Podcasts about evolving

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

change in the heritable characteristics of biological populations over successive generations

  • 4,133PODCASTS
  • 6,034EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 19, 2021LATEST
evolving

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about evolving

Show all podcasts related to evolving

Latest podcast episodes about evolving

The Cosmic Calling
113 | Evolving to Your Next Level with Vedic Astrology

The Cosmic Calling

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 32:56


How will you create your own unique, soul-aligned contribution to the New Age? Tapping into your Vedic astrology chart could provide you with the heightened perspective that you seek... ✨In this slightly more advanced astrology episode, I'm talking about how I'm using an ancient approach to calculating astrology charts in a NEW way that can help you tap into a higher dimension of your soul's mission, especially if you are already following your Western chart and no longer getting sense of fulfillment you're really craving.WE COVER:How I got inspired to begin using Vedic Astrology in my work and why I think it's an amazing addition to working with Western Astrology (plus, what both of those are!)The difference between Vedic Astrology & Western Astrology and how they can help you gain clarity around your calling in different ways both for your personal life & for your businessHow I've been using a hybrid of both of these styles to help people who are feeling stuck, overwhelmed, and burnt out rise above their limitations & tap into an even higher level of their higher selvesWhy Western Astrology is still helpful for the mindset most of us in the West are used to living by in our search for financial success & peer recognition and for creating a bridge to the lower dimensions// Book in your own custom Soul-Aligned Session at http://soulshineastrology.com/soul-aligned// For complete episode show notes, visit http://www.soulshineastrology.com/episode113// Download a written transcript for this episode by becoming a member of our Cosmic Calling Community at https://www.soulshineastrology.com/community/Support the show (http://soulshineastrology.com/community)

The Bright Ideas eCommerce Business Podcast | Proven Entrepreneur Success Stories
BI 379: How CPG Brand Gainful Went From Basement to Boardroom (Ft Eric Wu)

The Bright Ideas eCommerce Business Podcast | Proven Entrepreneur Success Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 52:15


Flowster Live Demo https://flowster.app/live-demo/ Episode Highlights   [2:39] — Gainful's humble beginnings Eric is the co-founder of Gainful, a CPG brand manufacturing personalized nutrition products.  During his undergrad years, Eric had always played sports but was intimidated by supplements. Not finding the products he wanted led him to mix his protein powder in his college dorm basement. [6:33] — The concept of progress As an athlete, he always wanted to do better. This passion translated into his desire to create a better protein powder.  As a liberal arts graduate, he wasn't knowledgeable about raising venture capital, setting up a business model, and other entrepreneurial skills. Yet his desire to make himself, the people, and the products around him better spurred him on. [8:53] — Setting their business foundation Jahaan, Eric's buddy, became excited about the idea of personalized nutrition.  His enthusiasm made Eric consider that there was a potential business in his personal experiment. Thus, they applied to accelerators and startup incubators. The progress and traction that they got with The Brandery got them into Y Combinator. Throughout their journey, they ran around gyms and conferences throughout their journey to hand out flyers and do some guerrilla marketing. [13:35] — Knowing your customers It's important to figure out your brand identity, core values, and customer needs. Everyone who purchases a Gainful product needs to answer a five-minute quiz to help Eric's team fulfill their needs. This quiz helped them figure out what makes them use the products that they love. [18:58] — Getting a distribution network Eric soon realized that working night shifts and selling products online isn't sustainable for growing a CPG brand. So, they found a production facility, hired a small staff, and employed a third-party logistics provider. Going from small circles to a distribution network is a crucial inflection point for CPG brands. Through that, Eric and Jahaan were able to focus more on tech, research, and innovation. [21:03] — Scaling personalized products Figure out what's important and what people want by doing it on a small scale. For two years, Eric and Jahaan mixed hundreds of protein powder blends by hand. By doing so, they found trends in customer conversion, retainment, and preferences. They waited for a specific amount of demand before going to a contract manufacturer. [26:47] — Bringing value vs. paid marketing The days of building a big business off the back of paid marketing are long gone. However, it will always be important for any direct-to-consumer business. Gainful focuses more on its products and finding ways for customers to see their brand value in their daily lives. [30:28] — Hiring people When hiring people, approaching each conversation with sincerity will help you be able to communicate better. It's also crucial to have strong advisors to lean on for reference calls or interviews. The most valuable thing for founders is being able to adapt and learn by doing. [35:34] — Leveraging your core competencies It's necessary to do things that will bring you closer to the customer and understand how your internal processes work.  Gainful's key differentiator is personalization and making product categories better through this trait. Eric has been communicating that vision to potential partners, investors, and his team. [39:58] — Evolving as a leader Setting brand values establishes Eric's credibility to lead the company.  He also considers being present, proactive, teachable, and compassionate as good starting points for getting people to believe in their brand. Reading Emily Heyward's book, listening to podcasts, and the Fitt Insider podcast's newsletter have helped him evolve as a leader. [45:33] — Dealing with impostor syndrome Eric is passionate about working with brilliant people, learning what makes customers tick, and bringing something valuable into the world. So when he doubts himself, he reminds himself that his job is still the best gig in the world. He also remembers the sacrifice his parents made to let him pursue his American dream with full freedom. He simply loves doing what he does every single day. If he feels down in the dumps, he clears his head through exercise and a good meal.    

The Mastermind Effect
147: Evolving Your Mindset in Every Stumblings and Successes with Eli Harris

The Mastermind Effect

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 38:09


In 2016, Eli Harris co-founded his first startup — a pioneering portable energy storage company called EcoFlow. After a $25M acquisition deal fell through, Eli eventually sold his stake and was left unsure of his next move. Then, the pandemic hit.   Sensing an opportunity to save lives while revolutionizing the $20B+ infection prevention industry, he joined forces with two of his mentors to found R-Zero. Just one year later, R-Zero's innovative technology is already in use in thousands of classrooms, restaurants, and small businesses, helping to pave the way to a new normal — one that's healthier and safer than ever before. In this episode, Eli will be sharing how he has been recovering and getting back ahead at the industry he's working in. This young entrepreneur is the epitome of getting back up and running ahead, even when he hit rock bottom at one point. This informative episode would incredibly inspire and get you going. Check it out!  [00:01 – 09:58] Opening Segment I introduce our guest, Eli Harris Eli shows his battle scars during his start-up His journey and opportunities in Beijing, China Learning how to make drones and marketing it Creating an eco-friendly battery system Being pushed from a company you loved Getting the right therapists and coaches to help out Eli is back - Getting back to the arena  Connect with Eli through the links below [09:59 – 26:55] How Eli Got Back Up and their Ground-breaking Projects Separation - Knowing who he is from his work Having the right people by his side to make opportunities possible Eli's peer mentors  Establishing trust and sympathy with partners and peers Eli's current business and projects during COVID Infection protection through disinfection Modernizing the disinfection process in the industry Eli and his team are forerunners in creating real-time audit trails Ground-breaking proof of high-technology disinfection concept How is Eli evolving with his mindset with his current company Protecting one's self from the “rinse and repeat” and competitive mindset [26:56 - 38:08] Interesting Things we can Learn from Eli Entrepreneurship defined by Eli Harris The smart kids ought to lead On hitting the Rock-bottom Putting yourself out there because you have the opportunity Eli is still working through recovery - not yet over it Consider setbacks and struggles as your fuel Eli's current business and projects during COVID What to expect from Eli in the next 12 months Remember: Sleep and Exercise changes everything - take care of yourself! Final words Tweetable Quotes: “There's nothing to trade for good family and friends who love you no matter what, but they have emotional bias, because they know you. It is nice to have that level of objectivity or clinical-ness of a therapist or a psychiatrist.” - Eli Harris Connect with Eli through his website at  https://rzero.com/ (https://rzero.com/) and follow him on https://www.linkedin.com/in/eli-harris-6a262164/ (LinkedIn) It's time to Stand Up, Show Up, and Level Up! Download The Success Finder on Apple and Google Play Store. You can connect with me, Brandon Straza, onhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/brandonstraza/ ( LinkedIn),https://www.instagram.com/brandonstraza/ ( Instagram), or send me an email athttps://my.captivate.fm/brandon@thesuccessfinder.com ( brandon@thesuccessfinder.com). I'd love to get in touch and talk more about personal development and how you can live past beyond your limits.

Blueshirts Breakaway
EP 309 - Igor Beats the Leafs by Himself, The First Week of Games & Josh and Luke of Evolving Hockey

Blueshirts Breakaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 78:26


IGOR IGOR IGOR The guys react to a wild OT and the extreme lack of of offensive NYR depth the team is facing. A quick recap of the first weeks games and what to expect moving forward. Then Josh and Luke of Evolving Hockey join the Breakaway to discuss their models in the metro, what their models like and dislike about NYR and their worst move of the offseason. Thanks for all the support you've given us. LGR.

Pharmacy Podcast Network
Evolving Trademarking | DarshanTalks

Pharmacy Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 35:59


On this episode of @darshantalks, we had discussed Evolving Trademarking with guest Christiane Campbell. Christiane Campbell, Cannabis and Luxury Branding Attorney, Partner at Duane Morris LLP (https://www.duanemorris.com/), had spoken about the recent boom in cannabis litigation, catalysed by the New Jersey effect. The legalisation of cannabis in New Jersey significantly impacted the tri-State area and the Midwest parts of the US. The pharma bills recently passed include the legalisation of cannabis for recreational use as well, which is evidence of FDA approval. Doctors have started prescribing doses of cannabis to their patients for medical use, but if they get the specifications wrong, it can lead to a consumer issue. Disputes related to false advertising are coming up, where companies are falsely claiming that their product is of higher quality and concentration. In case of trademark disputes, the client usually wants to know if the label is appropriate to avoid litigation or being sued by the USPTO and is the least bothered about whether the percentages of constituents of cannabis are correct. Trademark lawyers need to look at the issues with respect to the use and registration of the client's brand. More than looking at a trademark specifically, it is crucial to look at what brand it is about and whether the celebrity fits the associated messaging. Sometimes, if a star says something in an advertisement that was thoroughly vetted but still not sufficient, the FDA states that it is a false advertisement, and thus it should be replaced with a corrective ad. Usually, these kinds of circumstances are accounted for in the contract negotiated by the brand against the talent. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Evolving Hockey Podcast
Evolving Hockey Episode 6: First Week Impressions, Game Predictions, and Model Talk

Evolving Hockey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 61:15


We're only 6 days into the '21-22 NHL regular season, but that doesn't mean we shouldn't be impressed by the Buffalo Sabres or laugh at the Chicago Blackhawks. Shawn, Josh, and Luke chat about the first few games of this season, discuss our new game prediction model, and cover a few other pieces of way-too-early-in-the-season items along the way! 

1980s Now
Evolving 1980s Music w/ Queen V

1980s Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 69:11


Will, Ray and Kat discuss current 1980s news including the Mixtape 2022 tour, a surprise screening at New York Comic Con, and another crazy Indiana Jones 5 rumor. Then, they discuss five 1980s bands that changed their sound during the decade. Finally, Will and Kat speak with singer/songwriter Queen V. To listen to bonus episodes, support the show on Patreon visit www.patreon.com/1980snow. For more episodes of 1980s Now (formerly The 80its) and information about the show visit www.1980snow.com. And for even more 1980s awesomeness visit the80sruled.com or facebook.com/80sruled.

Soulfulvalley Podcast
A Sensitive Journey with Evolving on Purpose Author Tammy Goen

Soulfulvalley Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 14:16


Tammy is a self love and happiness coach for Highly Sensitive People. As an HSP she knows first-hand what it's like to feel misunderstood, unaccepted, overwhelmed and needing to be fixed. She's felt the self-loathing and shame and struggled in relationships and felt totally incapable of dealing with the atrocities of life and in spite of it all she learned how to thrive… how to love herself and embrace and enjoy her sensitivities and all that life has to offer. Tammy helps other Highly Sensitive People to reframe their pasts, let go of old beliefs and patterns that keep them stuck and develop coping strategies and a deep sense of self acceptance and self love. Using her degree in Counselling Psychology, her certifications in EFT/Tapping and HeartMath meditation and other meditation and mindfulness practices and energy healing techniques, she guides HSPs toward realizing their Super Power. She loves witnessing their “Aha!” moments as they gain new self awareness and understanding and embrace their sensitive journeys. https://linktr.ee/tammygoen

Maine Calling
The role of grammar and its relevance in the evolving use of language today, plus some do's and don'ts

Maine Calling

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 53:00


The role of grammar and its relevance in the evolving use of language today, plus some do's and don'ts

Maine Calling
The role of grammar and its relevance in the evolving use of language today, plus some do's and don'ts

Maine Calling

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 53:00


The role of grammar and its relevance in the evolving use of language today, plus some do's and don'ts

The Capitol Pressroom
Unionizing farmworkers highlights evolving agriculture landscape

The Capitol Pressroom

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 12:29


October 15, 2021 - A 2019 state law designed to foster collective bargaining rights of farmworkers is being utilized for the first time by a dozen employees at a Long Island vineyard, who will be represented by the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union. We hear from a farmworker at the vineyard and the local labor advocate who helped organize the movement.

Rattle & Pedal: B2B Marketing Podcast
Selling professional services is evolving. What does modern selling look like today?

Rattle & Pedal: B2B Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 26:25


Selling professional services in a technology-powered, content-marketing-inundated world is evolving. Is your firm adjusting its approach? The post Selling professional services is evolving. What does modern selling look like today? appeared first on Rattle and Pedal.

Lloyd's List: The Shipping Podcast
The Lloyd's List Podcast: The evolving risk of subterfuge shipping

Lloyd's List: The Shipping Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 23:43


As scrutiny of the subterfuge shipping fleet skirting sanctions to deliver blocked cargoes has intensified, the tactics being deployed by the murkier end of the maritime sector have rapidly evolved. This week's edition of the podcast peers behind the increasingly complex network of opaque tactic and institutions being set up to obfuscate sanctions evasion at sea. Featuring insights from: BIMCO, Lloyd's List Intelligence, sanctions expert Michelle Wiese Bockmann and C4ADS, a non-profit group that investigates how data impacts security and international conflicts.

Spirituality & Metaphysics for Empowerment
A Rude Awakening & Evolving From the Paradigm of the Old Matrix

Spirituality & Metaphysics for Empowerment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 97:00


On air readings with Michele. This show is for our listeners, if you have been wanting a reading this is the show to call into. Call 347-539-5122  _________________ Awakenings with Michele Meiche is your place for information and insight to understand the Global Shift of Awareness and Awakening to live a more Soul fulfilling life and experiencing Soul fulfilling relationships. Awakenings broadcasts ‘Live every Wednesday 12pm -1:30 pm PT    Call in for Intuitive and Numerology Readings  # 347-539-5122  Michele answers questions about Awakening, Spirituality, Metaphysics, Dreams, Self Development and the Soul Path.                                                        You can also connect with Michele on the app @MentorCam where she can answer your questions psychically, as well as help you via her Soul Insights and life advice. Email awakeningspodcast@gmail.com for guest and topic suggestions, as well as to have your questions answered ‘On Air'.

Women Of YouTube
103: Hope Allen - Youtube Obsessed

Women Of YouTube

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 58:32


Hope, creator of HopeScope, lives in Utah with her husband of 6 years, Tyler, and her Mini Doodle, Leo. As a former dental assistant and 2 time college drop out, she now enjoys making a living creating informative and entertaining fashion content on youtube, Instagram, and Tiktok. Hope began her channel in 2017 and has been a full time Youtube creator for two years! In this episode, I sit down with Hope to deep dive into the struggles of creating your Youtube channel, the challenges women face as creators, and how to approach and land brand deals! Hope has an incredible story and shares the vulnerable truth of the struggles of starting a Youtube channel, and even turns the interview back to me and asks some killer questions! Join the Money and Youtube Clubhouse room on Fridays: https://www.clubhouse.com/club/talking-youtube-by-vidiq Join our Facebook Group: http://t.ly/Nl9T  Get vidIQ to blow up your channel at womeonofyoutube.com/vidiq Follow Desiree at http://t.ly/GbY4  Connect with Hope at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAM2fyCjEdROyELretVTiiw/featured    Time Stamps: 00:00 - Podcast topic intro 00:55 - Meet Hope 02:05 - How Hope's Youtube journey began 04:05 - Transitioning from cost to income 08:10 - Incorporating personality and story into your Youtube 12:00 - How Hope built her Youtube as a business  15:20 - Hope's advice to women Youtube creators 17:00 - Rapid fire fun 23:15 - What is it like to help women creators 31:05 - What it is like to be a woman creator 40:00 - The difference in men and women creators 47:40 - How to begin and negotiate contracts 50:05 - How to pitch yourself to brands successfully 55:50 - Evolving your services and knowing your value 57:45 - Where you can follow Hope

Bri The Sports Guy
E357: The guys preview the NBA's South East division (Bri likes both the Heat and the Hawks as top 4 in the East) then they review the evolving Ben Simmons situation in Philly; Jon Gruden out in Raider Nation and MLB Playoff update (Brewers bats are ice

Bri The Sports Guy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 39:01


The guys preview the NBA's South East division (Bri likes both the Heat and the Hawks as top 4 in the East) then they review the evolving Ben Simmons situation in Philly; Jon Gruden out in Raider Nation and MLB Playoff update (Brewers bats are ice cold).

The Capitol Pressroom
Syracuse's evolving traffic plan

The Capitol Pressroom

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 12:29


October 13, 2021 - The state's evolving plan to overhaul a portion of Interstate-81 in Syracuse is broadly championed by the New York Civil Liberties Union, but the organization says more can be done to limit potential public health problems and promote local opportunities for people of color. NYCLU Education Policy Center Assistant Director Lanessa Chaplin joins the show to discuss the best path forward, last-second objections to a community grid and what this process could mean for other upstate cities.

The Product Experience
An introduction to impact mapping - Tim Herbig

The Product Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 33:47


Evolving your organisation from a feature factory to becoming outcome-focused is a challenge many of us have faced - but how do you actually do it? Impact Mapping is a great way to help take stakeholders and teams from focusing on the how-to the what and why.  We asked consultant, trainer and author Tim Herbig to give us the crash course on the topic, including how to get people to understand the difference between an Impact, an Output, and an Outcome. Featured Links: Follow Tim on LinkedIn and Twitter | Tim's Website | Read Tim's 'Using Impact Mapping to Navigate Product Discovery' piece | 'Idea Prioritization with ICE and the Confidence Meter' by Itamar Gilad | Gojko Adzic's book 'Impact Mapping: Making a Big Impact with Software Products and Projects'

SuperFeast Podcast
#137 Love, Sex and Psychedelics with Dr. Molly Maloof

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 73:52


We have one of our favourite returning guests on the podcast today, entrepreneur and practicing MD Molly Maloof, who is back this time going straight to the heart of health and happiness; Love, sex, relationships, and the harmonious intersection of medicine and love. One of the many reasons we love the work of Dr. Molly is she's all about maximising potential and better function within the human body. Evolving in her practice and true to form with her ever-innovative mind, Dr. Molly's work has recently taken a more focused move into the space of relationships and how the quality of our close relationships significantly determines our long-term health. Healthy relationships help us cope better and defuse the external stresses of life; So why not focus on improving relationships? Inspired by years of experience and research in psychedelics, the neurobiology of love, and drug-assisted therapy, Dr. Molly is developing a company that aims to improve relationships and strengthen bonds through drug-assisted therapy. A complete paradigm shift in the way we view modern medicine and an upgrade to the human condition and relationships. As always with Mason and Dr. Molly, this episode is energised and thought-provoking. They explore the topics of psychedelic-assisted therapies, sexual dysfunction and the root causes of relationship problems, the history of MDMA and couples therapy, where modern medicine is falling short, and so much more. Tune in for good convo and sovereign health.   "I think technology is where we see these bonds decay. We're seeing people give up their marriages, we're seeing people walk away from long-term relationships, and we're seeing families and children affected. One of the most adverse childhood experiences a kid will have is a divorce. Why are we not looking at these fundamental facets of society and saying, gosh, why can't we do better?" And maybe there's a way we can do better that's ethical, honourable, that's scientifically sound, and will leave people better than we found them".   - Dr. Molly Maloof     Mason and Molly discuss:   Natural Aphrodisiacs. Entactogens (empathogens) The psychedelic movement. Psychedelic assisted therapy. Combatting stress through love. Relationships, community, and happiness. How relationships affect long-term health. Exploring root trauma and healing sexuality. Technology and the decay of relationships. Sexual dysfunction and relationship problems. Dopamine, Norepinephrine, Oxytocin, and Serotonin.   Who is Molly Maloof? Dr. Molly Maloof's goal is to maximise human potential by dramatically extending the human healthspan through medical technology, scientific wellness, and educational media. Her fascination with innovation has transformed her private medical practice, focused on providing health optimisation and personalised medicine to San Francisco & Silicon Valley investors, executives, and entrepreneurs. Molly's iterative programs take the quantified self to the extreme through comprehensive testing of clinical chemistry, metabolomics, microbiome, biometrics, and genomic markers.   CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Cordyceps Deer Antler Molly's Twitter   Molly's Linkedin  Molly's Website Molly's Facebook Molly's Instagram  Psychedelic News Hour with Dr Molly Maloof Maximising Your Human Potential with Dr. Molly Maloof (EP#47) Spiritual Awakening and Biohacking with Dr. Molly Maloof (EP#108)   Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Mason: (00:03) Molly, how are you?   Molly Maloof: (00:05) I'm alive and well in the middle of a chaotic world. And somehow I feel like one of the more sane people in the room these days.   Mason: (00:14) You're the sane person. It's great because I like the fact that the sane person and one of the sane people on Instagram. I love your Instagram endlessly.   Molly Maloof: (00:23) Thanks.   Mason: (00:23) And I love you're the doctor whose drugs I want to take.   Molly Maloof: (00:28) Yeah, right. Like I kept on asking myself, "What if we made drugs that people wanted to take? What if we made drugs that actually improve the human condition?" What if we made drugs that actually improved resilience and improved our relationships? How come that's not medicine?   Mason: (00:46) Now, let me start with this little light question.   Molly Maloof: (00:48) Yeah.   Mason: (00:49) Where does the intersection of medicine and love begin and integrate?   Molly Maloof: (00:56) Yeah, right? Okay. Here's what occurred to me. And I haven't really even announced my company because I've been stalled, but I can talk about the big picture because I think it's really important. I spent my entire life trying to figure out how and ever since I was a child, and I was like, wanting to become a doctor at a young age, and then hit puberty in all sorts of hormonal disarray. And I was just like, "What is this happening to my body?" I remember thinking, someday I'm going to figure out my whole body, and I'm just going to understand all this weird shit that's happening to me. And so I spent a lot of my life trying and testing out things to see what would they would do. I would take supplements when I was in ninth grade. I was just constantly doing weird stuff to see what I could do to make my body function better.   Molly Maloof: (01:41) And then, left my residency, started my own medical practise, and really was like, "Fuck, I want to make a practise around optimising health, instead of just fixing sickness." So I want to understand health from first principles. So I spent all this time studying and practising . And fortunately, I had patients who would pay me a lot of money to like, be my lab rats. And they were willing, they were coming to me with experiments that they're like, "I want to do this, will you be help me?" And I'm like, "Sure." So I was one of those doctors that was just like, helping executives find greater performance. And then I had a bit of a come to Jesus moment.   Molly Maloof: (02:18) And I was just like, I did not go into medicine to be doctor just to rich people. That's not cool. And this is like been an interesting experiment. But I should probably be doing more with my life than just helping rich people stay healthy. So it really was that. That was really going through my head. I was at Esalen Institute, and I was just like, "Yeah. I'm pretty sure that there should be more to life than this."   Mason: (02:39) It's an elephant a lot of the time in the health sector.   Molly Maloof: (02:42) Yeah. But at the same time, I'm super grateful that I actually was able to do what I did because A, I could show I actually was part of like a massive trend movement, which was like, precision medicine for individuals was like, not a thing until, a few years after I started practising . So I've always been a bit ahead of the curve. But I've always also been one of those people who's just like, I can't settle for like surface level anything. So I have to get under the surface. So I got asked to teach at Stanford, a course. And she was like, "You seem to be this healthspan expert. So why don't you teach about it?" And I was like, well, of course, I got really insecure. And I was like, "Well, I know a lot. But I can't know enough to teach a second best school in the country." So I went and I started researching even deeper and started studying even more and started like coming up with this framework of what health was about.   Molly Maloof: (03:28) And in my process of studying everything, I was creating electron relationships. And I started figuring, I saw a couple TED Talks, and I started looking into the research of these two psychologists and this researcher from Stanford. And basically, the conclusion was that long term health and happiness is literally dependent on your relationships, like the number one factor in whether you're going to live long and healthy or not is your relationships. And why do you think that is? Well, usually they're the biggest source of stress or stress relief. And we know that stress is a huge source of disease, and yet everybody talks about stress, but nobody talks about what to do about it. Even like some of the best most famous doctors in America.   Molly Maloof: (04:11) Well, even doctors are on stress, like sit around talking about how they don't know what to do with stress. So I was like, "I wonder if we could actually create medicine, that improved relationships." And so I started figuring out through the psychedelic movement, that a lot of what entactogens do is they fundamentally reproduce the neurobiology of love. And so I started digging into the neurobiology of love and I was like, oh, so dopamine, norepinephrine, oxytocin, and serotonin are essentially like some of the bigger molecules involved with love and connection as well as hormones. So to me, it was like kind of a lightbulb moment happened when I was like, "Whoa, what if we actually were to create medicine that can reproduce the love that you had early in your relationship when you first got married, when you first started dating?" What would happen if you could actually reintroduce that feeling again, in your relationship, when you've been together for 10 years, and you're already annoyed by each other constantly. And there's all this resentment built up?   Molly Maloof: (05:17) And what if you could work on that resentment, work on your attachment issues, work on your relationship and your bond and strengthen that bond, through drug assisted therapy? And so that's kind of what I came up with as an idea. And so I'm in this process of investigating the possible ways to do this. But really, it's like a complete paradigm shift in modern medicine because A, it's not about individuals taking drugs, it's about two people taking a drug together. And B, it's not about doctors just handing people drugs, but it's drugs plus therapy. Drugs plus a therapeutic journey that you take, in order to achieve a certain outcome. So not only does medicine have to change in a few different ways, like A, we have to like see if the FDA will even let us give two people drugs. But B like, the payment system of medicine is about you go to a therapist, you go to a doctor, you get a drug, and the doctor is paid for that visit. And that psychologist is just paid for that visit.   Molly Maloof: (06:14) So I have friends that are in payments systems, and they're developing like bundled payment programmes because essentially you need to like create an entire outcome based experience that is paid for in a lump sum. And so there's a lot of things that need to change about in medicine. But I think that fundamentally the human bonds that we create, like are the hugest source of survival that we have. And a lot of people have overlooked this in this pandemic. We know now from isolation, that there's nothing healthy about people being by themselves in their homes, especially the elderly. Come on, and young people and children with families in one house, like we're meant to be in community, we're meant to be touching other people, we're meant to be around other people. And I think it's really a shame that we have ignored this factor for so long, and we're continuing to ignore it while people are killing themselves with alcohol and drugs and other substances.   Molly Maloof: (07:07) And it's just like, and even food, right? Like kids are gaining weight at record rates, people are gaining weight at record rates. And it's all because we're not supposed to be alone. We're not supposed to be indoors by ourselves isolated, like it's not productive, and it's the antithesis of health. So that's my shtick in my soapbox description. And I'm just going to say this, this is a really ambitious endeavour, there is a very good chance that it will not work because the government will stop me. That doesn't mean that people shouldn't be doing stuff like this because we actually need to change the way that people think about medicine. We actually need to change how medicine is delivered.   Mason: (07:42) You know what, like what brings up, I've been reading a lot of like management books because I'm at that stage by my business where I was like Peter Pan and I'm back in the real world a little bit where am I growing up and becoming a little bit adulty.   Molly Maloof: (07:56) We're both becoming adults, dude.   Mason: (07:57) We're both adulting the shit out of life right now.   Molly Maloof: (08:01) We're adulting the shit out of life.   Mason: (08:04) The one Tani got like the whole management team to raid was like a Patrick Lencioni one. I don't think that's how you pronounce his name, but he's got business fables, and it's the Five Dysfunctions of a Team and one of the dysfunctions, I can't remember if it's an exact dysfunction or just something I took out of the fable, but it's like you get an executive team and you go through all the different departments like what's our goalposts? Like what are we all agreeing on that we're looking at as like what we're all trying to get? Is it like customer acquisition? Is it customer happiness ratings? Is it revenue? It doesn't matter what the hell it is, we just focus on that and we go for it and then that unifies you. I think most people and including people that get into health and are entrepreneurs in the health same doctors what the thing that happens is they still they can't get over the hangover of getting dumped.   Mason: (08:53) The goalposts been put on you by a pretty old medical system that just like, just keep people alive. Just improve the condition somewhat. And I think why when you speak and when people listening, I know people like loving my team like listening to your last podcast in the community really excited is because the boldness that you have and it's screaming me, you're like, "No, I'm creating my own goalpost, not taking on that one, and I can see the bridge, and I'm going..." Like you actually can bridge it. It's not just, I'm defying you. It's like, "No," I'm just like, I can work with in that and I can see what you're focused on. And I'm very clear about what I'm focusing on. It's like relationship and then measure the markers to see that your relationships have improved and we know it because we have these markers. And that focus is really inspiring. It's really intimidating for people that have just allowed themselves to be handed what the goalpost is. So cheers you, I raise my hot chocolate to you.   Molly Maloof: (10:00) It's like I ask myself, "Okay, I've got this personal brand. If I like go and be Dr. Molly brand, Dr. Molly, how is that going to like..." Okay. So let's say there's Andrew Weil, there's Dr. Oz, there's all these, like leaders in the space. I could do that. And I can always fall back on that if this thing doesn't work, like I'll only be 40 by the time I fail at this, right? So I think I'm going to give myself like solid three years before I give up. Look, it's really hard to do this thing, but I'm going to give myself some significant time and commitment, like five to 10 years, then we'll see what happens. If I can get through past three years, I'll be fucking stoked. So point is, is like I can always fall back on like the Dr. Molly brand because it's like, that's cool. But that's just an evolution, right? That's just like, me becoming branded doctor 2.0. But the thing about this other thing is like, if we actually were to accomplish this, this just fundamentally changes medicine, and also could transform human relationships, which are falling apart.   Molly Maloof: (11:02) People are getting divorced after eight years, and kids are getting damaged by these relationships. Kids are missing their relationships with their parents, parents are not bonding, kids are feeling neglected. We've got to save the family unit and I think it starts with the primary relationship. And to me, this is something that is interesting to me that, I just don't think a lot of people work on their relationships, like I don't think it's something that a lot of people consider to be a thing that they should be doing every day. But it's actually so fundamental to survival, right? And yet, it's like when things are getting really bad, that's when they get to work. So we are looking at different indications. But fundamentally, the big picture, what I'm trying to do, it's kind of like bring what people have been doing underground above ground.   Molly Maloof: (11:49) The history of MDMA was like couples therapy, right? And Shulgin was giving it to psychologists to improve couples relationships. And it turns out, like underneath a lot of dysfunction, a lot of sexual dysfunction in men and women is relationship problems. So if you just keep on getting to the root cause of anything, it's like, "Oh, why don't we just like deal with the root cause? And go with that?" So it's pretty-   Mason: (12:15) I've definitely experienced with underground MDMA.   Molly Maloof: (12:17) Yeah.   Mason: (12:19) Therapy?   Molly Maloof: (12:19) Sure. Exactly.   Mason: (12:22) Yeah. With my wife. Can you just enlighten people about how you'd use it in like a clinical setting and why in particular it has been used there?   Molly Maloof: (12:37) So MDMA, we're not technically using MDMA, unless we can't use the substance we're going to work on toward developing which there's a lot of reasons why, like drug developments hard, right? But MDMA would be a good backup solution because of its history. MDMA is essentially an entactogen. So what it does is it means to touch with that it means to generate, it's also known as enpathogen. So it creates a deep sense of empathy and human connection. And that empathy reminds you of like, "Oh, there's this person next to me." And I can actually feel how they feel right now.I can actually, more noticeably understand their emotional experience. And I can be a part of that experience, rather than feeling so separate from someone else. And fundamentally, it also works on the neurobiology of love. So it's a love drug. So it creates a similar experience to what I call post coital bliss, which is kind of like right after you had sex, and you're feeling like really comfortable and really blissed out, it's like, that's kind of the MDMA experience.   Molly Maloof: (13:42) And the interesting thing is that through different types of combinations of different chemicals, we're going to be able to modulate consciousness in ways that we never thought we could do and it's fascinating, just this whole field of psychedelic medicine because it's just beginning like this whole revolution is just beginning. And it's like happening from a place of like deep interested in science and understanding the brain, but also from like a deep reference to the past. So like MDMA, for example, in the past was used in couples therapy. So two couples would come in and take the medicine with the therapist. And the therapist will help them work through their issues whether it be like attachment trauma, or deep seated resentment that's been carried or anger or betrayal or just trust issues. And therapist would use this medicine to help people come together again.   Molly Maloof: (14:32) And one of the rules interestingly, for couples therapy with when Ann Shulgin was doing it and was giving it to other therapists was no sex. So it's funny because I actually think that psychedelics go great with sex. And I think that like, you have to know what you're doing, you have to know the dose, but I do think that there will be a role in the future for psychedelic assisted therapy, and there should also be a role for psychedelic aphrodisiacs.   Mason: (15:00) Speak more about that.   Molly Maloof: (15:02) Well, okay, so I'm giving a talk at delic on this is actually quite kind of interesting. I'll give you a little preview of my talk. So it turns out that psychedelic aphrodisiacs have probably been used since like the beginning of human history.   Mason: (15:17) Cool thing. The two best things.   Molly Maloof: (15:21) Right? So people are fascinating, right? So turns out that there's like a whole bunch of categories of psychedelic aphrodisiacs. And they're so interesting. So there's the Acacia DMT, harmelin combo, there's an Alaska DMT harmelin combo, there's also the combination, that combo the drug. There's also MDMA, and MDA, which is the entactogen class of synthetic love drugs. There's LSD and psilocybin, which are the tryptamines. There's actually like a salamander that in Romania, they put into a vodka, and they use it as aphrodisiacs. There's also toads that people use as aphrodisiacs. There's Morning Glory, which is an LSD derivative, there's Hawaiian woodrose, there's all sorts of cool plants and animals that have been used since primitive times that are psychedelic, and that can turn you on.   Molly Maloof: (16:25) And there's also dangerous ones things like scopolamine, which is not technically a psychedelic, but it's a deliriant. And you don't really want to take like the tour up. But people in Brazil apparently, occasionally accidentally get dosed by like prostitutes, who are trying to take advantage of them. So there's actually a pretty good Vice episode on that. But turns out that it's not exactly a psychedelic, but you can't have psychosis and hallucinations. So I was like, "Wow, these are really interesting. There's all sorts of different mushrooms and fungi that people use, there's also like, what is it called? There's a type of fungus. Actually, let me look it up. I've got my computer right here. So why don't I come out and give you a little bit more detail on this because it's kind of getting good.   Molly Maloof: (17:14) So there's like this substance, there's actually a fruit in Southeast Asia called my Marula bean. And it has all sorts of weird ingredients in it, that can make you trippy. And then interestingly, alcohol has the effect of creating beta-carboline in the body, which I didn't know. So it's actually technically slightly psychedelic, which I never knew this. And then absinthe has wormwood which has thujone in it, which is mildly psychedelic as well. So it's essentially there's different doses of different ingredients that are kind of used for different reasons, right? And so there's basically like the medicinal dose, they said, which is the lowest dose, like the sort of the micro dose of medicine. And that's kind of like people taking things just for overall improvement of their health, mental health. And then there's the sort of aphrodisiac dose, which is a little bit higher than that. So it's enough to get you to start noticing a shift in your perception, but not so much to make the trip really hard.   Molly Maloof: (18:12) And then there's the shamanic dose, which is like what's being used in a lot of clinical studies, which is like people try to get to the root of really deep trauma. And oftentimes, getting to the root of trauma is actually what a woman or man needs to do in order to actually heal their sexuality. So I got particularly interested in this space because MDMA kind of accidentally helped heal my sexual dysfunction that I had in my 20s because of some trauma that I had in college, that I didn't even realise was causing sexual dysfunction because I didn't know I had sexual dysfunction. I just knew that I wasn't aroused. I was in pain every time I had sex, and it wasn't orgasming. And then I met a guy, we were using MDMA together and all these problems went away. And I was like, "What just happened"? And I had my first orgasm with a guy. I had orgasmed on my own, but never with a man before because of unfortunately, my history of sex was not positive.   Molly Maloof: (19:07) So I basically been trying to figure this out, "Wow, it seems like there's an opportunity for healing sexual dysfunction." Because a lot of the root causes of sexual dysfunction are relationship problems and trauma. And so then I started uncovering the whole trauma, Pandora's box, and I started discovering natural numbers on sexual trauma. And it became this whole holy shit moment, like fuck the world is so fucked up when it comes to sex. Talk about like, this Me Too movements, just the tip of the iceberg. Underneath all of it is like, clearly dysfunctional sexual upbringing that most people have because of our completely outdated religious culture, right? Basically really religiosity in a lot of ways really ruins sexuality for people because it makes it into this forbidden fruit and then in that you start wanting all sorts of things that are wrong because you're like, "Oh, I can't have it. So I want all these things that I can't have."   Mason: (20:05) Forbidden fruit. And the guys our snake tells us you want the fruit.   Molly Maloof: (20:09) Oh yeah, and women want it too, by the way. I was like, when I discovered masturbation was a sin in like fifth grade. I was like, "Oh, dear god, I've been masturbating my entire life." So funny, right? And there was just this moment I had growing up being like, really feeling like I went from like a really good Christian girl to like, a very bad child because I masturbated. And that's just not okay. So then I get into the history of psychedelics. And this talk and essentially, before Christianity, psychedelics were being used by medicine women and priestesses, and medicine men, and they were given to people as a tool for enhancing their virility and their fertility and their sexual function. And it was like, part of nature, sex was something beautiful, it was something acceptable, it is something that was part of life, right? It was celebrated. And then Christianity basically turned polytheism into this monotheistic culture, and basically started burning witches, and saying that these love potions are evil, and that anything related to sex was wrong.   Molly Maloof: (21:09) And now sex is the thing that you have to have in the bounds of marriage, which the church of course has to govern. And if you do anything outside of that, or let alone, you're homosexual, you're now a deeply evil person, and you deserve to be harmed. And you really think about this history. It's kind of epically fucked how much, no offence to men, but like patriarchy, took over religion, and basically made it all about men being in charge of the religious experience. Even though women were actually very much part of like polytheistic religious culture, and sexuality was part of that culture. And so it's like all this stuff is really went downhill from there.   Molly Maloof: (21:50) And now we live in this modern time where like, the Catholic Church has unending problems with brutalising children sexually. And we have not woken up to this reality that sex is not evil. It's part of life. It's a beautiful part of life. It's a part of life that is one of those magical mystical, if not psychedelic experiences. And it shouldn't be demonised, but I do think we need to return it back into a place of wholesomeness and respect and love and really treating people the way we would want to be treated and I don't think any woman or man wants to be raped.   Molly Maloof: (22:29) I don't think any woman or man wants to be assaulted, and I don't think if any child grows up thinking that, that's normal. And I don't know what changes in culture that makes it okay for kids and adults to like mistreat each other, but I really think that like part of my mission in life is actually to create a better culture around sex and love and really this company that I started called the Adamo Bioscience is basically a company that's dedicated to studying the science of love because I think that if we understood it better, we might be able to create more of it, and through multiple pathways and products and services. And yes, I have a commercial interest, but mostly because like it seems totally a better thing to be spending my life making money off of than anything else right now, which is like why not try to create more love in the world? I think there should be like 15 to 20 companies trying to do this.   Mason: (23:22) I think there will be once you show them the way. That's the that's the beautiful thing about being someone who's charging and leading the way. Something as a couple, I was just like thank you, epic download by the way and I saw... And I think it's nice openly talking about religion this way, we can see that it's gone far away from the natural and the original intentions. And I saw you like, I can just see you reshare the meme the other day. It tickled me the most of it was just like white Jesus cuddling someone going, "I'm sorry I made you a drug addict. Let me a book before I send you to hell." It just popped me in school I was like doing things that potentially was going down the way of being like condemned and told by teachers, "Well, your stepfather is going to go to hell because he believes in evolution."   Molly Maloof: (24:16) Oh my god, I remember being in sixth grade being like, "I think evolution is real and my school thinks I'm..." But they don't believe in it. Like, holy shit, that was our lives.   Mason: (24:28) Oh man, I got a few pop moments. I was like, "Hang on. So I'm going down this route. Where I'm sinning because I'm trying to think critically here and so now I'm going to go to hell, but you created me in your image and I'm doing? You set me off. You know all, you know I'm going to end up here. And then you're going to send me to hell?" I'm like, "You asshole. You sadist." Anyway, that was my pop.   Molly Maloof: (24:54) What got me to like what really challenged my beliefs when I was 18 was talking to a guy who went to Harvard and messenger, you're in messageboard you're talking to people smarter and older than you. And I remember talking to this guy and he asked me this question. He's like, "How can God be omnipotent, omniscient and omnipresent and how can there be a hell? If he's everywhere all the time all at once? How can it be ever a separation from God because hell is a separation from God?" And I was like, brain explode like oh that's impossible logical, total it felt like this doesn't work, right? Like does that work does not compute. And my brain just exploded I went into the bathroom and cried and cried in front of the mirror. I was like, "Oh my god, it means I'm all alone." I actually still believe in God now, but like my belief in God is much different than the patriarchal God that I grew up.   Molly Maloof: (25:50) I still pray to Jesus because I'm used to it's like a pattern, but I don't think Jesus is the only God. I think there's plenty of Gods you can pray to. But realistically I think that God is like infinite intelligence and beauty underneath everything that whether, and it's totally no gender or God can't have a gender.   Mason: (26:09) I'm going to send you my podcast with George Kavassilas. It's another mind blowing one. It's talking about the God matrix and the universe, the natural, the synthetic it's like really, really clear.   Molly Maloof: (26:25) Oh, cool.   Mason: (26:25) I'll send you because it's a very good one. And you know what, you were saying things that don't work and you know what I like that does work is aphrodisiac. So this is like telling before we move on from that point it's something that really jumped out at me that I really love and I might go a little bit of a tangent because I just wrote about it this kind of topic, this nuance. Yesterday we sent out a newsletter around lion's mane and I'm like I really love Lion's Mane because it's a bridge herb and for so often people are looking at, "I want a nootropic and so they go into a narrow," which is nice sometimes. It's nice to go reductionist. And you go, "I want something that's going to increase output and give me something now and I'm going to use this nootropic in order to get something. And then they eventually fall to Lion's Mane as like a nootropic and the word sits there very medical and very [inaudible 00:27:20], which is nice as well I use it.   Mason: (27:24) But then Lion's Mane is one if you get like a complete non grown on grain, you get one grown on wood, it's got elements of wild to it, all of a sudden you look past the textbook written black and white, in the tropic and you got the same intention here and then you look up at nature and you see, "Wow, my brain is so much more than what I thought it was and the output of my brain and the way the way that it operates in conjunction with my organs in my blood and my outlook in my life, it's connected to where I'm going to be. What I do now is connected to how I'm going to be when I'm 90 years old."   Molly Maloof: (27:59) Totally.   Mason: (28:00) it's not just take something get some output, it's like this pattern you can see the brain function connecting to the constant pattern of like, like the waves in never ending. Internally there are things that are like constantly happening that I can cultivate and work with and look at and ease into that are going to have my brain on the sea of marrow is the Daoists.   Molly Maloof: (28:21) I love that. The sea of marrow.   Mason: (28:26) And the aphrodisiacs are the same like that. And it's a fun one because people go, "Oh, aphrodisiacs great, it'll get your horny." And what you're talking about it's like a carrot that leads like you go and that's what I see. Like how I see Daoist aphrodisiacs as well, like deer antler in your pants.   Molly Maloof: (28:46) Yeah.   Mason: (28:48) Horny goat weed, like epimedium. These herbs cordycep, Eucommia, schisandra. People say the word aphrodisiac, and you go, "Great, okay, cool. I'm going to engage because I want to be horny." And you think there's more substance too, behind it. And then you get onto these aphrodisiacs and you start engaging with your sexuality, and all of a sudden it's an opportunity to connect to yourself and the word aphrodisiac falls away, and you start connecting to the sexuality. And I just heard it, then you're saying we're using aphrodisiacs to go and connect to the sexual trauma so we can connect to ourselves and our partner. And I think it's beautiful. I love it.   Molly Maloof: (29:32) Well, it's actually that the sexual trauma can damage your relationship to sex. So because it actually programmes your brain. There's this thing called the Garcia effect, and it's like when you eat something that makes you sick, you don't want it anymore because your brain associates that with feeling sick. Now not all women or men who have trauma end up with having sexual dysfunction, but a large percentage of women do that. In fact, like somewhere between 60 to 80% of women who had sexual trauma have some form of sexual dysfunction. And like in America, the numbers, which I think are underreported, are like one in five women are raped, one in four women are abused as children, one and three are assaulted in her lifetime. And so there's quite a lot of women who have sexual dysfunction because of the fact that their sexual experience was not pleasant. And it was, in fact, potentially scary and dangerous.   Molly Maloof: (30:26) So now their brain says, "Oh, that experience that's not good. I don't like that. And that's scary." And so it's kind of programmed as a traumatic memory. Now, only 30% of women with sexual trauma end up with PTSD, which is interesting. So there's actually more women with sexual dysfunction, than PTSD from sexual trauma, which is fascinating. So the theory is, is that with MDMA assisted therapy, that the medicine can actually help you revisit the trauma from a place of feeling safe and feeling okay and loved with a partner, preferably with a partner, if you're with someone that you feel safe with. And you can revisit that trauma, and then it gets reprogrammed in your brain, reconsolidated as, "Oh, this is not the worst thing in the world anymore." This is not something I need to like, fear or be afraid of anymore. That was just an event that happened. And in fact I think the real magic will come from when women can experience pleasure, again, through psychedelic medicine. As I did.   Mason: (31:32) How ironic that there's an aphrodisiac involved in that process.   Molly Maloof: (31:36) Well, you think, right? You think that like, that would make sense. It's just funny. I think we're just beginning to understand space. But I don't know if people even though this, but there's actually like three phases of neurobiology of love. The first is like the intense sex drive, which is like, our body is designed to get us to fuck a lot of people when you're young. Actually, the sex drive is like oestrogen and testosterone. And then like, you're horny, and you're young, and you want to have sex, and not everybody does. A lot of young people aren't these days, but the point is, is that it's designed to get you to be turned on and attracted to a lot of people. And then when you meet someone and you have sex with them, what happens is, is that you start activating other hormones. So dopamine starts getting released, oxytocin gets released after orgasm, and that can actually increase the attachment to this person.   Molly Maloof: (32:29) So especially in women particular. So then we start moving on to romantic love, which is actually an attachment device that's designed like we really evolved it in order to basically bond ourselves to someone, become obsessed and addicted to someone, so that we're more likely to have a baby with that person. And then keep that baby alive long enough that they will not die, right? And so the romantic love starts to switch over to pair bonding. And pair bonding is actually designed to keep that baby alive and family unit strong. Because pair bonding hormones are very similar to familial bonds. Like they think it's all mostly oxytocin vasopressin. So like, you actually look at the neurobiology of all this. It's highly adaptive, and it's a huge survival advantage to have love in your life, huge survival advantage to find someone to care about them. You're more likely to reproduce, you're more likely to make a child and a family and you're more likely to have a healthy family if there's healthy bonds.   Molly Maloof: (33:26) And so I think that we should be really looking at these things from the lens of science because a lot of what's happening in society today because I think technology is seeing these bonds decay, we're seeing people give up their marriages. We're seeing people walk away from long term relationships, and we're seeing families affected and children affected. And one of the main adverse childhood experiences a kid will have is divorce. So I'm just like, "Fuck, why are we not looking at these fundamental facets of society and saying, gosh, why can't we do better?" And maybe there's a way we can do better that's ethical, and that's honourable and that's scientifically sound and that will actually leave people better off and we found them. But again, this is like very much new territory. I don't think anybody has tried to do this or thought about doing this. And I'm actually giving you a lot of information that I like is going to keep kind of quiet but whatever you like might as well announce it to like your community first.   Mason: (34:20) Yeah. I think we're worth the drop. It's interesting, it's such a return to the natural. And I've been using that a lot because I feel like I'm saying for the matrix. I'm like nailing all over the bloody place at the moment like people.   Molly Maloof: (34:36) All the time.   Mason: (34:39) And it's so confronting for people which and I agree, as a system we haven't... What you're doing is going like, "Screw it, go to the core and think, multiple generations around leading to the core. Like, let's look at the divorce rates, let's look at the unhappiness and the lack of love in relationships and how that impacts ourselves and children." And I think about it a lot. And it gives me that raw, even talking about it now, there is tingling and there's a rawness and a raw excitement, when you know you're actually in the right place. But it's very confronting, looking at just how much healing there is to be done.   Molly Maloof: (35:18) Yeah. Well, someone told me when I was like, everyone was like, "No one's going to invest in this, and no one's going to do this. And this is crazy." I know, actually, I have a lead investor. So if investors are listening, I'm about to fundraise. So you should probably email me because it's going to be really good. It's going to be a really exciting time in the next few months because I'm actually going to be-   Mason: (35:37) I think I have like, probably $400 liquid at the moment.   Molly Maloof: (35:45) I'm not going to take your last $400. But maybe we could do something with-   Mason: (35:47) But that's not the last 400. We're being responsible in other areas.   Molly Maloof: (35:50) ... Lion's Mane. Yeah. No, but it's interesting. So like, I have a lot of people from biotech say, "This is absolutely never going to happen. It's impossible. Don't even try." And then I had a lot of people who are starting biotech companies say, "Fuck, if this problem is as big as you describe it is, then I'm pretty sure we should be throwing like a billion dollars at this." And I was like, "Fuck. Yeah, dude. Totally."   Mason: (36:16) Absolutely. Is there a market for this? If the people who would poohing it are probably the ones that just can't look in the mirror and be like, "I am the market." It's like, it's in your backyard. It's everywhere. Every time you go to a family reunion, every time you go to bed.   Molly Maloof: (36:40) I shouldn't say this out loud, but family members of mine-   Mason: (36:43) Just say it in a monologue.   Molly Maloof: (36:44) Yeah. I know my family story pretty well. I like deconstructed all of our problems at this point. I've plugged my computer in. And having deconstructed a lot of these problems, and really examined the people in my family who struggle with different problems. In my extended family, in particular, like my aunt and my grandmother, and just people I know. There's a lot to be said about early relationships, and about how important families are to the long term health of children. And when things go wrong in families, it can really, really hurt people long term. And I just looked at like, my great, great grandparents and their relationship with my grandmother. And I looked at my grandmother's relationship with her daughters, and I just looked at all this, and I was like, "Wow there's so many things that we don't realise that if we just fix that one thing, right, then it would have transformed the entire rest of a person's life."   Molly Maloof: (37:59) But there's a lot of things, we don't have solutions for. A lot of things we don't have pathways for, and a big one of those is healing trauma. And I recently did about 21 hours of deep, deep neuro somatic trauma healing from a friend of mine who's like a super gifted healer. And I can't explain in scientific terms what he did with me, but I do know one thing, and that's that we do not do a good job in our society, helping people who have trauma, heal, and express it immediately right over this happened. In fact, the medical system typically, when a girl has raped, she'll basically get a rape kit, and maybe sent to a psychologist. And if she's lucky, she'll get in, in a few months. And it's like, we don't actually have pathways for healing and caring for kids who've had major... I saw this, by the way, in health care system. I saw kids who were abused by their parents. And they go to social workers, and they kind of handed around the foster care system.   Molly Maloof: (39:00) And it's really crazy how much people experienced trauma in society. And there's really not a lot of good solutions besides talk therapy. And if talk therapy worked so well, we probably not be seeing so many problems. Like if talk therapy was like a really effective solution for all of our problems, we'd probably be seeing a lot of problems solved. Now I'm not saying talk therapy doesn't work.   Mason: (39:23) It doesn't pop the champagne. I think that's where I'm with you on that. I'm at the point in my journey where I'm like talk therapy with someone who's got a Jungian background is like perfect for me because I went so hard on psychedelics. And so I'm loving just the groundedness of it. But to get it going-   Molly Maloof: (39:36) Totally. I'm not saying it doesn't work. I think talk therapy is very much like working on your consciousness, right? Your conscious brain. Everyone actually need to talk therapy in order to fundamentally create sense, sense making around their life experience. Like that's the best thing it does. Is it creates a framework of understanding of like, "This happened to me, this happened to me, this happened to me and I understand why, and I understand how I dealt with it." And I'm trying to do a better job at it, right? But I think what's really more interesting about like, what's happening in psychedelic medicine is what's on a subconscious and the unconscious level, right? Like hypnotherapy does a pretty decent job at getting into the subconscious level.   Molly Maloof: (40:27) But what's fascinating is like all this stuff that's buried in the unconscious, right? That comes out in your dreams, that comes out in your... A lot of people have nightterors. That is most definitely a bunch of unconscious process trauma, like unprocessed trauma that needs to be like addressed. And I don't think people see it that way. They're just like, "Oh, it's a nightmare disorder." It's like, "No, you probably have like a major unresolved trauma from your childhood that you really should look at." And oftentimes, I know, multiple people who've taken psychedelics, and it just comes up to them. They're like, "Oh, my God, I was raped in high school by a few guys." And it just like comes up. Or they're like, "Oh, my God, I was sexually assaulted as a child." And this stuff comes up underneath because it's lifted out of the subconscious and unconscious.   Molly Maloof: (41:21) And that's what we don't talk enough about in like modern medicine. And even like psychology, I think, is this like, "Oh, wow," like everybody has deep trauma. But if you do have deep trauma, and it's like running in the background, it's like malware, it's just draining your energy. It's draining CPUs, it's actually playing a huge role in your behaviours and your triggers and how you interact with people. And if it's not looked at or addressed, and especially if they're things like internal family systems, like there's a lot of good forms of talk therapy that can really do a good job of bringing you back to your childhood or bringing you back these moments. And I don't even think drugs are completely necessary to get to these places. Meditation is also a phenomenal tool that a lot of people don't take advantage of. And there's a bunch of different types of meditation that are fairly obscure that can do a great job at helping people get underneath the surface of their pain.   Molly Maloof: (42:11) But a lot of this stuff is isn't mainstream. And it's a shame because a lot of people are still just like, "Where do I go to deal with all this stuff?" Most of the stuff that's worked really well for me has been very obscure stuff that I have had to find through word of mouth. And it's like not highly advertised experiences and therapies and meditation schools and it's like a lot more on the realm of like woo, but it works these things have worked. And it's like strange to me that they're not more well studied and in the mainstream.   Mason: (42:46) Yeah. We've got such a wide array of people with such a wide array of histories at different stages in their processes. And there's naturally going to be different therapies and different angles that are going to pierce the veil to whatever is sitting there behind the curtain in the subconscious and I definitely, like for me it was like personal development back in the day going like you know landmark forum was like one of the things to kind of like a bang. And I could see behind it and then okay that lost its relevance at some point. And then psychedelics became very relevant, got me probably went a little bit too hard into identifying with that community and the mannerisms around taking medicine and like that feeling like I finally belonged rather than doing the work. And then getting beautiful lessons and now it's like getting to the point where talk therapy for me 10 years ago just would have been like I think just sort of lapping up against a great wall.   Mason: (43:48) Whereas now I know how to scale that concrete wall, and I know what it looks like when I do connect to the subconscious. And I understand my processing bringing it out and what my process is, thanks to the work I did with psychedelics. I know how I'm going to bring that into awareness in my everyday and that's when personal practise comes in. That's where I know to the extent of like, with my exercise regime, I know keeping me strong enough and healthy enough to be able to handle staying in that space, where I can constantly acknowledge that part of me that wants to hide behind that veil and run everything. And I know someone like Tani she's like, there was a point where psychedelics were like, incredible. She goes, "I know I need that." And then she's like, "I don't need that anymore." And my meditation practise is exactly where I need to be and that's where I'm going to get the biggest bang.   Mason: (44:39) Not that it's about a bang, but she's going to get the rubber hitting the road. So I think that's like that integration because you see a lot of people in the psychedelic world, kind of pooh poohing therapy going like modern therapies like this domesticated little dog and psychedelics are this big dog in terms of what it can do. And it's like, true in one context, and in another context, if it's just integrated, you have an array of ways of approaching as you're talking about them. Then all of a sudden, the approach becomes multicoloured and multifaceted. And hopefully, it becomes more effective.   Molly Maloof: (45:16) I really think that we just maybe just need to marry them more. Even like MDMA assisted therapy today, is largely like, hands off. It's largely don't talk to the patient, let them do, they have their own experience, and let them do whatever they need to do to heal, it's not really guided at all. It's mostly kind of like, it's guided, but it's not really like lead. It's like, you're there. You're like going through this process, and you're having these experiences, but they're not actually trying to get you to go anywhere on your trip, they're trying to let you have your experience. Whereas like, I think that, in particular, it may be possible that like, we can give people medicine that gives them have the... I think that the idea is that you have the preparation. And then you have the creating the right set and setting. And then you take the medicine, and then you have this like deep integration experience. And that's typically what the experiences for psychedelic assisted therapy today. The question is, will the FDA let us give people drugs that turn them on unsupervised?   Molly Maloof: (46:26) Because you kind of need to be a little bit... You don't really want anyone watching you while you are with your partner. So I got a lot of questions, I need to figure out to make this thing, an actual proper model. But I think that it'll be really interesting to see how this thing evolves because I'm at the very beginning of this journey. I have an idea of what I think that this business model could look like. I have no idea what I think this therapy could be. But a lot of it is I'm like figuring it out, right? I'm like in this total creative mode of what will the future of medicine look like, if you could create it from scratch? And I've already done this once, and it turned out really great for me. And I could easily have just gone and scaled personalised medicine clinics for wealthy people. But now I'm like, "Let's see if we can create a democratised version of this medicine that actually is like it's going to start out expensive, but let's figure out how we can make this something that's eventually affordable for people." That's the goal.   Mason: (47:28) I think the other thing, that's why it feels like a safe bets. And interesting way to put it, but it makes sense, and has substance is because I think a lot of people approach this, and what we've always been taught how to do, lecture people on how they should be, and I'm going to create a product based on how I think you should act. Whereas what you're talking about, is going there's, let's say we're looking at, like morality around let's stay in our marriage, so that we don't destroy this family unit. There's a way that, that's been happened, we've been told what to do by the media. And therefore the part of us goes, if someone goes you have to stay on your marriage because it's the morally right thing to do. You're bad if you do that, there's no attraction there because it's an external like judgement , and we want to revolt against being told what to do, especially by society.   Mason: (48:31) It's why we get your rage against the machine, etc. And then, if you just understand the patterns that emerge when people do connect back to themselves, and do deal with their trauma within a relationship, what's natural for people and seems to be the pattern is people do naturally resonate with maintaining the relationship that they've chosen or maybe in some instance. Like a very conscientious uncoupling in a way that you're very connected and aware to the way that children are going to be affected by it and minimising that impact. Either way, there's an emergence of morality an emergence of ethics, rather than being told what to do.   Molly Maloof: (49:19) Yeah. There's emergence of just like, knowing what's right and wrong. Like, "Oh, yeah. We're not meant to be together. But we're also not meant to destroy each other's lives as we get divorced." I think if we were to be able to help people stay together, that would be ideal. But if we're also able to help people consciously uncouple in a way that doesn't destroy their lives. And I've heard this from multiple people, like one of my friends did MDMA with his ex wife when they were getting divorced and it completely transformed the divorce process because they were actually able to love each other through the process, and they're now really good friends. They're like super good friends. They just didn't want to be married. And it's like, that's appropriate, right? Like, it's also appropriate not to hate people for years. Just the number of people I know that have deep seated resentment for their exes. And it's like, that's not healthy for your nervous system, that's not healthy for your long term health. That's not going to keep you well.   Mason: (50:20) So we've both dived into exploring what health is, especially in the context of, and in this what we're talking about in this context of like synthetic morality, versus what emerges as right. I've just started in the last few months really feeling icky about the way I've used the word health and the way it's been used because it's natural, if you talk about healthy, then naturally, there's an opposition of unhealthy there. And so much of what's implied is basing yourself on, "I'm healthy because I'm not that." And so there's this intrinsic opposition, that... An opposition and kicking back against something in order to form identity around health. And we need the word because healthy, it's just a fun word that everyone knows. But kind of similar and synonymous with what we're talking about, and the emergence of morality and the emergence of ethics coming just through whether it's psychedelic therapy or whatever, how are you relating to health now?   Mason: (51:28) Because I definitely am finding, the more I move away from being wrapped in and around that world of being healthy versus unhealthy, and the more I kind of sit in that middle and see. What's emerging through the patterns of myself doing, I don't know, finding harmony for myself, delving into my shit, coming out the other side. Doing things that are maybe I've seen is unhealthy in one way, in one ideological circle. So I want to talk about dropping that coming back to what emerges within me. It makes the space, I don't know, I feel very roared and identified in terms of, even though we're leaders in the health space, I feel very, unidentified with anything that revolves around that word healthy. I'm curious as to where you're at, in your relationship to what is healthy.   Molly Maloof: (52:25) I used to think it was what the WHO said, which was like the complete absence of disease or infirmary. And then I was like, "No, it's not realistic." Health is actually a dynamic function of life. And to me, I have a very unique perspective on how I think, and it all stemmed from this other definition, that was the ability to adapt and self managed in the face of adversity. But I started digging under the surface, and I really started understanding things like biology, and fundamental human anatomy, and microbiology and physiology and molecular and cellular biology. And I was really thinking about it from like a mechanistic perspective as well. And I think that if you actually just look at any system, you can ask how healthy a system is based on its capacity. And whether it's able to perform its functions properly, basically, whether it's able to maintain its integrity of its structure. And that's usually a function of how much energy and how much work capacity is available.   Molly Maloof: (53:31) So, for example, the healthcare system, deeply unhealthy in America. Demands outspent capacity and it just completely started crumbling, right? Like just did not work, was not resilient, was not flexible, it was actually really struggling and breaking a lot and a lot of people have been broken through the experience of going to the healthcare system. So capacity and demands, if there's more capacity than demands, you're usually in a really good healthy state because you have enough energy to maintain the structure to do work. Now, when your demands are really high, and your capacity is really low, shit starts to break down. And so this is like the mitochondrial theory of ageing, which is fundamentally that when we lose about 50% of our functional capacity of organs, they start to malfunction, they actually start producing the ability to do the work functions that they had. And then we start to break down.   Molly Maloof: (54:27) And largely this is driven by metabolic dysfunction and stress. And like lack of exercise is really a big huge driver of disease because it's the number one signal for making more energy. So basically, I look at how we... If you actually think about like the biology of like metabolism, when we breathe air, we drink water, we eat food, it goes into our cells, it gets turned into substrates, those get put into the mitochondria, which are like little engines that could of our cells, and they have this called the electron transport chain which pulls off electrons kind of like power line. Like electrons are running through this electron transport chain. And they're powering this hydrogen turbine that creates an electrochemical gradient. And that gradient creates a battery and a capacitor. So a battery is like a differential charge between two, it's like a charge polarity. And then the capacitor is like a differential charge between two late membranes.   Molly Maloof: (55:22) And then so capacitors can deploy energy quickly. Batteries store energy as potential energy. So when you really look at it, like most people have broken their metabolisms in modern society, there's so many people with diabetes, so many people with heart disease, somebody with cancer, so many people with dementia. And those are really symptoms of broken metabolism, broken mitochondrial function. And it's funny because like, we look at all these things as separate diseases, but actually, they have the same root causes and like half of cancers are made up of metabolic in nature. So everyone's been kind of obsessed with this like, DNA and genetics theory of ageing. I'm just so unconvinced because it's kind of like, okay, that's like the architectural plans of the body. But in order to actually express those plans, you need energy. You actually need to make energy to take the plants and turn into a structure, which is proteins, right?   Molly Maloof: (56:15) So my perspective is that, like life is this interplay between energy matter and information. And essentially, like life itself, is negative entropy. So we're just constantly trying to fight against entropy, and the best way we know how to do that is like, maintain our functional capacity and be able to repair ourselves. And so this lack of being able to repair ourselves is often a function of the fact that a lot of people are just like, the biggest complaint in medicine is, "I'm tired," right? Being tired all the time is actually a reflection of energetic inefficient, insufficient energy production.   Mason: (56:56) Is that in particular with like the battery storage as you work-   Molly Maloof: (56:59) Yeah, exactly.   Mason: (57:00) Which is funnily used when you talk about, like his Yin and Yang.   Molly Maloof: (57:05) Yes. There you go. Right? We need time off to store energy. The most interesting thing about the Yin and Yang, is that there's this clear relationship between this toggling of switching between different states in biology to flourish. So you actually have to go from intense work to relaxation or rest. You have to go for ideally if you actually just look at all the best [inaudible 00:57:30] stressors, it's like, hyperoxia hypoxia breathwork. What is that? It's breathwork. Right? If you look at cold and heat, that's sauna and coal plant right? What are these things work so damn well, for making us feel healthy and feel good? Well, they're literally boosting mitochondrial biogenesis. And in some cases, like eating fasting is my toffee G, right? It's throwing-   Mason: (57:53) Being awake, being asleep.   Molly Maloof: (57:56) Being outside being indoors, like we actually need to spend way more time outdoors than we're doing. And like being in buildings and having your feet grounded into the earth, like being alone being with people, like life is this constant interplay, right? Yeah, there you go.   Mason: (58:14) That was earthing that I just mumbled.   Molly Maloof: (58:16) Yeah. So like today I've been experimenting with like different ways of movement throughout my day because I'm kind of sick of being in front of the computer constantly. And it makes me feel really unhappy. And there's this great meme you posted, feel dead inside, go outside. Fucking love that meme. And it's like, everybody loved that meme. I got it posted so many times. And it was like, actually, I spent two hours today on phone calls outside. And like, people get annoyed when you're not on a Zoom call. But I'm like, "Look, if I can walk, I will walk." And I got two separate workouts and that were like about 10 minutes each in the gym that were like broken up throughout the day. And it's like, holy shit, did I feel better today than I did for like many other previous days where I was just in front of a computer the whole time? Like, we're not meant to be in front of screens all day long. It's not healthy.   Molly Maloof: (59:06) It's not a healthy period. So the more that we can try to align our lives as much as possible with something with how we're actually like primitively programmed because our genes have not evolved since primitive times. We're the same genetically, there's been a few changes, but fundamentally, we're basically the same people as we were in hunting and gathering times. So it's no question that we've lost a lot of our health in the process of becoming more modern because we basically hijacked all of these different pathways that are actually ancient pathways of survival that are now being used to take advantage of people. Like the salt, sugar and fat in foods, the convenience of cars, right? Like humans are designed to conserve energy and to find food.   Molly Maloof: (59:53) So the society is now designed to like make everything ultra convenient, and eat too much. And it's like, okay. We don't move our bodies enough, we drive everywhere, we know what that's done to society. And so it's kind of like the real process of becoming a truly modern human is to actually try to like life according to your genetics, while also existing in a modern culture. It's a huge challenge.   Mason: (01:00:19) Can be a great thing. This is like the Daoist and the Yogi's would need to go outside of society to go and live in a cave so their life could revolve a

Locked On Saints - Daily Podcast On The New Orleans Saints
New Orleans Saints' Marshon Lattimore Early Defensive Player Of The Year Bid | Offense Evolving

Locked On Saints - Daily Podcast On The New Orleans Saints

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 30:09


The New Orleans Saints defense has been outstanding so far this season, led by the remarkable performance of cornerback Marshon Lattimore. Not only was his performance in Sunday's win against the Washington Football Team impressive, but it's a continuation of the remarkable production he's displayed in season action so far. With a league-leading 10 pass break ups, 11 forced incompletions, and a whopping 39% forced incompletion percentage, is Marshon Lattimore putting up a defensive Player of the Year bid early this season? How the New Orleans Saints have been evolving their offensive attack so far this season and how personnel usage, pass, and run percentages tell us what we need to know and how the return of players like Michael Thomas, Tre'Quan Smith, and even Nick Vannett in. The Saints are first and ted first in two major categories on the offensive and defensive side that immediately complement one another and have immediately led to their three wins. While their offensive efficiency currently remains along the middle of the league, there are some good signs for a continued climb as the team gets healthier while Marcus Williams, Demario Davis, and rest of the Saints defense continue to surpass expectations. Follow Ross on Twitter @RossJacksonNOLA Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Radio Boston
Our evolving recognition of Indigenous history as a country, and a region

Radio Boston

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 10:51


We speak with Paula Peters, or Sonk Waban, a member of the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe and an independent scholar of Wampanoag history.

Illusion Pod
I Am Constantly Shapeshifting, Adapting, and Evolving (and Other Phrases) Explained - SIGHSWOON

Illusion Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 61:29


I explain how the term “I am constantly shapeshifting, adapting, and evolving” became a mantra and truth for me - derived from a real life constant struggle between defining myself within the romantic gaze, the feminist mission, social expectation, narrative, and more. Each word in the phrase was chosen and placed in that order with specific reasoning. I also share the stories behind: “the cyborg in me recognizes the cyborg in you” for making peace with the internet, as well as the infinity mirror, sigh swoon, certain angel numbers, not a bot, and more.  This is a podcast from Gabi's Patreon, originally posted on September 8, 2021. For more weekly episodes or writing from Gabi, or to find these phrases on merch:Gabi's Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/sighswoonGabi's Merch: https://www.sunshineshop.la/product/sighswoon

Soulfulvalley Podcast
Making the Unconscious Conscious with Evolving on Purpose Co-Author Emma Johnson

Soulfulvalley Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 16:07


Emma Johnson is the Founder and CEO of Inner Smile and Empowered Prosperity. She helps Introvert / HSP Entrepreneurs stop the Shame and Sabotage cycles of Procrastination, Playing Small and Proving their worth by overworking, over giving and under earning. An Advanced Master Trainer in Emotional Freedom Technique, Emma also certifies other Trailblazer Practitioners to help spread the healing ripple further. With a BA Hons in French and German, Emma has lived internationally for years and is now settled in North Lincolnshire with her beloved dog Boss. An avid fan of anything to do with Holistic Wellness, Emma has been studying and researching for over 30 years to bring all of her knowledge and intuition to her sessions with clients. Her purpose is to change the way we experience ourselves in this lifetime, through changing the way we deal with stress, money and our right to be here. Insta/Facebook @innersmilecoach LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/emmajohnsoninnersmile/ http://www.empoweredprosperity.com            

Six Weeks To Fitness
How To Live A Healthy Lifestyle In The Entertainment Industry, Actor Stephen Sorrentino, Ep. 177Stephen Sorrentino

Six Weeks To Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 28:33


Vince Ferguson: Welcome to Six Weeks To Fitness, episode 177. I'm your host Vince Ferguson and joining me today on my Six Weeks To Fitness program is actor, comedian, composer, singer, impressionist, voiceover artist, Stephen Sorrentino. He has appeared on the Las Vegas strip, and has toured well over 25 countries and 43 states. Stephen's long resume has included television, film, and Broadway shows. He has worked with numerous celebrities, such as Patti LaBelle, Dennis Miller, Dana Carvey, and the legendary Debbie Reynolds. And here today to discuss the keys to longevity in the entertainment business and his career is Stephen Sorrentino. Stephen, how are you, bro? Stephen Sorrentino: I'm doing well, Vince. How are you? Vince Ferguson: You look great, man. I'm doing well. Thank you for coming on the show. Stephen Sorrentino: Well, thank you, brother. Vince Ferguson: Yeah, baby. And look at that. Yeah, exactly. Exactly. Vince Ferguson: Now, here at Six Weeks To Fitness, I usually interview fitness and nutrition experts, athletes, some doctors and celebrities, and we talk about the importance of living a healthy lifestyle. That has got to be very important to you. Stephen Sorrentino: It absolutely is. I mean, if you want to... Your brain wants to do a lot of stuff, creativity-wise. So you want to do it as long as possible. And if you don't take care of yourself, you get a short run. I don't want to burn bright and short. I want to burn bright for a very long time. Vince Ferguson: Oh, very well said. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: Now, I interviewed Denise Boutte, Jasper Cole, Kim Coles, and they all talk about the importance of health, because they've been in the business a long time like you. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: So how long have you been in the entertainment business? Stephen Sorrentino: I started when I was five years old, when I was a little boy. But I've been making a living at it, like full-time for 46 years now. So I'm lucky. Vince Ferguson: That's a blessing. That's huge. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: But now, you've also celebrated a birthday this week. Stephen Sorrentino: All right, let's not get crazy now. Vince Ferguson: Did my research, baby. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah, I turned 61. Yeah. Vince Ferguson: What?! What?! That's beautiful. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: But isn't that wonderful? When you don't have to feel that way, but you feel great. You look great. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: Because age, they tell me, is just a number. Stephen Sorrentino: It's just a number. And especially if you're creative and you want to keep well, you have to always think young. My brain always thinks nine years old, so I could be free, and create, and be funny, and be interesting, at least on stage. So if you think old, you're done, man. So you have to continue to just stay vibrant, eat the right foods, exercise as much as you can, and stay engaged with people. You know? Don't just know what you know, learn every day. That's the most important thing. Vince Ferguson: Learn every day. There's something to learn every day. Stephen Sorrentino: I hope so. And you know what? The people that stop learning, I usually find that they kind of just go down the pike and you don't see them anymore. And the older I get, I don't know if you're the same way, the more I don't know. Because I used to know everything when I was 18, and now at 61, I don't know nothing. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Exactly. The more you know, the more you don't know. Stephen Sorrentino: Uh-huh (affirmative). Vince Ferguson: It's amazing. But now where did it all begin for you, Stephen? Where did you grow up, and what was your childhood like? Stephen Sorrentino: I had a weird childhood, because I was in a third generation show biz family. My grandfather was kind of like a Ricky Ricardo type. He had his own club, and then he would perform after dinner with my mother and my father playing saxophone, my mother was a singer. So I kind of grew up in a box backstage type of a thing. It was a good family life in Long Island, New York. And the weekends, my parents were performing all the time. Sometimes, they'd take me. And then by the time I was like five or six years old, my grandfather would give me the big finger, which meant I needed to come up, and I'd sit on his knee and I'd sing a song with him. Which was frightening for me, but who knew I would make a living at it? Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: And then at 15, the bug hit me, man. You know? I had the PA system set up, and I played guitar, sax, flute, piano, and I just wanted a band. And you know? I got a record deal by the time I was 26, and I was hitting it and I love it. Every day, every part of it, I love it. So that's me. And then I toured around the world. I got to meet all these beautiful people, eat all these great foods, learn about nutrition…. learn about exercise from Chinese people, meditation. You know? It's a beautiful life if you go out there and you look for it, you know? Vince Ferguson: Yes. The more I speak to people like yourself who've been in the business a long time, they talk about meditation. You know? Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: And believing yourself, and that's so important. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. You have to listen to yourself. You have to listen to your heart, and what your body's telling you, listen to what your creativity is telling you. That's the only way to channel yourself. You know? So mind and body and spirit is all we have, and we put it all together when we make a living at it, and we touch other people. Stephen Sorrentino: And we educate them sometimes, and they say, "Gee, you're 61, and you're running around like you're 20." I'm like, "I know." Because I keep at it. You know? I'm a vegetarian. Vince Ferguson: Yeah, there you go, nutrition. Stephen Sorrentino: I don't drink booze anymore. I did for a long time. I don't touch any drugs or anything like that. So I'm a natural guy, you know? Vince Ferguson: Wow, that's amazing. Vince Ferguson: Now, you wear so many hats, you know? And again, you're vibrant, you're a comedian, you're a singer-composer, actor, everything. But if you could only choose one hat to wear, what would it be? Stephen Sorrentino: You're going to give me that question? Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: I think the spice of life is all the different things.  I don't think I have been asked that question before. Vince Ferguson: Good! Stephen Sorrentino: I was going to say, I'm going to say actor. Vince Ferguson: Really? Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah, because I think you get to be in as many people as you want to be, and you get to channel all the other personalities that are in you and then bring them out. It's almost like Halloween every day. So you get to wear any mask you want. You pull it out, you play the character, and you put it away. Stephen Sorrentino: But I'm like that with all my stuff, with my comedy, with my composition. Even when I put it to show, the way I design lights and stuff, I just I'll take different ideas, the way I do with nutrition and the way I eat, take everybody else's ideas, and bring them, and make my own. You know? Vince Ferguson: Yes, yes. Stephen Sorrentino: Is that a long answer or what? Vince Ferguson: No, but it makes a lot of sense. It makes a lot of sense. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: Now, to be the person you are today, obviously you had to go through, you learned a lot, you met a lot of people. Who were the most impactful in your life? Who made you who you are today, Stephen? Stephen Sorrentino: Oh, gee, you know what? I'm going to bring it all the way down to my sixth grade teacher. I know it sounds unexceptional. I could say Debbie Reynolds or something like that, or Patti LaBelle. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: But there was a person when I was in sixth grade that was a hippie back in the day. He had long hair and a beard, and that was very unlike the school district. And this guy just said, the first day, he goes, "You guys want to do a class, or you want to go outside because it's beautiful and just talk?" And he cared, and he listened to us. And from that moment, it was like a class of... It was like a camp. It almost like a hippie thing. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: It felt so good that somebody cared, and we all got to know each other. It wasn't a lesson. It was a lesson in life. It wasn't a book lesson. And I'll never forget him, so he touched my life. Stephen Sorrentino: And I'm going to say Patti. Not to be stupid, but Debbie Reynolds also. I learned so much from being positive about everything. Even when negative stuff was happening, say it in a positive way. "I don't want to do that." You know? With a smile. So you know? So I think being positive, and gleaning something from the people that you meet, especially on stage. Like George Carlin, hanging out with George Carlin and talking to him. Vince Ferguson: George Carlin? Stephen Sorrentino: Jerry Lewis. I mean, these are people that affected me as a kid, and then seeing what they're like in real life. So another person, Leslie Jordan. I don't know if you know the actor, he was on Will and Grace, he's little gay dude. Vince Ferguson: Oh. Stephen Sorrentino: I read his book, and I stopped drinking. Because I read his book, and it touched me somehow. And I called him, we had a mutual friend. I said, "How's that non-drinking thing?" Because I used to like my wine and it was affecting me at one point. And I said, "How's the non-drinking thing happen?" He goes, "Well, I won an Emmy." I said, "Well, I want an Emmy." He goes, "Then quit." And he made it so simple. And I went, "Yeah." And so I called him every day for 30 days just to say how I was doing, and I never had another drink. That was like 13 years ago. I never touched the booze again. Vince Ferguson: Really? Stephen Sorrentino: So that those are the people that touch you. Vince Ferguson: Yes. Stephen Sorrentino: And you never forget them. Vince Ferguson: Most definitely. Oh, that's amazing. And you mentioned Patti LaBelle. What was that experience like? Stephen Sorrentino: Oh, my God. I mean, that's the queen. I got called because she was having some problems. As a comedian, she was having some vocal problems. So they said, "Would you come in and do an audition for Patti LaBelle" I'm like, "For who?" And they said, "Patti LaBelle. And I'm like, "Wait, I'm going to sing in front of Patti LaBelle?" You know? Stephen Sorrentino: So I went there. And I got the job, because my comedy is a lot of singing impressions. I do like Sammy Davis and all that stuff, so I sing a lot. Vince Ferguson: Nice! Stephen Sorrentino: And so I'm looking. She walks in, and there's Miss Patti with the entourage. And I'm like, "Oh, my..." And I started getting weird. You know? Because it's Patti LaBelle. And I'm looking at the microphone and I said, "Okay, I can't do this. Because that's Patti LaBelle, I'm going to flip out. I'm going to pass out. I'm going to throw up. Whatever's going to happen." And then I just went through this little process that we all do when we try to take care of ourself. I said, I looked at the stage, and I looked at Patti, Miss Patti. And I took the microphone. I know a microphone. There's a stage. There's a monitor. That's an audience. I'm familiar with all of that. I'm just going to do it. And I went out and I killed. Stephen Sorrentino: And on the way out, I introduced her. She grabbed my shoulder with her beautiful nails, and she goes, "You're with me forever." Vince Ferguson: Really? Stephen Sorrentino: And she said that. Yeah. And that, just got the chills talking about it because I just believed in myself at that moment. I put all the crap aside, and all the negativity that what could happen, and just said, "Yeah, I'm doing this." And I did 69 dates over the years with Miss Patti, so it was just wonderful. Vince Ferguson: How many dates? 69? Stephen Sorrentino: 69 dates, I think. Yeah, probably all together in Las Vegas for many, many times, and then a couple of road dates. I was there for her 60th birthday. Yeah. Yeah, I've been around, man. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. No, yeah, you've been around. But also, you really mixed it up with these people, too, which is great, you know? Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Yes. Yeah. Vince Ferguson: And I'm sure they speak highly of you, as well, so that's amazing. Stephen Sorrentino: You know what? If you're smart, you get a lot from people. You don't just try to tell them who you are, but you listen. That's the biggest thing I ever could tell young people, because I mentor young people in the arts and I teach in China, as well. I mean, I'm a little nuts with that. I just tell them to listen. Because if you listen, you're going to hear everybody's story. You put it into your own little mix master, you make it, and then it becomes your story. You know? But listen, if we listen, we hear a lot. You know? Vince Ferguson: I think the problem to a lot of us today is that we don't listen. Right? We want to talk about what we know, who we are instead of listening- Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: ... to what someone else knows- Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: ... that might help us to become better than what we are today. Stephen Sorrentino: You know what? I don't know you very long, but I bet you I got months of stuff to learn from you. You know what I mean? And people don't take the time to listen. Especially when it comes to age, too. People, "Oh, he's old." When people, some young people say, "What song is that? Oh, I wasn't even born when that was written." Well, the world didn't start when you were born. I don't know if you got the memo. Vince Ferguson: Thank you. Thank you. It's so true, man. Vince Ferguson: I want to talk to you briefly about a movie. I just saw this movie, and you're in it, and it's called A Tale of Redemption and Regret. It was hilarious, but tell my viewers about it. Stephen Sorrentino: Well, it's you know? I got this script. I was in Las Vegas, and then COVID happened, so I moved back. I have a farm in the east coast of Virginia, and I just went to the farm just to be safe, and there's not going to be any work. And this young guy sent me script and said, "Look, I saw you perform a long time ago. I want you to do this character." So I'm like, "All right." Stephen Sorrentino: I read the script, and I loved it. It was a mafia guy that was down on his luck. It was like he wasn't going to win it at the end. He's actually kind of a loser. And I had a lot of empathy for him, because he's past his prime. Yeah, the '80s are over, and he's still trying to do the same thing, which is the mistake we all make. You have to roll, and change and evolve. Well, he can't, and I loved it. Stephen Sorrentino: So I called him up and I said, "If I give this guy a real personality ... I'll play the thing." And he did. So I produced the movie, I starred in it, and I also wrote the music for it. And it's just a really great romp of this... It's comedy, but it's dark comedy. Because he's kind of a murderer, but he's funny. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Yeah. You mix it all. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. You can see it on YouTube. It's also just won today... Or last night, I should say we won the London Short Film festival, the London Film Festival, and we won three other ones last week. So this movie is touching on something. I think all of us, as we get older, want to stay relevant. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: And some of us that can't, we fall through the cracks ... and this is touching on it. It's called A Tale of Redemption and Regret with Sunny the Heat. Vince Ferguson: Sunny the Heat? Stephen Sorrentino: It's a fun movie. Vince Ferguson: It really is. Stephen Sorrentino: I'm Sunny the Heat. Vince Ferguson: Yes. It really, it really, truly is, man. Stephen Sorrentino: Thanks. Vince Ferguson: And you say co-produced it. Now, also in the theme was about, as you said, getting older. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: And does Stephen Sorrentino worry about getting older? Stephen Sorrentino: Of course. You know? You want to stay relevant. And like last night, I'm on stage, and I'm playing the piano, and the recorder's rocking. You know? We're doing shows here in Las Vegas. And I said to myself, "Do I want to stand on the piano bench and jump off?" Well, at 30, that was easy. But at 61, I'll blow a hip. You know? Vince Ferguson: Yeah Stephen Sorrentino: I did it, because I did my running yesterday and I feel good. But what happens if? So you stuck getting that self-doubt thing, and you try to talk yourself out of it if you stay in shape. Vince Ferguson: Wow, exactly. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: Exactly. That's why being healthy is so important, right? So- Stephen Sorrentino: It's all you got, man. Vince Ferguson: I know. But do you think acting today is more of a young man's game, or does it make a difference? Stephen Sorrentino: No, I think acting, I think it... Well, the thing is, here's the way I look at it. At 22, there's 9,000 other guys that want the job and that could do it, because they're good looking and they want it badly. At 45 there's 500 guys because they want it pretty much. But at 60, there's only four guys. I'm going to get the part. You know? Vince Ferguson: Great way of looking at it. Less competition, you're saying, huh? Stephen Sorrentino: That's right. Yeah. Well, the thing is I'm a character actor, so I'm not going to be the leading man anymore. That ship sailed in the '70s, so... Or the '80s. So for me, I love to play older. I mean, to get into an old character, to play someone maybe from Ireland, then you really can get yourself all crazy. You know? It's great. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: You know? As long as I can pop out of it and run around the room a little bit, you know? Vince Ferguson: Yeah, yeah. Exactly, exactly. Very, very funny, man. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: But now, what advice would you give a young actor? Because you said you mentor actors, right? Young actors. Stephen Sorrentino: I do, yeah. Vince Ferguson: What advice do you give them if they want to get into the business? Stephen Sorrentino: Well, this movie is playing at all the film festivals worldwide, so I'm getting a multitude of people reaching out to me saying, "Help me." So I can't help everybody. But the first thing I said is, "Do you want to be an actor, or do you want to famous?" And if the answer is, "I want to be a star, I want to be famous," then I can't help you. But if you want to learn the craft and get famous because you're awesome, I can help you with that. You know what I mean? Stephen Sorrentino: So learn the craft. Don't just want to be... Anybody can be famous taking a picture of their hinny on Instagram and putting it out, and everybody looks at it. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: But to have a career like me for 46 years of getting paid, having homes around America, touring the world, that's really seeing the world on other people's dime because of the business, that's a real gift, man. So you have to put your work in. You know? As a musician, as an artist, as a comedian, as whatever it is that you do, put it all in. And this may sound weird to you. I don't have it B plan, I never did. I don't have a backup plan. Because if I have a backup plan, then I'm telling the universe or whatever I believe in that it may not work out. So my thing has always been A plan, and it always worked out. Vince Ferguson: And do you recommend that for most people? Stephen Sorrentino: I do. I have to. when you say I have a B, I'm going to have something to fall back on, you already fell back. Because you just said that you don't believe that it's going to work out for you. So I don't have a plumber thing, or a... You know? I did jobs when I was a kid. But I'm going to be an actor, comedian, composer until the minute I die. Vince Ferguson: Wow. Stephen Sorrentino: And that's the way it's going to be. Because I said so. You know what I mean? It sounds arrogant, but it's like the world, the universe is a restaurant. You got to tell the waiter what you want. Tell them exactly what you want. But you also have, you have the patience to wait for it and do the work. You know? Tell them what you want, like working on your body, working on your nutrition, be prepared, and then it will come to you. It's guaranteed. But if you say, "Eh, it's not coming. I'm going somewhere else," then you're not there for the food. And they show up with the hamburger for you, and you're not there to eat it. So stick with it, know your stuff, take care of yourself, and it'll come to you. That's what I tell my young people. Vince Ferguson: That sounds great, man. That's great advice. But now, what are the keys, in your opinion, to longevity in the entertainment business. I say entertainment business, because you're more than just an actor. Okay? Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: So what's the keys to longevity? Stephen Sorrentino: Evolve. Learn that- Vince Ferguson: Evolve. Stephen Sorrentino: You know? Your body, when you're 21, you could do certain weights. You could do certain fitness. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: But when you're 55, you're not going to do the same exercises. It's the same with the arts. You have to evolve. At 21, I looked young and handsome ... I had tight jeans on, long hair. You can't play that guy when you're 40. So you have to change, and evolve, and roll with the punches, and roll with what life brings you. I embrace the fact that I'm not 21. I'm glad, because now I'm playing this guy, the older mafia died. I'll be doing a play this summer in New York City. I forget the name of it right now because it's early here. It Could Be Worse, it's called. And I'm playing an Italian guy, and his daughter comes, and she's got a girlfriend and this whole... But it's two hours of non-stop, like manic energy. And I'll be able to do it because that guy, I took care of myself. So maybe he didn't take care of himself for the story. But for me to play him, I have to have taken care of myself. No drinking, no meat for me, no booze. You know? No anything. Just rest, exercise. Vince Ferguson: So those are the keys. Evolving, not drinking, not abusing your body, proper nutrition. Okay. When did you become a vegetarian? Stephen Sorrentino: Oh, my God, about 10 years ago. I'm an animal rights activist, and I didn't like meat as it was, the concept of it. And when I stopped eating red meat and pork, I felt better. And then I just said, "You know what? One day a week, I'm going to eat no meat at all." And eventually, it just went away. I just felt better and better. So I take protein shakes sometimes, and I have a lot of nuts. And I know that nutrition-wise, a lot of fruits. Yeah, you know? I try to eat right, man. Vince Ferguson: Yeah, man. Stephen Sorrentino: You're the vehicle? You know? You have to... Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: We want our car to go somewhere. So our brain is the map, and our body is the car, and if you don't put new tires on and take care of the oil and gas, it won't go anywhere. Vince Ferguson: It just doesn't work right. Exactly. Exactly. Stephen Sorrentino: You know? Vince Ferguson: That's good wisdom. What about exercise now? What exercises do you do on a regular basis that keep you going? Stephen Sorrentino: Well, jumping around on stage every night helps because you're sweating it out all the time. Vince Ferguson: Sure. Stephen Sorrentino: But I run three miles a day, three to six miles a day. A slow run, because I'm older, so my hips are not what it used to be. I do pushups every day, and if I can get to the gym twice a week and just do a whole, like a universal circuit, I'm good. Vince Ferguson: Nice. Stephen Sorrentino: I sweat it out. Got to sweat every day. Vince Ferguson: Nice. That's good to hear that. Stephen Sorrentino: Definitely Vince Ferguson: And also, good advice for other people to know that you have to move your body, right? Stephen Sorrentino: Have to. Yeah, as you get older, too- Vince Ferguson: Yes. Stephen Sorrentino: ... if you stop using it, you will lose it. Vince Ferguson: Exactly. I agree. Vince Ferguson: I don't lift as much now. I just want to be healthy. To me, it's about being fit. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah, but you look... Exactly. And you look good, so hello. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: That's the game. Vince Ferguson: And you want to be around long time, right? Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. I want to play an 80-year old in a play someday, and I'll be 80. That's cool. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. But you won't look 80. Stephen Sorrentino: No, I will look 70. Vince Ferguson: It's all good, it's all good. Vince Ferguson: I read a personal quote of yours, and it said- Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: It said, "I'm not afraid of dying. I'm afraid of living with no purpose." That was awesome. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: Explain that to my listeners and viewers. Stephen Sorrentino: You know? I said that as a mentor thing to a Chinese medical student, that he posted that somewhere. It became like this thing. I'm not afraid of dying. I mean, for me, living is the whole thing. Dying, I don't believe anything negative about it ... I think it's a positive thing. You just move into the next thing. I just don't want to be on this planet and not touch another person, not change another person's life, or leave a legacy. Even if it's just a song, or a performance that somebody said, "Gee, you really touched my heart." Or a song that somebody used for their wedding because it meant something. So we have a short time here relatively in this world, and I think our job is not to make money, and to buy stuff, and boast. But it's to touch as many people positively as possible and change their lives. That's it. I don't want to live without purpose. That's my purpose. Vince Ferguson: That is so well put, you know? Stephen Sorrentino: I didn't mean to be so profound. But it came out good, and when he posted it everywhere, I'm like, "Oh." Vince Ferguson: Yeah, man, it's like, "This guy's got a lot of wisdom to share. You know? He's really deep." Stephen Sorrentino: I'm the Dalai Lama. Vince Ferguson: Right. Exactly, exactly. Which is cool. Because someone needs to hear that, man. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah, that's cool. That's my life. I mean, when people reach out to me, I do the best I can. There a lot of people that... I was in a film festival in India recently, and all these Indian actors, young dude actors wanted to talk to me, and I'm getting like 13, 14 requests every day, "Hey, can I speak to you?" And I do the best I can. But at one point, I'm like, "I can't." You know? "Take a number," so to speak. So I want to give positive energy to anybody I can. You know? Someday, on a world platform, if I can. You know? Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: But we'll see. Vince Ferguson: That's awesome. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah, man. I mean, isn't that our job? Vince Ferguson: I think so. To give back and to help those who are around us. I believe that. Stephen Sorrentino: Isn't that what you're doing? Yeah, but look what you're doing. You are. Vince Ferguson: I believe, yes. And it feels good to do it, to share information. You bring on people like yourself who can also share uplifting and positive information, man. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: You know? It's a beautiful thing. Vince Ferguson: But now, I also know that you are in a film that's coming out the end of the year. It was directed by Victoria Rowell? Stephen Sorrentino: Yes! Vince Ferguson: ... of Young and Restless? Stephen Sorrentino: Yes! Young and Restless. Victoria's a like rockstar, you know? Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: First of all, I was excited because I'm the only white dude in the movie, which is freaking awesome. Vince Ferguson: Really? Oh, wow. A token. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah, I'm the token white dude, which is fine with me. Equal time, finally. And she's a great director. Actually, Denise Bute is in it, also as well. Vince Ferguson: Denise is in it? Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Blair Underwood, Bill Bellamy, and it's called- Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: ... A Rich Christmas. And I play a small part, but I play an English butler. Very, very different, you know? I've got my glasses like this. You know? One of those guys. And I had played Annie, I played Drake in Annie, which is a butler, with Sally Struthers- Vince Ferguson: Yes! Stephen Sorrentino: ... the year before. And Victoria saw a video of mine, and she goes, "You're hired." And it was so cool. So it's called A Rich Christmas. You know? It's a Christmastime movie on BET- Vince Ferguson: Yes. Stephen Sorrentino: ... and look for me. Yeah. And Victoria's again, you walk in the room, her positive energy fills the room- Stephen Sorrentino: ... and you just get taken over by her. Yes, strong, strong woman director, so unique. And great that we're starting to see more women, more people of color directing. It's wonderful. Vince Ferguson: Yes. Wonderful. Stephen Sorrentino: I'm inspired. Vince Ferguson: Where do you see yourself, Stephen Sorrentino? You've done so much, but where do you see yourself in next five years? Stephen Sorrentino: I'd like to have a regular show, like on a Netflix type of platform. Maybe the Sunny the Heat thing. I don't know. On whatever platform. Vince Ferguson: That's awesome! Stephen Sorrentino: And just have a steady job on television. And then on my off months, I'd love to tour a little bit to do my comedy, and then have enough time to mentor and teach young people. That's it. Vince Ferguson: That's it? Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: That's a lot, man. That's a lot. Stephen Sorrentino: That's okay. I got a lot. You know? Like I said, I got a lot of energy, so... Vince Ferguson: So how do you rest though? How do you take it down? Stephen Sorrentino: I shut off. So it's no people. Because anytime I'm around people, I kind of somewhat perform. I don't know. I can't really shut down. So what I do is I close everybody off, I go away, and I just rest. I just I do nothing. I try that. A little meditation. Vince Ferguson: Yeah. Stephen Sorrentino: And can I be honest with you? When I'm back in Virginia on my ranch, I mow the lawn. Vince Ferguson: You mow the lawn? Stephen Sorrentino: For eight hours. It's 13 acres of mowing- Vince Ferguson: Oh! Stephen Sorrentino: Because it's a 50 acre estate. Vince Ferguson: Whoa! Stephen Sorrentino: So I mow Vince Ferguson: Whoa, really? Really? Stephen Sorrentino: It's I can't. It sounds stupid, but it's very zen, man. Vince Ferguson: Very zen, unbelievable. Stephen Sorrentino: Zen mowing. I don't know what to tell you, but that helps to slow me down. Vince Ferguson: Because you're such an outgoing person, and I would imagine that you're always around people. But for you, get away from people. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah, I have to shut completely off. And I think, and somebody pointed this out, a psychologist friend of mine said, "You're not an extrovert. You're an extrovert for a living, but you're actually an introvert." And I think he's right. So I do this Mr. Personality thing. Vince Ferguson: Yes. Stephen Sorrentino: But my real person is a very quiet, inside thing. So it's kind of strange. Vince Ferguson: It is kind of strange, man. But how can my listeners and viewers find out more about Stephen Sorrentino? Stephen Sorrentino: You can go to Stephensorrentino.com. It's Stephen with a P-H. You can go to my Instagram, follow. There's a lot of awards being posted on that, which is New York actor or Stephen.Sorrentino. Or on Twitter, I'm Sorrentino. Easy. Vince Ferguson: Amazing. Definitely easy. Vince Ferguson: But one more thing about Tales of Redemption, right? Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: It was only 14 minutes. It was a very short movie. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Yeah, it's a short movie. We wanted to make an impact and show everybody what we could do. And now we're developing it as a series. Like I said, I want that series. So we've got 13 episodes written, and then we're going to start pitching it all over the world to whoever will look at it, and whoever will give us the most platforms that we can see it. And you people can watch Sunny, because he's a very interesting character. Vince Ferguson: Most definitely. I wanted more, man. I wanted more. How it ended, I wanted more Sunny the Heat. Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. A lot of people say, at the festivals that I went to in New York, they came up to me and said, "We want more of Sunny." And I'm like, "That's great." Vince Ferguson: Thank you. Thank you, man. Stephen Sorrentino: You know? No, thank you. Vince Ferguson: You can identify with Sunny, man. You know? Stephen Sorrentino: Yeah. Vince Ferguson: You really could. Vince Ferguson: Well, look, Stephen Sorrentino, on behalf of Body Sculpt of New York, that's my non-profit fitness program for kids, and Six Weeks to Fitness, I truly want to thank you for coming on my show today. Stephen Sorrentino: It's my pleasure. This has been a blessing. Thank you so much. Vince Ferguson: And to my listeners and viewers, I truly hope this program was informative, encouraging, and inspiring, and that you will continue listening in and watching our Six Weeks to Fitness program. If you have any questions or comments for the show, please leave them below. And don't forget to subscribe, so you don't miss any future episodes. And remember, you don't stop exercising because you are getting old. You're getting old because you stopped exercising.  www.6weekstofitness.com  

The FOX News Rundown
Evening Edition: The Evolving Military Mental Health Crisis

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 16:10


There has been a steady increase in suicides among United States Military members over the past five years. A recent Pentagon report says military suicide rates are up by 15% in just the last year. FOX's John Saucier speaks to FOX News Pentagon Reporter Lucas Tomlinson to discuss the rise, the latest numbers, and what the U.S. Department of Defense is doing in response.

PokéDads: A Beginner Pokémon TCG Podcast
Ep. 85 - Evolving Skies Eeveelutions Ranked (Is Leafeon Number One Because Grass Is Best!?)

PokéDads: A Beginner Pokémon TCG Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 104:51


Pokedads Rick and Aaron and Intern Drew breakdown Play! Pokemon news that tournaments are coming back to the states! Delay on certain Celebrations product. Then they break down their personal top 8 Eeveelutions. Lets go grass! Text Us! Pokedads has a Phone Number! Call us for questions or fun Pokedad Stories! 815-782-0202 Help us keep the lights on and the wives from yelling at us! Visit our Patreon. https://www.paperorplastic.net https://kollectiblekings.com https://www.nestcollectibles.com/ https://www.patreon.com/Pokedadstcg https://twitter.com/PokeDadsTCG https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBM1si3nlZjzwq75MJwpFig https://www.instagram.com/pokedadstcg/ Pokémon And All Respective Names are Trademark and © of Nintendo 1996-2021 Pokémon GO is Trademark and © of Niantic, Inc. PokéDads are not affiliated with Niantic Inc., The Pokémon Company, Game Freak or Nintendo #pokemon #pokemontcg #pokemonpodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/pokedads/message

CFR On the Record
The Evolving Military Balance in the Taiwan Strait

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021


Panelists discuss the risk of an armed conflict between the United States and China over Taiwan and how the United States should adapt its defense strategy to meet the China challenge.

OT: The Podcast
Gabe Reilly (Collective Horology) on evolving taste in watches and his love letter to IWC

OT: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 75:12


Today on the pod, we chat with Collective Horology co-founder Gabe Reilly. And we're speaking to Gabe for a very good reason because Collective has just teamed up with IWC to release the Pilot's Watch Chronograph C.03, Which Reilly describes as a love letter to IWC. To be fair, he also describes it as that watch you would get if you time-travelled back to IWC in the mid-90s, kidnapped the design team and brought them back to 2021. Thankfully for all involved, no time-shenanigans were involved in this watch. IWC still has a decidedly no-nonsense aesthetic, and Mr Klaus and Mr Habring haven't been pruned from the timeline. We also find out how Cartier and James Bond got Reilly into watches, and explore how community has changed over time – as well as what stayed the same. Finally, Felix and Andy have some profound realisations about the nature of their working relationship. As you do. This episode of OT: The Podcast is brought to you by NOMOS Glashütte, listen in to find out about the new Ahoi limited editions, or learn more here. Want to be part of the OT: The Podcast community? Join our Discord! The home of the hot take. https://discord.com/invite/X3Vvc9z7aV Shownotes https://www.otpodcast.com.au/show-notes/s2e50 Eminem's new restaurant, Mom's Spaghetti Morning Wars Season 2 trailer Asher Rapkin on OT: Collective Horology The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York   FOLLOW US: https://www.instagram.com/ot.podcast/ https://www.facebook.com/otpodcastau https://www.instagram.com/andygreenlive/ https://www.instagram.com/fkscholz/ Submit an application to our quasi-professional watch matchmaking service, by email: otthepodcast@gmail.com If you liked our podcast - please remember to like/share and subscribe. If you liked our podcast - please remember to like/share and subscribe.

Tax News & Views
The evolving withholding tax reclaims process

Tax News & Views

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 15:27


Withholding tax reclaims typically involve a complicated, time-consuming, and paper-driven process. In this latest episode, Katherine Worraker, an investment management specialist and Tax partner from Deloitte's London office joins Tim Rappoccio, a managing director in Deloitte Tax. They'll discuss the evolution of the withholding reclaims process around the world and the importance of appropriate controls and processes as investors pay more attention to reclaims than ever before.

Light Body Activation - meditative exercises to support your health & development

This episode is from a livestream event with Saul Goodman that was held on October 1st. It was for participants of our online video course called ‘Proprioceptive Exercise & the Outerbody'. Explore why you're drawn to light body activation and how proprioceptive exercise can be a bridge to connect your inner experiences to regular life activities. Then go on a guided proprioceptive journey to align more deeply with your true nature. This is where freedom lies. Please note that you can watch a video of this recording on our website by clicking the link below. Here are some related resources to support your understanding:Watch a video of this episode on our website: Proprioceptive Journey into Your Evolving Cell(f)Enroll in online instructional course: Proprioceptive Exercise & the OuterbodyWith this podcast you can access and regulate your developing light body. Within it are the keys to vast dimensions of information and adventure. It's free, it's healthy, it's fun, and you can enter into it whenever you want from wherever you are.Please leave a review wherever you listen to your podcasts in order to help support out show. This gives us valuable feedback & helps others find us. Also, you are welcome to share this with friends, family and colleagues who are interested in self-development and health. 

The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers
Evolving Sports Content w/The Athletic's Evan Parker

The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 50:51


The introduction, improved performance, and “free” nature of the internet upended every business model of sports consumption. Suddenly, all the content you paid for individually was at your fingertips with only an internet bill to pay for it. Magazines went online, struggled to maintain subscriptions, and several shut down permanently. As time went on and streaming apps became prominent even ESPN's media empire faced diminished profits as consumers started cutting the cords to bloated cable bundles. Newspapers got it the worst of anyone. In 2006, there were 74,410 people employed in the newspaper industry. By 2020, that number was cut in more than half to a total of 30,820. The sports section was not immune from those trends and several prominent beat writers with large online followings were shown the door. This episode's guest, Evan Parker, serves as Senior Vice President and General Manager of The Athletic. Its subscription-based model has managed to thrive by focusing on all the things the internet seemed intent to prove was obsolete, and he tells us how on the WorkInSports Podcast.

Evolving Hockey Podcast
Evolving Hockey Episode 5: Team Projections

Evolving Hockey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 61:27


Shawn, Josh, and Luke spend the entire episode mostly rambling about our recently finalized NHL team point projections. We talk about some interesting results, early reactions, and how the model works!

Origins: Explorations of thought-leaders' pivotal moments
JoAnn Kuchera-Morin - The AlloSphere, a deeper integration of art and science, and the new senses we need now

Origins: Explorations of thought-leaders' pivotal moments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 57:06


JoAnn Kuchera-Morin is a composer. But the music she writes is more than mere notes; it embraces art and science and engineering and finds new frontiers at the intersection of them all. Her 'music' is both song and her research into new modes of immersive, interactive scientific and artistic investigation. Through art as with science, her work seeks to create as she says, "an exponential rise in consciousness."Show Notes:Pythagoras - a rock is music frozen in time (09:00)Evolving according to where our culture is (11:20)Iannis Xenakis (12:30) Peripersonal and Extrapersonal space (15:40)AlloSphere (17:00 and 36:00)TED Talk - a new way to seeData sonification Origins episode #7 with Matt RussoBuddhist principle of impermanence (22:10)In Love with the World by Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche (23:00)New field of "Digital Multimedia" (28:30)Computer science and electrical engineeringSignal processing and programmingMusic and visual artsMedia Arts and Technology Program (29:50)Proprioception (39:10)Paideia (40:30)How do we go from the familiar to the strange? (47:00)Morning routine (48:00)The Impersonal Life by Joseph Benner (49:00)Bardo (53:30)Lightning Round (54:00)Book: Autobiography of a Yogi by Paramahansa YoganandaThe Simarillion by JRR TolkienPassion: Running, riding, exercise on a mountainHeart sing: the AlloSphere and the proximity to the frontier of science and art; Students dreamsScrewed up: Preoccupation with work over familyFind JoAnn online:Website'Five-Cut Fridays' five-song music playlist series  JoAnn's playlist

Beyond Influential
#167 Behind the Scenes of the Beyond Influential Podcast: Getting Started, My Interview Process, and How I Pitch & Connect with Dream Guests

Beyond Influential

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 122:42


Ready to go behind the scenes of Beyond Influential? As I get close to the 4-year anniversary of the show, I've received a lot of questions about my process, as well as podcasting in general (and it's been way too long since I've done an episode on!).   On this week's episode, we're turning the tables and Shannon O'Donovan from my team is interviewing me. I'm answering the questions we've collected from Instagram, emails, DMs, and Beyond Influential Backstagers, and I'm excited to share it all!   On Ep. 167, we chat about: Why I started Beyond Influential and how it has evolved over time How I pitch guests to be on the show My interview process: How I prepare for interviews, connect with my guests, and actually conduct the interview My favorite episodes, hardest interviews, and my dream guests The vision for Beyond Influential moving forward, and so much more! Timestamps: 2:30    Why did you start a podcast? 11:00   How did you name your podcast? 15:32    How do you keep improving your skills as an interviewer? 22:59    How has being a guest on other shows affected your approach as an interviewer? 32:52    How has Beyond Influential evolved over time? 43:23    How do you decide who to interview? 1:09:38   How do pitch someone to be on the podcast? 1:16:47   How do you prepare for interviews? 1:23:25   How do you build rapport with your guests? 1:28:11    What do you do during an interview? 1:33:30   Which episodes have been your favorites so far? 1:40:46   Who are your dream guests? 1:45:15    What have been the hardest interviews? 1:50:30   Have you released any episodes you weren't entirely happy with? 1:58:48   What's the vision for Beyond Influential moving forward? Want to get early access, ad-free Beyond Influential episodes, full transcripts, and other exclusive perks? Check out Beyond Influential Backstage! https://www.brittanykrystle.com/backstage   Don't want to miss an episode (or valuable free resources!)? Get on my list here: https://www.brittanykrystle.com/subscribe     Recommended Books on Interviewing: Howard Stern Comes Again: https://amzn.to/3iwSRXb Talk to Me: How to Ask Better Questions, Get Better Answers, and Interview Anyone Like a Pro,by Dean Nelson: https://amzn.to/3uGfnSm More Podcasting Resources: How to Start a Podcast: From Idea to Launch in 2021: https://www.brittanykrystle.com/how-to-start-a-podcast/ Podcast Equipment & Recommendations: https://amzn.to/2YlozzH   OTHER HELPFUL LINKS: Check out my Free masterclass on 3 Secrets to Building a Profitable Personal Brand! https://www.brittanykrystle.com/masterclass/     Beyond Influential Episodes to Check Out: #63 Lauryn Evarts Bosstick of The Skinny Confidential on Evolving from Blogger to Businesswoman & How to Build an Empire on Authentic Influence https://www.brittanykrystle.com/63-lauryn-evarts-bosstick-of-the-skinny-confidential-on-evolving-from-blogger-to-businesswoman-how-to-build-an-empire-on-authentic-influence/  #90 Dr. Joan Rosenberg on How to Build Lasting Confidence and Create a Life You Love https://www.brittanykrystle.com/dr-joan-rosenberg-on-how-to-build-lasting-confidence-and-create-a-life-you-love/ #104 Divya Gugnani of Wander Beauty On What it Takes to Grow a Global Brand & Build Businesses That Scale: https://www.brittanykrystle.com/divya-gugnani-of-wander-beauty-on-what-it-takes-to-grow-a-global-brand-build-businesses-that-scale/ #112 Lindsay Silberman on How to Be Taken Seriously by Brands & Make a Living as a Full-Time Influencer https://www.brittanykrystle.com/lindsay-silberman-on-how-to-be-taken-seriously-by-brands-make-a-living-as-a-full-time-influencer/ #144 Lindsay Silberman On Creating a Luxury Product-Based Ecommerce Business That Sells Out in Minutes https://www.brittanykrystle.com/lindsay-silberman-on-creating-a-luxury-product-based-ecommerce-business-that-sells-out-in-minutes/ #154 & #155 The Perfect Pitch: Hollywood Insider Tips on How to Network with the A-List & Land Your Dream Guests with Christopher McDonald Part 1 https://www.brittanykrystle.com/the-perfect-pitch-hollywood-insider-tips-on-how-to-network-with-the-a-list-land-your-dream-guests-with-christopher-mcdonald-part-1/ Part 2 https://www.brittanykrystle.com/the-perfect-pitch-hollywood-insider-tips-on-how-to-network-with-the-a-list-land-your-dream-guests-with-christopher-mcdonald-part-2/ #156 Paco Underhill on the Psychology of Shopping and How to Use it to Get More Sales https://www.brittanykrystle.com/paco-underhill-on-the-psychology-of-shopping-and-how-to-use-it-to-get-more-sales/ WANT MORE THAN ONE WAY TO SUPPORT THE PODCAST? Leaving a rating and review on Apple Podcasts goes a long way: https://apple.co/3rSk09A Take a screenshot while listening to the episode and share it in your Instagram Stories—and make sure to tag me @brittanykrystle! https://www.instagram.com/brittanykrystle/     To connect with me, Brittany Krystle: Website: https://www.brittanykrystle.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brittanykrystle/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/brittanykrystle/   LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brittanykrystle/   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brittanykrystlexoxo/   Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/brittanykrystle/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1f0uI6wzWqp58n7fk-7-1g   Clubhouse: https://www.joinclubhouse.com/@brittanykrystle     *Full disclosure: Some of the links above are affiliate links. I will be compensated (at no extra cost to you) should you choose to purchase through them. Thank you in advance. (I appreciate you!)

The Tuesday Club
Don't shoot, Granit's evolving

The Tuesday Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 52:39


"Don't shoot, Granit's evolving"Episode Description:Alan is joined by Damian and Keith, as they try and find things to talk about after Arsenal's 0-0 draw against Brighton. Starring Alan Davies, Damian Harris and Keith Dover. Produced by Jay BealeA 'Keep It Light Media' Production Sales, advertising, and general enquiries: hello@keepitlightmedia.com

Flipping the Script Leadership Behind the Scenes
We're back with Season 2! The Evolving Conscious Professional

Flipping the Script Leadership Behind the Scenes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 5:24


Hello everyone, it's Cha'Lea here! We took a bit of a hiatus as we explored what season 2 would be for Flipping the Script Podcast, and it's launching on October 11!The journey continues, and we can't wait to explore season 2, but before we do, we have a few episodes that have been in the queue to be shared around the topic of financial independence and the art of listening. We're incredibly thankful for our audience worldwide and our guest experts who shared a piece of their authentic journey to help shape yours. Join the conversation! 

ArtTactic
Artsy's Mike Steib on the Evolving Online Art Market

ArtTactic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 17:45


In this week's edition of the ArtTactic Podcast, Mike Steib, CEO of Artsy, chats with us about the evolving online art market. First, Mike reflects on the past 18 months and identifies how the online art market has changed. Then, he shares data revealing how much the art market has expanded since the first few months after the pandemic began. Also, Mike touches on the record breaking Julie Mehretu painting that recently sold on Artsy for $6.5 million. Additionally, he explains how Artsy is ensuring artists of all backgrounds have opportunities on their platform. And lastly, Mike gives his opinion on NFTs and to what extent they will crossover into the traditional art world.

Eatrite Nutrition Podcast
Episode No. 66 Evolving Through Fitness and Nutrition with Brian and Sarah

Eatrite Nutrition Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 44:17


This week we teamed up with two of Nicole's rockstar clients to discuss their fitness journey and how it impacted multiple aspects of their lives. We also discuss some of the challenges they have faced along their journey and their change in mindset. Check out Sarah on IG @yesmisse Check out Brian on IG and TikTok @bmotheprince

Bob Saget's Here For You
Jason Alexander and Bob Talk “Seinfeld” and Evolving as Comedic Performers Through Rapid Social Change

Bob Saget's Here For You

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 89:24


This week Bob is joined by actor, Jason Alexander, best known for his iconic role of George Costanza on Seinfeld. Jason reminisces about his time on Seinfeld and lets us in on if there will be a reboot or not. Bob and Jason reflect on the evolution of comedy over the past few decades as we've seen so much social change. Tune in to learn about Jason's time on Broadway in the '80s and find out what drew him to become an activist! I want you to start living a happier life today. As a listener, you'll get 10% off your first month by visiting our sponsor at BetterHelp.com/bob  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

TestTalks | Automation Awesomeness | Helping YOU Succeed with Test Automation

The success of DevOps is intrinsically linked to test automation. But how do you quickly scale your automation effort to keep up with the speed of delivery?  In this episode, Ethan Chung, a Solutions Architect at  Keysight Technologies, will share a comprehensive DevOps strategy that he has seen work for other companies.  Discover the power of automation intelligence, team collaboration hacks, handling the ever-expanding test surface, and much more.

Soulfulvalley Podcast
The day the universe put me on the right path Evolving on Purpose Author Sarah Brigid Brown

Soulfulvalley Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 14:16


Sarah Brigid Brown is a bilingual life transition coach, with a passion to share her knowledge and wisdom, helping sensitive, empathic men and women over 40 develop their confidence, balance their energies and emotions, and become happier people for it.   She does this by accompanying them on a journey to heal their past, reconnect to their inner child and love themselves enough to create a brighter and better future. This leads them to step into their life purpose, as they've reconnected to their heart and fundamentally changed how they see themselves.   Sarah knows exactly what it's like to embrace your purpose, as she went from being a people pleaser, always wanting to control everything, afraid to speak up and totally disconnected from who she REALLY was, to a passionate coach, teacher and guide, in love with life and her life, following her calling to help as many people as possible, embracing all her imperfections and believing in a future where love and community reign.   Sarah's approach is very holistic. She's a qualified EFT Practitioner, Performance Coach with NLP, IET Practitioner, New Paradigm MDT Master Practitioner and recently trained to be a Singing Bowl Sound Therapist.   What she loves more than anything else is letting her intuition guide her towards the modalities that would best serve each individual person. Website http://www.so-free.life YouTube http://www.youtube.com/c/SoFreeCoaching  

Becoming Human
#165 | Steven Sashen - Xero Shoes: Solving A Problem And Evolving a Solution

Becoming Human

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 84:00


Steven Sashen is the Co-Founder and CEO of Xero Shoes, a serial entrepreneur, . Steven and his wife, Lena Phoenix, started Xero Shoes after being inspired by Christopher Mcdougall's book, “Born To Run.”When Steve was 45, he returned to sprinting. Steve loved sprinting in his youth, but he experienced constant injuries in his return. He was introduced to barefoot running through his friend and he gave Steve a copy of, “Born To Run.” Steve experienced elation when he felt the ground on his bare feet and upon realizing his gait was changing. Steve made some sandals for him and his wife, Lena from Vibram soles and lace. While running, Steve would get compliments on his sandals and they'd ask for a pair for themselves. Since the first iteration, Xero Shoes and crew have come a long way. From minimalist sandals to making closed-toed minimalist shoes. They're making shoes that fit a wide range of lifestyles while delivering on shoes that are minimalist, with a wide toe box and retaining as much ground feel as possible.I love Xero shoes because they combine quality while delivering a very specific product for those that want to feel the ground while having just enough protection from foot punctures. Steve has a love for solving problems and helping bring ideas to life. His success in Xero shoes is a representation of finding a problem that wants to be solved; an alleviation of tension. Entrepreneurs are fascinating when you apply the axiom that it's the journey and not the destination that matters. I believe as an entrepreneur, it applies to focusing on not pursuing riches but alleviating tension through business.Check out his podcast, The MOVEMENT Movement, on youtubeSong featured on this episode: Oliver Hart - Step By Step

Becoming Human
#165 | Steven Sashen - Xero Shoes: Solving A Problem And Evolving a Solution

Becoming Human

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 84:00


Steven Sashen is the Co-Founder and CEO of Xero Shoes, a serial entrepreneur, . Steven and his wife, Lena Phoenix, started Xero Shoes after being inspired by Christopher Mcdougall's book, “Born To Run.”When Steve was 45, he returned to sprinting. Steve loved sprinting in his youth, but he experienced constant injuries in his return. He was introduced to barefoot running through his friend and he gave Steve a copy of, “Born To Run.” Steve experienced elation when he felt the ground on his bare feet and upon realizing his gait was changing. Steve made some sandals for him and his wife, Lena from Vibram soles and lace. While running, Steve would get compliments on his sandals and they'd ask for a pair for themselves. Since the first iteration, Xero Shoes and crew have come a long way. From minimalist sandals to making closed-toed minimalist shoes. They're making shoes that fit a wide range of lifestyles while delivering on shoes that are minimalist, with a wide toe box and retaining as much ground feel as possible.I love Xero shoes because they combine quality while delivering a very specific product for those that want to feel the ground while having just enough protection from foot punctures. Steve has a love for solving problems and helping bring ideas to life. His success in Xero shoes is a representation of finding a problem that wants to be solved; an alleviation of tension. Entrepreneurs are fascinating when you apply the axiom that it's the journey and not the destination that matters. I believe as an entrepreneur, it applies to focusing on not pursuing riches but alleviating tension through business.Check out his podcast, The MOVEMENT Movement, on youtubeSong featured on this episode: Oliver Hart - Step By Step

Not Investment Advice
Ep 24 - Citycoin Deep Dive w/ Patrick Stanley, Stacking Miamicoin + Evolving Cities

Not Investment Advice

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 53:33


Patrick Stanley (@PatrickWStanley) joins the NIA boys to discuss a full breakdown of Citycoin's origin, the current state of Miamicoin + what this could look like in the future for other cities.Make sure you're subscribed to catch a new episode every Thursday, where Jack Butcher, Bilal Zaidi & Trung Phan discuss what they're finding on the edges of the internet + the latest in business, technology and memes.Watch + Subscribe on YouTube:https://youtu.be/LvuS8APcubkListen into our group chat on Telegram:https://t.me/notinvestmentadviceLet us know what you think on Twitter:@bzaidi@trungtphan@jackbutcher@niadeskTimestamps:0:00:00 – Intro0:02:26 – How Cities Are Evolving, CEO of Miami + How Citycoins Fit In0:07:35 – Problem Miamicoin Is Solving + Origin of Citycoin0:13:19 – Not Doing An ICO + How They Setup Miamicoin0:17:29 – What Happens When The Price Goes Down? 0:20:58 – Government-run vs Customer-run0:23:17 – Ryan Hoover's Tweet: How To Mine + Stack Miamicoin0:28:52 – Setting Up A Wallet + Resources To Learn0:31:14 – Launching Citycoin in Your City + Working as a Community0:34:02 – Steelman Arguments Against Citycoin0:38:32 – Evolution of Nation-States0:40:05 – Expanding Definition of Memes, Affinity Tokens + Outsider Trading0:45:50 – What Makes A Good Citycoin City, Historical Memers + Next Cities?0:52:43 – Wrapping Up See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mind Revolution
What it Really Takes to Have that Dream Business

Mind Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 49:39


Evolving, growing, transforming — this is what the people in my space want (and they're doing it!) Change is beautiful and thrilling, and it comes with some challenges.   When you're ready to create change, your unconscious mind will begin to show you all the ways that what you're currently doing doesn't work. And let me tell you, that can feel frustrating. But it's just your unconscious mind confirming for you that growth is in order. While uncomfortable, this is just part of the growth process. So it's probably a good idea to expect and embrace it. It means that your unconscious mind is getting on board — which is great news!   This discomfort is what can propel you to take action in the direction of what you want. The first step can be especially difficult because your nervous system is learning and evolving to accommodate the growth you're seeking.    This is why taking those first steps can be painfully uncomfortable.   I've made two big changes in my career, and both times my new choices were uncomfortable until I learned the way around this expanded version of me. Recording and publishing my first podcast was so scary! But after doing it a few times, it was no big deal. And now I record and release episodes with speed. No sweat. When I decided to get more visible and start creating videos on Instagram — yikes! I was so nervous! Now that I've done it, though, I'm becoming more comfortable. I feel as if my brain is expanding and supporting me, and I'm even having fun with it.   What changed? Two things.  I took (external) action.  I had (internal) growth.    Our nervous systems have a tremendous ability to change when things in our environment begin to change. But in order for change to occur, we must do some things differently. Our  internal growth is fueled the action we take during times of change. And evolution of our neurological container (the nervous system) can and does compel us to action. In other words, action, growth, and evolution go hand in hand.   To be successful in making changes in business: Don't compare yourself to the outliers in your industry. You shouldn't expect the same results as someone who has been working at their business for years or has a massive email list when you're a few months in. Model them, sure. But don't compare.  Learn to sell by listening and using language effectively. (This is where the NLP Selling Series comes in!) Become more visible to grow your business — share content regularly, show your face on social media, try out video. Don't worry; people are not nearly as interested in what you do or look like as you are.  Persevere. Keep going. Take the next step. As you do, your nervous system will evolve to support you. Honor your vision. By giving it energy By learning new things By getting better each day   Change is indeed hard. And you might feel like it's not the right time because you've never done this before. I've got to break it to you… There's no such thing as a right time when your brain hasn't done it before. Embrace the discomfort to embrace the growth. You and your vision are worth it! And I'm here to support you on your journey. Let's do this!     Thanks for listening!   To share your thoughts:   Leave a note in the comment section below Use the “I have a question” button Share this show on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn  Find Brenda on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest and YouTube Links from today's episode:   21-day NLP Abundance Breakthrough   To help out the show:   Leave a positive review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews help, and I read each and every one. Subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher or Libsyn

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
09-28-21 ANCSA at 50: Evolving Alaska Native identity

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 56:45


Land stewardship is at the core of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The valuable resources that come with the land were a primary catalyst for the groundbreaking legislation passed 50 years ago. ANCSA also permanently merged Alaska Native identity with corporate entities, requiring a new vision for cultural progress and responsibility.

Crushing Iron Triathlon Podcast
#516 – Ironman Chattanooga 2021 - Recap

Crushing Iron Triathlon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 62:03


With over 50 athletes on the course, including co-host, Mike, C26 Triathlon created a slew of memories at Ironman Chattanooga. The weather was perfect, but we were once again reminded how HARD it is to do these races. We get into the swim, bike, run from both an on and off the course perspective. Mike tells the story of his battle with Phil and Chet in what many called “The Crushing Iron War II.” We talk about how some people keep getting better and others continue to struggle in this sport. And finally how to evolve and grow with gratitude and why it's so important to have fun.  Topics: Why we do this Ironman as a metaphor for life Everyone hurts There are no perfect days Under prepared  Playing the middle-ground and why it's smart Mike talks about the pain  Just slow down as much as possible Mike loses the Crushing Iron War Gratitude and Emotions When you come “this close” to putting it all together The finish Line Tri Club Champions The C26 Team was in full force Happy and Healthy When we miss the big point of it all Changing your perspective Evolving and growing If you're not having fun, you're doing it wrong How many times can we get off the mat  People struggle with being in the ballpark Dedicated to figuring out how we can have fun

The Modern Customer Podcast
3 Ways Customer Preferences Are Evolving In Banking

The Modern Customer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 31:23


Banking used to be a completely people-oriented business. Customers chose the bank that was closest to their neighborhood and went inside to interact with bankers for every transaction and question they had.  But now, what customers look for in a bank and how they interact with their money is changing. Customers now bank more digitally and want convenient technology-driven solutions. According to Beth Johnson, CXO of Citizens Bank, delivering a strong banking experience is now about tapping into customer needs holistically by leveraging technology, data and in-person interactions.  The goal of modern financial institutions is to drive change while still keeping the customer front and center.  Johnson says the pandemic accelerated the digital path Citizens was already well on by three to five years. Banking was already evolving, but customer preferences have changed drastically over the last 18 months. Understanding those changes and adapting the experience strategy is crucial to banks' success, especially in these three areas:  Complex digital interactions. Over the last 18 months, the way customers are willing to interact with banks digitally has gotten more complex. Customers are now more willing to have emotional and complex conversations through digital channels, where in the past they were only willing to discuss things like their financial futures in person. Johnson says the change marks a big switch for the industry and has forced banks like Citizens to expand their digital offerings to make it easier for customers to conveniently have those complex conversations. AI capability. The ability of AI to impact business is changing rapidly, especially with developments in personalization, cybersecurity and natural language processing. In banking, the biggest innovations are in real-time AI capabilities. Customers have gotten used to instant service in other industries and now want it in banking. Johnson says one of the biggest use cases of these capabilities is in real-time payments to move money seamlessly and instantly. Role of brands. Just three years ago, the vast majority of customers chose a bank because it had a convenient physical location. Today, the biggest factor in choosing a bank is brand perception for its products, community involvement and commitment to diversity and inclusion. Banks need to develop brands that do more than just offer convenient locations and put their customers and communities first.   Going forward, banks won't compete on products because products are too easy to copy. Instead, they will compete on their ability to tap into the rational and emotional sides of money to deliver innovative and convenient solutions to customers.  Banks must stay on top of changing customer preferences to deliver strong experiences in the ways that matter most. _______________ Blake Morgan is a customer experience futurist, keynote speaker, and author of the bestselling book The Customer Of The Future. For regular updates on customer experience, sign up for her weekly newsletter here.  Join the waitlist now for the new Customer Experience Community here. 

Purple Daily
Is Kirk Cousins evolving with Minnesota Vikings? – Comments Edition!

Purple Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 37:41


Is Kirk Cousins' demeanor and leadership changing for the better?; Is Cousins living up to his contract?; KJ Osborn's emergence as WR. 3; The pros and cons of overpaying running backs; Will the Vikings defense improve?; That and more as Judd and Declan read your YouTube comments!

The Business of Fashion Podcast
How Is Luxury Customer Service Evolving? | Transforming Luxury

The Business of Fashion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 36:26


In recent decades, the race to attract and retain customers saw dizzying amounts of money spent on clienteling — the industry term for building a 1 on 1 relationship with customers. Today, for major players of scale with the resources to invest in it, successfully digitising personalised in store service, which generates much high conversion rates through recommendations and experience, is being looked to as a key driver of future competitive advantage. Indeed, the luxury service revolution is now rooted in creating a single customer view, enabling businesses to guide an individual consumer to the products and services it offers that match their specific needs. An opportunity that stems from significant shifts in generational attitudes towards data sharing and its use. To discover what this means for the future of the luxury goods industry, BoF spoke with three global authorities to share their insights. Sebastian Siemiatkowski is the CEO and co-founder of Klarna. In 15 years, Siemiatkowski has grown Klarna into one of Europe's largest financial institutions, which provides alternative payment services to over 90 million shoppers, partnering with over 250,000 retailers globally and its own direct-to-consumer shopping app. “The whole purpose of digitalisation is utilising data to create value. It's the information that allows us to create richer experiences. If you sit down and have a [...] conversation with a consumer and you say, ‘yes, you are in control of what data is being shared and you have full transparency, and if you then would be willing to share some specific aspects of your data in order to get a better experience, a better price, a better whatever it might be,' then the answer is always going to be yes.” Holli Rogers is chair of renowned concept store Browns and chief brand officer of its parent company, Farfetch. Rogers quadrupled Browns' business while CEO between 2015 and 2021. Previously, Rogers held roles at Chanel and Neiman Marcus before joining Net-a-Porter as a founding member in 2002. “In the past as everything has been separate and disparate in terms of the different technologies. When you speak to different businesses everyone talks about, ‘yeah, I've got a client telling app. We use WhatsApp.' But actually if you break it down, none of them are connected one to the other. So you don't get a single customer view. It's this idea of how do you pull all of these pieces together in one space, collecting all of these hundreds of data points that allow you to give the customer what they want when they want.” Melissa Morris is the founder and designer of Métier, an independent leather maison best known for its logo-free handbags, travel bags and accessories. Prior to launching Métier in 2017, Morris studied sculpture and business at Emory University before working for Armani, Helmut Lang and Belstaff. “The bespoke aspect of our business is such a great way for us to deepen our relationships with our clients and also get a really clear understanding of what's missing in the assortment and gives me a clear direction on what to make next. What I've found is when I've gotten one bespoke request, what's good for one is good for everyone. So a lot of our bespoke requests that I've been brought into the line have turned out to be big successes.” Follow the series to ensure you never miss an episode and discover actionable insights into the opportunities and challenges a redefined industry will bring and how luxury's transformation will impact your business. Sign up for BoF's Daily Digest newsletter. For comments, questions, or speaker ideas, please e-mail: podcast@businessoffashion.com. For all sponsorship enquiries, it's: advertising@businessoffashion.com.