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People from France

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The Big Interview with Graham Hunter
Classic Big Interview: Thierry Henry

The Big Interview with Graham Hunter

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 43:45


Here's another chance to hear my interview with Thierry Henry from season four.You'll hear about how Barcelona's talented players adapted to the visionary Pep Guardiola's methods. The 2009 6-2 victory at the Bernabéu – in which Thierry scored a double and then went off injured –felt like the moment things fully clicked, and the Frenchman recovered in time to star in the Champions League final against Manchester United. Barcelona knew they would win – they could see the defeat in the United players' eyes, and not even Sir Alex Ferguson had a response.There's also chat about playing with Lionel Messi, whose talent is not of this planet.Brilliant stuff.Graham See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966
#173 Batman '65: Developing the Idea

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 80:51


What was the cultural environment in the US in 1965, as Batman was being developed? What were the events that led up to the decision that William Dozier would indeed make a Batman show? If TV in the ‘60s was thinking about what it could do better than movies, what's the answer to that question, and did it show up on Batman? What were some of the rules that Lorenzo Semple Jr made regarding how Batman and Robin should be written? This time, we look at what was going on in 1965 and the discussions that led up to ABC and Greenway's agreement to make Batman. PLUS: Marin Drake's metal version of the Batman theme, Maxwell Smart encounters a very familiar Frenchman in Holy Deja Vu, more from Adam and Burt about the making of Batman the Movie, and your response to our episode 170 discussion about Batman on 1970s Power Records. Memo from Dozier to Semple 4/20/1965: The topic of the Madrid meeting (thank you Mr. Glee) Bruce Lee letters (thank you Ben Bentley) 8/10/1965: More info on Number One Son? 2/16/1966: Green Hornet in the works Bat Message Board thread - episode 170 Contribute to the Dan E. Kool's Visonic Dome Kickstarter page!  

How To Love Lit Podcast
Walt Whitman - Leaves Of Grass - The Poetry Of Young America!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 41:53


Walt Whitman - Leaves Of Grass - The Poetry Of Young America!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  This episode and next, we tackle one of the most intimidating poets in the American Canon- Walt Whitman.  He is the generally accepted and almost uncontested greatest contribution America has made to the great canon of World Literature- the ones comprised of those that really intimidate- William Shakespeare,  James Joyce, Gustave Flaubert, Vladimir Nabokov, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Pablo Neruda, Ovid, Goethe, Neitche-, Dante- people like that- there are not too many Americans that make that list.    And he does intimidate me- truly.  And honestly he baffles me.  The things he says seem easy to understand except I don't actually understand them.  They are beautiful and interesting but also uncomfortable.  People love his writing and always have, but he's also very offensive- and he offends all equally- the prude and the religious, but also the secular and intellectual- he offends the socialist as well as the capitalist.  Name an identity- he references it and somewhat dismantles it.  Primarily because he absolutely rejects group identities as we think of them today- even in terms of nations but in every sense.  To use his words, “I am large; I contains multitudes” that's a paraphrase from my favorite selection of his work which we'll read today.      For me he's such a curious person in part because of the time he emerged in what was called then the American experiment- and I honestly think his perspective has a lot to do from this unique time period, of course this is not different than how I feel about all of the writers we discuss.  But being born in 1819, the United States of America is only 36 years older than he is.  His parents were present during the Revolutionary War and have a real respect for what people were trying to do here, and how unusual and fragile democratic government actually was or really is.  We, at least we here in the United States, live with the feeling that this country just always has been- that democracy just happens.  That elections are just things that have always happened.  Most students today in this country don't even think about it. Democracy is the normal order in how things occur; equality and liberty are just virtues that everyone agrees are important- by one definition or another.  But None of this was reality and common understanding in 1819 in almost any part of the planet Earth.  And most of the world looked at the United States with contempt- a bunch of non-educated hillbillies living in some weird schemata that wouldn't stand the test of time.  There was no culture in this country, by international standards.  We had no great art, no history to speak of, we weren't writing great philosophies or composing great music.  We had not produced a Voltaire, or a Jean-Jacques Rousseau.  We had no Catherine the Great or Cosimo De Medici sponsoring great artistic ventures.        And so enters Walt Whitman- to which he would say, and did say- whoopdeedoo Europe- you are correct- we have none of that, and I celebrate that we don't.      I want to begin with this famous poem by Whitman.  Of course, it's from Leaves of Grass which we'll introduce in a second, but if you are reading the Death bed edition which is the one I have- again I'll explain all that later, it's in the beginning, that very first part called “Inscriptions”.  Let me read Whitman's famous words on America.     I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear,  Those of mechanics, each one singing his as it should be blithe and strong,  The carpenter singing his as he measures his plank or beam,  The mason singing his as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work,  The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat, the deckhand singing on the steamboat deck,  The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench, the hatter singing as he stands,  The wood-cutter's song, the ploughboy's on his way in the morning, or at noon intermission or at sundown,  The delicious singing of the mother, or of the young wife at work, or of the girl sewing or washing,  Each singing what belongs to him or her and to none else,  The day what belongs to the day—at night the party of young fellows, robust, friendly,  Singing with open mouths their strong melodious songs.      Garry, I want to hear your first thoughts when you read this poem.  Let me start by saying, notice how celebratory it is.  America is singing carols- not dirges- and the song of the American is the song of hard work- not the Vienna Philharmonic- which by the way was founded in 1842.  America was not building art, as commonly understood- we were building lives- free lives- lives where people lived with the choices they made, but they got to make their own choices.  This is very different than anywhere else- places more cultured, more sophisticated, more idealized.  We don't have serfs working for great lords or ladies.  We have no jet-setters so to speak- or people of privilege or high cultural standing- In America we work hard,  but we work for ourselves-and everyone does it- and that is something we're proud of.  There is no shame in labor.  There's a song to that.      Yes, it's very much about homestead.  It's about individualism and taking responsibility to create it- About creating your own little corner of the world.  This is exactly the idea that Alexis DeToqueville referenced in his important work Democracy in America.  As a Frenchman, he was totally surprised and impressed with this very thing that Whitman is talking about.  This poem is a complete refutation of the English feudal system and that's what Northerners loved about it.  In the South, and what was so offensive to Whitman when he spent time in New Orleans was that they were trying to recreate that hierarchal system where some people outrank others to the point of claiming they weren't even human- and that, to Whitman, was the complete opposite of what the entire American Experiment was about.      His parents were clearly on team America- he had one brother named George Washington Whitman, another named Thomas Jefferson Whitman and a third named Andrew Jackson Whitman.       Ha- I guess that IS a statement.  This unique time of history in which he lived allowed Whitman to see such great contrasts in America- he saw democracy and success found in personal effort.  He saw vast amounts of unpolluted natural beauty, but he also saw evil at its most deranged, and pain and loneliness at its most intense.  We have to remember that his parents lived through the glorious revolutionary war, but he lived during the treacherous Civil War- and his perspective and life experience is very different. He admired the expanse of the West. He loved the natural beauty of this continent, but he also was horrified and despised to its core – the. National plague that has defined and still defines so much of the American story- this legacy of slavery- his views on such, btw- got him fired by more than one employer, btw.  At this time, newspapers were owned and operated by political parties, and he was always slipping in views that the political operatives didn't like- so he got fired.       HA!  Well, I guess some things never change.    One thing that baffles and almost offends most academics is Whitman's absolute nothing of an academic background.  His parents were basically illiterate, his family was excessively large and chaotic; today we would say dysfunctional.  He had one sibling that actually had to be committed to an insane asylum.   His formal education was inadequate because his father sent him out to work.  It's so ironic that the greatest American poet had no formal tutelage to except what he scrounged up for himself in his own self-taught way by reading in libraries and attending operas.  He didn't have that option.  His father was also pretty much a financial failure.  He was a carpenter by trade, but had also had a little property.  His father speculated in real estate after moving to Brooklyn, NY, but wasn't all that great at business and ended up losing most of it.      And of course, that's the problem with the land of opportunity- you are kind of out there on your own to make it or break it.  And people were very aware of this.  There was no guarantee, at all, that America would even survive as a country.  It was still an experiment.  No one else was living like this.  Europeans had monarchies; the South American countries were colonies.  Our neighbors to the East were living in empires.  Only this little backward nation in a corner of North America was trying to do this weird thing.    And Whitman loved it.  He really did.  He loved the land.  He loved the cities.  He loved the people.  He spent the first 36 years of his life walking around and observing life, mostly in New York City and Long Island (which was NOT a suburb of New York at that time).    He loved the libraries and spent tons of time there reading.  He loved music, especially opera, which we'll notice has a strong influence on how he writes.  He loved learning, listening and observing, and this is what he wrote about.  I heard one lecturer say that he was the first non-blind poet- which I thought was weird and what made it stand out.  But what the professor meant was that most poets were writing about their inner life, things from their imagination- think Edgar Allan Poe and “The Raven”, but Whitman, in many cases, was transcribing things that he was seeing and hearing in urban life- and this was very different.  He would catalogue it- to use a word that is often used to describe this thing that we just saw him do in the poem we just read, make these long lists of details in these long sentences.         I also want to point out that it was this desire to self-educate that led him, like many of his day, to be influenced and challenged by the great Ralph Waldo Emerson. We'll do an entire episode or more than one of him, but Emerson's non-conventional ideas about nature and the soul and our inter-connectedness, although ideas that were commonly accepted in the far East, were new on this continent.      True- well, In 1855, something happened.  Whitman self-publishes the book Leaves of Grass.  This first version was only 95 pages long- that's compared to the death bed one which has 415 in my copy.   There was no author's name on the cover.  Instead, on the first page there was this image of a man in laborer's clothes.  Whitman only reveals that he's the author through one of the first unnamed poems calling himself, “Walt Whitman, an American, one of the roughs, a kosmos.”    If you look up the word Kosmos in the dictionary it will tell you that that word means- a complex orderly self-inclusive system- which is interesting to think about someone describing themselves as- but it's a Greek word.  It's also a Biblical word- which is how I believe Whitman would know it.  It is used in the New Testament to mean the universe or the creation as a whole- that's how Whitman defines himself in this poem “Song of Myself”  and the context of how he wants us to understand his work and who we are as individuals.  We too are kosmos.      Well, it didn't start out very cosmic- that's for sure.  It's a miracle Leaves of Grass came to be read by anyone.  He self-published it, literally type-setting it himself.  He printed 795 copies and sold almost none of them.     Don't you wish you had one of those originals?    I know right, well, people do.  In case you're in the market, there are 200 that are still around, and in 2014, one sold at Christie's for $305,000.  It's so ironic- Whitman struggled financially until the day he died and celebrated working people in everything he wrote.  What do you think he would think of that, Christy?    I have zero doubt, he would love it.  Totally.  Beyond being the book's publisher, he also was the book's publicist.  He sent copies to the leading poets of the day trying to drum up some good reviews.  Whittier was said to thrown his copy into the fire he was so offended and outraged- the homoerotic imagery was more than he could handle, but Ralph Waldo Emerson saw it for what it was and wrote Whitman back an amazing letter of encouragement.  Let me quote Emerson, “I am not blind to the worth of the wonderful gift of Leaves of Grass. I find it the most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom that America has yet contributed.”  And of course, to this day, many world class literary scholars still think this about Whitman.       What I find humorous about Whitman is that he wrote glowing reviews of his book himself secretly and published them as if they were written by other people.       Yeah, he was working the influencer thing way back before that was a thing- He also, printed Emerson's actual glowing review when he reprinted the book in 1856, except he didn't get Emerson's permission to do so.  He put Emerson's words, “I greet you at the beginning of a great career” on the spine of the book and he published the entire letter with a long reply andress to Dear Master.”  It was NOT received well by Emerson.      I can see that as being slightly presumptuous.      Of course it was, but I would be tempted as well.  He really admired Emerson, in fact this is what he said about Emerson's influence on his writing.  “I was simmering, simmering, simmering; Emerson brought me to a boil.”    I want us to read the very first part of Song of Myself which was the first poem    I Celebrate myself, and sing myself,  And what I assume you shall assume,  For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.  I loafe and invite my soul,  I lean and loafe at my ease observing a spear of summer grass.  My tongue, every atom of my blood, form'd from this soil, this air,  Born here of parents born here from parents the same, and their parents the same,  I, now thirty-seven years old in perfect health begin,  Hoping to cease not till death.  Creeds and schools in abeyance,  Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,  I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,  Nature without check with original energy.  This is what I mean when I say, it seems like it's very simple to understand except I've read this poem hundreds of times and am still slightly confused as to what he means.  The term for this is ambiguous- he makes you, as a reader, put your own interpretation, put yourself into the lines to force the meaning out of it.      True, and if you take it at face value just superficially, it may seem that this is a narcissist celebrating egotism, but it clearly doesn't.  It also could be misunderstood to mean he celebrates idleness and laziness, but that doesn't seem to be right either.    Exactly- I love these first lines.  First of all, they are so iconic.  One thing Whitman is known for besides the cataloguing which I mentioned when we read I Hear America Singing, is this thing that today we call Free Verse. Whitman is often given credit for inventing the concept, although that is debatable.  But what is obvious is that there is no rhyme or meter of any kind at all and there isn't supposed to be.  He doesn't want anything to rhyme.  Instead, he wants to write in these really long sentences.  Every stanza is a single sentence, and he is going to do that through the entire poem.  Whitman felt you couldn't get your idea out in these little short phrases of iambic tetrameter like his Whittier, the guy who threw his book in the fire, was doing.  Whitman wanted, above all else, to create a sense of intimacy between himself and the person reading- and so he wanted to make sure you could follow his idea- from idea to idea.  He got this idea from two places- first he copied the idea from the one book he had been familiar with since his childhood- the King James Version of the Bible.  He copied the style like you see in the Psalms or even the Sermon on the Mount.  He also got the idea from the opera- if you think about opera- you also have these long phrases- that end with things like figaro figaro fiiiigaro-     Is that your impression of the opera?    Well, as you know, I enjoy the opera.  I haven't always, to be honest.  A few years ago, my good friend, I've mentioned her on the podcast before, Millington AP Literature/ Lang teacher Amy Nolette, coerced me to attend with her- and I did.  She is an accomplished musician so she really taught me how to admire what was going on- and we went every year for several years until Covid hit.  But, having said that, I'm fairly sure, that's my best attempt at singing opera.      But back to Whitman, so one of the first things that Whitman is famous for today is this concept of Free Verse- it was innovative then, but now, it doesn't seem that big of a deal.  That was a big deal, but a bigger deal to Whitman were the ideas he was putting out there.    I celebrate myself- not because I'm so important- not because I have all this amazing heritage or skill or anything- I celebrate myself because I have an essence that is 100% unique to me.  Let's read it again.     I Celebrate myself, and sing myself,  And what I assume you shall assume,  For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.  It's not accidental that he throws in there that scientific language.  And this is where he will offend the capitalist or competitive side of us.  He makes this bold assertion- in this poetic way- to say- what, do you think you're that much better than me- you are made of the exact same material I am- we're both made of atoms- science teaches us that- and for every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.      In some sense it's the I'm okay- you're okay attitude, but taking it up a notch- I celebrate myself- you celebrate yourself.      For sure, and something we all give lip-service to today but no one actually really believes.  I have a creative writing assignment that I ask my students to do every year.  We take another Whitman poem called “There was a Child Went Forth” that talks about identity and the physical objects and places that influence who you are- it's a wonderful poem, anyway, I ask my students to write a poem using Whitman's style and technique about THEIR lives.  I tell them we're going to read them in small groups, and if they like what they wrote and feel comfortable,  we are going to print them and put them outside my door in the hallway for everything to read.  At first they are very very resistant to the idea.  They all hate it- first because it's writing, secondly because it's poetry- but mostly because they don't think they want their lives sprawled on the hallway of the school.  I had a sweet darling child, actually a quiet student, raise her hand in protest and literallty say, I don't want to do this.  I can't do this.  All I do is go to school and work- there is nothing interesting at all about my life.      Ha!  She seems to have missed the point.  She didn't want to celebrate herself and she's exactly the kind of person Whitman loved celebrating.    Exactly- and lots of my kids are like that- they work at Sonic, Chick-Fila- the mall- mowing lawns- but in her case, it turns out she is way more interesting and her poem is on the wall right now.  I may take a picture and post it on our website, so you can see them all.  I'm very proud of my kiddos- not just because they produced good poems but because lots of them are hardworking.       I will say, that next phrase leads us to think that Whitman is a lazy person.  He extols the virtue of loafing.  But of course, what I know about his biography which we'll get more into next week when we talk about his experiences in the Civil War and all of that, but Whitman was the very opposite of lazy.  He was an extremely physical hard worker.      True- Let's read the lines you're talking about..    I loafe and invite my soul,  I lean and loafe at my ease observing a spear of summer grass.  When he says I loaf and invite my soul- he's getting into the philosopher side of him that is so complex and we really don't even have time to go there today, but it's that old idea of contemplating- today what we call mindfulness.  And I have to admit, I'm not good at this.        He really believes in mindfulness although he didn't know we renamed his concept for him.  Loafe- meaning chill out- turn off the phone, turn off the tv, turn off the computer and invite your soul into yourself.  Chill out!!!  Stop and observe a spear of grass.  Just look at it- let your mind go there- let it focus on something small- it's the kind of thing the yoga instructors keep telling us to do, that we rarely heed but we all know we should.      Exactly- attention and silence- he things they are indispensable to a sane existence- and two things I'm not all that good at.  And then we get to these last two sentences in this opening little poem-    My tongue, every atom of my blood, form'd from this soil, this air,  Born here of parents born here from parents the same, and their parents the same,  I, now thirty-seven years old in perfect health begin,  Hoping to cease not till death.  Creeds and schools in abeyance,  Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,  I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,  Nature without check with original energy.  There's a lot to say- but he's going to say- I'm proud to be from this place- my parents are from this place.  I'm 37- that is not young.  He is not a child prodigy- he's writing his first book late in life, relatively- he knows that- but he says I'm in good health and I begin- and I'm not going to stop until death- I'm going to live well all the way til the end- I'm not going to give up on myself.  Ever.      I can see why he's inspiring.  And I to get back to this idea of origins.  You know being an American today is something lots of people are proud of (although it is very American to trash our own country) but that's part of our national ethos- but even these same people proudly display their passport.  America is a powerful country and a rich country.  At that time it was a new country- and new countries don't have the safety of heritage and sometimes the people who come from them have trouble taking pride in their heritage.    I totally know what you're talking about.  There was a listener who connected with us through our Instagram page and showed us some beautiful pictures he had taken.  They were truly amazing- not only were the mountains breathtakingly gorgeous in their own right, but his eye for framing was genius.  I messaged him back and told him what I thought of his art.  We went back and forth and I finally asked him.  Where are you from? And he would never tell me.  He said he was from Central Asia and so fort which I eventually gathered he is from one of the new countries formally part of the USSR.   I'm not saying he was ashamed of where he was from, I didn't get that sense, but he seemed intimated that we were from America- a place that seems so far away and idealized from his point of view.  Whitman would tell this young man- you're from that wonderful air,  from wonderful heritage, from atoms just like ours- not just accept it celebrate it.    Because, as I read onward, he seems to imply, this is the attitude that breeds great things that breeds beautiful things but if it doesn't- that's okay as well- keep going all the way til death- compete not with others but with yourself- as he goes to self- publish the same book 8 more times until he does .    Ha!  I guess that's true.      I want to read the last sentence again of that opening because he sets up a lot of the rest of his writings with something of a warning-    Creeds and schools in abeyance,  Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,  I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,  Nature without check with original energy.  Again- that language seems simple but at the same time I have to really work at what he's going to say.  But I have an interpretation- he's going to say this- put away your school learning and your religious training when you read this.  Sit back because I'm going to say some really hard things- that's what he means with that word “hazard”- but they are not mean- they are natural- it's about the energy of being alive.  It's the beauty of being you, of being a physical body, of being an inter-connected spirit with connections to other people and part of this physical space.      And of course, it's that celebration of the physical body that kept getting him censored. Even Ralph Waldo Emerson later when he was reproducing his book begged him to self-censor what was thinly veiled homo-erotic passages, but he just wouldn't.  He didn't see them as erotic- he didn't even see sex like that.  For him sexuality and the physical body had a self-evidence important place in our lives and had to be brought out in the open- be it a hazard or not.  And again, it kind of was a hazard, he lost a really good job in Washington at one point because his boss found a copy of leaves of Grass in his desk and found it obscene.      Poor guy- well, that takes us to the title- Leaves of Grass- and what that even means.  I mentioned that Whitman was famous for his style or innovative literary technique, he has been increasingly praised for his innovative ideas about the body, the self, consciousness- he was one of the first America poets to even write about consciousness- the other one btw is Emily Dickinson.  But probably the thing I like the best about Whitman, and this is me, personally, is his ability to really capture a wonderful metaphor.  He could just say things in an understandable and pretty way- and this is what poetry really is all about- for my money.    This phrase that is the title – Leaves of Grass- it means something.  First let's read the first part of Song of Myself that talks about grass- I'd ask you to read all of it but I think we might get lost. Song of Myself number 6.      A child said What is the grass? fetching it to me with full hands;  How could I answer the child? I do not know what it is any more than he.  I guess it must be the flag of my disposition, out of hopeful green stuff woven.    Or I guess it is the handkerchief of the Lord,  A scented gift and remembrancer designedly dropt,  Bearing the owner's name someway in the corners, that we may see and remark, and say Whose?    Or I guess the grass is itself a child, the produced babe of the vegetation.    Or I guess it is a uniform hieroglyphic,  And it means, Sprouting alike in broad zones and narrow zones,  Growing among black folks as among white,  Kanuck, Tuckahoe, Congressman, Cuff, I give them the same, I receive them the same.  And now it seems to me the beautiful uncut hair of graves.  When Whitman loafs around and stares at grass- he sees a picture of America- or a picture of any democracy any group of people that understand that they are one poeple- of which America was the example he knew, but he's not exclusionary by any means.  He says, look, every single blade of grass is totally different and yet in some sense the same.  He calls it a uniform hieroglyphic- what an interesting turn of phrase.  It's and I use his words here “black folks as among white, kanuck, Tuckahoe, Congreeman, Cuff, I give to me the same, I receive them the same.”    For Whitman, the picture of America was a field of grass.  If we look at it, we see hopeful green woven stuff. The handkerchief of the Lord- but if we look at it closely we're all so different- and both things are truly beautiful.  It's a paradox.   He goes on to say, it's from the land, it's made up of the dust that is made up of the people of the land- I know it gets philosophical- and you can take it as far deep as you want to plunge with him.   But you don't have to get all that deep or esoteric if you don't want to.  You can just lay on the grass, and smell it and enjoy it- loaf on it- to use his words.    You know what I like about that entire image and about Whitman's entire philosophy.  He absolutely spoke of diversity, but he did not celebrate diversity- not like we think of doing that today.  He celebrates unity- and that's why this metaphor is the title.  Whitman had a very refined understanding of how easy we can rip each other apart- there is not more divisive time in American history than the 1850s and of course the 1860s- which are the war years.   He lived through the most divided time in American history and he could see it coming even in 1855.  But during his life time, he would see 2.5% of America's population die killing each other that was 750,000 people- if we would compare it to the population of America today- that would be over 7 million people.  Next week we will see how much he admired Lincoln and what he stood for, but as he understood the American experiment,  he believed in admiring differences and loving them, but identifying as a single group- first and foremost.  The dominant image here is of a single landscape- beautiful and united across time and space respecting the past not judging or condemning it- allowing ourselves to spring from it renewed and refreshed.   And I think that's where the universal appeal comes from.  If Whitman was just about American patriotism, maybe we'd like him in this country, but it would feel propagandistic.  His ideals are universal and apply to any group of people- anywhere.  And he's not afraid to admit-some of thing may be self-contradictory.  The first time I ever read Whitman was in college.  I went to school studying political science, but in my junior year I decided I didn't want to do that anymore and I was going to get an English major, well this meant I had to take almost exclusively classes that demanded intense reading- and all at the same time.  I read so much that they all ran together and my grades were not as good as they could have been had I had a healthier pace.  And in all that reading, not a whole lot stood out- but this little poem by Whitman actually did- I underlined it, and I kept the trade book I purchased at the time.  I actually still have it after all these years and so many moves.  In this little section, Whitman is talking in that intimate way that he talks to his reader- it's personal- it's in the second person- and at that time of my life- it was a very chaotic time to be honest- I had no idea what I was doing in my life, my mother had recently died, I had very little idea what I should do in the future- I had changed directions at the last moment- and these famous words just stood out.  Will you read them?  51  The past and present wilt—I have fill'd them, emptied them.  And proceed to fill my next fold of the future.  Listener up there! what have you to confide to me?  Look in my face while I snuff the sidle of evening,  (Talk honestly, no one else hears you, and I stay only a minute longer.)  Do I contradict myself?  Very well then I contradict myself,  (I am large, I contain multitudes.)  I concentrate toward them that are nigh, I wait on the door-slab.  Who has done his day's work? who will soonest be through with his supper?  Who wishes to walk with me?  Will you speak before I am gone? will you prove already too late?  Christy- what did that mean to you.      I really have no idea.  I think the line that I liked is the line everyone likes, “Do I contradict myself?  Very well then I contradict. Myself.”   It just made me feel better.  I knew I was full of inconsistencies. And Whitman just seemed to be saying- of course you are- everyone is- to understand that is just being honest.  Let it go.  Just concentrate on what is near- what you're doing today, supper- that sort of thing.  If you're successful- that's great- if you're a failure- what difference does it make- we're all the same atoms, we're all just leaves of grass.   He just made me feel okay.    Which I guess that would probably have made him happy- the bard of democracy- known as the good gray poet- speaking across time and space about what it means to be a human- to be a leaf of grass.  Thanks for listeninging- next episode- we will delve a little more into his adult life, read some of his most famous poems – those tributes to Abraham Lincoln- and finish our discussion of this amazing American.  AS always, please share about us with a friend or colleague- push out an episode on your social media feed, text an episode to a friend.  Connect with us on our social media at howtolovelitpodcast on facebook, Instagram, twitter, or Linkedin.  If you are a teacher, visit our website for teaching materials that provide ideas scaffolding for using our podcasts as instructional pieces in your classroom.      Peace out.      

New Books in East Asian Studies
Xavier Naville, "The Lettuce Diaries: How A Frenchman Found Gold Growing Vegetables In China" (Earnshaw Books, 2021)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 44:17


Many Western entrepreneurs and businesses have foundered in trying to set up shop in China. Different expectations, different ways of doing business, different institutions and platforms—all come together to remove any pretensions that one can easily transplant a foreign business model into the Chinese market. One of these entrepreneurs was Xavier Naville, who moved to China in 1997 where he built Creative Food. Unlike many others, his venture was a success. It's now a key supplier to major restaurant chains across the country including McDonald's, KFC and Starbucks. The Lettuce Diaries: How A Frenchman Found Gold Growing Vegetables In China tells Xavier's story growing Creative Foods: managing a Chinese team as a foreign manager, trying to work with farmers to improve how they conducted agriculture, and navigating investor demands.  In this interview, Xavier and I talk about his time in China, what he learned about starting a business, and whether things are different in a more developed, more advanced economy. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of The Lettuce Diaries. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at @nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books Network
Xavier Naville, "The Lettuce Diaries: How A Frenchman Found Gold Growing Vegetables In China" (Earnshaw Books, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 44:17


Many Western entrepreneurs and businesses have foundered in trying to set up shop in China. Different expectations, different ways of doing business, different institutions and platforms—all come together to remove any pretensions that one can easily transplant a foreign business model into the Chinese market. One of these entrepreneurs was Xavier Naville, who moved to China in 1997 where he built Creative Food. Unlike many others, his venture was a success. It's now a key supplier to major restaurant chains across the country including McDonald's, KFC and Starbucks. The Lettuce Diaries: How A Frenchman Found Gold Growing Vegetables In China tells Xavier's story growing Creative Foods: managing a Chinese team as a foreign manager, trying to work with farmers to improve how they conducted agriculture, and navigating investor demands.  In this interview, Xavier and I talk about his time in China, what he learned about starting a business, and whether things are different in a more developed, more advanced economy. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of The Lettuce Diaries. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at @nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Westerly Sun
Westerly Sun - 2021-11-17: Napoleon "Nap" Lajoie, Book Reading: "The Mercies" at Perks and Corks, and Francis Cornelius

The Westerly Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 2:45


You're listening to the Westerly Sun's podcast, where we talk about the best local events, new job postings, obituaries, and more. First, a bit of Rhode Island trivia. Today's trivia is brought to you by Perennial. Perennial's new plant-based drink “Daily Gut & Brain” is a blend of easily digestible nutrients crafted for gut and brain health. A convenient mini-meal, Daily Gut & Brain” is available now at the CVS Pharmacy in Wakefield. Now for some trivia. Did you know that Woonsocket native, Napoleon "Nap" Lajoie , also known as Larry Lajoie and nicknamed "The Frenchman", was a professional second baseman and player-manager. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Phillies, Philadelphia Athletics, and Cleveland Naps between 1896 and 1916. He managed the Naps from 1905 through 1909. Lajoie set the all-time American League single season batting average, led the American League batting average five times, had more than 3,000 career hits, and was elected the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1937. Next, a fun activity to do this weekend.. Perks and Corks on High Street is hosting their monthly book reading on Saturday from 5pm to 7pm. This month, the book is “the mercies” by Karan Milwood Hargrave. Grab a copy and join the discussion. See you there! Looking for a new role? We're here to help. Today's Job posting comes from Aramark in Westerly. They're looking for food service workers. Experience preferred and must be able to do occasional heavy lifting of up to 25 pounds. If you'd like to learn more or apply, you can do so by using the link in our episode description.  https://www.indeed.com/jobs?l=Westerly%2C%20RI&mna=5&aceid&gclid=Cj0KCQjwpf2IBhDkARIsAGVo0D2S3gEb-328GyRpBuTTeeKPdn3-klOh0KYAsfete6MEZmI5S4qTg-4aAnQkEALw_wcB&vjk=d06937ce8054ae33&advn=3085667542396710 Today we're remembering the life of Francis Cornelius, of Wintechog Road in North Stonington. He is survived by his wife, Veronica, his sons, his daughter, his two surviving brothers, eight grandchildren and one great grandchild. Francis was born in Newburgh, NY, and was a member of the United States Navy SeaBees, during the Vietnam War. For many years, he was an Inspector at Harris Graphics in Pawcatuck. After 30 years working in the industrial printing press industry, he retired to Florida where he was an avid golfer and enjoyed his days on the course. Frank was member of the Free Masons of Rhode Island for 49 years in Charity Lodge #23 and also completed the 32nd Degree of Scottish Rite. Thank you for taking a moment with us today to remember and celebrate Francis's life. That's it for today, we'll be back next time with more! Also, remember to check out our sponsor Perennial, Daily Gut & Brain, available at the CVS on Main St. in Wakefield! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

La Vie Creative
Ep 164: Sarah Donnelly, an American stand-up comedian, writer and actress who performs in English and in French.

La Vie Creative

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 38:50


Sarah Donnelly is an American stand-up comedian, writer and actress who performs in English and in French.Sarah is the co-creator and writer of the Audible Original series God Save My English with Paul Taylor, now in its second season and one of the best sellers on Audible France.Sarah is also the co-creator of Becoming Maman, a comedy show and podcast about raising French kids in Paris when you are not French.In 2018, she toured with Gad Elmaleh as his opener for the European leg of his international Dream Tour. She has also opened for Louis CK, Ted Alexandro, Brody Stevens, Tom Rhodes, and Keith Alberstadt.In 2016 she wrote and performed her sold-out, one-hour stand-up comedy show called Help! I Married a Frenchman, which received runner-up for the Best English Comedy Show in Paris by Expatriates Magazine. In 2017 Sarah was a writer and actress for the first-ever English language comedy show produced by the French network Canal+ starring Paul Taylor called “What the Fuck France ”.Sarah has worked on scripts for 2P2L and BlackPills productions, including an English Kev Adams series called “Super High”.Originally from Washington, D.C., Sarah has performed comedy at venues all over the U.S., Europe, and Asia, including shows at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, New York City's Upright Citizens Brigade Theater, the Olympia, and at comedy clubs and theatres in the UK and Northern Ireland, France, Luxembourg, Belgium, Denmark, Germany, The Netherlands, and Hong Kong.Finally, she's got two French kids and a French husband, who give her all the comedic material she could ever need.Anyone in Paris can see Sarah LIVE  in her new one hour stand-up comedy show “The Only American in Paris” at the Jardin Sauvage Sunday November 21st at 7pm or 8:30pm. You can reserve tickets here: https://www.billetweb.fr/sarah-donellyFollow her on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sarahdcomedy/TikTok: https://vm.tiktok.com/ZM8CYqs7t/Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/sarahdcomedyGo to her website to learn about show dates and other news: www.sarahdcomedy.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/join/Laviecreative)

早安英文-最调皮的英语电台
“传绯闻”用英语咋说?最搞笑的是,有人翻译成red news!

早安英文-最调皮的英语电台

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 10:50


「微信」或者「微博」搜索关注[早安英文],查看更多有趣实用的中英双语节目。�笔记:prominent重要的,著名的;显眼的Thedepartment has many prominent alumni. 这个系出了许多杰出的校友。Heis known as one of Europe's most prominent actors and screen sex symbols fromthe 1960s and 1970s. 他是20世纪60年代和70年代欧洲最著名的演员和银幕性感象征之一。 sex symbol性感的人;性感的演员Asex symbol is a famous person, especially an actor or a singer, who isconsidered by many people to be sexually attractive. “sex symbol”指的是被很多人认为具有性吸引力的名人,尤指演员或歌手。 Theyare Hollywood sex symbols of the Forties.他们是好莱坞40年代的性感偶像。Cannes Film Festival 戛纳电影节Thisis my invitation to the Cannes Film Festival. 这是我的戛纳电影节邀请函。Hereare some photos from the red carpet and the premiere of the opening night atthe Cannes Film Festival. 下面是戛纳电影节开幕式上众星亮相红毯的图片。be engaged to 订婚have an affair 传绯闻,出轨Marywas engaged to a Frenchman. 玛丽和一个法国人订了婚。Shouldyou confess if you've had an affair?如果你曾经跟别人有暧昧关系,你是否应该坦白?confess承认;坦白;忏悔Wepersuaded her to confess her crime. 我们说服她坦白她的罪行。Shewas reluctant to confess her ignorance. 她不愿意承认自己无知。获取节目完整音频、笔记和片尾的歌曲名,请关注威信公众号「早安英文」,回复“加油”即可。更多有意思的英语干货等着你!

My Big Phat Fabulous Life
My Big Fat Fabulous Life S9E12 - Bon Voyage

My Big Phat Fabulous Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 58:35


This season ends pretty much how it began, with a Frenchman blur. Buddy gets physically assaulted, Heather decides to be a surrogate, and Whitney is off to Paris.It's been a great ride friends! We'll see you soon.Marisa + Alan

You're On The Phone
ep. 125 The Cowboy Dispatches The Frenchman Ft. Steve Bessette: WEED UP WEDNESDAY

You're On The Phone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 110:22


On today's episode, The Cowboy returns and runs into an old Friend who does not like how the French Dispatch represents the French as a whole. FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF! Follow YoureOnThePhone: Twitch.tv/youreonthephone You're already listening to the show, why don't you go watch it too ONLY ON TWITCH Instagram @youreonthephone YouTube.com/mediocrecooking This episode is brought to you by: PROJEKT PRINT AND DESIGN Weed Up to these guys for making the OFFICIAL STICKER of YOTP www.projektpd.com AXESLASHER: DEAD ALIVE Go listen and buy the vinyl for Axeslasher's newest record DEAD ALIVE! Recorded live at The Bluebird theater in Denver Axeslasher.com or wherever you listen to music! VENEER Alex is in another movie AND ITS FANTASTIC go to JANKYJANK.com rent the movie for 48 hours AND FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF! MEDIOCRE COOKING New episodes every Thursday at 11am MST YouTube.com/mediocrecooking Thanks for supporting Baxter and I :-)

DigiGods
DigiGods Episode 229: 2021 Halloween Special

DigiGods

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 90:44


It's all horror for our second COVID-era Halloween special, featuring classic Universal Monsters, Wes Craven's Scream, M. Night Shyamalan's Old and Silence of the Lambs on 4k. Also, Kino's quartet of terrifying Vincent Price classics, monstrous boxed sets from Arrow, Elvira, Kolchak, Lon Chaney, Jonathan Frid and new installments of The Conjuring and Escape Room… only on The DigiGods! DigiGods Podcast, 10/26/21 (M4a) — 42.27 MB right click to save Subscribe to the DigiGods Podcast In this episode, the Gods discuss: The Amazing Mr. X (Blu-ray) The Amityville Moon (DVD) Are You Afraid of the Dark?: Curse of the Shadows (DVD) The Awakening (Blu-ray) Bad Candy (Blu-ray) Batman: The Long Halloween, Part Two (Blu-ray) Born for Hell (Blu-ray) The Brotherhood of Satan (Blu-ray) Brotherhood of the Wolf (Blu-ray) Butcher, Baker, Nightmare Maker AKA Night Warning (Special Edition) (Blu-ray) Cold War Creatures: Four Films From Sam Katzman (Blu-ray) The Comedy of Terrors (Special Edition) (Blu-ray) The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It (4k UHD Blu-ray) Dark Shadows and Beyond: The Jonathan Frid Story (Blu-ray) Dark Spell (Blu-ray) Dark Stories (DVD) Day of the Animals (Blu-ray) Deadly Friend (Blu-ray) Death Screams (Blu-ray) Deep Red UHD (Limited Edition) (4k UHD Blu-ray) Demons 1 & 2 (4k UHD Blu-ray) Elvira's Haunted Hills Collector's Edition (Blu-ray) Escape Room: Tournament of Champions (Blu-ray) Exhumed: A History of Zombies (DVD) Frankenstein's Daughter (Blu-ray) The Frenchman's Garden (Blu-ray) Friday the 13th 8-Movie Collection (Blu-ray) Fried Barry (Blu-ray) Funhouse (DVD) A Ghost Waits (Blu-ray) Great White (Blu-ray) Grizzly (Blu-ray) Hitcher in the Dark (Blu-ray) Honor Killing (Blu-ray) House of Wax: Collector's Edition (Blu-ray) The Howl of the Devil (Blu-ray) Howling Village (Blu-ray) The Hunchback of Notre Dame (Kino Classics) (Blu-ray) Hunting Ground (Blu-ray) I Am Toxic (DVD) I Spit on Your Grave - 3-Disc Set (4k UHD Blu-ray) I Spit On Your Grave: Deja Vu (Blu-ray) Jungle Trap (Blu-ray) Jurassic Hunt (DVD) Kolchak: The Night Stalker (The Complete Series) (Blu-ray) Last Gasp (Blu-ray) Little Vampire (Blu-ray) The Mad Doctor (Blu-ray) The Monster Collection (Blu-ray) The Night (Blu-ray) Night of the Animated Dead (Blu-ray) Night of the Bloody Apes (Blu-ray) Nightbeast (Blu-ray) Old (4k UHD Blu-ray) The Old Ways (Blu-ray) One Dark Night (Blu-ray) Queen of Spades (Blu-ray) The Raven (Special Edition) (Blu-ray) Room 9 (DVD) Rush Week (Blu-ray) Scream UHD (4k UHD Blu-ray) Scream, Pretty Peggy (Blu-ray) The Screaming Woman (Blu-ray) The Silence of the Lambs (4k UHD Blu-ray) Skinned Deep (Blu-ray) The Stand (Blu-ray) The Stand 2-Pack (Blu-ray/DVD) Straight Outta Nowhere: Scooby-Doo Meets Courage the Cowardly Dog (DVD) Ten Minutes to Midnight (Blu-ray) Theater of Blood: Special Edition (Blu-ray) Threshold (Blu-ray) Through the Shadow (DVD) The Tomb of Ligeia: Special Edition (Blu-ray) Trick or Treats (Special Edition) (Blu-ray) Universal Classic Monsters - Icons of Horror Collection (Dracula, Frankenstein, The Invisible Man, The Wolf Man) (4k UHD Blu-ray) The Victim (Blu-ray) The Watcher / Skeleton Key Double Feature (Blu-ray) The Wiggles: Halloween Party (DVD) Please also visit CineGods.com. 

My Big Phat Fabulous Life
My Big Fat Fabulous Life S911 - Late, Toothless, and High

My Big Phat Fabulous Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 37:13


Will he or won't he? We sail, we shuck, we lose a tooth, and we talk about the Frenchman. 

Booknotes+
Ep. 33 Mike Duncan "Hero of Two Worlds"

Booknotes+

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 71:12


Frenchman the Marquis de Lafayette came to America two years after the start of the American Revolution and was promptly made a major general in the Continental Army by George Washington. The year was 1777 and Lafayette, an aristocrat with no military experience, was 19. He later returned to France and helped launch the French Revolution. History podcaster Mike Duncan, author of "Hero of Two Worlds," joined us to talk about Lafayette's life and fight for liberty on both sides of the Atlantic.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

My Big Phat Fabulous Life
My Big Fat Fabulous Life S9E10 - Maine Reason For Tension

My Big Phat Fabulous Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 46:49


Welcome to Bangor - the land of puffins, lobsters, and Frenchman Bay. Is the Frenchman a bad liar or just an idiot? 

Cut To The Race | By FormulaNerds
Episode 67: News Roundup 22/10/21

Cut To The Race | By FormulaNerds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 53:30


On this week's Cut to the Race news roundup, Dan and Jay are back to dive into all the biggest stories from the world of motorsport over the past week.Maggie's is a charity providing free cancer support and information in centres across the UK and online - https://www.maggies.org/about-us/how-maggies-works/our-story/ The new F1 calendar is out and features the return of a few favourites - and a few tasty triple-headers. Two of Finland's finest drivers will join forces to compete at next year's Race of Champions - Valtteri Bottas will partner with two-time world champion Mika Hakinnen. Pierre Gasly gave his thoughts on once again being rejected by Red Bull - does the Frenchman deserve another shot?The Andretti name could reappear in Formula 1 with rumours of a potential takeover of Sauber - could we see an American on the grid in the near future?In the junior categories, F2 and F3 are set for a major revamp next year but are the changes actually worthwhile?The duo also looks ahead to this weekend's US Grand Prix and predict who they think will come out on top in Texas.Follow FormulaNerds www.Facebook.com/FormulaNerds www.twitter.com/FormulaNerds www.instagram.com/FormulaNerds www.formulanerds.com

TriWatches Podcast
Episode 78 - Dirty Frenchman

TriWatches Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 57:07


This week all the guys are back! Thomas is in a new office, Cam spent the weekend hiking in the park and Dave ran around the South of England. They discuss watch winders, IWC collaboration with Hot Wheels, NATO straps that are too expensive, a new Zenith and a few new Patek chronographs that lead into a rant about Stainless Steel "sport" watches. Enjoy! Thomas' wrist checkhttps://www.instagram.com/p/CC1jv_iKKZc/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link Cam's wrist checkhttps://www.instagram.com/p/CT7j_pVJDDM/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link Dave's wrist checkhttps://www.instagram.com/p/B3Ow-irnvmm/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link Kross Tie-Fighter Watch Winderhttps://kross-studio.ch/en/tie-advanced-x1-watch-winder/overview IWC x Hotwheelshttps://www.ablogtowatch.com/iwc-debuts-limited-pilots-watch-chronograph-edition-iwc-x-hot-wheels-racing-works/ Great Nato Straps that don't cost a fortune (Bark & Jack)https://barkandjack.com/collections/tubular-nylon Zenith Defy Classichttps://timeandtidewatches.com/hands-on-the-zenith-defy-classic-skeleton-night-surfer-timetide-edition-marks-five-firsts-for-the-collection/ Three New Patek Philippe Chronographshttps://www.hodinkee.com/articles/patek-philippe-launches-three-new-versions-of-very-complicated-chronographs 

Big Knick Energy Podcast
Big Knick Energy Podcast Episode #24 - Season Preview with Grungy Gentleman‘s Jace Lipstein

Big Knick Energy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 84:25


Big Knick Energy Podcast Episode #24 - Season Preview with Grungy Gentleman's Jace Lipstein  TreDuse aka Coach (@theNYPostman on Twitter and @thenewyorkpostman on IG) is back!! Joe Yolk (@joeylandolfa) and Coach have a very special returning guest this week in the form of Jace Lipstein.  Jace is the creator of New York born men's design wear Grungy Gentleman (@grungygentleman on all socials.) You can also buy his stuff at Grungygentleman.com.  Jace is an extremely passionate Knicks fan and just became a father. We talk about the first month of fatherhood, how he's already breeding his son to cheering for the blue and orange, and obviously all things Knicks from a season preview standpoint.  The boys start with what do they expect out of Mitchell Robinson and the Center position as a whole. Then they talk about just how awesome it is to have added New York's own Kemba Walker to the team as well as an actually playable Frenchman in Evan Fournier (sorry Frank Ntilikina). All of the new offensive weapons should open the floor for returning stars RJ Barrett and Julius Randle. Derrick Rose got to live out every New Yorker's dream of getting engaged in the middle of MSG, and Coach Thibodeau's drive towards excellence doesn't stop even in the preseason.  They end with season predictions and who will be our biggest rival going forward... Trae Young.  Make sure to like, share and subscribe/follow us  @bigknickenergy on Twitter @bigknickenergy_ on IG  Find our podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Podbean and YouTube. 

Looking Into Wine
Producer profile: Chene Bleu with owner Nicole Rolet

Looking Into Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 35:58


In this episode, I talk to Nicole Rolet the co-owner of Chêne Bleu, who has to put Chêne Bleu on the global wine map in just over two decades. Blessed with a convergence of natural factors, Chêne Bleu has the benefit of an exceptional location, multifaceted geology, and a southern Rhône climate with soils more typical of the northern Rhône. Isolated and protected, high in a mountain saddle, Chêne Bleu has its provenance in a unique, four-corner borderland of the department Gigondas, Cotes du Ventoux, Côtes du Rhône and Séguret come together Nicole explains why they felt that it was right for them to not be part of those appellations. The story of Chêne Bleu begins with Xavier Rolet, a Frenchman who has made a big mark in the world of finance. In 1993, he came upon a run-down estate in the South of France. The property was so dilapidated and overgrown, that no one had expressed interest in it for 20 years. His first offer was accepted, and he went to work.In the episode, we explore how the Nicole and Xavier Background has to help to shape the success of Chêne Bleu, their long term vision and having the wit to collaborate earlier on with some of the most important wine specialists in the world. What are the principles of Biodynamic are used at Chene Bleu and what lay ahead for the estate?Remember to Subscribe and leave a Review! We would love you hear from you! Reach us on: Instagram lookingintowineTwitter Mattia ScarpazzaMail Info@mattiascarpazza.comOnline Recording on studio-level: SquadCast https://squadcast.fm/?ref=mattiascarpazza

Ben Franklin's World: A Podcast About Early American History
313 Mike Duncan, The Marquis de Lafayette

Ben Franklin's World: A Podcast About Early American History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 69:50


You know “America's favorite fighting Frenchman” is the Marquis de Lafayette. But what do you know about Lafayette and his life? How and why did this French-born noble end up fighting in the American Revolution? Mike Duncan, a self-described history geek, public historian, and the podcaster behind the award-winning podcast The History of Rome and the popular podcast Revolutions, joins us to investigate the life of the Marquis de Lafayette with details from his book, Hero of Two Worlds: The Marquis de Lafayette in the Age of Revolution. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/313 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Colonial Williamsburg Foundation The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Bonus Episode: The Marquis de Lafayette and the Hermione  Episode 071: Bruce Venter, Saratoga & Hubbardton, 1777 Episode 203: Joanne Freeman, Alexander Hamilton Episode 208: Nathaniel Philbrick, Turning Points of the American Revolution Episode 311: Katherine Carté, Religion and the American Revolution Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin's World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

Leftist Reading
Leftist Reading: The Wretched of the Earth Part 5

Leftist Reading

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 19:01


Episode 60:This week we're continuing with The Wretched of the Earth by Frantz FanonThe full book is available online here:https://monoskop.org/images/6/6b/Fanon_Frantz_The_Wretched_of_the_Earth_1963.pdf[Part 1-4]Concerning Violence[Part 5 - This week]Concerning Violence- Fifth reading - 0:49[Part 6-7?]Violence in the International Context[Part 8-10?]Spontaneity: Its Strength and Weakness[Part 11-14?]The Pitfalls of National Consciousness[Part 15-17?]On National Culture[Part 18?]Colonial War and Mental Disorders[Part 19?]Series A[Part 20?]Series B[Part 21?]Series C[Part 22?]Series D[Part 23?]ConclusionFootnotes:9) 02:18This refers to Mirabeau's famous saying: "I am here by the will of the People; I shall leave only by the force of bayonets." —Trans.10) 03:07It is evident that this vacuum cleaning destroys the very thing that they want to preserve. Sartre points this out when he says: "In short by the very fact of repeating them [concerning racist ideas] it is revealed that the simultaneous union of all against the natives is unrealizable. Such union only recurs from time to time and more­over it can only come into being as an active groupment in order to massacre the natives — an absurd though perpetual temptation to the settlers, which even if it was feasible would only succeed in abolishing colonization at one blow." (Critique de la Ration Dialectique, p. 346.)11) 09:23Aimé Césaire, Les Armes Miraculeuses (Et les chiens se taiscient), pp. 133—37.12) 11:41Temporary village for the use of shepherds.—Trans.13) 12:38We must go back to this period in order to judge the importance of this decision on the part of the French government in Algeria. Thus we may read in "Resistance Algérienne," No. 4, dated 28th March 1957, the following:"In reply to the wish expressed by the General Assembly of the United Nations, the French Government has now decided to create urban militias in Algeria. 'Enough blood has been spilled' was what the United Nations said; Lacoste replies 'Let us form militias.' 'Cease fire,' advised UNO; Lacoste vociferates, 'We must arm the civilians.' Whereas the two parties face-to-face with each other were on the recommendation of the United Nations invited to contact each other with a view to coming to an agreement and finding a peaceful and democratic solution, Lacoste decrees that henceforward every European will be armed and should open fire on any person who seems to him suspect. It was then agreed (in the Assembly) that savage and iniquitous repression verging on genocide ought at all costs to be opposed by the authorities: but Lacoste replies 'Let us systematize the repression and organize the Algerian manhunt.' And, symbolically, he entrusts the military with civil powers, and gives military powers to civilians. The ring is closed. In the middle, the Algerian, disarmed, famished, tracked down, jostled, struck, lynched, will soon be slaughtered as a suspect. Today, in Algeria, there is not a single Frenchman who is not authorized and even invited to use his weapons. There is not a single Frenchman, in Algeria, one month after the appeal for calm made by UNO, who is not permitted, and obliged to search out, investigate and pursue suspects. "One month after the vote on the final motion of the General Assembly of the United Nations, there is not one European in Algeria who is not party to the most frightful work of extermination of modem times. A democratic solution? Right, Lacoste concedes; let's begin by exterminating the Algerians, and to do that, let's arm the civilians and give them carte blanche. The Paris press, on the whole, has welcomed the creation of these armed groups with reserve. Fascist militias, they've been called. Yes; but on the individual level, on the plane of human rights, what is facism if not colonialism when rooted in a traditionally colonialist country? The opinion has been advanced that they are systematically legalized and commended; but does not the body of Algeria bear for the last one hundred and thirty years wounds which gape still wider, more numerous and more deep-seated than ever? 'Take care,' advises Monsieur Kenne-Vignes, member of parliament for the MRP, 'do we not by the creation of these militias risk seeing the gap widen between the two communities in Algeria?' Yes; but is not colonial status simply the organized reduction to slavery of a whole people? The Algerian revolution is precisely the affirmed contestation of that slavery and that abyss. The Algerian revolution speaks to the occupying nation and says: 'Take your fangs out of the bleeding flesh of Algeria! Let the people of Algeria speak!' "The creation of militias, they say, will lighten the tasks of the Army. It will free certain units whose mission will be to protect the Moroccan and Tunisian borders. In Algeria, the Army is six hundred thousand strong. Almost all the Navy and the Air Force are based there. There is an enormous, speedy police force with a horribly good record since it has absorbed the ex-torturers from Morocco and Tunisia. The territorial units are one hundred thousand strong. The task of the Army, all the same, must be lightened. So let us create urban militias. The fact remains that the hysterical and criminal frenzy of Lacoste imposes them even on clearsighted French people. The truth is that the creation of militias carries its contradiction even in its justification. The task of the French Army is neverending. Consequently, when it is given as an objective the gagging of the Algerian people, the door is closed on the future forever. Above all, it is forbidden to analyze, to understand, or to measure the depth and the density of the Algerian revolution: departmental leaders, housing-estate leaders, street leaders, house leaders, leaders who control each landing . . . Today, to the surface checker-board is added an underground network. "In 48 hours two thousand volunteers were enrolled. The Europeans of Algeria responded immediately to Lacoste's call to kill. From now on, each European must check up on all surviving Algerians in his sector; and in addition he will be responsible for information, for a 'quick response' to acts of terrorism, for the detection of suspects, for the liquidation of runaways and for the reinforcement of police services. Certainly, the tasks of the Army must be lightened. Today, to the surface mopping-up is added a deeper harrowing. Today, to the killing which is all in the day's work is added planified murder. 'Stop the bloodshed,' was the advice given by UNO. "The best way of doing this,' replied Lacoste, 'is to make sure there remains no blood to shed.' The Algerian people, after having been delivered up to Massu's hordes, is put under the protection of the urban militias. By his decision to create these militias, Lacoste shows quite plainly that he will brook ho interference with HIS war. It is a proof that there are no limits once the rot has set in. True, he is at the moment a prisoner of the situation; but what a consolation to drag everyone down in one's fall! "After each of these decisions, the Algerian people tense their muscles still more and fight still harder. After each of these organized, deliberately sought after assassinations, the Algerian people builds up its awareness of self, and consolidates its resistance. Yes; the tasks of the French Army are infinite: for oh, how infinite is the unity of the people of Algerial"14) 13:13This is why there are no prisoners when the fighting first starts. It is only through educating the local leaders politically that those at the head of the movement can make the masses accept 1) that people coming from the mother country do not always act of their own free will and are sometimes even disgusted by the war; 2) that it is of immediate advantage to the movement that its supporters should show by their actions that they respect certain international conventions; 3) that an army which takes prisoners is an army, and ceases to be considered as a group of wayside bandits; 4) that what­ever the circumstances, the possession of prisoners constitutes a means of exerting pressure which must not be overlooked in order to protect our men who are in enemy hands.

My Big Phat Fabulous Life
My Big Fat Fabulous Life S9E8 - A Big Fat Dissapointment

My Big Phat Fabulous Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 38:08


An egg retrieval, a missed test, and a missed connection? Is the Frenchman really coming to Maine? And where's Hunter? 

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes
Who was Marquis de Lafayette? with Mike Duncan

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 56:15


Time for a fun one, America's favorite fighting Frenchman. You may have seen streets, parks, and subway stations that include the name Lafayette, but may not know much about the man other than the show-stopping performance of Daveed Diggs, who played Lafayette in Hamilton. The actual Marquis de Lafayette was born in France to immense wealth and privilege, allowing him to mingle in the most elite circles of the time. He shipped off to the US colonies to find his fortune and endeared himself to George Washington, fought for US independence and then returned to France to play a crucial role in *their* revolution as well. Mike Duncan, a fish monger turned wildly popular history podcaster, wrote about Lafayette's story in his new book, “Hero of Two Worlds: The Marquis de Lafayette in the Age of Revolution.” He joins to discuss Lafayette's fascinating life, his research and life in Paris during Covid and whether the US is on the precipice of revolution and democratic decline.

Hysterical History
Episode 182: Lafayette, America's Favorite Fighting Frenchman - Part Four

Hysterical History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 97:48


In this episode, Alexis and Hailey discuss Adams vs Lafayette, his feelings on slavery, and how a compromise will not work in the French Revolution.Special thanks to our patrons: Kathleen, Katelynn, Ashley, Loreena & Josh, Gamy, Natalie, Natalya, Daniel, Kara, Coffee Infused Nerd, Polly, Erica, Vallie, Laura, Lizzy, Denise, Ariana, Lilly, Eddy, Kaycee, Nerissa, Grace, Wayne, Jennifer, Kristilyn, History Hunter, Patricia, Emily, Lane, Jenna, Michelle, Oliver, Bethany, Simon, Maria, and Olumadebo! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

My Big Phat Fabulous Life
My Big Fat Fabulous Life S9E7 - Chase'n the Frenchman

My Big Phat Fabulous Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 42:04


Ashley finds out she's been replaced by an app, Heather's womb is up for grabs, and Buddy's back, but does he want to be? 

California Wine Country
Nova Perrill, Foppiano Vineyards Winemaker

California Wine Country

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 33:31


Nova Perrill, winemaker at Foppiano Vineyards, is back on California Wine Country with Steve Jaxon and Dan Berger. He has been on this show before, the last time was this episode on April 24, 2019. The pronunciation FOH-ppi-a-no is Italian, FAH-ppi-a-no is American and you can take your pick. Foppiano winery is at the southern end of the city limits of Healdsburg.There have been grapes on that property for over 125 years. Southbound on the 101, take Old Redwood Hwy, and it's on your right next to the nursery. They have been there since 1896. They have specialized in Petit Syrah, which they have made since their founding. They were the first to put that name on a bottle in 1964. Family members drew the borders for the Russian River Valley AVA, Louis Foppiano was a leader in that process. This was a big decision, to draw the line between the warmer Dry Creek Valley and the Russian River Valley, which is cooler. During Prohibition, the homeowner was allowed to make 200 gallons each year untaxed. Dan Berger tells about how some people pooled their permits and made more than a single family limit. They also shipped fresh grapes and sacramental wine. They found a way to survive Prohibition. There is a famous photgraph of an IRS “Revenuer” in front of the winery, watching wine being dumped. Historically, Petit Syrah was the most important variety growing there. Russian River Valley is cool, but not so cool at its northern end, where they are. These wines age well in the bottle. They have fruit all the way until you open them. Nova Perrill has been at Foppiano Vineyards for seven years. He says it takes 5 solid years to get to know the vineyard, the operation and the people. Previously, Nova was the assistant winemaker at Dry Creek Vineyard, established in 1972 by David Stare. He made all the kinds of wine they produce, notably Sauvignon Blanc and Zinfandel. He was there for seven years. Before that, he was at Mt. Eden wines in Santa Cruz, run by Martin Ray. He sold his name to another winery. He was instrumental in passing better wine labeling laws in the 1940s. He himself learned from Paul Masson, who was a Frenchman who had a winery and specialized in sparkling wines. Today there is a top notch music venue on the Paul Masson property. He is a Cal Poly SLO grad, with a bachelor's in ecology. He took the MS in Crop Science, there, and learned about viticulture, then he applied those concepts at Mt. Eden. He is happy with having taken a hands-on approach from the beginning. All they ever did to the wine was add yeast, the rest was 100% in the vines and climate. That allows the “terroir” to express itself. Nova has pioneered his vineyard controls and vineyard management techniques. This Sauvignon Blanc will develop itself in the bottle over the next couple of years. Later Dan says it may be even better after 5 years. They have about 150 acres around the winery. They produce 1000 cases or less of each of these varietals grown on their estate. There is real depth that comes with age in a well-made wine. “The winemaker has to build this into the wine. It doesn't just happen.” Nova Perrill says that their Sauvignon Blanc vines are old and are visible from the 101. Dan Berger gets a little hint of lemon oil or lime and also a bit of fresh fig. Dan would decant it, to let the waxy component come out. Dan says that it's screw capped, which is good for aging, but means it will need some air to let its flavors out, after it is opened. Foppiano Vineyards is open for wine tastings, although they are not what they used to be, after the pandemic. Calling ahead is optional. They are open for outdoor tasting. Now they taste a 2020 Chardonnay. Nova says, if you start with high-quality fruit, all you have to do is not screw it up. “You can only make the wine worse.” There is brightness and complexity in the same bottle here. At first you sense fruit. Or wait a year or two and get more complexity.

SocietyFringePodcast's podcast

Kass and I went to New Orleans together when we were dating. It was achingly romantic and magical. We stayed at The Frenchman right on the southeast tip of The French Quarter. We befriended a bartender at a place called The Abbey on Decatur Street who had recovered from a stroke brought on by alcoholism. We called him "Strokey." That feels like a very New Orleansy thing. I had proposed to her soon enough after this. The band passed on this song for EUTAW STREET too! Harrumph. So this is "micro" in the parlance of the album SOCIETY FRINGE PLAYER.

My Big Phat Fabulous Life
My Big Fat Fabulous Life S9E6 - Crappy Birthday To You

My Big Phat Fabulous Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 29:27


The French Man gives Whitney a devastating birthday gift.  Ashleigh is on the verge of losing her job to an app, and Todd is forced to celebrate his birthday with Whitney. 

With Bowl and Spoon
Belize Part II

With Bowl and Spoon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 47:49


Brett and Shelly keep talking about their post-pandemic lockdown trip to Belize. From the mainland, they travel to the island of Caye Caulker and spend 8 days on this tiny island where the motto is "Go Slow". Caye Caulker - part of the municipality of Belize City, barrier reef, rum cocktails - with lime, Coconut rice with chicken and plantains, watermelon and soursop juice, rain and sand roads, filled with milky water, bikes, bucket of beer, Charles, conch coconut curry, Fresh, everything was so fresh!, Cuban place with tacos, fry jacks, various influences - West Indian, Cuban, Monique and Maurice, Wish Willey's, iguanas, My birthday dinner, tarpon, seahorses, Gets dark around 630pm, Rent a dog system, deep sea fishing, red snapper - eyes popped out, Barracuda want to eat your face, I ATE FISH!, Reef snorkeling, while our captain goes conch hunting, Iguana Reef sunset, Shelly and the Stingrays, History of the Iguana Reef and the environmental aspect of it, the off the beaten path breakfast, huevos rancheros and watermelon juice, Front Street and Back Street, The grumpy Frenchman, Coco Plums, the Birthday key lime pie, Namaste Café, Chia pudding, Ice and Bean - coffee, mini doughnuts, rum balls, smoothies and fry jacks, Hammocks and swings, Great escape! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/withbowlandspoon/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/withbowlandspoon/support

Radio 22: Nobody Cares Podcast

Or-A-Gon-O This episode with Nick on vacation we have our friend and fellow comedian Olivia Witt in studio as they try to find out if Craig is a Republican white woman inside, the new young homeless people in Madison, Sex Robot Security Guards, French Man who was in a coma for 39 years, is Vaginal Steaming a real thing, our thoughts on the trans woman who fought and won her MMA fight, and much more.

The Home of Football
When Real Madrid signed Julien Faubert

The Home of Football

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 34:36


Some say this was the most surprising transfer in the history of football. This story starts in the 2009 January transfer window, at West Ham United. The players are on the team bus, on their way to Fulham for a game in the Premier League, when a mobile phone rings. Julien Faubert, one of the West Ham players, picks up his phone. On the other end of the line is a Frenchman, who says he works for Real Madrid. This man tells Faubert that Real Madrid wants to sign him. But Faubert feels like this isn't serious, like someone is trying to prank him, so he says he doesn't want to be bothered. He has a game to play. He switches off his phone.After the game, Faubert switches his phone back on. He has 40 text messages and a couple of missed calls from his agent. Real Madrid really wants to sign him, and they have to hurry up, because the transfer deadline is rapidly approaching. In this episode of our podcast we tell the amazing story of a man who was born in poverty in a French harbor, and ended up making one of the most unexpected transfers in the history of football. This is the crazy story of Julien Faubert and his transfer to Real Madrid. It's a story about frantic phone calls on deadline day, playing with a ballon d'or winner, being wrongly framed by the media, and finding peace in the south of France. - See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

¡Qué Golazo! A Daily CBS Soccer Podcast
Fabrizio Romano: Pogba rethinking Manchester United future (Soccer 9/13)

¡Qué Golazo! A Daily CBS Soccer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 18:26


Paul Pogba was rumored to be on his way out of Manchester United last season, but that was before a certain striker returned to Old Trafford. Fabrizio Romano joins Luis Miguel Echegaray to discuss the Frenchman's future and Cristiano Ronaldo's big money deal with the Red Devils. Plus, Paulo Dybala's contract negotiations, the race to sign Dušan Vlahović and why FC Dallas fans don't need to worry about Ricardo Pepi just yet. Qué Golazo' is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Castbox and wherever else you listen to podcasts.  Follow the Qué Golazo team on Twitter: @quegolazopod, @lmechegaray, @JimmyConrad, @FabrizioRomano, @Jon_LeGossip, @jamesbenge, @heathpearce, @LRoman32, @PartidoPooper Watch Qué Golazo on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/QueGolazo For more soccer coverage from CBS Sports, visit https://www.cbssports.com/soccer/ To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Twin Peaks Wonderful & Strange Logcast
40. The Short Films of David Lynch

Twin Peaks Wonderful & Strange Logcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 171:06


TV Calibration and DVD menu (6:50)... Six Men Getting Sick (12:43)... The Alphabet (27:15)... The Grandmother (42:39)... The Amputee (1:25:41)... The Cowboy and the Frenchman (1:41:00)... Lumiere / Premonitions Following an Evil Deed (2:03:05)... Pierre and Sonny Jim (2:15:30)... Fire / Pozar (2:22:05)... What Did Jack Do? (2:30:16)... Wonderful & Strange Questions of the Week / Outro (2:39:38)

Climactic
Nourishing Matters | Incredible story of SOIL - Matthew Evans & Sadie Chrestman

Climactic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 67:08


Find more of Nourishing Matters to Chew On here. Tilth, glomalin, exudates … luscious words from the world of soils and a great conversation with Matthew Evans and Sadie Chrestman about Matthew's new book Soil – The incredible story of what keeps the earth, and us, healthy.  Matthew and Sadie Chrestman are the well known and much loved co–creators and operators of Fat Pig Farm, collaborators in arms and life and both strong advocates for open, fair, accountable food and farming systems and delicious food. This episode dives into just how very precious and remarkable soil is and why we need to get to know and ‘look after' it better – now. ‘Soil' is a joyful, magical book. It's packed with stacks of facts & curious tales to help us really ‘see', smell, feel and taste soil in creative, more informed ways and it packs a loving but really powerful punch for pretty much anyone who grows food or eats  – and it offers an uplifting call to action to better care for soil, for our and planetary health and food futures in a changing climate.  A rollercoaster of a read – ‘Soil' is a mix of Alice in Regenerationland; meets Dr Karl, & Costa; great scientists, quacks & visionary gardeners & farmers of the world – and Frenchman, Stephane Le Foll, who, at the Paris Climate Summit in 2015 touted the idea that an extra 0.4% organic carbon into soil each year might radically ‘garden' us away from runaway global warming …. There's a whole lot of love in this book – for soil and for the tiny trillions of bacteria, fungi and neglected critters in it and for people and the planet.  Listen in, enjoy and dig into Matthews latest book that is available from all good bookstores and online booksellers.  Image Acknowledgements: Sadie, Kitti Gould Photographer Matthew, Alan Benson Photographer  Matt's Website Fat Pig Farm @fat_pig_farm Instagram @nourishing_matters @foodswellaustralia  Facebook Nourishing Matters Foodswell                   Twitter @foodswell1 If you'd like to give Nourishing Matters a hand, you can buy us a coffee (or more!) by making a donation @ givenow.com.au/nourishing Listen @ https://omny.fm/shows/nourishing Support the show: https://www.givenow.com.au/nourishing Support the show: https://www.climactic.fm/p/support-the-collective/

Off Track with Carruthers and Bice

Loris Baz is near the end of his debut season in the MotoAmerica HONOS Superbike Championship with the Warhorse HSBK Racing Ducati of New York team and it's been a struggle. Faced with a new bike, a new team, a new series, a new country and new on-track rivals, the Frenchman has done much better than he thinks. He's currently fifth in the MotoAmerica Superbike Championship with six podiums and he'd be much higher in the title chase if not for the five non-finishes. We caught up with Baz at New Jersey Motorsports Park for the penultimate round of the series and this week's 150th edition of Off Track With Carruthers And Bice.Support the show (http://motoamerica.com)

Inside with Brett Hawke
#188 Fred Vergnoux, 5x Olympic swim coach

Inside with Brett Hawke

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 82:28


Fred Vergnoux is the new technical director of CN Metropole de Las Palmas of Gran Canaria leaving his head coaching position at the Royal Spanish Swimming Federation (RFEN). For the last 11 years he has coached Mireia Belmonte, winner of the Women's 200 Fly at the Rio Olympics. Some of his other swimmers including Alena Popchanka (Fred's wife!), Amaury Leveaux, and Kirsty Balfour. Before Spain, Fred was handpicked by Bill Sweetenham as he was rebuilding British Swimming. 00:00 Swimming Sponsors 03:30 Hi Fred 04:45 Resting at Mom's house 06:15 Frenchman in charge of Spanish National Team 09:00 Multilingual 12:15 Coaching influences & philosophies 22:30 Back to club coaching 26:05 See the plan through 32:45 Mireia Belmonte 36:55 How Belmonte trains 43:55 Gold medal set 46:00 Mental coach 58:15 Learning from COVID 01:04:00 What it takes 01:10:00 Paris 01:13:00 Bill Sweetenham story Support Our Sponsors: THE MAGIC 5: Custom fitted goggles that are tailor-made for your exact face. You shouldn't feel you are wearing goggles. Use code BRETTHAWKE20 at checkout to receive 20% off. SWIM ANGELFISH: Receive the tools and skills needed to teach swimmers with autism, physical disabilities, anxiety, sensory and motor conditions with Swim Angelfish, the global leader in adaptive swim. Get certified online today! SUPERIOR SWIM TIMING: Run a swim meet with ease from your laptop. SST is fully compatible with Hy-Tek and Team Unify as well as Colorado, Daktronics, and Omega touchpads. Tell them Brett sent you! DESTRO SWIM TOWERS: Save $150 per double swim tower by using the code "brett" at checkout! SWIMNERD LIVE: Create an interactive heat sheet. Stream your swim meet scoreboard in real time over top your live stream. Turn any tv into a digital scoreboard. Subscribe & Listen: Apple Podcasts Google Spotify YouTube Produced by: SWIMNERD Supported by: Fitter & Faster

My Big Phat Fabulous Life
My Big Fat Fabulous Life S9E4 - Vaxed and Waxed

My Big Phat Fabulous Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 34:54


Fat girl summer is here! Ashleigh and Whitney take a road trip to Georgia.  Will Babs get her car keys back, and does the Frenchman really exist? 

History on the Side Podcast
Episode 23 - Oh, Mississippi, Where Art Thou?

History on the Side Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 44:18


The tale of a particular Frenchman and his disastrous Texas colony. Where in the world is the Mississippi River anyway? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/historyontheside/support

Journey of an Aesthete Podcast
"The Madame B Talks"

Journey of an Aesthete Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 74:19


Deb/Madame B statement: I am an American who left America. (Frankly that will probably be the most interesting thing about me to most of your listeners). I am a teacher a pastry chef a cat lover a FOREVER Chicage girl and Bob Newhart lover. Links to Madame B: @madame.b.in.paris Inside the Episode with Mitch "The connections between any two individuals are ultimately matters of mystery and should remain so. By that I of course do not mean that we shouldn't have basic facts of how people meet and know others; I mean that the bonds and relations among people have a specialness that can never be reduced to a single source, cause or purpose. I mean I could give very linear facts some of which are made clear on this particular episode. That I knew filmmaker Anna Biller who in turn happened to know one Madame B. Of the guests I have known on the show I believe this might be one of the only few I have only met online and long distance. Sometimes one fact about a person - in the case the love for Bob Newhart - can go an awfully long way. And with any shared interest it has to be the right shared interest. But in all seriousness, this guest is absolutely brilliant in more than one sense. She has sometime close to an absolute understanding of aesthetics as well as, in ways I had not originally known in human psychology a field she briefly considered making a full profession. She had on more than one occasion asked me why I am always the host. Also that I should have a regular advice column on the podcast, "Ask A Dandy", an idea that, though interesting doesn't exactly work for now since this isn't a fashion or lifestyle podcast at all. So instead we came up with this. I thought it would be fun to do half hour episodes and link them; on each we would take turns being the guest and host respectively. Even though I have traveled the world myself, but mostly in the 1990s, not so much in the past twenty years I must say, I am always in awe with those who seem to travel with freedom, one reason I loved having Smriti Shankar as one of our guests. I think moving from one apartment to another in the same city is a trauma and an ordeal, from one state to another more intense and still haven't gotten over that as it was only over two years ago. Deb of course moved to France. Sometimes I think she has more wisdom than most. In Madame B's case she moved to France and married a Frenchman, and not only that had already lived in Germany for a period! She is someone who is clearly not afraid to travel. I think it is important, especially in a rather youthful genre like the podcast, to break it up once in a while, not only for variety, but also that humans need different forms what each unique form can deliver or do. I enjoyed speaking with Deb; her high intelligence makes for world class conversation and I think it might be nice for a return engagement at a later date." --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mitch-hampton/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mitch-hampton/support

El Tel & Jon’s La Liga Weekly
6: La Liga Weekly: Transfer Special

El Tel & Jon’s La Liga Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 36:50


Terry Gibson and Jon Driscoll reflect on deadline day deals and the return of a certain Frenchman to Atleti! 

Hysterical History
Episode 181: Lafayette, America's Favorite Fighting Frenchman - Part Three

Hysterical History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 78:42


In this episode, Alexis and Hailey return after a long slumber. to teach you more about Lafayette, why America likes him so much, how we win the war, and how George Washington is his dad, no argument. Special thanks to our patrons: Kathleen, Katelynn, Ashley, Loreena & Josh, Gamy, Natalie, Natalya, Daniel, Kara, Coffee Infused Nerd, Polly, Erica, Vallie, Laura, Lizzy, Denise, Ariana, Lilly, Eddy, Kaycee, Nerissa, Grace, Wayne, Jennifer, Kristilyn, History Hunter, Patricia, Emily, Lane, Jenna, Michelle, Oliver, Bethany, Simon, Maria, and Olumadebo! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Harvest Community Church (PCA) in Omaha, NE
“Who May Enter into Holy Places?” – Hebrews 9:1-14

Harvest Community Church (PCA) in Omaha, NE

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021


If you have your Bibles, please turn with me to Hebrews 9:1-14. As always, I'll be reading out of the ESV, the English Standard Version. And so hear now the word of the Lord. 9 Now even the first covenant had regulations for worship and an earthly place of holiness. 2 For a tent was prepared, the first section, in which were the lampstand and the table and the bread of the Presence. It is called the Holy Place. 3 Behind the second curtain was a second section called the Most Holy Place, 4 having the golden altar of incense and the ark of the covenant covered on all sides with gold, in which was a golden urn holding the manna, and Aaron's staff that budded, and the tablets of the covenant. 5 Above it were the cherubim of glory overshadowing the mercy seat. Of these things we cannot now speak in detail. 6 These preparations having thus been made, the priests go regularly into the first section, performing their ritual duties, 7 but into the second only the high priest goes, and he but once a year, and not without taking blood, which he offers for himself and for the unintentional sins of the people. 8 By this the Holy Spirit indicates that the way into the holy places is not yet opened as long as the first section is still standing 9 (which is symbolic for the present age). According to this arrangement, gifts and sacrifices are offered that cannot perfect the conscience of the worshiper, 10 but deal only with food and drink and various washings, regulations for the body imposed until the time of reformation. 11 But when Christ appeared as a high priest of the good things that have come, then through the greater and more perfect tent (not made with hands, that is, not of this creation) 12 he entered once for all into the holy places, not by means of the blood of goats and calves but by means of his own blood, thus securing an eternal redemption. 13 For if the blood of goats and bulls, and the sprinkling of defiled persons with the ashes of a heifer, sanctify for the purification of the flesh, 14 how much more will the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without blemish to God, purify our conscience from dead works to serve the living God. Hebrews 9:1-14, ESV Well, earlier this week, I stumbled across an attention grabbing headline that stated this. It said, "More than 60 percent of born again Christians in America between the ages of 18 and 39 believe that Buddha, Muhammad and Jesus are all valid paths to salvation." Now, this was based on a study on religious pluralism in America that was conducted by some Christian ministry. But after digging into the data a little bit that was provided, I discovered that while the headline singled out the 18 to 39 age bracket, those in the older brackets didn't really fare much better either. And in some cases they were actually worse. In short, it seems that among self-professed evangelicals, regardless of age demographics, pluralism that is the view that there are multiple valid religions in the world is a serious problem. This study also fits with a similar survey that was conducted by another Christian ministry last year, where respondents were asked to respond to the phrase, "God accepts the worship of all religions, including Christianity, Judaism and Islam." And respondents to that statement, fifty-two percent, in fact, of evangelicals between the ages of 18 and 34 either agreed or strongly agreed with that statement. Now, assuming that these results are truly representative of the religious landscape among self-professing evangelicals in America, it goes to show, I think, just how well the world has catechized and discipled the church and her members. After all, when the world happily elevates such values as plurality, as the supreme values that we should live by, but downplays values such as truth. Well, it's no wonder why so many of our neighbors and people we love and maybe even you have followed suit in rearranging values more in line with what the world treasures and less in line with what the Bible affirms from start to finish is true. But when we turn to the Bible, we find the unmistakable claim that our God is in fact unique among the so-called gods of the world. Rather than being just one God among many in a buffet of religious options, the Bible tells us that our God isn't anything like the so-called gods of the world. Our God, for one thing, is a triune begin. For another thing, our God, we learn, is infinite, eternal, all wise, all powerful, love, merciful, gracious, majestic, good. And he's the perfection of all of his attributes. God just isn't like the so-called gods of the world, and as a consequence, how we approach this one triune perfect God really does matter. We can't approach this God through the values or systems of any world religion we choose, and neither can we approach this God as the weak and morally troubled people that all of us are and think that he'll smile upon us all the same. Whether the Bible tells us that to approach a holy holy Holy God, that is a God who's set apart from what's common in every way, to be received as children and people of this holy God, and to have our worship accepted by this holy God requires nothing short of holiness. Holiness, according to God's standards ourselves. And so our big idea this morning is this, Holiness lies at the heart of our worship.. Again, we need to know that the one we worship, the one that we cling to for life is holy and therefore how we approach the holy God requires holiness ourselves. So two points as we walk through this passage. 1. The Problem of Holiness. Yes, it requires holiness to approach a holy God, but we have a problem and it's a holiness problem. That's the first point. 2. Access Through the Holy One - And then second is how we nonetheless gain access to the Holy God through a Holy One. The Problem of Holiness So let's start out for this first point. First, the problem of holiness. And notice that when we turn to our passage, our author begins picking up where he left off in chapter eight. In chapter eight, you may recall a few weeks back when we spent some time studying that passage, our author spent some time comparing and contrasting the so-called old covenant. The old covenant was this covenant that God made with Moses to the nation of Israel. And he contrasts this old covenant with the new covenant, the new covenant, the covenant that God has inaugurated through his son, Jesus Christ, our Lord. After comparing and contrasting these two covenants the old covenant and the new covenant, or the first covenant in the second covenant in chapter eight of Hebrews, arguing all along the way for the superiority of the new covenant. Now, in chapter nine, our author focuses on just one aspect of these various covenants. Namely how one worshiped in the old covenant versus how we worship in the new covenant. In fact, that's his focus throughout this passage. And to begin, he spends the first 10 verses or so focused on what worship in this old covenant with Moses looked like in its own day. So to begin our survey of the contrast that our author draws in our passage, look with me at versus two through five of our passage. There our author begins by going back well over a thousand years from the time in which he writes, to explain to us the system of worship in the old covenant with the so-called tabernacle. Notice that in the first five verses or so of our passage, our author spends a lot of time here describing to us this earthly place of holiness that was known as the tabernacle. So to give you a little bit of background to this thing called the tabernacle. After the Exodus event, and you can read all about this in the Book of Exodus, when God, through his servant Moses led his people out of slavery and captivity in Egypt. He gathered his people in the desert to himself at a place called Mount Sinai. This is an event you can read about beginning in Exodus 19, where the people of Israel were wandering through the desert and God led them to this mountain called Mount Sinai. It was at Sinai where God called Moses up on the mountain, and he gave him the Ten Commandments. God entered at that point into a covenant with Israel. He secured a relationship with his people. He promised at that point to be their God. He promised that they would be his people. He gave them laws, and he promised that if they lived according to those laws, that they would be blessed. Well, after articulating that the essence of these laws in the Ten Commandments, much of the Book of Exodus, the second half of Exodus that is, is taken up with describing to us the construction and design of this thing called the tabernacle. Now, the tabernacle was this large mobile tent in the old covenant where God's people would go in order to worship God. They would come into the tabernacle and they would offer bloody animal sacrifices when they sinned. The priest of Israel, a special group of among the nation, would also minister day and night in the tabernacle complex. So with that background in mind, when we look at versus two through five of our passage, we noticed that our author is concerned here with describing to us the various sections of this mobile tent called the tabernacle and some of the furniture or the equipment that was in the tabernacle. And by the way, if you're using a sermon worksheet this morning, the ones that we normally hand out or place in the back, I've included a schematic of the tabernacle in that for you to follow along as we work through these verses. Nonetheless, let's point out a few features of this tabernacle, according to our passage. Well, for one thing, our author tells us that this tabernacle had various sections to it. When a worshipper would come into this tabernacle with a sacrifice, he would have to go into, first of all, this outer portion called the outer court of the tabernacle. That was as far as he could go. A worshipper could bring an offering a bull or a goat or a bird, depending on whatever the kind of sacrifice he came to offer would be. He would then have to kill the sacrifice himself in the outer courtyard. It gets a little bit graphic. He then had to chop up the sacrifice accordingly and then let the priest do the rest. Which often involved taking a portion of the sacrifice or all of the sacrifice, and then burning it all up on this thing called the brazen altar or the altar of burnt offering that was in this outside, outer court kind of complex. Then towards the back of this tabernacle complex was a smaller tent, which was called the tent of meeting. This tent of meeting this enclosure in the back was divided into two sections, and only the priests of Israel were allowed to enter that tent. Average Joe Israel worshipper couldn't go in it. Only the priests were allowed to go in that tent. So our author and Hebrews tells us that in this first section of the tent, this was known as the Holy Place, there was a lamp stand that was kept burning continually. If you've ever seen a menorah that represents this lamp, stand in the tabernacle, the lampstand was known as a menorah. There was also a golden table which had these 12 loaves of bread on it called show bread that were replaced every Sabbath day. Then in front of the second curtain, so there was another curtain inside, there was an altar known as the Altar of Incense, on which the priests would crush up incense every day, and they burn these incense on this small Altar of Incense. This was located right in front of the second section, which is called the Most Holy Place. You have a Holy Place, and then the second section is called the Most Holy Place. So let's talk about that second section for a moment. Again, after you entered the temple or tabernacle complex, then you walked into the tent of meeting, you'd arrive at the Holy Place. We just talked about that. Then there was a second curtain that opened into this Most Holy Place, and it was in that central most interior room that God's people held it to be the Most Holy Place on Earth. Because that in that Most Holy Place was where God in a sense, dwelled on Earth. Now, the whole tabernacle complex was holy, but as you drew further and further into the tabernacle complex, you get into the courtyard, then the Holy Place, then the Most Holy Place. The idea was that you were drawing closer and closer to the glory and the presence of God. So what was in this Most Holy Place? Well, our author points out, at least one thing. He tells us that this thing called the Ark of the Covenant was in there. Now this Ark of the Covenant was this ornate golden box that contained the two tablets of the Ten Commandments that were given to Moses on Mount Sinai. Then there was a jar of Manna and Aaron's staff that were placed nearby. This Ark of the Covenant also had on it something called the Mercy Seat, which is just a fancy name for the lid of this big thing called the Ark of the Covenant. Then above the ark, there are these two golden cherubim. These images of heavenly creatures who overshadowed the mercy seat and they themselves represented the glory of God looking down upon the people. Now, this is only a short summary of all of the various items that were in the tabernacle and what the tabernacle looked like. And you could go to the Book of Exodus or Leviticus, or to a lesser extent, Numbers and read about all the details that you ever would want to know about tabernacle and tabernacle worship. Bear in mind that there were author gives us these these many details in verses two through five, and we could probably spend an entire sermon just talking about all those details and what everything represented. Our author gives us these details not to just give us some information, right? He does it with a particular purpose in mind. He wants us to see that though the tabernacle and all the furniture in it was arranged with with purpose and meaning and thought in mind. Though, this whole thing was carefully crafted by the best craftsmen in Israel, and it must have been a sight to behold in its own day. Pastor Jacob reminded us that it was a glorious place to be and in fact it was. It was nevertheless limited, incomplete and imperfect in what it could actually do. For as elaborate and ornate and as glorious as it must have been to be in the tabernacle in its own day. There was something about it that was always wanting. Over in San Jose, California, there's a historic landmark known as the Winchester Mystery House. It's this massive mansion that's about twenty-four thousand square feet. One hundred and sixty rooms, ten thousand windows, forty-seven staircases and six kitchens. Now, as the story goes, Sarah Winchester, whose husband was the owner of the Winchester Repeating Arms Co. They made the Winchester rifles. She tragically lost, in a short span of time, both her husband and her infant daughter to various diseases. So widowed and alone and severely depressed, Sarah Winchester moved from her home in New England to California. At some point along the way, she became convinced that her family was cursed by the people who had fallen dead to the Winchester rifle, and that the only way to find relief from this supposed curse was to continually nonstop build a house. And so in 1884, Sarah Winchester purchased this very small farmhouse, and between the years of 1884 and until her death in 1922, this farmhouse was subject to round the clock construction. As Sarah frantically sought to expand the house to what it is today. She spared no expense in the process. Now, if you were to visit the Winchester mystery house in its own day, I would imagine that you would probably encounter a beautiful, though still unfinished building. Although it probably looked majestic during its expansion. You nevertheless be faced with the fact that it was still incomplete. Regardless of how well it looked, there always seemed to be no end to the constant work and construction and expansion that was directed by Sarah Winchester. Now, well, the tabernacle never underwent endless construction like the Winchester house. Worshippers nevertheless still had to face a similar reality to the one that onlookers and visitors to the Winchester house had to face in its own day. And that is, it was incomplete. In one sense, the construction of the tabernacle may have been done, but the tabernacle itself could never achieve what it pointed towards. It may have looked beautiful. It may have been this glorious place where God's presence dwelled, but its outward appearance couldn't make up for the fact that it was only provisional and limited, imperfect and incomplete, and it would never see the end to which it looked. Just as this earthly place of holiness was limited, provisional, so too the holy regulations that governed what happened inside were likewise limited and incomplete. Notice that when we proceed in our passage to verses six through 10, our author tells us how the priests of Israel ministered inside the tabernacle. So we hear a lot about the furniture and the construction and verses two through five. And now we learned what happened inside the tabernacle. Our author tells us a few things. First, he tells us that it was the priest's job, like we already said, to enter into this first section of the tabernacle regularly, what we call the Holy Place, to perform their ritual duties. Now, these duties would have included things like trimming the lamps on the menorah, which was constantly lit up. It would have included crushing incense and burning incense, always at the altar of incense, Among other duties that they had to perform. While these priests had the weighty job of drawing near to God, of drawing into the Holy Place, it was only the job of the High Priest, one select priests out of all the priests, who got to go into the Most Holy Place once a year and have as close to direct access to God as one could ever hope to have under the old covenant. On the so-called Annual Day of Atonement and this is described for us in Leviticus 16, the High Priest got to draw near to God in the Most Holy Place. To do so required quite an ordeal to unfold. First, the high priest before he would enter in, he had to dress himself in pure white linen. A special vestments had to be procured and put on. Then after clothing himself accordingly, the high priest had to go outside. He had to slaughter a bull and then come into the Most Holy Place with the blood of a bull and was required to sprinkle it on the mercy seat, the mercy seat being that lid of the Ark of the Covenant that we already mentioned. In doing that, he would take care of his own sins and the sin of his family. But all wasn't done because remember, a priest was supposed to represent the nation of Israel. The high priest supremely so. So after atoning making up for his sins and the sins of his family, he then had to go out to the courtyard and he had to get a goat this time. Slaughter a goat, bring the blood of the goat in in order to deal with the sins of the people of Israel, those he represented. Now you only need to read a few chapters in the Book of Leviticus to know that this day, in particular, the Day of Atonement and tabernacle worship in general was a bloody affair. If you're the kind of person who gets queasy at the sight or thought of blood, I apologize. I do too just ask my wife. But the whole system revolved around the offering of blood in order to take care of the sins of our people. Notice that in our passage our author reminds us that when the High Priest went in to the Most Holy Place, he did so not without taking blood. Blood was central to these offerings because blood was seen as representing the life of an animal or person. And so when you offered the blood of an animal, you are offering life in your place. Because the wages of sin is death. Understand that sin is so serious, even one sin is such an affront against a holy and eternally Holy God, that life has to be taken. Blood has to be spilled in order to pay the debt that our sin incurs. In a sacrificial system, this is what you'd be reminded of over and over again. You'd be reminded every day about the seriousness of sin and about how costly rebellion against a Holy God really is. One the things we should take away from this curious study of the tabernacle is exactly that. That sin is serious and sin, brothers and sisters is quite costly. I can recall the first time in my life. Unfortunately, the only time up until now in my life where I got into a car accident. When I was in high school, I was driving through a parking lot and upon turning down one of the rows, I took to turn a little bit too tightly and ended up clipping the front end of a car with my parents minivan that I was driving. Apparently, I took the turn too tightly and in the aftermath I was quite embarrassed by it all. I was afraid of the consequences of my parents, but other than that, I didn't think too much about the fender bender, because outside of a few dents and scratches, the minivan seemed OK. It was still running fine, so no harm, no foul. But a week or two later, after the minivan got repaired, my dad reported to me the damage that was incurred to the minivan. Fortunately, insurance covered it, but he told us that he told me that the insurance claim was as far as I can recall, it's been a while, several thousand dollars. At the time that was shocking to hear because it just didn't look that bad. As a naive high schooler who admittedly had no conception for what things cost, it took me quite by surprise to hear that dents and scratches and bodywork could cost that much. It took that event for me to come to terms with just how costly it can be to scratch up your vehicle a little bit. It might not look that bad on the surface of things, but the cost can be quite steep. In the same way, friends, we often just don't get the costliness of our own sin. The only reason that such a pervasive belief exists even among Evangelicals, that there are many paths to God and that God accepts a variety of worship is because the need for holiness isn't held in as high regard as it needs to be.God just isn't elevated in our thoughts or affections as the one who is utterly holy, and we don't view ourselves very often through the lens in which the Bible sees us, as utterly unholy in our human nature. The only reason that belief that I mentioned at the outset, the only reason that gains a foothold in the world and in the church is because we have a severely distorted view of holiness. But even if you're on the right side of orthodoxy on that issue and you're part of the apparently 40 percent of evangelicals who rightly confess that the only way to God is through Jesus Christ and him alone. Well, we too, can sometimes carry a functionally naive view of our sin. After all, how often do we see ourselves completely justified and unstained in the midst of conflict? Or how long do we harbor grudges and bitterness when somebody sins against us in the most minor of ways? Or how many times do we relativize our sin to comfort ourselves in view of the apparent graver infractions of others? Friends, we need to understand that even the smallest sin is rebellion against God and his law, and even the smallest sin requires that blood be spilled and that life be paid to shield us from the righteous wrath of God. Do you understand that? Do you get that? And if you're a Christian, do you grieve your sin accordingly? Or are you humble when your church family graciously calls you to confession? And more importantly, are you looking to Jesus every single day as the only solution to your sin problem? And if you're not a Christian, if you don't even consider yourself a Christian, know that you have a serious holiness problem. God is more holy than you ever dared imagine, and you are less holy and less well off than you imagine that you are. The only solution, the only solution to our holiness problem and the only way any of us could draw near and stand in the presence of a Holy God is through a priestly representative who himself is the perfection of holiness. Access Through the Holy One This leads to our second point where we discover that though our sin makes access to God into Holy Places, tenuous at best. Through the Holy One of Israel, the doors to God's throne of Grace have been swung wide open for you and me. So second point, access through the Holy One. Know again, there were a couple of big issues with the tabernacle in the old covenant. For one thing, access we already mentioned this, was extremely limited. Remember only the High Priest and only at that once a year got to enter into the Most Holy Place. Another issue was that the entire sacrificial system couldn't, as our author tells us, quote, perfect the conscience of the worshipper. These sacrificial offerings may have been able to deal with external issues and ceremonial issues, but they couldn't get at the sin issue that's lodged deep in the human heart. But when the Holy One of Israel, Jesus Christ, our Lord came into the world as our better high priest. When he lived as an unstained priestly representative on our behalf and then died as a perfect and final bloody sacrifice for sin. What we learn in our text and Hebrews returns to this theme a number of times, that when that happened, Jesus entered in to the real heavenly tabernacle so that as a holy cleansed people, we could follow in his train. Down in the swamps of Central Florida lies what many people would believe to be the happiest place on Earth, Walt Disney World. At one of the parks in Disney World Epcot Center, you can immerse yourself if you so choose in the culture of a variety of different nations. You see at Epcot, there's this large lake, and around this large lake are 11 pavilions, which feature 11 different nations. The architecture of each of these pavilions is designed to reflect the respective nation they represent, as well as the food they serve and the items they sell. It's supposed to be this cross-cultural experience in the heart of Central Florida. So take France, for example, if you spent some time at Epcot Center and in the French Pavilion at Epcot, you could feast on authentic French pastries. I think they call them patisserie in French. You could speak with employees in French, even if your French is broken and they'll happily converse with you rather than rolling their eyes at you like a Frenchman did to me once in Paris, but that's another story. There's even a miniature Eiffel Tower at the French Pavilion in Epcot, too. Despite journeying to the French Pavilion at Epcot, you can't say you've been to France because it's not the real thing. It may have the look and feel of authentic French culture. People might speak the French language, but you'd be fooling yourself if when you return you said, I have been to France, because the pavilion is only an imperfect replica of the real thing. This is what the tabernacle of the old covenant was. We've already said that it was imperfect, it was incomplete, but in saying that, bear in mind, it was never going to be complete because it always represented something better. Heaven itself. When Jesus spilled his blood, we learned in Hebrews 9:12, he entered once for all into Holy Places. He didn't enter into the physical tabernacle or the physical temple in Jerusalem. Not at all, he entered into heaven itself, and in doing so, he opened up the way for you and me to truly fellowship with God in the present that no one, not even the high priest of the old covenant, was privy to. Friends, the benefits we receive from Christ's ascension into the better and more perfect tabernacle are benefits found in no other world religion and no other institution on Earth. The Heidelberg Catechism, one reformed confession catechism that we look at from time to time, ask the question at one point, how does Christ's ascension benefit us? It's a good question to ask. What should we gain from Christ ascension? And it answers that question by reminding us that because of Christ ascension, we have three things. We have one someone who advocates for you and me at the father's right hand. Because of Christ ascension two, we have the promise that we one day when we die and finish our sojourn on this Earth we will be taken to heaven too. Then three, because of Christ's ascension, we receive the spirit of the risen and ascended Christ right now, who, according to Heidelberg Catechism, who by whose power we seek, the things that are above where Christ is seated at the right hand of God and not things that are on Earth. So are you doing that right now? Are you seeking the things of heaven and not the things of Earth? Brothers and sisters, because Christ entered into the heavenly tabernacle, we have been granted the spirit of the risen and ascended Christ, who, among other things, directs our gaze heavenward. Who Directs our gaze from thinking about and concerning ourselves from day to night with the things of this Earth and instead directs our gaze to the heavenly places where Christ is seated. Is that where your mind, is that where your heart, is that where your affections are focused as you sojourn in this life under the sun? Ask yourself in relationships with people who you love, who don't know Christ, is it your desire above everything else that they would become citizens of this heavenly kingdom through faith in Christ? Is it your hope above everything else that the Kingdom of God that the will of God would be done on Earth as it is in heaven? And does your speech reflect that in the way you talk about God and in the way you talk about things? Does your schedule reflect that in the way you prioritize things? Or are you really more focused on building and preserving your own kingdom here on Earth? Friends through Christ's ascension into the real deal, the real heavenly tabernacle, we have access to God in the present. Access that no priest under the old covenant administration had. Access to better heavenly food and spiritual gifts and the great hope of one day joining Christ in the heavenly places, too. As our passage prepares to close, we're reminded once again that the only reason at all that we have these benefits in the so-called new covenant, which is where we live in and what we enjoy, is because of the broken body and shed blood of Jesus Christ. Now we've already heard quite a bit about blood in our passage. But the reality is that animal blood could never do anything about the problem of sin. It could purify the flesh as far as externalities were concerned, but it couldn't do anything about the human heart. And yet, Christ's blood does and can. First, we learn that Christ's blood didn't deal with temporary uncleanliness. Remember, the tabernacle blood had to be offered again and again. A worshipper sins, they come into the tabernacle, they offer blood. The next week, they sin, they come into the tabernacle, more blood and on and on and on. But with Christ, our author tells us, when he offered up his own blood, he secured an eternal redemption. This is why Jesus could say on the cross it is finished. No more laboring and never arriving, no more longing and never receiving. In Christ and it's finished and it's finished for good. Christ's blood, we read, redeems us, which means that it frees us from the slavery and bondage of sin. Understand that if you don't know Christ, the Bible tells us that you are not free. The Bible tells us that you are a captive, that you are enslaved by your own sin nature. You're not free in the way you might think. Yet Christ offers for us the perfect price to emancipate all those who find refuge in him from the slavery of guilt and sin, that apart from Christ, holds all of us captive. Then we learn that through the very same blood of Christ, it also purifies our consciences from dead works to serve the living God. Through Christ's blood our hearts are cleansed, our souls are cleansed, all of our spiritual faculties are cleansed whiter than snow. In telling us that Christ purifies our consciences or authors getting something specific here. Understand that in the Bible, the conscience is what gives us our sense of guilt. When we feel guilty about something, it's because our conscience has been pricked. John Owen, for example, notes that when Adam hid from God after he sinned, it was because of his conscience. His conscience produced in him a sense of guilt and shame. And so too, when our consciences are overwhelmed with a sense of guilt of our sin, it's often our tendency, we do this in various ways, to hide from God. Yet through the blood of Christ, our consciences, we hear have been purified such that we have no reason to hide from God. We don't need to hide our sin or try to hide our sin from God as if we ever could. We don't need to be apprehensive about coming to our Heavenly Father. Though we often do and should grieve our sin when we sin, we need not be haunted by the sins of our past. Christ has cleansed our whole being through his blood, including our consciences. As a consequence, we have been not only free to approach God regularly and boldly, approaching, as the author of Hebrews tells us earlier the throne of grace with confidence, but we've also been invited and this is where our passage ends to serve him too. This is the direction this whole passage drives. That having been cleansed, having been redeemed by the blood of Christ, we are urged then to serve the living God. As Christians, we serve God in a number of ways. First and foremost, we serve him in our worship by giving him the praise that he's due. We serve him in the world by bearing witness a salt and light in every opportunity that we're given. We serve him in the church by serving his body. We serve him at our homes by disciplining those in our household. Christ has set us free so that we might boldly do just that. That we might boldly serve him in all of the various ways and opportunities he's given us to do so. That's the call that this passage ends with. Application What should we take away from all this? Well, in conclusion, I just have one thing for us to think through. One thing for us to maybe apply, if you will, and that is be holy. By this, I mean two things. First, be holy positionally. That is if you don't embrace the Holy One of Israel, Jesus Christ as savior and king know once again that you will have no hope to enter the Holy Places where Christ is seated. Unfortunately, one of the typical tropes we hear in our pluralistic culture is that just as there are many ways up a mountain, theoretically, so too there are many ways to God. Yet the Bible tells us that the only way to ascend the mountain, the mountain which belongs to God, is with clean hands and a pure heart. Now, in our human nature, none of us meet those criteria spiritually. All our hands are dirty, and all of our hearts are stained with sin, rotten to the core. But Jesus Christ does meet those criteria. The plea from our passage is that you would therefore know him, that you would identify with him, that you would place your trust in him, and that when you do so that you know that you will be a member of the holy people of God. Who are holy, not because of anything we've done, but only because of Jesus Christ our Lord. Yet the starting point for all of us is to be holy in this positional kind of way through faith in Jesus Christ. The Bible still calls us to be progressively holy, too. After all, Peter tells us, "Just as he who called you as holy, you also be holy in all of your conduct." To be holy simply means to be set apart from that which is common. As it applies to our lives as Christians, holiness calls us to recognize first and foremost where our citizenship lies and to live as citizens of that kingdom during our sojourn on Earth. It's an appeal to learn the language of that kingdom, the customs of that kingdom, to grow in fellowship with the people of that kingdom, and to resist being discipled by the kingdoms of this world. So grow and holiness, because in Christ Jesus, you are already holy. Trust that the Holy One of Israel will welcome you into his holy, heavenly tabernacle through Christ and Christ alone when he calls each of us into our glorious home. Pray with me. Gracious, Heavenly Father, Lord, we are challenged in some ways by this appeal to holiness because we know in our flesh that we often don't live as holy people that we are. And we also take hold of the promise, the promise that through Christ Jesus, we are the holy people of God. Through the Holy One of Israel, we have become positionally holy so that we could draw near to you regularly and boldly and with confidence. Lord, I pray that we would remember that. That we would do that regularly. That we would not shortchange the benefits of the new covenant that are ours in Christ Jesus. That you would help us remember these things by your Spirit as we live, move and have our being. In Christ's name, we pray. Amen.

The Cycling Podcast
157: Stage 14 | Don Benito – Pico Villuercas | Vuelta a España 2021

The Cycling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 54:42


The first of two very challenging weekend stages was a bit of a stalemate as far as the race between the overall contenders was concerned but there was an intriguing battle for the stage win. RIchard Moore and Lionel Birnie check in with our man in Spain, Daniel Friebe, to recap stage 14, which was won by Romain Bardet. The Frenchman was arguably the most dangerous of the riders in the 18-man break and we'll hear from another man in the lead group, Lotto-Soudal's Matt Holmes, who wanted to get away without Bardet but suffered two untimely punctures. We also clear yesterday's little local difficulty between Deceuninck-Quick Step's sprinter Fabio Jakobsen and his lead-out man, and eventual stage winner, Florian Senechal. Finally, we learn about Jose Maria Jimenez, who lit up the Vuelta around the turn of the century and was one of three high-profile tragic figures in professional cycling in the early 2000s. Tomorrow's stage visits Jimenez's home town and will pay tribute to El Chava. The Cycling Podcast is supported by Supersapiens and Science in Sport Supersapiens is a continuous glucose monitoring system that helps you make the right fuelling choices. See supersapiens.com For 25% off all your SiS products, go to scienceinsport.com and enter the code SISCP25 at the checkout.

On The Continent
On The Continent: Hey big spenders

On The Continent

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 52:19


Welcome back to another edition of On The Continent! Miguel Delaney joins Dotun and Andy to discuss the latest on Kylian Mbappé and Cristiano Ronaldo.We wonder how the Frenchman's arrival could revitalise Real, while there are mixed opinions about Ronaldo's possible uneasy marriage with Pep Guardiola's Man City. After a very weird window with spending confined to the very top, we also discuss the broader transfer market across Europe this summer.Elsewhere, José Mourinho's seducing another fanbase as his Roma side get off to a flyer with Tammy Abraham particularly impressing. Plus, we check in with the Champions League qualifiers, which featured a wonderful – but revealing – blast from the past as Benfica and PSV fought for a group stage spot.Got a question for us? Find us on socials@footballramble.***Please take the time to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your pods. It means a great deal to the show and will make it easier for other potential listeners to find us. Thanks!*** See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

ESPN FC
Kane's Tottenham U-Turn

ESPN FC

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 67:02


The FC crew discuss Harry Kane's surprise decision to stay at Spurs after spending the summer pursuing a move to Man City and debate whether Man City should make a move for Cristiano Ronaldo after they ailed to sign the Spurs striker. Plus, PSG's Leonardo claims that Mbappe wants to leave PSG and what that now means for the Frenchman's potential move to Real Madrid.

ESPN FC
Madrid To Make Kylian Mbappe Coup?

ESPN FC

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 49:31


The FC crew discuss the transfer rumors swirling around Cristiano Ronaldo and whether he will remain at Juventus this season. Plus, Real Madrid's interest in Kylian Mbappe steps up after reports surface that the Frenchman might be willing to leave before the transfer window closes, and the panel weighs whether Man City should be trying to sign Erling Haaland instead of Harry Kane.

Borgo Pass Horror Podcast
The Invisible Ray (1936)

Borgo Pass Horror Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 94:40


A visionary astronomer, Dr. Janos Rukh, has invented a telescope that can look far out into deep space, into the Andromeda Galaxy, and photograph light rays that will show the Earth's past. He has theorized about this being possible for some years, much to his discredit among his fellow scientist-colleagues. Looking at the remote past on a planetarium-like dome in his lab, two of those ardently skeptical scientists, Dr. Benet and Sir Francis Stevens, watch a large meteorite smash into the Earth a billion years ago, in what is now the continent of Africa. Amazed by Rukh's demonstration, the pair invite him to go on an expedition to locate the impact site.Rukh finds the meteorite, but is exposed to its unknown radiation, now dubbed "Radium X". This causes him to glow in the dark and to make his mere touch instantaneous deadly to any living thing. The exposure also begins to warp his mind. Returning to the base camp, he entreats Dr. Benet to devise a means of neutralizing Radium X's poisoning effect. Benet develops a serum that holds the lethal element's toxicity at bay, but Rukh must take regular doses of the antidote or he will revert to being a luminous killing machine. Rukh returns to his jungle base and learns from Benet that this situation has been complicated by the romantic relationship between Rukh's wife, Diana, and Ronald Drake, the nephew of Lady Arabella Stevens, Dr. Stevens' wife.Benet takes a piece of the meteorite back to Europe, where he modifies its effects to help people, including curing the blind. Working along similar lines, Rukh cures his mother's blindness, but in spite of her warning, he goes to Paris to confront Benet and the others. There, he pretends to acknowledge his wife's new relationship with Drake, but in reality, it is the first step in his plan for revenge. Rukh murders a Frenchman he closely resembles, making it appear that he has died and been rendered unrecognizable due to an accident with Radium X.Believing the deception, Diana marries Ronald. Rukh now begins to use his radiation poisoning to kill off the expedition members. He marks each death by disintegrating a single statue on the exterior of a church across from where he is hiding. Each time, he focuses the radiation through a window using a raygun-like device. He manages to kill both Stevenses before the police realize what is happening. Dr. Benet helps them set a trap by convening a scientific conference at his home to discuss Radium X, but Rukh secretly gains access and kills Benet. He has saved his revenge on Ronald and Diana for last but finds himself unable to kill his former wife. This hesitation brings him to a confrontation with his mother, the most important woman in his life. She has foreseen her son's growing madness and smashes the last of his antidote bottles in order to stop him. As the Radium X begins to consume him from within, Rukh jumps from a window. He disappears in an explosive flame, having been vaporized before reaching the ground.

Techno Music - Techno Live Sets Podcast
Reclaim Your City 447 by Zadig

Techno Music - Techno Live Sets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 123:27


Donate here👉 www.technols.com Reclaim Your City 447 | Zadig (Paris) A surefire trader of pressurized grooves and gut-busting kicks, Parisian brutalist Zadig is our guest this week and for the occasion the Frenchman comes up with a loud and wild sample of the stormy churn he's made a name for himself with. Through a flock of releases for […] Subscribe to listen to Techno music, Tech House music, Deep House, Acid Techno, and Minimal Techno for FREE.

The Steering Committee
BMW M2 Competition vs. Porsche Cayman T

The Steering Committee

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 68:26


Episode 43: Ryan discovers a ghost dealership and drives Colorado's Guanella Pass. Doug congratulates a Frenchman and digs on models. Together they go full “Everyday Driver” to determine the best new $60k sports car for Ryan's dad. A couple of show notes: we were wrong about the Supra. The base model is not currently available with a manual. Oh, and the M2 Comp and CS have a different engine than the base M2, and, share a virtual dash. Lastly, is there better beer than Bruz Beers? No, there is not. Get yours at bruzbeers.com

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
UFC 265 Recap (Vive La France)| MMA Gambling Podcast (Ep.62)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 65:22


After the French took home their first UFC title this weekend, the MMA Gambling Podcast decided we needed a Frenchman to break it down. So with Jeff Fox getting pulled from the podcast (maybe he couldn't make weight?), Gumby Vreeland brings in Lucas Grandsire to give his take on all the UFC 265 action. Matchmaking, recaps, and in-depth discussions of broken limbs - don't miss it.    Make sure to subscribe to our new feed(s)! Apple Spotify Follow - Twitter | Instagram Watch - YouTube | Twitch Listen - Apple | Spotify Read - SportsGamblingPodcast.com Discuss - Slack | Reddit Download the SGPN app - https://sgpn.app Support for this episode - WynnBet | UnderdogFantasy code “SGPN” | PropSwap.com code “SGP”  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

F1 Nation
Hungarian GP Review: Ocon takes his chance

F1 Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 80:03


Damon and Tom look back on another thrilling, crash-affected race that produced a brand-new winner: Esteban Ocon! They discuss how the Frenchman was able to hit the jackpot, unpick the opening lap crashes that proved catastrophic for Red Bull and Ferrari, discuss Lewis Hamilton's exhausting fight back from a questionable strategy call, and why Sebastian Vettel impressed, despite his disqualification. Tom also shares some behind the scenes perspective on THAT spiky press conference answer from Max Verstappen, before former Toyota driver Allan McNish joins to discuss the top performers of the season so far. And finally there's another edition of Ask Damon, where the champ answers YOUR questions. To ask your question to Damon, send a voice note to AskDamonHill@gmail.com This episode is sponsored by: Manscaped.com - get 20% off + free shipping with code F1NATION sons.co.uk use code  F1NATION25 to get £25 off your first order