—and never in my life outside of school had something been so prescriptive and easy. I mean, [it was] really difficult because you have to do that work but if even a stranger can promise me that if I do this work and I get that, then like f*ck yeah, I'm gonna do this. So I stuck to that training plan like it was my bible and what I saw was that it wasn't magic but these physical challenges that I was doing really were very much tied to my mental ability to push through it and to stay in places of discomfort…You're in a place of discomfort but you're moving through it—you don't get stuck in the place of discomfort, so that was a really powerful lesson for me.” I've been waiting a while to have this conversation with Alison Mariella Désir and it did not disappoint. Alison wears many hats: she's a mom, athlete, and coach. She works as the Director of Sports Advocacy and an Athlete Advisor for Oiselle, she's a co-chair of the Running Industry Diversity Coalition, co-founder of Harlem run, a community organizer, and a lot more. In this episode, Alison told me about her relationship with running, the ways in which it's evolved over the years, and how she views her place in the sport today. We discussed how feeling out of place as a runner led her to create communities where people feel like they belong, we talked about the lack of diversity in the running industry and the work she's doing to help change that, as well we her upcoming book, The Unbearable Whiteness of Running, due out in 2022. We also talked about identity and extroversion, competitiveness and community building, and a lot more. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-168-with-alison-mariella-desir/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 167 | Amby Burfoot

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 94:44

    “One day we had a bad basketball practice. The coach was pissed off at us. He literally made us run the cross-country course as punishment. I was the worst player on the JV basketball team but I came back first when we had to run 3 miles in cross country and I just said, ‘Hey, maybe I should switch sports instead of fighting to be bad.' And so I switched to running and running seemed to be a place where an obsessive personality and an infinite amount of work payed some benefits—and it did for me. I don't think it's quite as important now as I did 50 years ago but there's no replacement for hard work, is there?” Amby Burfoot is a legend in running and someone I've looked up to and admired since I first got my start in the sport over 20 years ago. A native of Connecticut, Amby won the 1968 Boston Marathon when he was a senior at Wesleyan University. After his competitive running career ended, he worked at Runner's World, where he spent 25 years as an editor before retiring in 2012. Amby is still running strong—and writing about running regularly—as he nears the age of 75 and I just have so much respect for everything he's done and is still doing in the sport. There's a lot that we covered in this conversation. We talked about Amby's competitive running career, how he got started, and what it was like to win the Boston Marathon while he was still in college. He told me about his obsessive personality and the different forms it's taken over the course of his life. We discussed what he's up to now, his longevity as a runner and writer, and continuing to pursue your passions as you age. Amby told me about his time at Runner's World, he shared his thoughts on the evolution of the running media landscape over the past 2-3 decades, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Tracksmith. Tracksmith crafts performance running apparel, inspiring publications, and distinct experiences that allow runners to indulge in the sport's rich culture. Tracksmith is offering new customers $15 off your first purchase of $75+. Just use code MARIO15 when you check out at tracksmith.com/mario. — Goodr: If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodr sunglasses, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for 15% off your order. Look good, run goodr! Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-167-with-amby-burfoot/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 166 | Christine Gould

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 109:58

    “When I was out there, baking along the lake where it was really hot, all I was really trying to do was just keep moving forward, and whatever that entailed. So I was just looking ahead to the next aid station—like, what can I do to keep moving forward? It really became that simple, which, for as busy as my brain can be sometimes with thinking, is surprising because I really didn't think much beyond that because I just knew how hot it was, and how else was I going to get to the finish line? I just have to move forward…It's not always—I think we forget this as competitive athletes that all have goals—but it's not always about the result too, it's just sometimes how you do the thing and get across the line. We always learn infinitely more from the struggles than we do from our successes.” We are back with a new episode of the podcast after a brief hiatus and my guest this week is a really special one: it's my favorite person in the entire world, my best friend and biggest supporter, my wife, Christine Gould. Christine has been one of my most requested guests since I started the show 3-1/2 years ago and you'll finally get to hear from her this week. Christine recently completed Ironman Coeur d'Alene in Idaho (it was her first swing at that distance in 14 years), and this was a good opportunity to debrief with her about that experience—why she signed up for the event, how it went, and what she learned from it—as well as to learn more about her and how she operates, us as a couple and how we operate, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Tracksmith. Tracksmith crafts performance running apparel, inspiring publications, and distinct experiences that allow runners to indulge in the sport's rich culture. Tracksmith is offering new customers $15 off your first purchase of $75+. Just use code MARIO15 when you check out at tracksmith.com/mario. — Goodr: If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodr sunglasses, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for 15% off your order. Look good, run goodr! Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-166-with-christine-gould/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 165 | Mark Coogan

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021 70:19

    “It's not just one workout that's going to make you have a good race. That's pretty simple. I've more come to the conclusion that I'd rather do 20 B+ workouts over 10 weeks instead of having four A+ workouts and then just go into a race. I think if I can get the consistency of this B+ type workout—when I do those, I feel like we're not stressing the body so hard that we're going to get injured—I feel like we're improving, getting physically better as a runner, but we're not getting as many little injuries or dinged up, or just soreness. And I feel like when we do that and then go to a race and try to do an A+ [effort] in the race, it just seems to be working a lot better for me. So I just think being really consistent over a long period of time, you know, you don't have to have any of these super duper workouts to prove who you are.” Mark Coogan is the coach of New Balance Boston Elite. His squad will be competing at the U.S. Olympic Trials in Eugene, Oregon, beginning on June 18. As an athlete, Mark represented the United States at the 1996 Olympics in the marathon, he's competed on multiple world championship teams, and he's also the first sub-4 minute miler from my home state of Massachusetts. During his professional career, Mark was ranked top-10 in the U.S. from the mile to the marathon, which is not something that too many athletes can claim. I absolutely loved this conversation and I think many of you will too. We mostly talked coaching, how Mark got his start in it, and how he's grown the most over the years. He told me about managing his squad's nerves and expectations heading into Trials, how they've recalibrated during the pandemic, and the lessons they've learned over the past year. He also described the family culture that his team tries to maintain, coaching his daughter Katrina for the first time, and how he approaches working with a group that's focusing on a wide range of events. Mark also told some great stories, like running the race of his life at the 1995 U.S. Championships against Bob Kennedy, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — New Balance. The new FuelCell Rebel v2 is my new favorite running shoe. It's super super light, it's incredibly responsive, and offers good protection underfoot. I think it's the perfect workout shoe and I'll be using it all the time. Check it out today at newbalance.com and consider adding a pair to your rotation today. — Goodr: If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodr sunglasses, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for 15% off your order. Look good, run goodr! Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-165-with-mark-coogan/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 164 | Lauren Hurley

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 84:29

    “When I was doing triathlon I would get a workout and I'm like, ‘Oh, I can't do that. That's too hard. No way.' Now Tom tells me this workout and I'm like, ‘You're crazy, but let's go for it. Let's try it.' Because I don't care. I don't care if I fail. So I think that's a huge thing for people. It's like as soon as you step away from that fear of failing you open yourself up to so many things—and for so long that just held me back. Because really, and it's so cliche, but anything is possible. And it's been a big lesson I've learned throughout this short little running journey I've done and I'm gonna carry that through the trials. Do I think I'm gonna make the Olympics? No. But do I think I can run the Olympic standard? Yeah, I do. And I'm not gonna tell myself I can't, you know? So that's gonna be cool and exciting and I'm gonna carry that to Eugene.”  Lauren Hurley is a friend of mine and it's been super fun to watch her improvement in running from afar the past few months. She recently qualified for the Olympic Trials at the Portland Track Festival, running 32:17 for 10,000m, finishing fifth in her first ever race on the track at any distance. Lauren might be new to racing on the track but she is not a novice athlete. She raced triathlon professionally for 10 years, winning 11 Ironman 70.3 events and numerous other races. She retired from triathlon in 2019 after accepting a 6-month suspension from USADA for testing positive for THC—a banned substance that was in the CBD cream she was using to treat an ankle injury at the time. In this conversation, we talked about Lauren's suspension and why, in retrospect, it ended up being best thing that ever could have happened to her. Lauren told me about feeling burned out from her professional triathlon career and why she never thought she'd do another interval, much less compete, again. We discussed motherhood—she and her husband Matt have a 10-month old son named Wilder—and how that's reshaped her perspective on what's important in life. Lauren talked about growing up a swimmer, suffering from disordered eating in high school, and how finding running and triathlon in college helped her manage anxiety and get healthy. We also talked about competitiveness, entrepreneurship, how 10 years of high-level triathlon training has contributed to her current success in running, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — New Balance. The new FuelCell Rebel v2 is my new favorite running shoe. It's super super light, it's incredibly responsive, and offers good protection underfoot. I think it's the perfect workout shoe and I'll be using it all the time. Check it out today at newbalance.com and consider adding a pair to your rotation today. — Goodr: If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodr sunglasses, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for 15% off your order. Look good, run goodr! Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-164-with-lauren-hurley/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 163 | Thomas Reiss

    Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 102:54

    “Running has been a big factor in my life. Running made me start my own business, I met my wife because of running—that's how I ended up here. So running has always been a big factor in my life. I think that's why I still enjoy running at my age versus just being done with it. I know so many guys who were really fast and they're like, ‘I'm done, I don't wanna run anymore. Why are you still running?' [It's because] I still love it—it has become part of me.” I first met Thomas Reiss at the Leadville 100 back in 2017 when he was crewing and pacing for our mutual friend, Brett Rivers, who I was coaching at the time. I knew Thomas as a veteran ultrarunner who had experienced some success in the sport but also that he was a badass designer whose logo and branding work I was familiar with and admired. I've been wanting to have a long conversation with him ever since and this one did not disappoint. Thomas, who is 53 years old, is a husband and dad to two teenage boys who is still getting after it on the road, track, and trails from the mile to ultramarathon distances. Like me, he loves it all. In 2018, he broke the American record for 50-54 year olds in the 50K on the track, running 3:39:26. Just last December he broke 5 minutes for the mile and he's got his eye on some age-group records and national titles. Basically, I want to be Thomas when I grow up. Originally from Germany, running first came into Thomas' life when he was a young kid. He ran his first marathon at the age of 22 and his involvement in the sport has only snowballed from there. In this conversation, we talked about growing up in Germany and playing in punk bands during his teen years, and how that experience reminds him of some of the growth we're seeing in ultrarunning today. He told me about starting a running magazine back in Germany, how his relationship with running has evolved over the years, and what keeps him motivated and excited as he approaches his mid-50s. We also talked about competitiveness, creativity, why brands in running should do a better job of highlighting Masters runners, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — BOA. BOA wants you to get dialed in, locked in, and connected to the trail in the new BOA-powered La Sportiva Cyklon. Available in men's and women's, every aspect of the shoe is engineered to deliver revolutionary fit and performance on the trail, and was designed and tested in BOA's state of the art Performance Fit Lab to improve running efficiency and reduce landing impact. BOA is exclusively offering four morning shakeout listeners the opportunity to win a free pair of the Cyklon. To enter, head over to boafit.com/Mario. — Picky Bars. Picky's products are made with real ingredients that I can pronounce and recognize—and there's a peace of mind that comes with not second-guessing what I'm putting into my body. If you want to try some Picky products for yourself while supporting the podcast, go to pickybars.com/MARIO and enter the code MARIO at checkout to save 20% off your purchase of 25 bucks or more. You can also join the Picky Club at that link, which is a subscription service, and save 20% off your first box with the code MARIO. Super easy, amazing offer, take advantage of while you can at pickybars.com/MARIO. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-163-with-thomas-reiss/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 162 | Abdi Abdirahman

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 69:00

    “People know me as Abdi the distance runner, the funny guy, just outgoing, and that's all good, but they don't know the reason I came to the U.S.—how did I end up here, what was my choice, that struggle behind me getting here, at the end of the day, your parents, your family, what they've been through to get here. And that's the difficult part of the book, because that just brings back some memories because of the civil war in Somalia. It's not like one day I woke up and said, ‘Hey, I'm going to go to America.' It wasn't that easy. It was one day you woke up and you don't know what the future holds for you, you don't know where you're going to get your next meal, what happened, because it was a civil war. At the end of the day I'm thankful for everything that I've been through, and it's made me the person who I am today, but it wasn't the easiest though.” Abdi Abdirahman is one of my favorite people in the sport and I am super excited to share this episode with you. The 44-year-old is a five-time Olympian and he'll represent the United States in the marathon at this summer's Games in Japan. Abdi also has a new book coming out soon. It's called Abdi's World: The Black Cactus on Life, Running, and Fun and it's due out in July. In this conversation, we talked about making his fifth Olympic team and how he's feeling three months out from the Olympic Marathon. He told me about growing up in Somalia, coming to the United States when he was 7 years old, and how that experience shaped his perspective and outlook on life. We talked about his longevity in the sport, his relationship with running and what it means to him beyond just competition and his career, and why he's gone to Ethiopia to train in recent years. Abdi also discussed his upcoming book, giving back to his community and establishing a charitable foundation built around hope, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — BOA. BOA wants you to get dialed in, locked in, and connected to the trail in the new BOA-powered La Sportiva Cyklon. Available in men's and women's, every aspect of the shoe is engineered to deliver revolutionary fit and performance on the trail, and was designed and tested in BOA's state of the art Performance Fit Lab to improve running efficiency and reduce landing impact. BOA is exclusively offering four morning shakeout listeners the opportunity to win a free pair of the Cyklon. To enter, head over to boafit.com/Mario. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-162-with-abdi-abdirahman/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 161 | Aaron and Joshua Potts

    Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 74:03


    “What we're doing, it's for the culture. It's not ultimately about trying to get money. We want to push the track and field culture forward. We want it to be more entertaining, we want it to be more fun. We're doing this for the athletes. And with both of us being athletes before, we understand those struggles and, I don't know, I'm really big on believing that track and field is a stage, it's an amazing sport, but the culture needs to be continually developed and advanced so we can showcase that—and that's the mission, it's something that's not about getting subscriptions or anything. We're really genuine and just want to push the culture forward and make track more of a mainstream sport.” Aaron and Joshua Potts are the guys behind The Running Report, a media outlet produced “for culture and by the culture.” They also co-host the 2 Black Runners podcast, where each week they recap the most recent running news, host insightful interviews with athletes from across all disciplines of track and field, and offer up their perspective on the running world as two black runners in the sport. They first came across my radar a few months ago when they interviewed one of my earliest running heroes, Michael Johnson, and I've been following their work ever since. In this conversation, we got into their recent broadcast work at The KC Qualifier put on by Trials of Miles Racing and Citius Mag. They told me how The Running Report and 2 Black Runners came to be, what they saw missing from the way the sport was being broadcast and covered, and what changes they'd still like to see as it relates to how track and field is packaged and presented. We also talked about the importance of culture and what they mean when they use that word, how they see The Running Report and 2 Black Runners evolving in the future, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — BOA. BOA wants you to get dialed in, locked in, and connected to the trail in the new BOA-powered La Sportiva Cyklon. Available in men's and women's, every aspect of the shoe is engineered to deliver revolutionary fit and performance on the trail, and was designed and tested in BOA's state of the art Performance Fit Lab to improve running efficiency and reduce landing impact. BOA is exclusively offering four morning shakeout listeners the opportunity to win a free pair of the Cyklon. To enter, head over to boafit.com/Mario. — Picky Bars. Picky's products are made with real ingredients that I can pronounce and recognize—and there's a peace of mind that comes with not second-guessing what I'm putting into my body. If you want to try some Picky products for yourself while supporting the podcast, go to pickybars.com/MARIO and enter the code MARIO at checkout to save 20% off your purchase of 25 bucks or more. You can also join the Picky Club at that link, which is a subscription service, and save 20% off your first box with the code MARIO. Super easy, amazing offer, take advantage of while you can at pickybars.com/MARIO. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-161-with-aaron-and-joshua-potts/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout


    Episode 160 | Stephanie Howe and Jorge Maravilla

    Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021 123:19

    “All of this adversity that we've been dealing with, you know, adversity is nothing new to me. I'm officially claiming that I'm the dean of Adversity University. As an immigrant, as a brown-skinned man, as someone—who, Spanish is my first language—having to always assimilate, having to always adapt, having always to comfort others with the comfort of who you are, those are just daily adversity situations and circumstances that I've existed with, so adversity is nothing new. And I've dealt with so many other adversities, from emotional to life, just like everybody else. We all have our stuff and it's how you face and deal with those things that build up your character, you know? It's no different than, ‘Sure, maybe I've placed well in a certain race,' and honestly I hate to say this but I can care less how well I do or not, but that moment we described earlier where it took me 3-1/2 hours to walk 7 miles while I watched Stephanie win Western States—that to me was very character-building and a really, really important part of who and what I am today and how I can utilize that as a skillset and a toolset to face life.” Stephanie Howe and Jorge Maravilla are quite the power couple and it was a treat to sit down with the two of them recently at their home here in Marin County, where we all live. A little on their respective running backgrounds: Stephanie is the 2014 Western States Endurance Run champion, she's finished in the top 10 at UTMB, and won numerous other races at various distances over the course of her career. Jorge is two-time national champion on the trails at the 100 mile and 100K distances, he won the Masters national cross country title in 2018, and he's also got a 2:21 marathon personal best to his credit. In this conversation, we talked a little about running, but mostly about how their relationship came to be, navigating new beginnings, their different backgrounds growing up, and becoming parents together recently—and all of this was intertwined around themes of respect, trust, community, exploration, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Tracksmith: Tracksmith is a Boston-based running apparel brand, born from a desire to celebrate both the history and the evolving culture of the sport. They recently released their Spring Collection full of stylish gear perfected for the pursuit of personal excellence. Designed for running hard and logging miles as the season shifts, this collection is designed with endurance in mind. Right now, Tracksmith is offering new customers $15 off your first purchase of $75 bucks or more. Just use code MARIO15 when you check out at tracksmith.com. — Goodr: Goodr sunglasses are don't bounce, they don't slip, they're polarized to protect your eyes, and they come in a nice range of styles and fun colors. They're the most affordable performance shades on the planet with most pairs costing only $25 to $35 bucks a piece. If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodrs, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for 15% off your order. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-160-with-stephanie-howe-and-jorge-maravilla/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 159 | Anthony Costales

    Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2021 84:55

    “Over the last years, the main thing to me when I get into a race, I think what kind of changed my trajectory at least in the road stuff, was that I don't want to look at times anymore—that was the big thing in the roads: I don't want to look at times, I just want to compete. People would ask, ‘What are you shooting for?' I'm like, ‘I just want to compete.' And that's kind of been my answer for everyone in most races that I've done over the last many years. There's been a couple times I've gone out to a race that the competition, you could tell, wasn't going to be too stout and you go out for time or a course record on that by yourself, but when there's big competition, it's just strictly about competing to me.” Anthony Costales recently won the Canyons 100K in Northern California in 9 hours, 11 minutes, and 40 seconds, defeating a stout field, which earned him a Golden Ticket to this year's Western States Endurance Run. He's only a few years into the trail and ultra game and is really starting to make a splash in the sport. A graduate of Chico State, Anthony has a 2:13 marathon personal best on the roads, he won the U.S. Trail Marathon Championship in 2018, and also represented the U.S. that year at the World Long Distance Mountain Championships in Poland, where he finished 10th overall. Anthony's a native of Fairfield, California, he now lives and teaches middle school P.E. in Salt Lake City, Utah, and he's a relatively new dad. In this conversation, we talked about Anthony's most recent win, of course, but also his progression in the sport, how he's shifted his training in recent years, and the physiological and psychological differences of racing on the trails versus competing on the roads. Anthony told me why he calls himself a silent competitor, we discussed why shorter distance trail races don't get nearly the respect and attention of ultra-distance events, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Tracksmith: Tracksmith is a Boston-based running apparel brand, born from a desire to celebrate both the history and the evolving culture of the sport. They recently released their Spring Collection full of stylish gear perfected for the pursuit of personal excellence. Designed for running hard and logging miles as the season shifts, this collection is designed with endurance in mind. Right now, Tracksmith is offering new customers $15 off your first purchase of $75 bucks or more. Just use code MARIO15 when you check out at tracksmith.com. — Goodr: Goodr sunglasses are don't bounce, they don't slip, they're polarized to protect your eyes, and they come in a nice range of styles and fun colors. They're the most affordable performance shades on the planet with most pairs costing only $25 to $35 bucks a piece. If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodrs, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for 15% off your order. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-159-with-anthony-costales/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 158 | Hillary Allen

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2021 67:29

    “I don't shy away from the hard stuff anymore. I know I enjoy hard things from a training perspective, [and] like super-challenging races, but that also goes emotionally—I can't expect to be a better person unless I can work through those things as well, so I'm happy to talk about hard subjects.” Hillary Allen is a professional athlete, coach, teacher, and author of the new book, Out and Back: A Runner's Story of Survival Against All Odds. She's a returning guest to the show—be sure to check out her first appearance back on Episode 49 if you haven't already—and she's just one of my favorite people to talk to in general. In this conversation, we talked about her book, which was recently released. She told me about how it came to be, what she's learned from revisiting it recently while she's been recovering from foot surgery, and how writing became a cathartic exercise for her in recent years. We also talked about her stubborn and independent streaks, why asking for help is challenging for her, the importance of cultivating and leaning into your community, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Picky Bars. Picky's products are made with real ingredients that I can pronounce and recognize—and there's a peace of mind that comes with not second-guessing what I'm putting into my body. The bars are a go-to for me before a run, and even when I'm just out running errands, particularly the “Ah, Fudge Nuts” flavor, and I can't get enough of the PB&J All Day granola in my yogurt. If you want to try some Picky products for yourself while supporting the podcast, go to pickybars.com/MARIO and enter the code MARIO at checkout to save 20% off your purchase of 25 bucks or more. You can also join the Picky Club at that link, which is a subscription service, and save 20% off your first box with the code MARIO. Super easy, amazing offer, take advantage of while you can at pickybars.com/MARIO. — Atlanta Track Club. Member and lottery registration for the AJC Peachtree Road Race in Atlanta, Georgia is going on right now. The race will be held in-person and virtually this year on July 3rd and 4th. Strict COVID-19 safety precautions will be in place for the in-person version with limited spots available—Atlanta Track Club members get guaranteed entry and race day preference. If you're not a member you can join today and then sign up to get a guaranteed spot at Peachtree! Non-members will be placed into a lottery and race day preference will be accommodated as spots remain. Registration is going on now until May 1 and you can put your name in today at ajc.com/peachtree. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-158-with-hillary-allen/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 157 | Ask Mario Anything

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 92:16

    “When I talk to the athletes that I coach, the number one thing that I'm trying to pay attention to throughout the course of our relationship is seeing and understanding how this pursuit of running fits into their life and everything else that they've got going on from family to work to hobbies—and yes, you can have other hobbies besides running—and also, how those things are affecting their pursuit of running because if you have a very demanding job, or you have a very active family, or you have a lot of other hobbies, that is not only going to cut into your training time—and I don't say that in a bad way—but it's another variable that you have to account for that can affect how you're feeling on a given day, how well your workout goes, or if you're mentally fresh to race or not. So I think it's important to understand that mix from both sides.” This week on the podcast I'm answering listener questions in the first Ask Mario Anything episode of 2021. On the other side of the mic for this one is sponsorship director, Chris Douglas, who you'll get to learn a little more about at the beginning of the show. We got some good ones about this summer's Olympics, returning to running postpartum, balancing running and training with the rest of your life, how the podcast and newsletter get made, and more. Thank you to everyone who submitted questions and apologies for all the ones I wasn't able to answer in this episode. This episode is brought to you by: — Tracksmith: Tracksmith is a Boston-based running apparel brand, born from a desire to celebrate both the history and the evolving culture of the sport. They recently released their Spring Collection full of stylish gear perfected for the pursuit of personal excellence. Designed for running hard and logging miles as the season shifts, this collection is designed with endurance in mind. Right now, Tracksmith is offering new customers $15 off your first purchase of $75 bucks or more. Just use code MARIO15 when you check out at tracksmith.com. — Atlanta Track Club. Member and lottery registration for the AJC Peachtree Road Race in Atlanta, Georgia is going on right now. The race will be held in-person and virtually this year on July 3rd and 4th. Strict COVID-19 safety precautions will be in place for the in-person version with limited spots available—Atlanta Track Club members get guaranteed entry and race day preference. If you're not a member you can join today and then sign up to get a guaranteed spot at Peachtree! Non-members will be placed into a lottery and race day preference will be accommodated as spots remain. Registration is going on now until May 1 and you can put your name in today at ajc.com/peachtree. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-157-ask-mario-anything/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 156 | Steve Magness

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2021 103:37


    “Most of my life was spent chasing times, mainly because I ran really fast in high school—a 4:01 as you mentioned—and when you un 4:01, you know, it's always in your head that, ‘Oh man, there's a second and change that I can get out of my body to get in that elusive, venerated sub-4 club,' so you think and you obsess over times and I certainly did to an unhealthy degree in my college and a little bit in my post-college life as well. So I think coming to terms with, and realizing and recognizing that that doesn't really matter anymore, was something that was incredibly freeing for myself.” Steve Magness wears many hats in the worlds of running and performance. He's been the head cross-country coach and assistant track coach at the University of Houston since 2012 and he's also worked with numerous professional athletes at the Olympic and world championship level. He's the coauthor of Peak Performance and The Passion Paradox, both of which he wrote with former podcast guest Brad Stulberg, and he's also the author of The Science of Running. Steve also co-hosts two podcasts, On Coaching, which dives deep into the art and science of training and coaching for runners, and The Growth Equation, a weekly no-bullshit discussion on well-being and performance. As an athlete in the early 2000s, Steve was one of the top scholastic runners in the country, running 4:01 in the mile—which, at the time, was the 6th fastest high school mile in U.S. history. This was an awesome conversation and I hope you enjoy listening to it as much as I did taking part in it. Steve told me about how he spends and splits his time amongst his various interests and pursuits, what his relationship with running looks like these days, and how he's channeled his competitive instincts throughout his life. We discussed how the past year has challenged him as a coach, the lack of checks and balances in the sport of track and field, and why he believes the sport has a long way to go before it can be considered truly “professional.” We also talked about what spurred his interest in coaching, how his time at The Oregon Project affected his outlook and trajectory as a coach, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Tracksmith: Tracksmith is a Boston-based running apparel brand, born from a desire to celebrate both the history and the evolving culture of the sport. They recently released their Spring Collection full of stylish gear perfected for the pursuit of personal excellence. Designed for running hard and logging miles as the season shifts, this collection is designed with endurance in mind. Right now, Tracksmith is offering new customers $15 off your first purchase of $75 bucks or more. Just use code MARIO15 when you check out at tracksmith.com. — Goodr: Goodr sunglasses are don't bounce, they don't slip, they're polarized to protect your eyes, and they come in a nice range of styles and fun colors. They're the most affordable performance shades on the planet with most pairs costing only $25 to $35 bucks a piece. If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodrs, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for 15% off your order. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-156-with-steve-magness/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout


    Episode 155 | Kyle Merber

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2021 72:07

    “Every single day for the last 15 years of my life I had a goal and I was able to tangibly work towards it day in and day out and all of my decisions were guided by the idea that I wanted to achieve this goal. There's not many other things that are happening in the world or in my life where that exists. I have goals in relationships, I know I'll have goals in my new work life, and longterm bucket list things I want to cross off but not necessarily things that every single day I'm seeing that input and output to the amount of effort that I'm giving towards it. I think that's just really unique to track and field and running—I don't think that even basketball players have that same experience.” Kyle Merber, like last week's guest, Andrew Bumbalough, is a recently retired professional athlete. He spent his professional career training and racing with the New Jersey New York Track Club and Coach Frank Gagliano, where he put up personal bests of 3:34 in the 1500 and 3:52 in the mile. In this conversation, we really didn't spend any time talking about Kyle's races, or highs and lows in the sport, or how he got his start in running; instead, we dug into what it's been like moving on from running in a professional capacity and he opened up and gave his honest reflections of what he experienced as an athlete. We talked about the coverage of the sport, whether or not we need to bring new fans into, how he plans to stay involved now that he's no longer competing at an elite level, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Tracksmith: Tracksmith is a Boston-based running apparel brand, born from a desire to celebrate both the history and the evolving culture of the sport. They recently released their Spring Collection full of stylish gear perfected for the pursuit of personal excellence. Designed for running hard and logging miles as the season shifts, this collection is designed with endurance in mind. Right now, Tracksmith is offering new customers $15 off your first purchase of $75 bucks or more. Just use code MARIO15 when you check out at tracksmith.com. — Goodr: Goodr sunglasses are don't bounce, they don't slip, they're polarized to protect your eyes, and they come in a nice range of styles and fun colors. They're the most affordable performance shades on the planet with most pairs costing only $25 to $35 bucks a piece. If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodrs, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for FREE shipping on your first order. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-155-with-kyle-merber/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 154 | Andrew Bumbalough

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2021 97:16

    “You just run so much when you're training for the marathon that if you don't truly love it, you won't really enjoy it. I think for most of my career prior to that I was so focused on performance and valuing the competition and what it gave me from that standpoint but I think as I transitioned to the marathon I really became interested in this idea of running for running's sake. And as I started to do that I started to notice other people. You go to a marathon, whether it be Boston or Chicago or wherever, you're immersed in a sea of runners—you're starting on the line with forty or fifty thousand other people and everyone has a different story of why they're there and how they got there.” Andrew Bumbalough is a recently retired professional athlete who spent the entirety of his career training and racing with the Bowerman Track Club, where he put up personal bests ranging from 3:37 for 1500m to 2:10 for the marathon. Amongst his numerous accomplishments, he finished 5th at the 2018 Boston Marathon, represented the U.S. in the 5000m at the 2011 world championships on the track, and won a national 5K title on the roads in 2013. We had a wide-ranging conversation that I really enjoyed and I think you will too. We talked about Bumbi's last race—the Olympic Trials Marathon, where he dropped out at 16 miles—and when he knew it was time to retire from the sport. He told me about his 10-year relationship with coach Jerry Schumacher and what makes him such a successful coach, what his relationship with running has looked like since he retired, and how his body has responded to the reduced training load. We discussed getting into coaching and how he approaches working with a wide range of athletes, the work he's done in footwear product innovation and how technology advances have changed what's possible in both training and racing, what he makes of some of the eye-popping times we've seen on the track and roads over the past year, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Goodr: Goodr sunglasses are don't bounce, they don't slip, they're polarized to protect your eyes, and they come in a nice range of styles and fun colors. They're the most affordable performance shades on the planet with most pairs costing only $25 to $35 bucks a piece. If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodrs, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for FREE shipping on your first order. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-154-with-andrew-bumbalough/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 153 | Shalane Flanagan

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2021 65:07

    “I'm hoping that my position with Bowerman and what I'm doing is just the beginning of a whole bunch of other women getting into coaching—and especially at this level. I think there's some great coaches at the collegiate level and high school level and they've been doing an amazing job, but I think to take it to this level as well, at the professional level, I feel like there's very minimal women out there and I'd love to just hopefully be a resource and a mentor to some future women that want to get into coaching. That being said, I don't have personal coaching goals, I just hope that it's something even bigger than that—it's actually a catalyst for a whole bunch of women to be in positions of power and mentoring and leadership and guiding.” Shalane Flanagan hardly needs an introduction, so I'll keep this short: she is one of the greatest American distance runners of all-time—a 4-time Olympian, an Olympic silver medalist in the 10,000m, world cross country bronze medalist, and the 2017 New York City Marathon champion. Over the course of her professional running career, Shalane won 16 national titles and held or still holds several American records. These days, she's a mom to her son Jack, a coach with the Bowerman Track Club, and The New York Times best-selling author of Run Fast. Eat Slow. This was Shalane's second time joining me on the podcast—be sure to check her first appearance back in Episode 7 if you haven't already—and we had a great time catching up about coaching, parenting, book writing, and what her own running looks like these days. We also talked about her relationship to anxiety, how she channels her competitiveness now that she's no longer a professional athlete, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Girls on the Run has been inspiring girls to know and activate their limitless potential and boldly pursue their dreams. On Thursday, March 25 at 7 PM EST you are invited to join an exciting 25th Birthday virtual event celebrating the inherent power and courage of girls. Join me and RSVP today at gotr.gives/TMS. The event is free to attend, but donations can be made and special add-on packages are available for purchase such as a copy of Hoda's newest book and a pair of GOODR sunglasses customized for Girls on the Run. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-153-with-shalane-flanagan/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 152 | Darcy Budworth

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2021 89:17

    “I think I'm somebody where I grew up in a family of many people, a large family—and then also I grew up Morman, and so I grew up around many families that were very large and also my mom did daycare at our home—and so I've always just been around a lot of people and I've always had to be somebody that has found my voice among many people while also being friends with everybody. And it's funny, when I was growing up I always had friends all over the place. I never realized until recently that that continues to be true. I feel like I'm a connector where I love just meeting new people and finding out about new people and then connecting different people with likeminded people, so I definitely think that's probably the core of my being.” Darcy Budworth is the co-founder and race director of Take The Bridge, which is an underground and unsanctioned series of races that was born in New York City in 2015 and has since spread to numerous other cities around the world. I raced my first Take the Bridge this past February in San Francisco and I loved everything about it. As I wrote in my newsletter a few weeks ago, the race was low-key and community focused, the distance was unconventional—we happened to run 4.2 miles over the Golden Gate Bridge—and even the turns we took were up to us as long as we hit the required checkpoint along the way. There were no mile markers, no clocks, and at the end of the night, you were battling it out for place, not trying to run a pre-determined pace. There was level of purity to it that I really appreciated and, quite honestly, didn't even know I missed. It reminded me a lot of cross-country but with a fast and the furious, every runner for him or herself urban street vibe to it. In this conversation, Darcy and I talked a lot about Take the Bridge and all aspects of unsanctioned racing in general, but we also got into her background, how she got into running, her relationship to the sport, as well as some discussion about stress, anxiety, injuries, and more. This episode is brought to you by: — Atlanta Track Club. Member and lottery registration for the AJC Peachtree Road Race in Atlanta, Georgia is going on right now. The race will be held in-person and virtually this year on July 3rd and 4th. Strict COVID-19 safety precautions will be in place for the in-person version with limited spots available—Atlanta Track Club members get guaranteed entry and race day preference. If you're not a member you can join today and then sign up to get a guaranteed spot at Peachtree! Non-members will be placed into a lottery and race day preference will be accommodated as spots remain. Registration is going on now until May 1 and you can put your name in today at ajc.com/peachtree. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-152-with-darcy-budworth/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 151 | Hawi Keflezighi

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2021 109:34


    “I would work around the clock, weekends, because I was passionate, and that's one thing I say to anyone that's passionate about what they do: make sure you do things that are sustainable, because no matter how passionate you are, no matter how much you love your job, if you're doing it 24/7, seven days a week, and you don't give yourself a break just because you love it, it's still work and it will eventually catch up to you. And I did have those moments when I was a one-man operation—I loved it, and that's why I was so quick to hire somebody else on my team, just to make sure we build the infrastructure to sustain ourselves for many years ahead.” Hawi Keflezighi is one of the top agents in all of endurance sports, and one of the nicest guys that I've ever known. He is the founder and president of Hawi Management and his agency represents some of the top athletes in track and field, road racing, trail running, and triathlon. His most notable client is his brother Meb, who he has been representing since 2005, and his roster also includes Aliphine Tuliamuk, Alexi Pappas, Katie Zafares, and Joe Gray, amongst others. We covered a pretty wide range of topics in this conversation, from the book he's been helping his dad out with to the role that storytelling has played throughout his life. We talked about coming to the U.S. from Eritrea via Italy and some of his earliest memories as a young kid, to how he ended up at UCLA, and the path he followed to becoming a sports agent. Finally, we got into the weeds of the business, marketing, and sponsorship side of professional running and discussed how contracts have evolved over the past 15 years, what the job responsibilities are for an athlete today, how he sees things evolving in the future, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — New Balance: I was recently able to get my hands on a pair of the new Fresh Foam 1080v11 and I was shocked to love them even more than I did last year's v10 model. New Balance claims the 1080 offers the ultimate ride, and I'd have to agree. It's the best fitting shoe I own and the Fresh Foam X cushioning feels super comfortable underneath my feet. It's lightweight and flexible, but also responsive and durable—basically the perfect trainer to log most of your miles in, which is what I do. I wear it on most of my non-workout days and for long runs too. Check out the Fresh Foam 1080v11 on newbalance.com and consider adding a pair to your rotation. — Girls on the Run has been inspiring girls to know and activate their limitless potential and boldly pursue their dreams. On Thursday, March 25 at 7 PM EST—just a few weeks from now—you are invited to join an exciting 25th Birthday virtual event celebrating the inherent power and courage of girls. Join me and RSVP today at gotr.gives/TMS. The event is free to attend, but donations can be made and special add-on packages are available for purchase such as a copy of Hoda's newest book and a pair of GOODR sunglasses customized for Girls on the Run. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-151-with-hawi-keflezighi/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout


    Episode 150 | Jenna Wrieden

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2021 62:14

    “I think I just learned over time that I have to be able to trust my own instincts and portray whatever I'm saying to an athlete with complete confidence and with complete backing of the head coach because you never want to diverge. And I know sometimes young coaches, they're so excited to coach, they want to do everything they can that is within themselves to start coaching but you have to remember [that] you have to back your head coach because you're backing the culture and you're backing what they've created and I think it's really important to be a really good sidekick ven though you've got bigger goals than that. You've got to kind of fall in line with that culture and really cultivate it and have confidence in doing that, and over time then you get to come up with your own pillars or your own culture, but it takes years and years and years to do that, I think.” Jenna Wrieden is the assistant coach at HOKA Northern Arizona Elite, where she's been on staff since January. Prior to moving to Flagstaff to work alongside Ben Rosario and crew, she coached in the collegiate ranks since 2006, most recently as an assistant at Louisville, where over the course of 4-1/2 years she worked with several All-Americans. As an athlete, Jenna ran at Arizona State, where she was teammates with Des Linden and Amy Cragg, and—fun fact—in 2014 she set a world record for the fastest half marathon ever run on a treadmill. I always enjoy talking to fellow coaches and this conversation was no exception. We talked about Jenna's new role, how it came to be, and what the transition has been like so far from the collegiate to the professional ranks. Jenna also told me about how she got her start in the sport and what spurred her pursue coaching after college, how her own relationship with running has evolved over the years, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — New Balance: I was recently able to get my hands on a pair of the new Fresh Foam 1080v11 and I was shocked to love them even more than I did last year's v10 model. New Balance claims the 1080 offers the ultimate ride, and I'd have to agree. It's the best fitting shoe I own and the Fresh Foam X cushioning feels super comfortable underneath my feet. It's lightweight and flexible, but also responsive and durable—basically the perfect trainer to log most of your miles in, which is what I do. I wear it on most of my non-workout days and for long runs too. Check out the Fresh Foam 1080v11 on newbalance.com and consider adding a pair to your rotation. — Girls on the Run has been inspiring girls to know and activate their limitless potential and boldly pursue their dreams. On Thursday, March 25 at 7 PM EST—just a few weeks from now—you are invited to join an exciting 25th Birthday virtual event celebrating the inherent power and courage of girls. Join me and RSVP today at gotr.gives/TMS. The event is free to attend, but donations can be made and special add-on packages are available for purchase such as a copy of Hoda's newest book and a pair of GOODR sunglasses customized for Girls on the Run. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-150-with-jenna-wrieden/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 149 | Keith Kelly

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2021 129:02

    “I don't know where the desire to win comes from other than the desire to just feel like I've done my best and to know that when it's all said and done that I can't really have any regrets…The ability to go hard and to hurt yourself, yeah, I think some athletes have it better than others—and I would put myself, maybe I could at times, go fairly deep—and I don't know really where that comes from. I think it's one of those things where it was more of a desire just to know I've done my best, and if my best wasn't good enough, which in many times it wasn't, that's OK, because then I could walk away and be like, ‘Well, that's as good as I am.' And I think knowing that can give any athlete a little sense of peace or a sense of calm.” Keith Kelly and I go back 20 years to when we were both competing on the New England collegiate racing scene. He was an NCAA Division I national Cross Country champion at Providence College and I…well, I participated in some of the same events that he did from much further back in the field. We struck up a friendship a few years later when we both started working in the running industry and our paths have been criss-crossing ever since. In addition to his individual NCAA title, Keith was a 5x All American at Providence, he finished 24th in the senior men's race at the 2001 World Cross Country championships, and he won the Irish national cross country title in 2009. When his competitive running career got cut short due to injury, he got into cycling and rose through the ranks to race as a Cat 1 within a year of putting himself in the saddle. Now 43 years old, Keith works as a Global Run Marketing manager at New Balance. In this episode, Keith talked to me about athletic career, his extensive injury history, and when he knew running was something his body could no longer tolerate. We discussed his interest in cycling, how he channeled his fitness and competitiveness into his new sport, and what he misses most about running. We also talked about how the pandemic has affected the running industry, how super shoes are changing the sport, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Goodr: Goodr sunglasses are don't bounce, they don't slip, they're polarized to protect your eyes, and they come in a nice range of styles and fun colors. They're the most affordable performance shades on the planet with most pairs costing only $25 to $35 bucks a piece. If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodrs, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for FREE shipping on your first order. — Girls on the Run has been inspiring girls to know and activate their limitless potential and boldly pursue their dreams. On Thursday, March 25 at 7 PM EST—just a few weeks from now—you are invited to join an exciting 25th Birthday virtual event celebrating the inherent power and courage of girls. Join me and RSVP today at gotr.gives/TMS. The event is free to attend, but donations can be made and special add-on packages are available for purchase such as a copy of Hoda's newest book and a pair of GOODR sunglasses customized for Girls on the Run. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-149-with-keith-kelly/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 148 | Colin Bennie

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 16, 2021 89:53


    “There were definitely a number of times where I found myself just trying to analyze every single aspect of what I was doing different from the year before, or what I wasn't doing different from the year before, and why there were any of these discrepancies in how I was running and I think that was the only stretch of time where I let myself get to that point because I realized that it definitely was an unfortunate sort of spiral to find yourself in because the more you think about, ‘Oh man, what am I doing wrong?' or ‘What do I need to be doing better? Maybe that's why I'm not running so fast.' There's no shortage and no way to stop yourself from finding more and more things that you can fix—or convince yourself need fixing—even when maybe all it's coming down to is you're spending way too much time in your own head and not just letting the training do what it's supposed to do and go along for the ride because sometimes it's really all you need to do.” Colin Bennie is the sub-2:10 American marathoner that no one seems to be talking much about, which is one of the reasons I'm super excited to share this episode with all of you. He also happens to be a fellow Central Massachusetts native and we had some fun geeking out about the unique area where we both grew up. Colin, who is 25 years old, finished third at The Marathon Project in Arizona last December, running 2:09:38 in just his second marathon. He made his marathon debut at last year's Olympic Trials, finishing an impressive ninth in 2:12:14. Colin is a member of the Reebok Boston Track Club, which is based in Charlottesville, Virginia, and he's coached by Chris Fox, who guided him throughout his All-American collegiate career at Syracuse University. In this conversation, Colin told me about his childhood, looking up to his two older brothers, and playing a bunch of different sports before settling on hockey and running in high school. We talked about his collegiate years at Syracuse, his relationship with Coach Fox, and how he and his teammates help make one another better athletes and people. We also discussed the importance of being a team player, what the transition to professional running was like for him, moving up to the marathon, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — New Balance: I was recently able to get my hands on a pair of the new Fresh Foam 1080v11 and I was shocked to love them even more than I did last year's v10 model. New Balance claims the 1080 offers the ultimate ride, and I'd have to agree. It's the best fitting shoe I own and the Fresh Foam X cushioning feels super comfortable underneath my feet. It's lightweight and flexible, but also responsive and durable—basically the perfect trainer to log most of your miles in, which is what I do. I wear it on most of my non-workout days and for long runs too. Check out the Fresh Foam 1080v11 on newbalance.com and consider adding a pair to your rotation. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-148-with-colin-bennie/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout


    Episode 147 | Rajpaul Pannu

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2021 105:14

    “Running, for me, is an act of a rebellion. There's subtext in which if there's a BIPOC person on the starting line and you see a picture of them in a sea of people, I feel like you're really giving a narrative that goes against the grain in terms of what society is expecting of you or how society views you. So running, for me, is my personal act of rebellion. It is something that goes against the grain as to what you do as a first generation Indian-American. From our background, there is a huge emphasis on education in the sense of becoming a doctor, becoming an engineer—and doing something that I feel like juxtaposes that in a sense of what people expect out of you is rebellion to me.” Rajpaul Pannu recently finished second at the Hoka One One Project Carbon X 2 100K in 6:28:31—it was his debut at the distance and the third fastest time ever run by an American. The 29-year-old is also a 2:17 marathoner and math teacher who is currently splitting his time between Denver, Colorado and the Bay Area. I loved this conversation and I think you will too. Raj has an enthusiasm about him that's contagious and an introspectiveness that I really admire. We talked about his most recent race, of course, and what he was feeling before, during, and after it. He told me about re-examining his relationship with running after last year's Olympic Trials Marathon and how he's used the pandemic to rethink his goals, priorities, and identity as a runner. Raj also recalled the first run he ever went on, he described how a family history of heart disease and his dad's early passing factored into taking those first strides, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — New Balance: I was recently able to get my hands on a pair of the new Fresh Foam 1080v11 and I was shocked to love them even more than I did last year's v10 model. New Balance claims the 1080 offers the ultimate ride, and I'd have to agree. It's the best fitting shoe I own and the Fresh Foam X cushioning feels super comfortable underneath my feet. It's lightweight and flexible, but also responsive and durable—basically the perfect trainer to log most of your miles in, which is what I do. I wear it on most of my non-workout days and for long runs too. Check out the Fresh Foam 1080v11 on newbalance.com and consider adding a pair to your rotation. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-147-with-rajpaul-pannu/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 146 | Nathan Martin

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2021 77:39

    “I like pushing myself and that's one thing about running, too: You can argue, there's not a crazy amount of technical stuff—like when you get into some of those track events like hurdles and stuff, it's crazy technical—but, you know, it's that idea that it's your will versus what your body's kind of telling you, right? Or, in some cases, like you're fighting against somebody else. So just being able to get into a race and say, ‘You know what, it's time to go,' and just test your body is what I gravitate towards—and don't get me wrong, sometimes I do that and I'm like, ‘Why in the world did I do that? I am in so much pain,' but a lot of the time it's just awesome that I have the opportunity to do that. I'm not necessarily a person who's going to back down from somebody. Sometimes I'll be cautious, like, ‘OK, this is not the right time to be making these moves.' But, you know, when it comes down to the last little bit of the race, if I have something in me, I'm going to push hard and I'm going to try and dig as deep as I can to finish.” Nathan Martin ran 2:11:05 at The Marathon Project back in December to finish ninth overall. It was a personal best by over three minutes and also the fastest marathon ever run by a Black man born in the United States. Nathan broke Herm Atkins' mark of 2:11:52, which had stood since 1979. I really enjoyed this conversation and getting to learn more about Nathan. We discussed the newfound media attention he's received since The Marathon Project, signing with an agent, and how he's been adjusting to all of that. We also talked about what his accomplishment means to him and when he realized it was a bigger deal than he originally thought. He also told me about growing up with six sisters, losing both of his parents to cancer and how their passings shaped his life, why it's important for him to serve as a role model and give back to his community, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — New Balance: I was recently able to get my hands on a pair of the new Fresh Foam 1080v11 and I was shocked to love them even more than I did last year's v10 model. New Balance claims the 1080 offers the ultimate ride, and I'd have to agree. It's the best fitting shoe I own and the Fresh Foam X cushioning feels super comfortable underneath my feet. It's lightweight and flexible, but also responsive and durable—basically the perfect trainer to log most of your miles in, which is what I do. I wear it on most of my non-workout days and for long runs too. Check out the Fresh Foam 1080v11 on newbalance.com and consider adding a pair to your rotation. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-146-with-nathan-martin/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 145 | Dinée Dorame

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2021 78:13

    “I really try to reflect on why I love running in the first place and really—I'm not trying to be cheesy and fluffy about it—I really love the actual, physical action of running and I think that if you really love that, you will find a way to keep going because that's ultimately what's worth it. And I think if you are a slower-paced runner, that's fine. I've learned to own my pace and recognize that I deserve to have goals and even if that goal is knocking just a few seconds off of your mile pace or something like that, and you're comparing yourself to others on Strava, just keeping in mind that it's your story and it's all about you in that moment, and I think, in that sense, that is where I try to center myself and remember that I'm really blessed to be able to do this and I'm really grateful that yes, my feet have a lot of issues, but they also carry me every day across the land. So, I keep those things in mind and remember that there is a brighter future ahead and that I do have the capability to improve.” Dinée Dorame is a runner and podcast host from Albuquerque, New Mexico. I've been mentoring her for past few months as she's been preparing to launch her show, The Grounded Podcast with Dinée Dorame, which debuts this week wherever you listen to audio content. Dinee's podcast is really unique and it's going to fill a big hole in the running podcast space as she explores the intersection of running, culture, land and community through long-form conversations with runners of all backgrounds and ability levels. Her voice is a needed one and I'm excited to amplify it a bit in this week's episode. Dinée, who is a citizen of the Navajo nation, grew up in a running-crazy family. Her dad ran at the University of Colorado and is a successful high school coach in New Mexico. Her mom is a lifelong runner as well, and running has been a huge part of Dinée's life for as long as she can remember. In this conversation, we spoke about the idea for her podcast and when and how she decided to make it a reality. Dinée also told me about what it was like growing up in a running household, how her own relationship to the sport has evolved over the years, and how running helps her connect to the land. We also talked about opening up more connection points for runners within the sport, diversifying the voices we hear from, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — New Balance: I was recently able to get my hands on a pair of the new Fresh Foam 1080v11 and I was shocked to love them even more than I did last year's v10 model. New Balance claims the 1080 offers the ultimate ride, and I'd have to agree. It's the best fitting shoe I own and the Fresh Foam X cushioning feels super comfortable underneath my feet. It's lightweight and flexible, but also responsive and durable—basically the perfect trainer to log most of your miles in, which is what I do. I wear it on most of my non-workout days and for long runs too. Check out the Fresh Foam 1080v11 on newbalance.com later this week and consider adding a pair to your rotation. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-145-with-dinee-dorame/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 144 | Craig Curley

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2021 93:34

    “I'm responsible for my life and what I want to do in this world. And whatever silly thing that I am good at, I'm going to pursue it and not look back. I believe I could be super fast and I don't want to waste those gifts. And that was kind of my moment of, ‘I'm gonna do this running thing.' Because in the beginning it was really easy to be like, ‘I quit running, I don't need to run competitively, I don't need to do any of that.' But when that happened to me, that event, it changed me in the sense that there's lot of people who have different gifts and they don't use [them]. And I wanted to make sure that I used my gifts because I think if we all use our gifts we could do something really special, not for ourselves, but for our family, and, if we're really good, we can do something for our community, wherever we live.” This week's episode is one of my favorite conversations that I've ever had for the podcast and I am super excited to share it with all of you. Craig Curley was one of most up and coming distance runners in the U.S., from about 2010-2016, clocking a 63-minute half marathon, 2:15 marathon, and some top-10 finishes at national championship races. He hasn't raced a lot in recent years but two weekends ago he finished third at the Bandera 100K, his first time competing at that distance. Craig, who is 32 years old, is one of the most, humble, hard working, and down to earth people that I've ever spoken to and it really comes out in this episode. We caught up a few days before Bandera and hit on a lot of different topics, from the connection Craig feels to the trails and mountains, to his life growing up on a Navajo reservation in Arizona, and how he balances living in the modern world without getting too far away from his Navajo roots. We also discussed his relationship to running and how it's evolved over the years, not wasting his gifts and talents, serving as a role model for other Native Americans, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Tracksmith: As we start 2021, Tracksmith continues their tradition of encouraging No Days Off — their annual call for patience, persistence and participation in running. Tracksmith is shipping a free NDO Poster with every order to encourage commitment to consistency, while supplies lasts, so get your order in today at Tracksmith.com. Additionally, they are offering new customers $15 off your first purchase of $75+ when you use the code Mario15 at checkout. — Goodr: Goodr sunglasses are just the best! They don't slip, they're polarized to protect your eyes, and they come in a nice range of styles and fun colors. They're the most affordable performance shades on the planet with most pairs costing only $25 to $35 bucks a piece. If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodrs, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout to save 13% off your purchase. Look good, run goodr! Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-144-with-craig-curley/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 143 | Frank Lara

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2021 62:59

    “I think at Furman I ended up doing a lot on my own, just thinking, ‘Oh, I have to do all this stuff to be good.' So I ended up overdoing a lot of things that I ultimately was kind of wearing myself out trying to get all this stuff done—just in my head to have an edge on everybody. But I think a big factor now is just that I'm letting myself recover and rest and I go into every race feeling super good and super fresh because I have taken the time to focus on letting my body relax and only stressing it out when it needs to be stressed. I think that's been a big factor...I found that giving myself actual ample time to recover and rest has been the biggest change for me. I think it's a big factor to the success I'm having now.” Frank Lara is a professional runner for the Roots Running Project out of Boulder, Colorado. He also works part-time for Strava as a community management representative. Most recently, Frank paced 20 miles of The Marathon Project at sub-2:09 pace, just a couple weeks after running a massive personal best of 27:44 in the 10,000m. In 2020, he was named the U.S. 15K champion a few months after the winner of the race was sanctioned by USADA for a doping violation. I enjoyed this conversation, which we recorded back in December, just a couple days before Frank's pacing assignment at the Marathon Project. We talked about transitioning from collegiate to professional running, his biggest learnings as a pro, and developing the confidence to compete at the highest level of the sport. He also told me about learning how to rest, chasing his curiosities, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Tracksmith: As we start 2021, Tracksmith continues their tradition of encouraging No Days Off — their annual call for patience, persistence and participation in running. Tracksmith is shipping a free NDO Poster with every order to encourage commitment to consistency, while supplies lasts, so get your order in today at Tracksmith.com. Additionally, they are offering new customers $15 off your first purchase of $75+ when you use the code Mario15 at checkout. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-143-with-frank-lara/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 142 | Alexi Pappas

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2021 55:37


    “If we don't know what the most important thing to do in a day is, or in a moment, then we will become more like leaves, blowing with every breeze. And so I think there have been times in my life where if I wasn't clear with myself on my own priorities or my goals then I was behaving more like a leaf and being blown around—and I don't think we want to be like rocks, where we're not affected by anything, but I think I've grown and try to be more like a tree where there's some roots but you can still feel the breeze. I say this thing—that tomorrow starts tonight—and I really mean it when I say I just prepare as best I can for the next day or the next thing I'm doing so that I give myself the best chance at attacking what my north star is first.” Alexi Pappas is a professional athlete who holds the Greek national record in the 10,000-meters and competed for Greece at the 2016 Olympic Games. She's also an award-winning writer and filmmaker whose work has appeared in The New York Times, Runner's World, The Atlantic, Outside magazine, and other publications. Her first book, Bravey: Chasing Dreams, Befriending Pain, and Other Big Ideas comes out on January 12. In this conversation, we talked about her new book, how it came to be, and the process of writing it. We also discussed the power of imagination, personal responsibility, approaching our mental health the same way we do our physical health, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Tracksmith: As we start 2021, Tracksmith continues their tradition of encouraging No Days Off — their annual call for patience, persistence and participation in running. Tracksmith is shipping a free NDO Poster with every order to encourage commitment to consistency, while supplies lasts, so get your order in today at Tracksmith.com. Additionally, they are offering new customers $15 off your first purchase of $75+ when you use the code Mario15 at checkout. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-142-with-alexi-pappas/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout


    Episode 141 | Best of 2020

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2020 82:22

    This week's episode of the podcast—the last one for 2020—is a “best of” compilation of highlights from 12 of the most impactful conversations I've had over the past 12 months. To provide a little context: I put out 47 episodes of the podcast in 2020—totaling almost 100 hours of conversation—and picking out soundbites from only a dozen of them to highlight here was really freaking hard. I literally have notebooks full of stuff that I've learned from every single guest and I simply cannot express enough gratitude for all that they've shared with me and, in turn, all of you. In this episode you'll hear from six women and six men whose stories, experiences, wisdom, and insight really stood out to me. They are, in order of episode release date: Fernando Cabada, Laura Schmitt, Nate Jenkins, Mike Smith, Mary Cain, Karen Boen, Faith E. Briggs, Mike Rouse, Brenda Martinez, Kilian Jornet, Diljeet Taylor, and Knox Robinson. These weren't necessarily the most downloaded episodes but I promise you each of these guests will move you in some way by either teaching you something new, providing an important insight, or getting you to reflect upon and perhaps even re-examine some aspect of your own life. If you're a devoted fan of the podcast, it's my hope that this second annual “best of” episode serves as a bit of a refresher or maybe a reminder to revisit an old episode or two. For those of you who are newer listeners to the show, welcome. Use this episode as a nudge to check out some of the conversations you may have missed while also letting it serve as a primer for what's to come in 2021. Whether you tune in to every episode of the podcast or only listen every once in a while, I just want to say: thank you. I'm tremendously grateful for your interest and support. I'm a little over three years into this podcast journey and the impact it's had on my life and many of you who listen regularly is immeasurable. I'm so glad to have all of you along for the ride and sharing in these experiences with me. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-141-best-of-2020/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 140 | Alex Hutchinson

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2020 98:03


    “It's not just like you can have a bad race because you get too nervous. No. The very essence of, in the middle of a race, you're asking yourself, ‘Can I maintain this pace? Can I speed up? Can I slow down?' And that decision, which you're asking yourself with every stride essentially, is not answered by, ‘I can't speed up because some physical parameter is maxed out,' because it's not—it's clearly not, you can keep going. Instead, it's maxed out by your brain's assessment of how hard you're going and whether that is something that is sustainable and will get you to the finish line. And so fundamentally, you make that switch that, ‘Oh no, at every point, unless I collapse on the ground, at every point through a race, it's been my mind that's deciding whether I can keep going or whether I can speed up or not.'” Alex Hutchinson is the author of the New York Times best-seller Endure, which is one of my favorite books of the past few years, he's a contributing editor at Outside magazine, where he writes the Sweat Science column, and his byline has also appeared in numerous other publications. We recently had a great conversation about writing, running, and the path he's followed in both of those disciplines. We also talked about the concept of endurance, which he wrote an entire book about, the limits on our potential, the future of connected fitness, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Tracksmith: Tracksmith is an independent running brand built on a deep love for the sport. They craft products, tell stories, and create experiences that aim to celebrate, support and add to running's distinct culture. This holiday season, Tracksmith is acknowledging that Running is a Gift and that this year, the miles meant more. They want to say 'thank you, running', for being the simple act that has kept us sane in a turbulent year and they're offering new customers $15 off your first purchase of $75 or more through the end of the month. To learn more, check out tracksmith.com and use code Mario15 at checkout. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-140-with-alex-hutchinson/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout


    Episode 139 | Knox Robinson

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2020 103:12

    “I started to wonder decades later if running for me was the first time that I had ever had facts ascribed to my name. And I wonder if being lied about and called racial epithets from a young age and to know from age 4 or 5 that I'm living in a society that speaks of you in a way that you know is not accurate and you know is not who yourself to be. And so for an entire lifetime of people lying to you and lying about you, saying you did something that you didn't do, saying that you were someplace that you weren't, somebody saying or assuming you would do something or had done something that had never even entered your mind. I think running, and getting times, for the first time, for me, as a teenager, was the first time that I ever had experience with facts, you know what I mean? You can't lie about your time. You can't lie about your race. It's there in the newspaper, in the results section, and I think that that experience was so intoxicating to me, that like, you could call me whatever you want, and you could say all these racist stereotypes about black people you want, but you can't never say that Knox Robinson didn't run 9:41 on a Tuesday night.” Knox Robinson is a returning guest to the show. He first appeared back on Episode 12, which was recorded Boston Marathon weekend in 2018. In addition to being a friend of mine, Knox is a writer, coach, and athlete who is now based in Los Angeles. Prior to that he spent years in New York City, where he co-founded the Black Roses NYC running crew. Knox ran collegiately at Wake Forest before stepping away from the sport for the better part of a decade to work in the music industry. We recorded this conversation back in late July but I've held onto for a couple of reasons: 1. Knox was a guest on a lot of other podcasts this past summer and I didn't want this one to get lost in the shuffle; and 2. This was at times, quite frankly, an uncomfortable exchange as we discussed difficult topics like running while black, race in America, the role of the media in all of that, and more. But I'm sharing it here today in its entirety because it had a profound impact on me and I hope it will do the same for you. We got into Knox's roots and his background as a runner and a storyteller, his writing practice and what it looks like, and the idea of running as a sort of leveling agent. We also discussed his recent move to LA and what he hopes to achieve there, setting up a high altitude retreat in the mountains of Mexico, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Tracksmith: Tracksmith is an independent running brand built on a deep love for the sport. They craft products, tell stories, and create experiences that aim to celebrate, support and add to running's distinct culture. This holiday season, Tracksmith is acknowledging that Running is a Gift and that this year, the miles meant more. They want to say 'thank you, running', for being the simple act that has kept us sane in a turbulent year and they're offering new customers $15 off your first purchase of $75 or more through the end of the month. To learn more, check out tracksmith.com and use code Mario15 at checkout. — Goodr: Goodr sunglasses are just the best! They're the most affordable performance shades on the planet with most pairs costing only $25 to $35 bucks a piece. If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodrs, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for FREE shipping on your first order. Look good, run goodr! Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-139-with-knox-robinson/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 138 | Chris Miltenberg

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2020 116:51

    “If you're going to be a good coach, you have to believe you're really good, right? You have to balance humility with confidence. You have to believe you're really good. And I hope this doesn't sound arrogant, but I believe I'm really good. And so, even then I did, even when I was uncertain, so I also did have this false sense of like, ‘Well, they've got to hear from me. I've got the answers. They've got to hear from me.' None of that matters if you're not building a connection with each of them every day. I think a lot of it was when I was young, man, [it was] ‘I'm going to put my stamp on this, this is what we're going to do.' I wish I could go back and have actually enjoyed it more.” Chris Miltenberg is one of the top collegiate cross-country and track coaches in the United States. He's currently the director of cross country and track and field at the University of North Carolina, where he took over last year after holding the same position at Stanford from 2012 until mid-2019. Prior to that, he was the head women's cross country coach and associate head coach for track and field at Georgetown from 2007-2012. He got his start in coaching at Columbia, where he worked as an assistant from 2004-07. Milt's resume is incredibly impressive. His women's cross country team at Georgetown won the national title in 2011, his teams have earned 10 podium finishes in NCAA Championship competition, not to mention numerous conference and regional titles over the past 16 years. He's had dozens of student-athletes earn All-America honors, many have gone on to run professionally, his teams have been recognized for their success in the classroom, and Coach Milt has racked up more coach of the year awards than I can count. We recently had a conversation about coaching, the path he's followed, challenges he's faced, and who he's learned from along the way. We talked about why he left Stanford for Carolina, how he and his teams have been navigating the pandemic, and why he ultimately believes the events of this past year have helped him, his staff, and his team focus on what's really important. Milt also told me how paranoia and insecurity fuel his work ethic, why that's gotten him into trouble sometimes and what he does to keep himself in check, how he keeps himself sharp as a coach, and a lot more. This is a long one folks but it's a must-listen for any coach, leader, manager, parent, or athlete. This episode is brought to you by: — Tracksmith: Tracksmith is an independent running brand built on a deep love for the sport. They craft products, tell stories, and create experiences that aim to celebrate, support and add to running's distinct culture. This holiday season, Tracksmith is acknowledging that Running is a Gift and that this year, the miles meant more. They want to say 'thank you, running', for being the simple act that has kept us sane in a turbulent year and they're offering new customers $15 off your first purchase of $75 or more through the end of the month. To learn more, check out tracksmith.com and use code Mario15 at checkout. — Goodr: Goodr sunglasses are just the best! I've been wearing them for the past few years and they don't bounce, they don't slip, they're polarized to protect your eyes, and they come in a nice range of styles and fun colors. They're the most affordable performance shades on the planet with most pairs costing only $25 to $35 bucks a piece. If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodrs, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for FREE shipping on your first order. Look good, run goodr! Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-138-with-chris-miltenberg/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 137 | Ask Mario Anything #5

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2020 60:09

    “I think you should ditch worrying about your heart rate and just go by feel. Easy is a feeling, it is not a number. Sometimes you need parameters if you are prone to running too hard on your easy days but you should be able to ask yourself, ‘Does this feel easy?' and if the answer is no, you need to back it off a few notches. And even if the answer is yes, there's no harm in backing it off a notch because an easy run, the purpose of it, is to yes, maybe get in aerobic work but it's mostly to recover from the quality work that you're doing and to be able to absorb it. And on a truly easy day, you really can't go easy enough. I'll tell my athletes sometimes, ‘I want you a step above walking.' And that's going to be different for everyone, or everyone's perception of that is going to be a little bit different, but the point is, it needs to feel easy, it can't just be your watch telling you that here's the number that you're supposed to be at and it's easy because you're at that number because we're not programmable robots, we're human beings. And you need to be able to check in with yourself and be honest with yourself and ask yourself, ‘Is this truly easy?' and if it's not, have the discipline and the confidence to back off so that you're not overdoing it.” This week on the podcast I'm answering listener questions in the final Ask Mario Anything episode of 2020. We got some good ones about diversity in the sport, running with my dog Tahoe, easy run paces and weekly mileage, shoes, setting goals, and more. On the other side of the mic for this one is John Summerford, who I spend a few minutes catching up with before we dive into reader questions. (Side note: Check out the first installment of John's new documentary series, “Leaving LA,” on Instagram @baresrecords, which pairs well alongside an update he shared with me in the preamble to this podcast.) This episode is brought to you by: — Gatorade Endurance: I've been using Gatorade's Endurance Formula before and during some of my workouts recently to ensure that I'm adequately energized and hydrated, and, so far, so good. I LOVE the Watermelon flavor and it's also available in Lemon-Lime, Orange, and Cherry. Check out and try some of Gatorade Endurance's different options for yourself this off-season. Use the code "Shakeout20" and get 20% off your purchase at gatoradeendurance.com. — InsideTracker: InsideTracker is the ultra-personalized nutrition platform that analyzes your blood and DNA biomarkers along with your lifestyle habits to help you optimize your body and reach your goals. As we head into the holiday season, take advantage of InsideTracker's BEST DEAL of the year and take control of your health and wellness by using the code GIFTFROMMORNSHAKEOUT at insidetracker.com to save $200 on the Ultimate Plan, their most comprehensive package. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-137-ask-mario-anything/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 136 | Jae Gruenke

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2020 109:19

    “What I love about running, and what I love even more about running than I ever loved about dancing, is how human it is. It's a fundamental human gait: We crawl, we walk, we run, technically, apparently, skipping is also another gait, and so when you get better at it, for myself, I just felt more human. At that point in my life already, I had been through so many movement methods in trying to get myself together as a dancer: so much yoga, Klein technique, Gyrotonics, Alexander, Trager, everything that was out there I had done, practically, that I could find, and that was a lot. It all had effects, gave me different sensations. There's a certain way that I feel after I do yoga, but after I run, I realize I feel more human, as in a member of my species—it's really pronounced, really profound—and I really love working with that more than anything else.” Jae Gruenke is a highly sought-after expert on running form and technique. She's also a Feldenkrais Practitioner, founder of The Balanced Runner, and has helped countless runners from beginners to Olympians improve their form and performance since 2003. I've been following Jae's work for a little while now and recently found out that she doesn't live far from me, so we sat down at a local park and had a conversation that I think you'll really enjoy and take a lot away from. We talked about what it is that Jae does exactly and how she uses the Feldenkrais Method of Movement Education to help runners with their technique. She told me how she got into running after years as a professional dancer and how solving her own problems led her to working with others who were navigating similar issues. We discussed what mainstream publications miss when it comes to running technique, common places where runners go wrong, and what she considers to be the six elements of good form. We also got into cadence, the influence of footwear, the analyses she does on the elite fields in major races, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Gatorade Endurance: I've been using Gatorade's Endurance Formula before and during some of my workouts recently to ensure that I'm adequately energized and hydrated, and, so far, so good. I LOVE the Watermelon flavor and it's also available in Lemon-Lime, Orange, and Cherry. Check out and try some of Gatorade Endurance's different options for yourself this off-season. Use the code "Shakeout20" and get 20% off your purchase at gatoradeendurance.com. — InsideTracker: InsideTracker is the ultra-personalized nutrition platform that analyzes your blood and DNA biomarkers along with your lifestyle habits to help you optimize your body and reach your goals. As we head into the holiday season, take advantage of InsideTracker's BEST DEAL of the year and take control of your health and wellness by using the code GIFTFROMMORNSHAKEOUT at insidetracker.com to save $200 on the Ultimate Plan, their most comprehensive package. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-136-with-jae-gruenke/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 135 | Diljeet Taylor

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2020 79:44

    “There's things we take for granted, as athletes, as coaches, and have those things taken away from you, you really just realize how much they mean to you and I think every opportunity we get to show up to work, every opportunity we get to showcase our talents, it should be done with gratitude, it should be done through gratitude. Gratitude should be the entry point to all that we do and all that we accomplish in life and I think as long as we keep that as our center focus, your perspective in sport and in life—you know, sport right now but definitely life in the future—it just changes.” Diljeet Taylor is the Associate Director of Cross Country and Track and Field at BYU, where she's coached since 2016. In 2019, her women's cross-country team finished second at the NCAA championships—only six points behind Arkansas—and it was the first time the Cougars had been on the podium since 2003. Prior to BYU, Diljeet coached both the men's and women's cross country and track programs at her alma mater, Division 2 Cal State Stanislaus, for nine years. I absolutely loved this conversation and I think you will too. We talked about how Diljeet and her team have navigated the pandemic on both an individual and collective level. She told me about her emphasis on gratitude and why it's such a big part of the culture she's created at BYU, her mission of empowering women, and the importance of investing in people and not performances. Diljeet and I discussed how she got into coaching, the influence coach Frank Gagliano had on her decision to pursue it as a career, and how she makes it work as mom of two kids and full-time Division 1 coach. We also talked about the self-check she does every day, the effect of social media on athletes this day and age, balancing confidence and humility, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Gatorade Endurance: I've been using Gatorade's Endurance Formula before and during some of my workouts recently to ensure that I'm adequately energized and hydrated, and, so far, so good. I LOVE the Watermelon flavor and it's also available in Lemon-Lime, Orange, and Cherry. Check out and try some of Gatorade Endurance's different options for yourself this off-season. Use the code "Shakeout20" and get 20% off your purchase at gatoradeendurance.com. — Inside Tracker: InsideTracker is the ultra-personalized nutrition platform that analyzes your blood and DNA biomarkers along with your lifestyle habits to help you optimize your body and reach your goals. As we head into the holiday season, take advantage of InsideTracker's BEST DEAL of the year and take control of your health and wellness by using the code GIFTFROMMORNSHAKEOUT at insidetracker.com to save $200 on the Ultimate Plan, their most comprehensive package. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-135-with-diljeet-taylor/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 134 | Matt Hart

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2020 77:37


    “If the book tells you anything it's just that there's this long history from go of this kind of behavior, whether it's sexist behavior or outright mistreatment of women I guess is probably the biggest one that comes to mind. It has been happening for a long time and when I first started reporting in 2017 or even in 2016 looking into Nike and on another assignment around the Nike ecosystem, I heard these stories that…I just couldn't, when I first started reporting I couldn't believe the stories I was hearing. They just seemed like, this must be made up, this is too ridiculous.” Matt Hart is a freelance journalist whose writing covers a wide swath of topics from sports science to adventure and exploration to performance-enhancing drugs, nutrition, evolution and more. His work has appeared in The Atlantic, The New York Times, National Geographic, Adventure, Outside, Men's Journal, and other publications. Matt has a new book out and we spent the entirety of this conversation talking about it. It's called Win at All Costs: Inside Nike Running and It's Culture of Deception and man oh man, it is a hell of a read. The book, which is out now, takes a deep dive into the story of the Nike Oregon Project and the infrastructure that supported it, tying together themes of deception, systemic cheating, abuses of power, gender discrimination, medical malpractice, greed, and more. I received an early copy of the book and even though I knew a lot of the story, I couldn't put it down and knocked it out in a weekend. In this episode, I ask Matt about the origins of the book, the myriad of complex characters involved, his difficulties in reporting it, why he thinks Nike is sticking by coach Alberto Salazar and paying for his legal defense, and what needs to happen at Nike for the corporate culture to change. We also discuss whether or not we can believe what we're seeing in sport, if there's anything more to this particular story, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by Goodr. Goodr sunglasses don't bounce, they don't slip, they're polarized to protect your eyes, and they come in a nice range of styles and fun colors. Most pairs cost only $25 to $35 bucks a piece. If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodrs, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for FREE shipping on your first order. Look good, run goodr! Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-134-with-matt-hart/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout


    Episode 133 | Carolyn Su

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2020 77:56

    “By nature, diversity is uncomfortable, at least initially, right? Until we can embrace and accept the discomfort of having someone with a different opinion, a different life experience, and different idea, or way of doing things. That part is not trendy or glamorous. We like to think that diverse community—the idea of it is a lot easier to swallow. I think there's a lot of introspection that needs to be done and we don't all know how to do that, nor do we have the language, but we need to be willing to listen and learn and not everybody's ready for that, I don't think.” Carolyn Su is the creator of the @DiverseWeRun Instagram account, which she launched as a place to highlight runners from different backgrounds and share their stories with a wider audience. I first became aware of Carolyn a few months ago when she was featured in a Runner's World article along with 10 other BIPOC runners speaking out about their experiences with racism and perceptions of diversity within the running community. In this episode, Carolyn, who is Taiwanese-American, told me about how she found running while she was struggling with an eating disorder in college, why she still has a hard time calling herself a runner sometimes, and how running ultimately became a source stability in her life. We also discussed why she started @DiverseWeRun, what it's going to take to tackle the issues of diversity, equity, inclusion, and representation in running so that we can create a more equitable and accessible sport for everyone, and a lot more. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-133-with-carolyn-su/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Episode 132 | Marquis Bowden

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2020 86:44

    Where's that work ethic come from? “For sure my grandmother, and I think growing up without a mom and a dad. You know, nothing was ever handed [to me], we had to work for everything. Also just seeing that's what's needed to survive in this world is the art of working hard. I don't expect anything—I just want to work hard. I just take pride with having the magic in things, you know. I just want things to always go well. I know things will not always go well but I think my grandmother and growing up definitely with that chip on my shoulder and just having to work hard.” Marquis Bowden is a 31-year-old runner based in Los Angeles and he first came on my radar several weeks ago when I saw him featured in a film from Tracksmith called Race Day is (still) Sacred. I then started hearing him pop up in my podcast feed, which then sent me down the rabbit hole and landed me on articles about him in both Tempo Journal and Runner's World, and I just knew we had to have a conversation. A former college basketball player who says that running found him a few years ago, Marquis has big goals in the sport. He ran a two-minute personal best of 2:39 last month for his virtual Boston Marathon, and while he has a long way to go on paper to achieve his goal of qualifying for the Olympic Trials, Marquis has the tools, the drive, and the guidance to take him to some pretty incredible places. His humble, hard-working nature, and the pride he has for his family and community, is also admirable and all of that really comes out in this conversation. We talked about his journey in the sport, how his training has evolved, and all that, but we got deeper into his story: about growing up in the inner city of Compton and Carson, California, and being raised by his grandmother because his parents were out of the picture. Marquis told me about reuniting with his dad just a few years ago and how that missing puzzle piece fit back into his life. We also talked his lack of self-belief as a kid and how he grew his confidence, his work ethic and having a chip on his shoulder, patience and playing the long game, as well as the importance of living each day with gratitude and love. We also discussed what it means to be a black male in running today, how we can increase diversity, equity, and inclusion in the sport, and a lot more. Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-132-with-marquis-bowden/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: www.themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

    Claim the morning shakeout podcast

    In order to claim this podcast we'll send an email to with a verification link. Simply click the link and you will be able to edit tags, request a refresh, and other features to take control of your podcast page!

    Claim Cancel