Podcasts about Longtime

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  • 3,791PODCASTS
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  • Oct 20, 2021LATEST
Longtime

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Best podcasts about Longtime

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Latest podcast episodes about Longtime

Rich and Daily
Is Katie Couric Telling Us The Whole Truth?

Rich and Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 10:04


Tell us how you really feel, Katie! Longtime co-host of NBC's Today show, Katie Couric, is releasing a new tell-all book, Going There, that promises to dish A LOT of dirt. Like text messages between Katie and her #MeTooed co-host Matt Lauer. Katie also reveals regrets and missteps -- and sheds some light on the "don't-ask-don't-tell" TV news culture she worked in. So, is Katie giving us the goods, or is she just all talk?Listen ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App. Support us by supporting our sponsors!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Great Song Podcast
Magic (The Cars) w/Joey Abbott - Episode 811

The Great Song Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 65:13


Longtime friend and guest co-host Joey Abbott joins the boys to continue Magic Month with one of the greatest hits from one of the greatest American bands, The Cars! Ric Ocasek and company deliver all kinds of goodness in this week's show, and we deliver all kinds of silliness, including: - The missing lyric from “Magic” - Rob gets sonned by his own son - NASCAR plays the hits - JP loses it Thanks for listening and supporting, as always! -- Join us on PATREON for early access, longer interviews, weekly reaction mini-sodes, full bonus shows, and more chances to be part of the show! patreon.com/greatsongpod Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram @greatsongpod for Shenanigans, giveaways, and more! Join the Facebook group! Facebook.com/groups/greatsongpod greatsongpodcast.com Co-producers: Andrea Konarzewski, Ari Marucci, Brad Callahan, Michael Conley, Peter Mark Campbell, David Steinberg, Randy Hodge, Chaz Bacus, Juan Lopez and Game of Throws --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/greatsongpod/message

Coffee & Kettlebells
Raising Children With Learning Disabilities: A Conversation With Longtime Burn Family Member Tricia Wanish

Coffee & Kettlebells

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 28:11


Morgan is joined by Trcia Wanish, one of our Franchise Partners of our Frisco and McKinney, TX locations! She has been with Burn since what feels like day one. Tricia is a mother and business owner who once rocked the mic on the floating floor. She is breaking down some hard things she has faced in her motherhood journey and how she, and her family, have come out on the other side even stronger.There are no topics off the table today. A few things Morgan and Tricia cover are children with learning disabilities, underlying blessings in the toughest of times, the benefits of mental and physical health as a result of Burn, how she stays motivated every day, and ways she fills up her cup!Are you interested in learning more about parenting children with learning disabilities?  Learn more here.

Rogue Squadron Podcast
279. Intergalactic Keggers: Our First Guest In A Long Time Actually Hates Star Wars

Rogue Squadron Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 123:01


The real cure for depression is fighting crime. HOW TO SUPPORT THE PODCAST Share the show with a fellow dungus Send us a drunken email: roguesquadronpodcast@gmail.com Join the Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/starwarsandbeer (facebook.com/starwarsandbeer) Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/roguesquadpod (patreon.com/roguesquadpod) FOLLOW US ON Instagram: https://instagram.com/roguesquadpod (instagram.com/roguesquadpod) Twitter: https://twitter.com/roguesquadpod (twitter.com/roguesquadpod) Facebook: https://facebook.com/roguesquadpod (facebook.com/roguesquadpod) Support this podcast

Seen & Herd
S2E40: It's been a really long time…

Seen & Herd

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 8:33


Blimling Economist Tiffany LaMendola brings us this week's market update and Darby reminds members to register for the upcoming Pasture, Rangeland, and Forage luncheon meetings. For more information on the services provided by Blimling: www.blimling.com To reach out to Tiffany: tlamendola@blimling.com

All Sides with Ann Fisher
Rick Steves And The Future Of Travel Post-Pandemic

All Sides with Ann Fisher

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 54:34


Most of the world's countries are open to travelers from the U.S., but the ongoing surge in COVID cases makes some harder to enter than others. Longtime travel expert Rick Steves talks about the future of travel post-pandemic.

VPR News Podcast
This NEK business closed nearly a year ago. But longtime employee Gary Ely says his heart is still inside

VPR News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 7:28


After 98 years in business, Caplan's Army Store in St. Johnsbury is closed. They closed on the last day of 2020. Independent reporter Erica Heilman stopped by to talk with longtime employee Gary Ely about the store, and his many years there.

Tcast
Everyday Chaos: Technology, Complexity, and How We're Thriving in a New World of Possibility with Long-Time Affiliate of Harvard's Berkman Klein Center and Best Selling Author David Weinberger, Ph.D

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 68:31


Technology is quickly becoming the backbone of modern infrastructure. At the pace that it is progressing, it may someday become as ubiquitous and as vital to our economy as cement and concrete. However, AI is agnostic. Despite its immense computing capabilities, it will never be capable of human understanding and discernment. One example of this is the results derived from A/B Testing, where researchers compare two versions of a marketing asset to see which one performs better. While it can show which campaign would run better, it cannot provide any new learning.  With this limitation in mind, is it still beneficial for us to know what the most probable outcome for a certain event would be—even if we don't understand the why or how for its occurrence? Can Machine Learning Go Wrong?: At this point, David discussed an imaginary scenario where even something as non-controversial as spam mail could become a problem if it was found that legitimate emails from businesses owned by people of color were found to be falsely marked as spam at an unequal rate, in comparison to people who are not of color. Aside from the inefficiency, the AI would become an unfair metric for emails and may even be damaging businesses on the basis of race. The decision-making process behind sorting emails into the spam folder is compromised because the technology is using so many signals in “deep, complicated, and multi-independent patterns of probability” that will be near-impossible to comprehend without a lot of time, money, and effort. At this point, this massive system is hurting communities that are already disenfranchised in the first place. This brings to mind Microsoft's Tay.ai, a chatbot on Twitter created by the tech giant in 2016 that was designed to mimic the conversational patterns of a 19-year-old girl. It would learn from continuous interaction with other users on the social media platform. Immediately after its release, Tay became controversial after it started tweeting inflammatory and offensive comments. As a result, Microsoft was pushed to shut down the service only sixteen hours after it was launched.  Social Justice And Technology: It's a clear indication that the people responsible for programming AI have a corresponding social burden to fulfill, particularly in ensuring that their technology does not harm anyone. This burden can become even bigger when machine learning and AI is applied to other fields, such as medicine and smart transportation. Beyond Tay.ai, computer scientists and engineers around the world find themselves at the helm of constructing technologies with so much potential. How do we address inherent human bias in these individuals? David reveals that most people who have the knowledge to work with these complex technologies do not necessarily have the same depth of understanding for social justice as well. This led to a call for participatory machine learning, otherwise known as the design justice movement. Giving Minorities A Seat At The Table: Participatory machine learning involves people who are familiar with related issues on social justice, as well as communities who would be most affected by the presence of new technologies. They are given a position in planning and management.  Their input is important from the get-go because it does have an impact on how these systems work. To further explain, David painted the picture of an imaginary emerging smart city that decided to use AI to reinvent its bus system.  Ultimately, all the new bus stops, routes, and schedules are successful in moving people faster to their destinations, and the numbers echo its success. However, a caveat: these statistics have been decided on average, and only show that it is successful based on how well it moves affluent communities more efficiently than those located on the outskirts of the city. Those living on the outskirts, who need efficient transportation more than others for work and productivity, become isolated from the system. At this point, it would be difficult to unravel all the work put into making the new transportation system a success. It's important for the marginalized to be consistently consulted on the impacts of new infrastructures and technologies, even after construction and installation are finished. Those responsible for creating these systems have a special responsibility to ensure that those who do not have the same footing will finally get a seat at the table.  David agrees that it may be a lengthier, more expensive process. After all, it will take more time, money, and effort to locate these people, recruit them, and ensure that everyone is on the same page. However, it is the cost that we need to pay if we want a shot at eliminating inequality.  The Limits of Machine Learning: Beyond the cost of bringing people to the table, David acknowledges that technological progress is already expensive in and of itself. Machine learning systems require individuals who are highly educated in computer science and computer engineering; they will also need other systems that require massive technologies to run.  Finally, lingering questions on data sharing and ownership prevent communities from fully utilizing what they have. To what extent do you own your data and what should your relationship with it be? What does it mean to own something? We do not live in individual data cocoons that we own. We live in a community. This public community cannot be run without public data, and public sharing of information about one another.  The thoughts that define my actions within this system of public information and data, however, are missed by algorithms, analysis, and machine learning. This is because people do not want or have the ability to share why they are driven to take certain actions.  Ultimately, it appears that one of our most profound discoveries from machine learning is that the world is much more complex than we ever wanted to believe. Despite these sophisticated machines processing massive amounts of information, we do not have the capability to provide a completely accurate and precise prediction of what will happen. This does not mean that the approximate knowledge we have now is worthless. It helps us appreciate our universe in a new way by teaching us to be comfortable with complexity.  Are We Entitled to Understanding Anything?: In line with TARTLE's mission to promote stewardship and collective responsibility, Alexander asked the implications of machine learning in helping humans create better decisions and more informed choices based on the observable universe. To this, David asked a thought-provoking question: why do you think humans are entitled to understanding? Machine learning and artificial intelligence are capable of taking us to greater heights without the interference of human cognitive biases. With its objective oversight, it has the potential to bring out the best in us as human beings that live in a complex system. As technology continues to innovate at an unprecedented pace, David leaves us with a parting message: machine learning will drive us to examine all the values that we hold, and sometimes to consider painful trade-offs between two or more equally important values. “So don't hold on too tightly to any one value; think about how you may have to give up on some of it in order to support other very important targets.” David concluded. www.tartle.co   Everyday Chaos: Technology, Complexity, and How We're Thriving in a New World of Possibility Harvard Senior Researcher and Best Selling Author David Weinberger, Ph.D. by TARTLE is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0   Tcast is brought to you by TARTLE. A global personal data marketplace that allows users to sell their personal information anonymously when they want to, while allowing buyers to access clean ready to analyze data sets on digital identities from all across the globe.   The show is hosted by Co-Founder and Source Data Pioneer Alexander McCaig and Head of Conscious Marketing Jason Rigby.   What's your data worth?   Find out at: https://tartle.co/   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TARTLE   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TARTLEofficial/   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tartle_official/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/TARTLEofficial   Spread the word!    

Over the Road
An Update from the Road

Over the Road

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 17:06


Greetings! It's been a while, but we're back with an update on the state of the trucking industry in 2021, and a taste of new projects from the Over the Road team: some music, another podcast, and a book. Long Haul Paul has released a new record called, “Cornbelt Cafe.” Find it wherever you stream and download music, or head over to LongHaulPaulMusic.com.  OTR producers Ian Coss and Lacy Roberts recently collaborated on a hybrid podcast/album about marriage, divorce, and the meaning of lifetime commitment. Listen and subscribe to Forever is a Long Time on Apple Podcasts or wherever you find your podcasts. And don't miss Shining Man, the novel recently published by OTR editor Todd Dills, from our production partner Overdrive Magazine. Can't say when we'll be back in the feed again, but stay safe and take care out there! Over the Road is a collaboration between Overdrive Magazine and PRX's Radiotopia. Learn more about the show at overtheroad.fm.

The Benny Show
Vaccine Mandates BACKFIRE Across The Country As GOP FLIPS Longtime Democrat Seat in Iowa

The Benny Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 37:44


The RED WAVE is HERE: Longtime Democrat Seat in Iowas FLIPS . Vaccine Mandates are CRUMBLING Nationwide. And The Supply Chain Crisis is Hitting America

Educational AD Podcast
WHAT'S UP With Upchurch #2 Jessica Upchurch, CAA - longtime AD now with HomeTown Ticketing shares!

Educational AD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 17:54


Each Wednesday we will be offering another NEW feature of the Educational AD Podcast as Jessica Upchurch, CAA offers her take on the world of Educational Athletics! Jess is a longtime High School AD in Florida who recently joined the Home Town Ticketing Team and for the first couple of shows, she will share some of the really cool reasons YOU should be using Home Town! THIS is The Educational AD Podcast! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/educational-ad-podcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/educational-ad-podcast/support

Know In Part Podcast
Know In Part Podcast - Episode 62 - Hey Bro', Long Time No See

Know In Part Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 59:53


Jacob thought his brother Esau was still angry and vengeful towards him, but when Esau saw him, he ran to him, kissed him and wept. Reunited after 20 years and it feels so good.

Salted Carmel Podcast
Episode 77: Jim Buzzelli

Salted Carmel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 24:57


Longtime parishioner Jim Buzzelli joins us to explain how Cursillo retreats and Bible studies helped him discover Christ. Although these things helped, the aspect of Jim's life that sustains him is the Christian community that the Lord has given him.  The call to action for this week is to challenge others to improve in their faith: invite them to a Bible study or ask them a deeper question about their faith. 

Chasing Poker Greatness
#4 CPG Villagers: Longtime High Level Poker Pro

Chasing Poker Greatness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 76:27


Today's guest is a good friend of mine for the last five or six years, Joe Desimone. Joe Desimone is a villager. He's currently an MTT Pro, but back when I met him in my old twitch street days he was battling in the cash game arena. He's been a successful professional poker player for the last 10 years or so. Greatest Village is very lucky to have somebody as skillful as Joe around to answer MTT questions where, you know, the village is not exactly full of MTT specialists, right? We're cash game pros typically so, Joe is a major, major asset to the Village. And in my conversation today with Joe Desimone he's going to drop a Greatness Bomb on an underbluffed spot when you're battling against fish, he's going to dive deep into his poker origin story, and him and I are also going to reminisce about the good old days. So now, without any further ado, I bring it to you a long time a professional poker player and good friend, the one and only Joe desimone.To learn more about the Free Nuffle promotion, visit: https://chasingpokergreatness.com/free-nuffle-promotionNew CPG Cash Game Courses!Preflop Bootcamp: https://bit.ly/Preflop-BootcampFish in a Barrel: http://bit.ly/fish-in-a-barrelNeutralize Flop Leads: https://bit.ly/2OkN8Yt

The College Football Daily
Week 6 Winners & Losers: Breaking down one of the best weeks in a long time

The College Football Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 18:54


Oklahoma and Iowa kept their playoff chances alive, Texas A&M achieved the impossible, LSU and UNC continued their underachieving seasons, and Texas collapsed in the Red River Showdown. Brad Crawford joins Lance to break down the biggest games of the past Saturday. Host: Lance Glinn Guest: Brad Crawford Follow or Subscribe to The College Football Daily on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Find the 247Sports podcast for your favorite team here! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Kickback With The Boys
Our First Conversation In A Long Long Time... Ep. 8

Kickback With The Boys

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 56:37


Anthony Montiel a close friend of Jose joins him to talk life, experiences and of all that has happened over the years. In this episode you will hear as they chill and have a 1 on 1 conversations about what's been going on, from parties to mistakes & more... - Listen On: iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/talking-life/id1551283672 - Listen On: Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6sQDOIAsvxBFs2tVKJkIx5?si=_O2yqXrVRamVleAY2_ThIQ&dl_branch=1 - Follow The Socials: - Youtube: https://youtube.com/channel/UC515R0ljAs6V89StH9JEW6Q YouTube Clips: https://youtube.com/channel/UCEo-kKzuK9fZFVeGPqJZ2ug - Instagram: https://instagram.com/thetalkinglife?utm_medium=copy_link - Serious Business Inquiries: mailto:talkinglifeshow@gmail.com -

Hedrich Files
Rotten Banana Podcast- M-V-Bettina (Spies, Lies, & Allies Ep9)

Hedrich Files

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 62:38


Logan and Ali are back to discuss the latest episode of The Challenge: Spies, Lies, & Allies, we cover all the aftermath from Priscilla's game changing move, Ashley being rightfully paranoid, how we feel about politics playing into the daily challenges, Ed continuing to be our favorite rookie ever, Ashley reading Cory for filth after his pathetic attempt at betrayal, and Bettina+Cory's EPIC come from behind victory against Jeremiah and Amber. Longtime friend of the pod Victor joined us for this weeks 'Let's Get Loud' segment to discuss potential twists TJ might lay on us next week!Follow us on Twitter: @HedrichFiles + @helloalievansJoin us on Patreon:http://www.Patreon.com/HedrichFilesWe're excited to share that we have a new partner this season! Loud Lemon Spiked Sparkling Lemonade is bringing you the Rotten Banana Podcast. Go to their website, http://www.loudlemon.com, to find a store locator and check out all of the refreshing fruity flavors available. Who's ready to get loud?

Corporate Courtney
FL39- It's Been a Long Time

Corporate Courtney

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 19:25


Corporate Courtney is BACK! On floor 39, I share why I disappeared from the podcastsphere and what's changed over the last few months. I discuss taking time away from work for surgery, moving, and my experience making a lateral move to further my career. 

Almigos
105. Food!! With Joseph Scanni

Almigos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 112:03


After another hiatus, the Almigos Duo is back. Longtime pal Joseph Scanni to yuck it up about a variety of things, but most prominently the wonderful world of food. Favorite cuisines, cooking dishes, movie dishes are discussed. It's a flavorful episode you won't want to miss.

Unveiling Mercy
October 6 - A Long Time Ago and Ahead

Unveiling Mercy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 3:33


עולם - I consider the days of old, the years long ago. I said, “Let me remember my song in the night; let me meditate in my heart.” PSALM 77:5–6 — LINKS Purchase "Unveiling Mercy" and learn more... 1517 Podcast Network Support the work of 1517 CONTACT and FOLLOW chad@1517.org Facebook Twitter SUBSCRIBE Apple Podcasts Spotify Overcast RSS Google Podcasts Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

The Bike Shed
311: Marketing Matters

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 37:37


Longtime listener and friend of the show, Gio Lodi, released a book y'all should check out and Chris and Steph ruminate on a listener question about tension around marketing in open-source. Say No To More Process, Say Yes To Trust by German Velasco (https://thoughtbot.com/blog/say-no-to-more-process-say-yes-to-trust) Test-Driven Development in Swift with SwiftUI and Combine by Gio Lodi (https://tddinswift.com/) Transcript: CHRIS: Our golden roads. STEPH: All right. I am also golden. CHRIS: [vocalization] STEPH: Oh, I haven't listened to that episode where I just broke out in song in the middle. Oh, you're about to add the [vocalization] [chuckles]. CHRIS: I don't know why, though. Oh, golden roads, Golden Arches. STEPH: Golden Arches, yeah. CHRIS: Man, I did not know that my brain was doing that, but my brain definitely connected those without telling me about it. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: It's weird. People talk often about the theory that phones are listening, and then you get targeted ads based on what you said. But I'm almost certain it's actually the algorithms have figured out how to do the same intuitive leaps that your brain does. And so you'll smell something and not make the nine steps in between, but your brain will start singing a song from your childhood. And you're like, what is going on? Oh, right, because when I was watching Jurassic Park that one time, we were eating this type of chicken, and therefore when I smell paprika, Jurassic Park theme song. I got it, of course. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: And I think that's actually what's happening with the phones. That's my guess is that you went to a site, and the phones are like, cool, I got it, adjacent to that is this other thing, totally. Because I don't think the phones are listening. Occasionally, I think the phones are listening, but mostly, I don't think the phones are listening. STEPH: I definitely think the phones are listening. CHRIS: Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. So, Steph, what's new in your world? STEPH: Hey. So we have a bit of exciting news where we received an email from Gio Lodi, who is a listener of The Bike Shed. And Gio sent an email sharing with us some really exciting news that they have published a book on Test-Driven Development in Swift. And they acknowledge us in the acknowledgments of the book. Specifically, the acknowledgment says, "I also want to thank Chris Toomey and Steph Viccari, who keep sharing ideas on testing week after week on The Bike Shed Podcast." And that's just incredible. I'm so blown away, and I feel officially very famous. CHRIS: This is how you know you're famous when you're in the acknowledgments of a book. But yeah, Gio is a longtime listener and friend of the show. He's written in many times and given us great tips, and pointers, and questions, and things. And I've so appreciated Gio's voice in the community. And it's so wonderful, frankly, to hear that he has gotten value out of the show and us talking about testing. Because I always feel like I'm just regurgitating things that I've heard other people saying about testing and maybe one or two hard-learned truths that I've found. But it's really wonderful. And thank you so much, Gio. And best of luck for anyone out there who is doing Swift development and cares about testing or test-driven development, which I really think everybody should. Go check out that book. STEPH: I must admit my Swift skills are incredibly rusty, really non-existent at this point. It's been so long since I've been in that world. But I went ahead and purchased a copy just because I think it's really cool. And I suspect there are a lot of testing conversations that, regardless of the specific code examples, still translate. At least, that's the goal that you and I have when we're having these testing conversations. Even if they're not specific to a language, we can still talk about testing paradigms and strategies. So I purchased a copy. I'm really looking forward to reading it. And just to change things up a bit, we're going to start off with a listener question today. So this listener question comes from someone very close to the show. It comes from Thom Obarski. Hi, Thom. And Thom wrote in, "So I heard on a recent podcast I was editing some tension around marketing and open source. Specifically, a little perturbed at ReactJS that not only were people still dependent on a handful of big companies for their frameworks, but they also seem to be implying that the cachet of Facebook and having developer mindshare was not allowing smaller but potentially better solutions to shine through. In your opinion, how much does marketing play in the success of an open-source project framework rather than actually being the best tool for the job?" So a really thoughtful question. Thanks, Thom. Chris, I'm going to kick it over to you. What are your thoughts about this question? CHRIS: Yeah, this is a super interesting one. And thank you so much, Thom, although I'm not sure that you're listening at this point. But we'll send you a note that we are replying to your question. And when I saw this one come through, it was interesting. I really love the kernel of the discussion here, but it is, again, very difficult to tease apart the bits. I think that the way the question was framed is like, oh, there's this bad thing that it's this big company that has this big name, and they're getting by on that. But really, there are these other great frameworks that exist, and they should get more of the mindshare. And honestly, I'm not sure. I think marketing is a critically important aspect of the work that we do both in open source and, frankly, everywhere. And I'm going to clarify what I mean by that because I think it can take different shapes. But in terms of open-source, Facebook has poured a ton of energy and effort and, frankly, work into React as a framework. And they're also battle testing it on facebook.com, a giant website that gets tons of traffic, that sees various use cases, that has all permissions in there. They're really putting it through the wringer in that way. And so there is a ton of value just in terms of this large organization working on and using this framework in the same way that GitHub and using Rails is a thing that is deeply valuable to us as a community. So I think having a large organization associated with something can actually be deeply valuable in terms of what it produces as an outcome for us as consumers of that open-source framework. I think the other idea of sort of the meritocracy of the better framework should win out is, I don't know, it's like a Field of Dreams. Like, if you build it, they will come. It turns out I don't believe that that's actually true. And I think selling is a critical part of everything. And so if I think back to DHH's original video from so many years ago of like, I'm going to make a blog in 15 minutes; look at how much I'm not doing. That was a fantastic sales pitch for this new framework. And he was able to gain a ton of attention by virtue of making this really great sales pitch that sold on the merits of it. But that was marketing. He did the work of marketing there. And I actually think about it in terms of a pull request. So I'm in a small organization. We're in a private repo. There's still marketing. There's still sales to be done there. I have to communicate to someone else the changes that I'm making, why it's valuable to the system, why they should support this change, this code coming into the codebase. And so I think that sort of communication is as critical to the whole conversation. And so the same thing happens at the level of open source. I would love for the best framework to always win, but we also need large communities with Stack Overflow answers and community-supported plugins and things like that. And so it's a really difficult thing to treat marketing as just other, this different, separate thing when, in fact, I think they're all intertwined. And marketing is critically important, and having a giant organization behind something can actually have negative aspects. But I think overall; it really is useful in a lot of cases. Those are some initial thoughts. What do you think, Steph? STEPH: Yeah, those are some great initial thoughts. I really agree with what you said. And I also like how you brought in the comparison of pull requests and how sales is still part of our job as developers, maybe not in the more traditional sense but in the way that we are marketing and communicating with the team. And circling back to what you were saying earlier about a bit how this is phrased, I think I typically agree that there's nothing nefarious that's afoot in regards to just because a larger company is sponsoring an open-source project or they are the ones responsible for it, I don't think there's anything necessarily bad about that. And I agree with the other points that you made where it is helpful that these teams have essentially cultivated a framework or a project that is working for their team, that is helping their company, and then they have decided to open source it. And then, they have the time and energy that they can continue to invest in that project. And it is battle-tested because they are using it for their own projects as well. So it seems pretty natural that a lot of us then would gravitate towards these larger, more heavily supported projects and frameworks. Because then that's going to make our job easier and also give us more trust that we can turn to them when we do need help or have issues. Or, like you mentioned, when we need to look up documentation, we know that that's going to be there versus some of the other smaller projects. They may also be wonderful projects. But if they are someone that's doing this in their spare time just on the weekends and yet I'm looking for something that I need to be incredibly reliable, then it probably makes sense for me to go with something that is supported by a team that's getting essentially paid to work on that project, at least that they're backed by a larger company. Versus if I'm going with a smaller project where someone is doing some wonderful work, but realistically, they're also doing it more on the weekends or in their spare time. So boiling it down, it's similar to what you just said where marketing plays a very big part in open source, and the projects and frameworks that we adopt, and the things that we use. And I don't think that's necessarily a bad thing. CHRIS: Yeah. I think, if anything, it's possibly a double-edged sword. Part of the question was around does React get to benefit just by the cachet of Facebook? But Facebook, as a larger organization sometimes that's a positive thing. Sometimes there's ire that is directed at Facebook as an organization. And as a similar example, my experience with Google and Microsoft as large organizations, particularly backing open-source efforts, has almost sort of swapped over time, where originally, Microsoft there was almost nothing of Microsoft's open-source efforts that I was using. And I saw them as this very different shape of a company that I probably wouldn't be that interested in. And then they have deeply invested in things like GitHub, and VS Code, and TypeScript, and tons of projects that suddenly I'm like, oh, actually, a lot of what I use in the world is coming from Microsoft. That's really interesting. And at the same time, Google has kind of gone in the opposite direction for me. And I've seen some of their movements switch from like, oh Google the underdog to now they're such a large company. And so the idea that the cachet, as the question phrase, of a company is just this uniformly positive thing and that it's perhaps an unfair benefit I don't see that as actually true. But actually, as a more pointed example of this, I recently chose Svelte over React, and that was a conscious choice. And I went back and forth on it a few times, if we're being honest, because Svelte is a much smaller community. It does not have the large organizational backing that React or other frameworks do. And there was a certain marketing effort that was necessary to raise it into my visibility and then for me to be convinced that there is enough there, that there is a team that will maintain it, and that there are reasons to choose that and continue with it. And I've been very happy with it as a choice. But I was very conscious in that choice that I'm choosing something that doesn't have that large organizational backing. Because there's a nicety there of like, I trust that Facebook will probably keep investing in React because it is the fundamental technology of the front end of their platform. So yeah, it's not going to go anywhere. But I made the choice of going with Svelte. So it's an example of where the large organization didn't win out in my particular case. So I think marketing is a part of the work, a part of the conversation. It's part of communication. And so I am less negative on it, I think, than the question perhaps was framed, but as always, it depends. STEPH: Yeah, I'm trying to think of a scenario where I would be concerned about the fact that I'm using open source that's backed by a specific large company or corporation. And the main scenario I can think of is what happens when you conflict or if you have values that conflict with a company that is sponsoring that project? So if you are using an open-source project, but then the main community or the company that then works on that project does something that you really disagree with, then what do you do? How do you feel about that situation? Do you continue to use that open-source project? Do you try to use a different open-source project? And I had that conversation frankly with myself recently, thinking through what to do in that situation and how to view it. And I realize this may not be how everybody views it, and it's not appropriate for all situations. But I do typically look at open-source projects as more than who they are backed by, but the community that's actively working on that project and who it benefits. So even if there is one particular group that is doing something that I don't agree with, that doesn't necessarily mean that wholesale I no longer want to be a part of this community. It just means that I still want to be a part, but I still want to share my concerns that I think a part of our community is going in a direction that I don't agree with or I don't think is a good direction. That's, I guess, how I reason with myself; even if an open-source project is backed by someone that I don't agree with, either one, you can walk away. That seems very complicated, depending on your dependencies. Or two, you find ways to then push back on those values if you feel that the community is headed in a direction that you don't agree with. And that all depends on how comfortable you are and how much power you feel like you have in that situation to express your opinion. So it's a complicated space. CHRIS: Yeah, that is a super subtle edge case of all of this. And I think I aligned with what you said of trying to view an open-source project as more generally the community that's behind it as opposed to even if there's a strong, singular organization behind it. But that said, that's definitely a part of it. And again, it's a double-edged sword. It's not just, oh, giant company; this is great. That giant company now has to consider this. And I think in the case of Facebook and React, that is a wonderful hiring channel for them. Now all the people that use React anywhere are like, "Oh man, I could go work at Facebook on React? That's exciting." That's a thing that's a marketing tool from a hiring perspective for them. But it cuts both ways because suddenly, if the mindshare moves in a different direction, or if Facebook as an organization does something complicated, then React as a community can start to shift away. Maybe you don't move the current project off of it, but perhaps you don't start the next one with it. And so, there are trade-offs and considerations in all directions. And again, it depends. STEPH: Yeah. I think overall, the thing that doesn't depend is marketing matters. It is a real part of the ecosystem, and it will influence our decisions. And so, just circling back to Thom's question, I think it does play a vital role in the choices that we make. CHRIS: Way to stick the landing. STEPH: Thanks. Mid-roll Ad And now a quick break to hear from today's sponsor, Scout APM. Scout APM is leading-edge application performance monitoring that's designed to help Rails developers quickly find and fix performance issues without having to deal with the headache or overhead of enterprise platform feature bloat. With a developer-centric UI and tracing logic that ties bottlenecks to source code, you can quickly pinpoint and resolve those performance abnormalities like N+1 queries, slow database queries, memory bloat, and much more. Scout's real-time alerting and weekly digest emails let you rest easy knowing Scout's on watch and resolving performance issues before your customers ever see them. Scout has also launched its new error monitoring feature add-on for Python applications. Now you can connect your error reporting and application monitoring data on one platform. See for yourself why developers call Scout their best friend and try our error monitoring and APM free for 14 days; no credit card needed. And as an added-on bonus for Bike Shed listeners, Scout will donate $5 to the open-source project of your choice when you deploy. Learn more at scoutapm.com/bikeshed. That's scoutapm.com/bikeshed. STEPH: Changing topics just a bit, what's new in your world? CHRIS: Well, we had what I would call a mini perfect storm this week. We broke the build but in a pretty solid way. And it was a little bit difficult to get it back under control. And it has pushed me ever so slightly forward in my desire to have a fully optimized CI and deploy pipeline. Mostly, I mean that in terms of ratcheting. I'm not actually going to do anything beyond a very small set of configurations. But to describe the context, we use pull requests because that's the way that we communicate. We do code reviews, all that fun stuff. And so there was a particular branch that had a good amount of changes, and then something got merged. And this other pull request was approved. And that person then clicked the rebase and merge button, which I have configured the repository, so that merge commits are not allowed because I'm not interested in that malarkey in our history. But merge commits or rebase and merge. I like that that makes sense. In this particular case, we ran into the very small, subtle edge case of if you click the rebase and merge button, GitHub is now producing a new commit that did not exist before, a new version of the code. So they're taking your changes, and they are rebasing them onto the current main branch. And then they're attempting to merge that in. And A, that was allowed. B, the CI configuration did not require that to be in a passing state. And so basically, in doing that rebase and merge, it produced an artifact in the build that made it fail. And then attempting to unwind that was very complicated. So basically, the rebase produced...there were duplicate changes within a given file. So Git didn't see it as a conflict because the change was made in two different parts of the file, but those were conflicting changes. So Git was like, this seems like it's fine. I can merge this, no problem. But it turns out from a functional perspective; it did not work. The build failed. And so now our main branch was failing and then trying to unwind that it just was surprisingly difficult to unwind that. And it really highlighted the importance of keeping the main branch green, keeping the build always passing. And so, I configured a few things in response to this. There is a branch protection rule that you can enable. And let me actually pull up the specific configuration that I set up. So I now have enabled require status checks to pass before merging, which, if we're being honest, I thought that was the default. It turns out it was not the default. So we are now requiring status checks to pass before merging. I'm fully aware of the awkward, painful like, oh no, the build is failing but also, we have a bug. We need to deploy this. We must get something merged in. So hopefully, if and when that situation presents itself, I will turn this off or somehow otherwise work around it. But for now, I would prefer to have this as a yeah; this is definitely a configuration we want. So require status checks to pass before merging and then require branches to be up to date before merging. So the button that does the rebase and merge, I don't want that to actually do a rebase on GitHub. I want the branch to already be up to date. Basically, I only ever want fast-forward merges on our main branch. So all code should be ahead of main, and we are simply updating what main points at. We are not creating new code. That code has run on CI, that version of the code specifically. We are fully rebased and up to date on top of main, and that's how we're going. STEPH: All of that is super interesting. I have a question about the workflow. I want to make sure I'm understanding it correctly. So let's say that I have issued a PR, and then someone else has merged into the main branch. So now my PR is behind me, and I don't have that latest commit. With the new configuration, can I still use the rebase and merge, or will I need to rebase locally and then push up my branch before I can merge into main but at least using the GitHub UI? CHRIS: I believe that you would be forced to rebase locally, force push, and then CI would rebuild, and that's what it is. So I think that's what require branches to be up to date before merging means. So that's my hope. That is the intention here. I do realize that's complicated. So this requirement, which I like, because again, I really want the idea that no, no, no, we, the developers, are in charge of that final state. That final state should always run as part of a build of CI on our pull request/branch before going into main. So no code should be new. There should be no new commits that have never been tested before going into main. That's my strong belief. I want that world. I realize that's...I don't know. Maybe I'm getting pedantic, or I'm a micromanager of the Git history or whatever. I'm fine with any of those insults that people want to lob at me. That's fine. But that's what I feel. That said, this is a nuisance. I'm fully aware of that. And so imagine the situation where we got a couple of different things that have been in flight. People have been working on different...say there are three pull requests that are all coming to completion at the same time. Then you start to go to merge something, and you realize, oh no, somebody else just merged. So you rebase, and then you wait for CI to build. And just as the CI is completing, somebody else merges something, and you're like, ah, come on. And so then you have to one more time rebase, push, wait for the build to be green. So I get that that is not an ideal situation. Right now, our team is three developers. So there are a few enough of us that I feel like this is okay. We can manage this via human intervention and just deal with the occasional weight. But in the back of my mind, of course, I want to find a better solution to this. So what I've been exploring…there's a handful of different utilities that I'm looking at, but they are basically merged queues as an idea. So there are three that I'm looking at, or maybe just two, but there's mergify.io, which is a hosted solution that does this sort of thing. And then Shopify has a merge queue implementation that they're running. So the idea with this is when you as a developer are ready to merge something, you add a label to it. And when you add that label, there's some GitHub Action or otherwise some workflow in the background that sees that this has happened and now adds it to a merge queue. So it knows all of the different things that might want to be merged. And this is especially important as the team grows so that you don't get that contention. You can just say, "Yes, I would like my changes to go out into production." And so, when you label it, it then goes into this merge queue. And the background system is now going to take care of any necessary rebases. It's going to sequence them, so it's not just constantly churning all of the branches. It's waiting because it knows the order that they're ideally going to go out in. If CI fails for any of them because rebasing suddenly, you're in an inconsistent state; if your build fails, then it will kick you out of the merge queue. It will let you know. So it will send you a notification in some manner and say, "Hey, hey, hey, you got to come look at this again. You've been kicked out of the merge queue. You're not going to production." But ideally, it adds that layer of automation to, frankly, this nuisance of having to keep things up to date and always wanting code to be run on CI and on a pull request before it gets into main. Then the ideal version is when it does actually merge your code, it pings you in Slack or something like that to say, "Hey, your changes just went out to production." Because the other thing I'm hoping for is a continuous deployment. STEPH: The idea of a merge queue sounds really interesting. I've never worked with a process like that. And one of the benefits I can see is if I know I'm ready for something to go like if I'm waiting on a green build and I'm like, hey, as soon as this is green, I'd really like for it to get merged. Then currently, I'm checking in on it, so I will restart the build. And then, every so often, I'm going back to say, "Okay, are you green? Are you green? Can I emerge?" But if I have a merge queue, I can say, "Hey, merge queue, when this is green, please go and merge it for me." If I'm understanding the behavior correctly, that sounds really nifty. CHRIS: I think that's a distinct but useful aspect of this is the idea that when you as a developer decide this PR is ready to go, you don't need to wait for either the current build or any subsequent builds. If there are rebases that need to happen, you basically say, "I think this code's good to go. We've gotten the necessary approvals. We've got the buy-in and the teams into this code." So cool, I now market as good. And you can walk away from it, and you will be notified either if it fails to get merged or if it successfully gets merged and deployed. So yes, that dream of like, you don't have to sit there watching the pot boil anymore. STEPH: Yeah, that sounds nice. I do have to ask you a question. And this is related to one of the blog posts that you and I love deeply and reference fairly frequently. And it's the one that's written by German Velasco about Say No to More Process, and Say Yes to Trust. And I'm wondering, based on the pain that you felt from this new commit, going into main and breaking the main build, how do you feel about that balance of we spent time investigating this issue, and it may or may not happen again, and we're also looking into these new processes to avoid this from happening? I'm curious what your thought process is there because it seems like it's a fair amount of work to invest in the new process, but maybe that's justified based on the pain that you felt from having to fix the build previously. CHRIS: Oh, I love the question. I love the subtle pushback here. I love this frame of mind. I really love that blog post. German writes incredible blog posts. And this is one that I just keep coming back to. In this particular case, when this situation occurred, we had a very brief...well, it wasn't even that brief because actually unwinding the situation was surprisingly painful, and we had some changes that we really wanted to get out, but now the build was broken. And so that churn and slowdown of our build pipeline and of our ability to actually get changes out to production was enough pain that we're like, okay, cool. And then the other thing is we actually all were in agreement that this is the way we want things to work anyway, that idea that things should be rebased and tested on CI as part of a pull request. And then we're essentially only doing fast-forward merges on the main branch, or we're fast forward merging main into this new change. That's the workflow that we wanted. So this configuration was really just adding a little bit of software control to the thing that we wanted. So it was an existing process in our minds. This is the thing we were trying to do. It's just kind of hard to keep up with, frankly. But it turns out GitHub can manage it for us and enforce the process that we wanted. So it wasn't a new process per se. It was new automation to help us hold ourselves to the process that we had chosen. And again, it's minimally painful for the team given the size that we're at now, but I am looking out to the future. And to be clear, this is one of the many things that fall on the list of; man, I would love to have some time to do this, but this is obviously not a priority right now. So I'm not allowed to do this. This is explicitly on the not allowed to touch list, but someday. I'm very excited about this because this does fundamentally introduce some additional work in the pipeline, and I don't want that. Like you said, is this process worth it for the very small set of times that it's going to have a bad outcome? But in my mind, the better version, that down the road version where we have a merge queue, is actually a better version overall, even with just a tiny team of three developers that are maybe never even conflicting in our merges, except for this one standout time that happens once every three months or whatever. This is still nicer. I want to just be able to label a pull request and walk away and have it do the thing that we have decided as a team that we want. So that's the dream. STEPH: Oh, I love that phrasing, to label a pull request and be able to walk away. Going back to our marketing, that really sells that merge queue to me. [laughs] Mid-roll Ad And now we're going to take a quick break to tell you about today's sponsor, Orbit. Orbit is mission control for community builders. Orbit offers data analytics, reporting, and insights across all the places your community exists in a single location. Orbit's origins are in the open-source and developer relations communities. And that continues today with an active open-source culture in an accessible and documented API. With thousands of communities currently relying on Orbit, they are rapidly growing their engineering team. The company is entirely remote-first with team members around the world. You can work from home, from an Orbit outpost in San Francisco or Paris, or find yourself a coworking spot in your city. The tech stack of the main orbit app is Ruby on Rails with JavaScript on the front end. If you're looking for your next role with an empathetic product-driven team that prides itself on work-life balance, professional development, and giving back to the larger community, then consider checking out the Orbit careers page for more information. Bonus points if working in a Ruby codebase with a Ruby-oriented team gives you a lot of joy. Find out more at orbit.love/weloveruby. CHRIS: To be clear, and this is to borrow on some of Charity Majors' comments around continuous deployment and whatnot, is a developer should stay very close to the code if they are merging it. Because if we're doing continuous deployment, that's going to go out to production. If anything's going to happen, I want that individual to be aware. So ideally, there's another set of optimizations that I need to make on top of this. So we've got the merge queue, and that'll be great. Really excited about that. But if we're going to lean into this, I want to optimize our CI pipeline and our deployment pipeline as much as possible such that even in the worst case where there's three different builds that are fighting for contention and trying to get out, the longest any developer might go between labeling a pull request and saying, "This is good to go," and it getting out to production, again, even if they're contending with other PRs, is say 10, 15 minutes, something like that. I want Slack to notify them and them to then re-engage and keep an eye on things, see if any errors pop up, anything like that that they might need to respond to. Because they're the one that's got the context on the code at that point, and that context is decaying. The minute you've just merged a pull request and you're walking away from that code, the next day, you're like, what did I work on? I don't remember that at all. That code doesn't exist anymore in my brain. And so,,, staying close to that context is incredibly important. So there's a handful of optimizations that I've looked at in terms of the CircleCI build. I've talked about my not rebuilding when it actually gets fast-forward merged because we've already done that build on the pull request. I'm being somewhat pointed in saying this has to build on a pull request. So if it did just build on a pull request, let's not rebuild it on main because it's identically the same commit. CircleCI, I'm looking at you. Give me a config button for that, please. I would really love that config button. But there are a couple of other things that I've looked at. There's RSpec::Retry from NoRedInk, which will allow for some retry semantics. Because it will be really frustrating if your build breaks and you fall out of the merge queue. So let's try a little bit of retry logic on there, particularly around feature specs, because that's where this might happen. There's Knapsack Pro which is a really interesting thing that I've looked at, which does parallelization of your RSpec test suite. But it does it in a different way than say Circle does. It actually runs a build queue, and each test gets sent over, and they have build agents on their side. And it's an interesting approach. I'm intrigued. I think it could use some nice speed-ups. There's esbuild on the Heroku side so that our assets build so much more quickly. There are lots of things. I want to make it very fast. But again, this is on the not allowed to do it list. [laughs] STEPH: I love how most of the world has a to-do list, and you have this not-allowed to-do list that you're adding items to. And I'm really curious what all is on the not allowed to touch lists or not allowed to-do list. [laughs] CHRIS: I think this might be inherent to being a developer is like when I see a problem, I want to fix it. I want to optimize it. I want to tweak it. I want to make it so that that never happens again. But plenty of things...coming back to German's post of Say No to More Process, some things shouldn't be fixed, or the cost of fixing is so much higher than the cost of just letting it happen again and dealing with it manually at that moment. And so I think my inherent nature as a developer there's a voice in my head that is like, fix everything that's broken. And I'm like, sorry. Sorry, brain, I do not have that kind of time. And so I have to be really choosy about where the time goes. And this extends to the team as well. We need to be intentional around what we're building. Actually, there's a feeling that I've been feeling more acutely than ever, but it's the idea of this trade-off or optimization between speed and getting features out into the world and laying the right fundamentals. We're still very early on in this project, and I want to make sure we're thinking about things intentionally. I've been on so many projects where it's many years after it started and when I ask someone, "Hey, why do your background jobs work that way? That's a little weird." And they're like, "Yeah, that was just a thing that happened, and then it never changed. And then, we copied it and duplicated, and that pattern just got reinforced deeply within the app. And at this point, it would cost too much to change." I've seen that thing play out so many times at so many different organizations that I'm overwhelmed with that knowledge in the back of my head. And I'm like, okay, I got to get it just right. But I can't take the time that is necessary to get it, quote, unquote, "Just right." I do not have that kind of time. I got to ship some features. And this tension is sort of the name of the game. It's the thing I've been doing for my entire career. But now, given the role that I have with a very early-stage startup, I've never felt it more acutely. I've never had to be equally as concerned with both sides of that. Both matter all the more now than they ever have before, and so I'm kind of existing in that space. STEPH: I really like that phrasing of that space because that deeply resonates with me as well. And that not allowed to-do list I have a similar list. For me, it's just called a wishlist. And so it's a wishlist that I will revisit every so often, but honestly, most things on there don't get done. And then I'll clear it out every so often when I feel it's not likely that I'm going to get to it. And then I'll just start fresh. So I also have a similar this is what I would like to do if I had the time. And I agree that there's this inclination to automate as well. As soon as we have to do something that felt painful once, then we feel like, oh, we should automate it. And that's a conversation that I often have with myself is at what point is the cost of automation worthwhile versus should we just do this manually until we get to that point? So I love those nuanced conversations around when is the right time to invest further in this, and what is the impact? And what is the cost of it? And what are the trade-offs? And making that decision isn't always clear. And so I think that's why I really enjoy these conversations because it's not a clear rubric as to like, this is when you invest, and this is when you don't. But I do feel like being a consultant has helped me hone those skills because I am jumping around to different teams, and I'm recognizing they didn't do this thing. Maybe they didn't address this or invest in it, and it's working for them. There are some oddities. Like you said, maybe I'll ask, "Why is this? It seems a little funky. What's the history?" And they'll be like, "Yeah, it was built in a hurry, but it works. And so there hasn't been any churn. We don't have any issues with it, so we have just left it." And that has helped reinforce the idea that just because something could be improved doesn't mean it's worthwhile to improve it. Circling back to your original quest where you are looking to improve the process for merging and ensuring that CI stays green, I do like that you highlighted the fact that we do need to just be able to override settings. So that's something that has happened recently this week for me and my client work where we have had PRs that didn't have a green build because we have some flaky tests that we are actively working on. But we recognize that they're flaky, and we don't want that to block us. I'm still shipping work. So I really appreciate the consideration where we want to optimize so that everyone has an easy merging experience. We know things are green. It's trustworthy. But then we also have the ability to still say, "No, I am confident that I know what I'm doing here, and I want to merge it anyways, but thank you for the warning." CHRIS: And the constant pendulum swing of over-correcting in various directions I've experienced that. And as you said, in the back of my mind, I'm like, oh, I know that this setting I'm going to need a way to turn this setting off. So I want to make sure that, most importantly, I'm not the only one on the team who can turn that off because the day that I am away on vacation and the build is broken, and we have a critical bug that we need to fix, somebody else needs to be able to do that. So that's sort of the story in my head. At the same time, though, I've worked on so many teams where they're like, oh yeah, the build has been broken for seven weeks. We have a ticket in the backlog to fix that. And it's like, no, the build has to not be broken for that long. And so I agree with what you were saying of consulting has so usefully helped me hone where I fall on these various spectrums. But I do worry that I'm just constantly over-correcting in one direction or the other. I'm never actually at an optimum. I am just constantly whatever the most recent thing was, which is really impacting my thinking on this. And I try to not do that, but it's hard. STEPH: Oh yeah. I'm totally biased towards my most recent experiences, and whatever has caused me the most pain or success recently. I'm definitely skewed in that direction. CHRIS: Yeah, I definitely have the recency bias, and I try to have a holistic view of all of the things I've seen. There's actually a particular one that I don't want to pat myself on the back for because it's not a good thing. But currently, our test suite, when it runs, there's just a bunch of noise. There's a bunch of other stuff that gets printed out, like a bunch of it. And I'm reminded of a tweet from Kevin Newton, a friend of the show, and I just pulled it up here. "Oh, the lengths I will go to avoid warnings in my terminal, especially in the middle of my green dots. Don't touch my dots." It's a beautiful beauty. He actually has a handful about the green dots. And I feel this feel. When I run my test suite, I just want a sea of green dots. That's all I want to see. But right now, our test suite is just noise. It's so much noise. And I am very proud of...I feel like this is a growth moment for me where I've been like, you know what? That is not the thing to fix today. We can deal with some noise amongst the green dots for now. Someday, I'm just going to lose it, and I'm going to fix it, and it's going to come back to green dots. [chuckles] STEPH: That sounds like such a wonderful children's book or Dr. Seuss. Oh, the importance of green dots or, oh, the places green dots will take you. CHRIS: Don't touch my dots. [laughter] STEPH: Okay. Maybe a slightly aggressive Dr. Seuss, but I still really like it. CHRIS: A little more, yeah. STEPH: On that note of our love of green dots, shall we wrap up? CHRIS: Let's wrap up. The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes, as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. All: Byeeeeeee!!! Announcer: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

The Loud Boys
#82 - Me Love You Ryan Long Time (w/ Ryan Long)

The Loud Boys

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 81:07


Comedian Ryan Long joins Robbie Goodwin, Dalton Pruitt, & Joe Gorman to discuss Dalton's talent for going to concerts, reaction videos, Ryan's switch from music to comedy, CDs, talking to a date, Trump shirts and plenty more.Subscribe to our Patreon for exclusive weekly episodes, bonus content, and more!: https://www.patreon.com/loudboys#loudboys #comedy #loudboyspodcast #daltonpruitt #robbiegoodwin #joegorman #ryanlongFOLLOW THE WHOLE SHOW!:Ryan Long (Guest):http://instagram.com/ryanlongcomedyhttps://twitter.com/ryanlongcomedyThe Loud Boys:http://facebook.com/loudboyspodhttps://www.instagram.com/loudboyspod/https://twitter.com/loudboyspodRobbie Goodwinhttps://twitter.com/robbiegoodwinhttps://www.instagram.com/robbiegoodwin/https://www.youtube.com/user/kramerica2k4/featuredJoe Gormanhttps://twitter.com/joewgorman?lang=enhttps://www.instagram.com/joewgormanDalton Pruitthttps://twitter.com/newdalton69420https://www.instagram.com/saltydalty69420/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Podcast
Feel The Wrath - Episode One With Jesse Simmers - 1st Vocalist Of PLUTOCRACY - 2021

Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 55:58


Welcome to Feel The Wrath. A new Podcast venture I'm doing interviewing friends, family and people I admire. And an excuse for me to talk to people I haven't had a conversation with in YEARS. Also a way to promote what they or their family members are working on or doing. I have a whole list of people that have agreed to be on this so SUBSCRIBE to this channel PLEASE to keep updated every time I post a new episode. This is Episode One. I talk with my LONG TIME homie Jesse Simmers. He was the FIRST vocalist for the band PLUTOCRACY and goes over the very early history of the band and its creation. A few memories about our BROTHER Kindred McCune AKA Stinkweed. He also speaks about his daughter Caitlyn, who is a PRODIGY professional surfer at the age of 15. This was A LOT of fun to do. I love being able to talk with BROTHER'S like Jesse and go over memories from the past. This is the type of call I never wanted to end. But my current software I am using (ZOOM) only allows me 40 minute sessions at a time. (If anyone knows of a better software to use for these type of podcasts please let me know.) Enjoy this episode. There are MANY more to come. I can't wait. Go check out KurleeDaddee.com for more video's.

Minority Reportz Podcast
I WAS ANGRY WITH MY DAD FOR A LONG TIME AND WHAT HELPED ME GET OVER IT WAS HE CAME FROM A TERRIBLE FAMILY-Marty Ross (Comedian) Ep.73

Minority Reportz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 62:58


Mona invites Marty Ross (Comedian on AGT) to discuss his tumultuous relationship with his father, starting stand up in his 60s and making his debut on AGT.SUBSCRIBE TO OUR CHANNEL FOR ALL THE LATEST INTERVIEWS WITH THE HOTTEST ARTISTS AND CHANGE MAKERS. If you enjoyed our podcast, please SUBSCRIBE ON APPLE PODCAST AND LEAVE A 5 STAR WRITTEN REVIEW. FOLLOW USYOUTUBE: @MonaShaikhComedianFACEBOOK: @MonaShaikhComedianINSTAGRAM: @monascomedyTWITTER: @monascomedyWEBSITE: www.minorityreportz.comLISTEN & SUBSCRIBE TO OUR WEEKLY PODCAST. NEW EPISODE EVERY WEEK ON SPOTIFY, ITUNES AND Apple Music and all major streaming services.***MINORITY IS THE NEW MAJORITY***

Fanboys
Episode #439 - Long time no pod

Fanboys

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 56:40


00:02:04 Apple Event Nachberichterstattung 00:16:42 iOS 15 00:29:42 Lol. Amazon Astro 00:32:17 Prusa i3 MK3S+ 00:35:33 Mary Robinette Kowal: Lady Astronaut series 00:40:31 Deathloop 00:44:03 Judith Moffit: The Coup Series 00:50:24 Talking Sopranos 00:55:02 Rausschmeisser

Chat with Betty
S2/E 17: The Insiders Secrets To Everything Beauty, Wellness, and Skincare - But The Healthy Way- With Jeannie Jarnot, Founder Of Beauty Heroes

Chat with Betty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 24:18


#42 Season 2 - Episode 17: On Today's Episode we are joined by Jeannie Jarnot, the Founder of Beauty Heroes. Longtime spa director and healthy beauty expert, Jeannie Jarnot, is on a mission to deliver beauty you can trust, one Hero product at a time. After uncovering the prevalence of toxic ingredients in the spa industry – and how they might have contributed to her own infertility – Jeannie began her quest to make healthy beauty the rule rather than the exception. The complexity of navigating cosmetic ingredients only fueled her passion to make it simple to discover safe, effective and luxurious skincare. Today, as the founder of Beauty Heroes, Jeannie brings a lifetime of beauty, wellness and ritual to her company and her customers, delivering healthy beauty through the thrill of Discovery. By working only with brands who have an unwavering commitment to ethical sourcing, purity and quality, she has become the industry standard bearer on ingredient integrity, establishing her company as the most trusted source for healthy beauty. Jeannie works directly with brand founders to hand select, test and approve each product featured by Beauty Heroes. Yet, Jeannie's curation process is more than skin deep; she is passionate about championing progressive brands that make sustainability and waste reduction central to their business model. Feeling called to have a deeper conversation about beauty and wellness for people and the planet, Jeannie pioneered Project Blue Beauty, a platform to connect conscious consumers with beauty brands that are going from ‘green' to ‘blue', shining a spotlight on brands that are not just minimizing their environmental footprint, but actually leaving the planet better than they found it. Beauty Heroes is walking the talk and embracing Blue Beauty through its philanthropic partnership with One Tree Planted. This collaboration was the inspiration behind Beauty Heroes' first lifestyle products – glass straws and eco-luxurious utensil sets, available in the Beauty Store. Jeannie takes a 360° look at the products she curates for Beauty Heroes, ensuring ethical sourcing, conscious packaging and brand values are carefully considered. Through Project Blue Beauty, Jeannie and her team celebrate initiatives, share best practices and inspire action." Social: @beautyheroes + @jeanniejarnot Website: https://www.beauty-heroes.com Chat with Betty The Podcast: It's fun, raw, inspiring, and self growth focused - join in on the chats today! Follow on social for all the behind the scenes - IG: @bettygulko Twitter: @bettygulko TikTok: @betty.gulko CH: @bettygulko Web: www.bettygulko.com FOLLOW /SUBSCRIBE / RATE / REVIEW / SHARE xx Betty, your GLOW UP bestie Contact: chatwithbettypodcast@gmail.com Betty now offers: 1:1 Mindset and Confidence Consulting ~ Available Today! *Confidence on Video *Confidence in Dating *Confidence with your Voice *Confidence in elevating your life babeZ* --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/betty-gulko/support

Texas Rangers Baseball Podcast
Episode #6 T.R. Sullivan

Texas Rangers Baseball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 62:00


Longtime beat writer for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram and MLB.com T.R. Sullivan joins Jeff and John. He has started writing his memoirs for the Texas Rangers Newsletter and discusses his latest story about the darkest period of Texas Rangers baseball and how it compares to today. Then, Jeff and John talk about the current 40-man roster and the decisions that have to be made by the end of November. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/txrangerspod/support

IGN.com - Daily Fix (Video)
PlayStation Studios Newest Acquisition Was a Long Time Coming - IGN Daily Fix

IGN.com - Daily Fix (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021


On today's IGN The Fix: Games, Sony Interactive Entertainment has announced yet another studio acquisition - Bluepoint Games, the developers of the Shadow of the Colossus remake on PS4, and, most recently, the PS5 remake of Demon's Souls. Bluepoint and PlayStation have worked closely together for years, but the news comes after the studio's latest successful release, as Sony confirmed Demon's Souls has sold more than 1.4 million copies since release. IGN spoke with PlayStation Studios Head Hermen Hulst and Bluepoint President Marco Thrush to learn more about the acquisition, PlayStation's overall studio strategy, and about how, though Bluepoint is steeped in PlayStation remaster and remake expertise, it wants to explore original ideas. Christopher Judge, the voice behind Kratos in 2018's God of War and the upcoming sequel, has said that his surgery was the reason that God of War: Ragnarok was delayed from its original 2021 release window. Judge shared this story on Twitter following God of War being crowned the champion of IGN's Best Video Game of All Time Bracket. He Quote Tweeted a Tweet from God of War's engineering lead Jeet Shroff that was responding to the victory and he then continued to thank the fans and send love to his God of War family. Grand Theft Auto: The Trilogy - The Definitive Edition - which one could assume would contain remastered versions of Grand Theft Auto III, Vice City, and San Andreas - has been rated by Korea's Game Rating and Administration Committee. This rating was spotted by those like @Nibellion on Twitter, and it appears to confirm Kotaku's report from August 2021 that said these remasters - all of which would be remastered in Unreal Engine - are on their way to PS5, PS4, Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One, PC, Stadia, mobile devices, and even the Nintendo Switch. Akeem has all that in your Daily Fix!

Diner Talks With James
The Pursuit of Truth with Emmy-Nominated Reporter and Anchor, Joe Mauceri

Diner Talks With James

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 71:43


Longtime friend and Emmy-nominated anchor and reporter, Joe Mauceri, slid into a Brooklyn diner booth with me for this episode! Joe and I talked about a few childhood memories and what kind of burger you're allowed to order in a diner. After asking Joe what he wanted to be when he was a kid, we learn about the home videos where his on-camera experience started and it was very cool to hear how he went from there to being a journalism/broadcast major at Syracuse. I asked Joe how he finds places to inject his personality when doing the news, which is typically quite serious and heavy. We also talked about the role that bias does and doesn't play as a sports reporter. The current state of the media in our country is fascinating. I asked Joe a few questions about being in the field of journalism and what advice he would give to newcomers. We rounded the conversation out with me asking Joe how he is raising his children to have an open mind and why being a Dad matters to him. One of Joe's quotes that I loved was, “I can't help you if you don't tell me the truth.” Another special diner talk in the books, y'all!    About the Guest:  Joe Mauceri is a Brooklyn Boy with a large extended family, but he's an only child. He is married to my amazing wife Erin and they have two awesome children Maddox 4 and Lucas 2. Joe lives four blocks from where he grew up, loves his mom's cooking and sports. Joe is a sports anchor and reporter for WPIX in New York City. He is also an entrepreneur who has started 3 businesses. Joe is an adrenaline junkie who has been sky diving, bungee jumping, and zip-lining. Last, but not least, he is a morning person, but works nights! Connect with Joe and learn more: www.dadhab.com instagram.com/joethereporter instagram.com/TheDadHabit About the Host:  Friends! Here's a somewhat stuffy bio of me:   I am an author, professional speaker, coach, host, and entrepreneur. My first book, Leading Imperfectly: The value of being authentic for leaders, professionals, and human beings, is available wherever people buy books. I speak internationally to willing and unwilling attendees about authenticity, vulnerability, and leadership. My clients include American Express, General Electric (GE), Accenture, Yale University, The Ohio State University, and many others. As a speaker, I am doing the two things I loves the most: making people think and making people laugh!  I host my own events multiple times a year. They are 2-day events called Living Imperfectly Live (and sometimes they are 1-day virtual events). They are a space where humans from every walk of life can come together to be part of a community on the pursuit of badassery. The goal is to help attendees start living the life we say we want to live. Alas, you're here because of an idea I had a number of years ago and didn't think I was good enough to pull it off. I finally acted on it and alas Diner Talks with James was born! As you can see from what I do in my professional life, Diner Talks is alligned with everything I believe in and teach.  If this wasn't dry enough, and you would like to know more info about my speaking, events, or coaching feel free to check out my website: JamesTRobo.com. Let's Be Friends on Social Media! Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jamestrobo (https://www.instagram.com/jamestrobo) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jamestrobo (https://www.facebook.com/jamestrobo) LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jamesrobilotta/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jamesrobilotta/) YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/JamesRobilottaCSP (https://www.youtube.com/JamesRobilottaCSP) Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/JamesTRobo (https://www.twitter.com/JamesTRobo) Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or...

Prime Time Crime
73. R. Kelly Lands in Prison for a Long Time

Prime Time Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 18:16


Infamous R&B recording artist, R. Kelly, won't be flying after all. Kelly, whose real name is Robert Sylvester Kelly, was found guilty on all counts of sex trafficking and sex with minors by a New York jury. He faces decades in prison. prosecutors called more than 45 witnesses against him, the trial took six weeks of taxpayer's money, BUT the jury took just nine hours to convict him. To a defense attorney, that's a slap in the face. On this episode of Prime Time Crime, Katrina Daniel and her guest Criminal Defense Attorney, Joe Rosenbaum, dissect the R. Kelly case. Follow the show: Instagram: primetimecrime_ Twitter: primetimecrime_ External clip from (https://youtu.be/pafJHx-o21k) Host: Katrina Daniel Produced: Carmen Lucas Edited: Wyatt Peake In association with legalvideoconcepts.com

Shared Practices | Your Dental Roadmap to Practice Ownership | Custom Made for the New Dentist

Longtime listeners and bingers get hooked on Shared Practices from Season 2 on valuation. While our early seasons withstand the test of time, Steven and Andrew help refine the focus of valuation as we learn: Evaluation > Valuation. Every time. Steven@SharedPractices.com Andrew@SharedPractices.com

Educational AD Podcast
WHAT'S UP With Upchurch? Jessica Upchurch, CAA - longtime AD now with HomeTown Ticketing shares!

Educational AD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 16:48


Each Wednesday we will be offering another NEW feature of the Educational AD Podcast as Jessica Upchurch, CAA offers her take on the world of Educational Athletics! Jess is a longtime High School AD in Florida who recently joined the Home Town Ticketing Team and for the first couple of shows, she will share some of the really cool reasons YOU should be using Home Town! THIS is The Educational AD Podcast! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/educational-ad-podcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/educational-ad-podcast/support

Sugar Mom by Robin Marshall
Sugar Mom wants to Catch UP!

Sugar Mom by Robin Marshall

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 22:29


Where have I BEEN? Not an easy question!! It's been a LONG TIME since we've spoken! It's the same as if I asked YOU, "What's New?" What could you possibly SAY?? This is my quick recap and reason as to Why I'm Back. I also missed you. No Lie. It meant a lot to me to know that you were there listening, understanding and relating! Time to #Catch-Up! Please do subscribe if you're one of my new peeps! STARS are my friends! For God's Sake, I used to do Gold Star Charts with all my kids! They felt like a million bucks with each gold star... Now I Know how they Felt!!! LOL! Look at my art here and pay no attention to the prices until we talk! https://www.saatchiart.com/account/artworks/1743095?category=paintings Much Love and continued podcasts from, #SugarMombyRobinMarshall See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Just As Special
How do bio kids respond to fostering? (Part 2 of Can you just sit with me in this mess?)

Just As Special

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 16:42


Longtime foster parent and foster parent trainer, Kaleo George, discusses how each of her 3 kids are impacted by their family's foster care journey.   

Gravity Leadership Podcast
Brian Zahnd Deconstructs Deconstruction

Gravity Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 71:21


Longtime friend of Gravity Brian Zahnd returns to chat about his new book, When Everything’s on Fire: Faith Forged from the Ashes. As is usual with Brian, we got into some unexpected territory and loved every second of it. Brian Zahnd is the founder and lead pastor of Word of Life Church, a non-denominational Christian […] The post Brian Zahnd Deconstructs Deconstruction appeared first on Gravity Leadership.

School Leadership Series with Daniel Bauer

Host Daniel Bauer provides weekday motivation for the modern educator. Listeners can expect tools and tricks from a variety of sources: inspirational books, stories from the mastermind, and weekly challenges. Learn more and listen to the category defining leadership conversation for school leaders, Better Leaders Better Schools at https://betterleadersbetterschools.com   Copyright © 2021 Better Leaders Better Schools

The Marketing Book Podcast
BONUS A Few Ideas From the First 350 Books

The Marketing Book Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 41:41


About this Bonus Episode: Not too long ago I was interviewed by Philip Stutts on his Undefeated Marketing Podcast. Longtime listeners may recognize his name since Philip has been a guest on The Marketing Book Podcast twice: The first time for his book Fire Them Now: The 7 Lies Digital Marketers Sell...And the Truth about Political Strategies that Help Businesses Win More recently to talk about his newest book, The Undefeated Marketing System: How to Grow Your Business and Build Your Audience Using the Secret Formula That Elects Presidents He was also on the show for part of the limited-time series Authors in Quarantine Getting Cocktails when I produced 66 episodes during the lockdown in 2020, and he was one of the primary reasons I started doing it. Philip has a very interesting background. For many many years, he has been a political consultant and has worked on over 1,200 political campaigns including U.S. presidential races in the United States. His political media firm is Go Big Media. Over the years a number of his clients asked for business marketing advice so he later established a separate marketing firm just for businesses Win Big Media. Much of his marketing advice is based on the realities of what has worked well for marketing candidates, and I find that very intriguing and enormously effective these days. Philip and I were introduced by another guest on the show, David Meerman Scott, author of several books including The New Rules of Marketing and PR: How to Use Content Marketing, Podcasting, Social Media, AI, Live Video, and Newsjacking to Reach Buyers Directly (7th edition), and Phillip later introduced me to the legendary Jay Abraham whom I was able to interview on the podcast about his book, The Sticking Point Solution: 9 Ways to Move Your Business from Stagnation to Stunning Growth. Phillip has really enjoyed being on The Marketing Book Podcast and has heard from a lot of marketing book podcast listeners, and he thought that this short interview might be of interest to my listeners because we talked about some key ideas from the first 350 books that have been on the show, and since last week I did publish episode 350 with Dorie Clark about her new book, The Long Game: How to Be a Long-Term Thinker in a Short-Term World, this seemed like a nice celebratory bonus. Enjoy! -Douglas Burdett, host of The Marketing Book Podcast Click here for this episode's website page to access all the links mentioned during the interview: https://www.salesartillery.com/marketing-book-podcast/ideas-350-books  

The Drive with Jack
* Drew Stanton, Former MSU & Long-time NFL Quarterback

The Drive with Jack

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 29:08


Convoy Conversations
Here for a Good Time Not a Long Time

Convoy Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 75:04


Is the way to the superior man a bunch of bullshit? Living care free is living stress free. And enjoy things with the understanding that everything good and bad must come to an end. And will your friends of today be your friends of tomorrow?

Extra Cheese
#PackersDaily: They'll talk about that one for a long time...

Extra Cheese

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 27:10


Aaron chats with Packers fans worldwide after the morning after the team's thrilling Week 3 victory over the San Francisco 49ers.

NosillaCast Apple Podcast
NC #855 Synology Encrypted Hyper Backup, AfterShokz Headphones, Nuke and Pave, Blog Posts Take a Long Time

NosillaCast Apple Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 40:21


Encrypted Off-Site Backups with Synology Hyper Backup AfterShokz OpenMove Headphones – A Niche Joy – by Jill from the North Woods Nuke and Pave Your iPhone, It's Fun! Why My Blog Posts Take So Long to Write Join the Conversation: allison@podfeet.com podfeet.com/slack podfeet.com/facebook Support the Show (Affiliate Links): Patreon Donation PayPal one-time donation Parallels Toolbox Affiliate - get 3 mos free Learn through MacSparky Field Guides Shop Podfeet Shirts Backblaze One Free Month

The Zone Sports Network - Utah Jazz
The Big Show - Utah Jazz Insider Report 09/24/21 - Holly Rowe, reporter & analyst

The Zone Sports Network - Utah Jazz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 18:31


Longtime sports reporter and analyst Holly Rowe was announced as the newest member of the Utah Jazz television broadcast team and stopped by The Big Show on Friday afternoon to talk about what she's looking forward to learning, reporting, and covering this coming 2021-22 NBA season.

Living on Earth
Big Oil Under Fire for Climate Disinformation; “They Knew”: The Feds' 50-Year Climate Failure; Widespread Youth Anxiety About Climate and more

Living on Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 51:15


Industry and the US federal government have long worked in tandem to sideline climate concerns and continue to promote Earth-warming fossil fuels. Now the US House Oversight and Reform Committee has summoned top executives from Exxon, Shell, BP and Chevron and two affiliated lobbying groups to testify in front of a committee hearing in October, as part of an ongoing investigation into the fossil fuel industry's promotion of climate disinformation.   Also, for the past 50 years, the US government has known about the problem of climate change but has continued to promote fossil fuel development and done little to avert a crisis. Longtime environmental leader Gus Speth joins us to discuss his new book “They Knew.”   And a recent study found that three-quarters of young people surveyed believe the future is frightening because of climate change. What young people are expressing about their eco-anxiety and how parents can safely talk to their kids about climate.   Join us on October 5 for our next Living on Earth Book Club event! “Guardians of the Trees” author Dr. Kinari Webb will join Steve Curwood and Bobby Bascomb to talk about healing the world's rainforests and the communities who depend on them. Register at https://loe.org/events/   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

GeekWire
Amazon's Kindle Vella through the eyes of a longtime Seattle author

GeekWire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 26:27


Fred Moody is a retired journalist in the Seattle area, the former managing editor of Seattle Weekly, and the author of a series on Kindle Vella, Amazon's new episodic storytelling platform for mobile devices. It's called Barfly on the Wall: A meteoric misadventure into Seattle bartending.   GeekWire's Todd Bishop has been looking into Kindle Vella and other story platforms as a reflection of broader changes in how people publish and read stories. Moody is one of the authors featured in a GeekWire story on the subject. Moody has followed Amazon since its early days as an online bookseller, interviewing Jeff Bezos for an article when the company was based in a modest office south of downtown Seattle. The company was so small at the time that Bezos personally followed up with Moody to explain how the journalist's out-of-print book about the Seattle Seahawks ended up in Amazon's online catalog. "He was talking about why he was located in Seattle, and what his plans were, to be the world's biggest bookstore and all that, but there was no sense that they were headed where they were headed, at least not to my benighted eyes," Moody recalled this week. "You could tell he was really onto something, but nobody could have imagined what that something was." In 2004, as the tech economy was taking off in the city, Moody wrote about Seattle's "struggle for its soul" in his book, Seattle and the Demons of Ambition. That book was inspired in part by his experience encountering protesters during the World Trade Organization riots, which opened his eyes to Seattle's evolution into a "massive establishment symbol with all this corporate power," as he puts it. More than a decade later, in 2015, his eyes were opened to yet another side of the city when he came out of retirement to work as a day-shift bartender at the Shanghai Room in Seattle's Greenwood neighborhood, which his daughter Caitlin and son-in-law Tony took over when they opened the adjacent North Star Diner. (They stepped down as owner/operators earlier this year.) Moody started taking notes about the characters at the bar, the people he worked with, and his experiences with the late Anthony Bourdain and his crew when the famed chef and television host visited Seattle for his final show here. When the pandemic hit, Moody found himself with the time to write. "I wanted to experiment with a different kind of narrative, where I'm telling these short little pieces, sometimes anecdotes, sometimes conversations, or little pieces from people's lives, then just kind of jumping from one to the other," he explained, describing it as "a mosaic" that builds into a larger narrative. Then he heard about Vella. "It was almost like a perfect format for what I'd been doing," he said. "I could just take these bite-sized, little things, and make these episodes." Vella also matched the trends he had witnessed from behind the bar. "I was really taken with the idea that it would be so phone-friendly, because the audience I was thinking about for this book were people that read exclusively on their phones, which I noticed in my bartending was the case with almost everybody under 40 years old," he said. Read the full story on GeekWire. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rock N Roll Pantheon
AllMusicPodcasts 63: "Long Strange Trip" with Amir Bar-Lev

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 31:55


For 30 years, the Grateful Dead were the most unlikely success story in rock and roll. At the peak of their popularity, they were the highest-grossing concert act in America. Director Amir Bar-Lev joins us to talk about his remarkable film “Long Strange Trip” that explores all aspects of this beloved band, a tribe of contrarians who made art out of open-ended chaos, and inadvertently achieved success. Longtime heads will happily tune in and drop out, of course, but casual or even non-fans shouldn't fear Long Strange Trip, the definitive and unprecedented look at the life of the Dead. Join us and Amir to hear more about this one-of-a-kind documentary film. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima
Zac Jackson: OBJ does have an aura. He's raised the bar really high early in his career, opposite of what the bar has been in Cleveland and has not had a huge season in a long time.

The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 16:31


Browns writer Zac Jackson joined The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima to discuss OBJ's status, the Landry injury, how can Felton be more involved with the offense, etc... Can the Browns defense hold up against the Bears? Listen to The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima weekday mornings 6-10am on Sports Radio 92.3 The Fan and the Audacy App! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Batchelor Show
1709: The longtime special relationship with Australia Jeff McCausland @mccauslj @CBSNews @dickinsoncol

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 6:45


Photo: "Australians welcome Americans", postcard 1908. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow  The longtime special relationship with Australia Jeff McCausland  @mccauslj @CBSNews @dickinsoncol https://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/report/2007/ssi_mccausland-stuart-tow-wesley.pdf

kPod - The Kidd Kraddick Morning Show
Love Letters To Kellie- Friendzoned By Longtime Crush

kPod - The Kidd Kraddick Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 10:25


What do you do when you confess to your crush that you like them and get zero reaction? Recognize the friendzone! Plus, someone can't quit thinking about their ex. Kellie gives her advice on these problems and more!

Mountain & Prairie Podcast
Hampton Sides - Tales from a Most Excellent Adventure

Mountain & Prairie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 55:18


Hampton Sides is a historian and New York Times bestselling author who is best known for his engaging works of narrative nonfiction, including the books “Blood and Thunder,” “Ghost Soldiers,” “On Desperate Ground,” and more. His latest project is an ebook and audiobook titled “THE EXOTIC: Intrigue and Cultural Ruin in the Age of Imperialism,” which details the life and unbelievable adventures of a man named Mai, who was the first Polynesian to set foot on British soil. “The Exotic” is much shorter than Hampton's previous books but much longer than a magazine article, giving the reader a chance to enjoy Hampton's one-of-a-kind historical storytelling in only a few hours of reading. - Longtime listeners of Mountain & Prairie will remember Hampton's two previous appearances on the podcast. The first was an in-depth discussion of his book “Blood and Thunder” and the history of the American West, which was recorded live and on stage at the Aspen Institute. In his second appearance, we focused on his writing and research process, and his career progression from journalist at Outside Magazine to becoming a best-selling historian. Today's conversation takes us far beyond the American West, everywhere from remote islands in the South Pacific to King George's court in England. So if you're a fan of adventure, history, and profiles of Indigenous people who have often been overlooked by mainstream history, you'll love this book. - Hampton and I connected virtually and had a fun conversation about the book and his process for writing it. We talked a lot about Mai's unbelievable journey from Polynesia to England and back again, as well as the opportunities and challenges of exploring history from an Indigenous perspective. We talked about Hampton's process for researching the book and how COVID has forced him to adjust his usual approach. Hampton was actually in the South Pacific researching the book in March 2020 when the pandemic hit, which, as you'll hear, added an extra layer of adventure to an already adventurous trip. And as usual, Hampton offers up some great book recommendations that I think you'll enjoy. - “The Exotic” is available exclusively on Scribd, which is an online service that gives you instant access to ebooks, audiobooks, articles, podcasts, and more. I've thoroughly enjoyed Scribd over the past few weeks, and I'd encourage you to give it a shot. You can access it for free for 30 days by following the link in the episode notes or on this episode's webpage. And I'm not being paid for this endorsement-- I'm just a fan of what Scribd is doing and the unique forms of writing that they are bringing to the world. - I hope you enjoy this episode, and I hope you'll invest a few hours reading “The Exotic.”  And if you haven't already, go back and listen to my past episodes with Hampton-- they are fun and educational conversations.  Thanks so much. --- “The Exotic” by Hampton Sides 30-day free trial of Scribd Hampton's first and second M&P episodes Episode notes with links: https://mountainandprairie.com/hampton-sides-3/ --- TOPICS DISCUSSED: 4:00 – How Mai got Hampton's attention 11:45 – Hampton discusses who Mai was 22:00 – Hampton walks us through what Mai did while he was in England 31:30 – Hampton explains what happens when Mai returns home 36:30 – Hampton describes doing his research while COVID-19 took off and discusses how the pandemic affected his writing 43:30 – Hampton talks about Captain Cook 51:15 – Hampton's book recommendations --- ABOUT MOUNTAIN & PRAIRIE: Mountain & Prairie - All Episodes Mountain & Prairie Shop Mountain & Prairie on Instagram Upcoming Events About Ed Roberson Support Mountain & Prairie Leave a Review on Apple Podcasts

Mobbed Up: The Fight for Las Vegas
Bonus: Season 2 Epilogue

Mobbed Up: The Fight for Las Vegas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 53:44


Longtime gaming executive and consultant Ed Nigro was in the middle of the battle between Wayne Newton and Johnny Carson to buy the Aladdin Hotel after the mob was kicked out.    Nigro was appointed to manage the Aladdin until it could be sold to reputable buyers, and then partnered with Carson in his bid to take over the Aladdin.     In this season-ending forum at The Mob Museum, Nigro joins Season 2 host Jeff German and former Gov. Robert List in a discussion about the Aladdin's troubles under the control of the mob and how the state and the courts dealt with it.   Nigro also provides a revealing look behind the scenes of the high-stakes battle between Carson and Newton.