Podcasts about Boston Marathon

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World's oldest regularly run marathon

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Best podcasts about Boston Marathon

Show all podcasts related to boston marathon

Latest podcast episodes about Boston Marathon

Ali on the Run Show
437. The CIM OTQ Pacers Take on the Boston Marathon

Ali on the Run Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 68:49


“You have to honor the race by going and trying to do the best you possibly can.” In December 2019, three men — Menso de Jong, Chris Stehula, and Ken Rakestraw — led 72 women to Olympic Trials qualifying times at the California International Marathon. Soon after, they came on the Ali on the Run Show to share their stories. Before CIM, neither Menso, Chris, nor Ken had ever run 2:45 marathons before. But that day, they pulled it off. And, in the process of doing so, they each earned themselves Boston Marathon qualifying times. So now, Menso, Chris, and Ken are back on the Ali on the Run Show for another race recap episode — but this one is different. This time, the only people they were pacing were themselves, and there were plenty of highs, lows, and backward walks along the way. Enjoy hearing about their race day strategies (most of which did not go according to plan), what the rolling start in Boston was really like, and what lessons they learned on the course that day. SPONSOR: The WineShine Half Marathon — Register today for the inaugural event, happening July 16, 2022. See you in Napa! What you'll get on this episode: How everyone's feeling after Boston (6:45) The desire to run Boston (10:30) What training for Boston looked like (13:30) Everyone's plans for Boston (26:45) What the start was like (37:00) How the race broke down for everyone (44:15) Highs and lows from the day (52:25) Follow Ali: Instagram @aliontherun1 Join the Facebook group Twitter @aliontherun1 Support on Patreon Blog Strava Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Spotify SoundCloud Overcast Stitcher Google Play SUPPORT the Ali on the Run Show! If you're enjoying the show, please subscribe and leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. Spread the run love. And if you liked this episode, share it with your friends!

Voice of Influence
210: Dare to Own Your Voice with Liz Brunner

Voice of Influence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 43:50


Do you find it difficult to own who you are? In this episode of the Voice of Influence podcast, Andrea interviews Emmy Award Winning journalist and author of the book "DARE TO OWN YOU: Taking Your Authenticity and Dreams Into Your Next Chapter," Liz Brunner. A speaker who trains others in the craft of speaking, Liz shares compelling stories about covering 9/11, the Boston Marathon bombing, and what she did to get the opportunity to interview President Barack Obama as a local reporter.  Learn about how our Team Performance System and Personal Brand Strategy can Help You Serve Well and Sell More at  www.voiceofinfluence.net   Read the transcript here:   https://www.voiceofinfluence.net/210 Give and receive feedback that makes a difference! Register for our 20 minute Deep Impact Method video course here:  www.voiceofinfluence.net/deepimpact

Most Pleasant Exhaustion
Episode 195--Michelle's Boston Marathon Race Report!

Most Pleasant Exhaustion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 61:51


This week, we heard a lot about Michelle's difficult experience at the Boston Marathon. She had a gutsy performance, but it wasn't what she hoped for. We also revealed our last Book of the Quarter for 2021!

Ali on the Run Show
436. CJ Albertson, "The Guy Who Led the Boston Marathon for 21 Miles"

Ali on the Run Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 64:48


“It was a win-win either way. If they go with me, they're running my race, and that's great. And if they don't go with me, I have a huge lead at Boston, and that's pretty awesome, too!” If you watched the 2021 Boston Marathon, you got to know CJ Albertson — or at least his face — pretty well. That's because CJ, who runs professionally for Brooks Running, took the lead in the men's elite race right from the start, and held it for 21 miles. He ran solo that entire time, gapping the rest of the field by two minutes at one point. After 21 miles, the pack caught up to CJ — who was also celebrating his birthday that day — but he was able to hang in and ultimately finished 10th. Those 21 miles at the front may have put CJ on the Boston map, but he's hardly new to the running scene. The California native is a 2:11 marathoner and cross-country and track coach at Clovis Community College. In 2019, he completed the indoor marathon world record challenge in 2 hours 17 minutes and 59 seconds. (That's 26.2 miles, indoors, on a 200-meter track!) Then, in 2020, CJ set an all-surface 50K world best time of 2:42:30, which he also ran on a track. CJ loves pursuing the fun side of running, and is always up for a challenge, whether it's leading the Boston Marathon or topping the leaderboard of every Peloton class he takes. All that and more, on this episode of the Ali on the Run Show. SPONSOR: UCAN. Click here and use code ALI for 20% off your entire UCAN order! What you'll get on this episode: What CJ's Boston recovery has been like (2:30) On feeling like a star (6:30) What the day before the race was like (8:30) On praying before the race (17:00) What it was like walking to the start line (23:50) CJ's race plan, and how it played out (26:20) On gapping the field — by two minutes — and eventually getting caught by the pack (35:15) That finish line feeling (48:15) CJ's love for Peloton (50:55) What's next? (57:40) Follow CJ: Instagram @cjalbertson Follow Ali: Instagram @aliontherun1 Join the Facebook group Twitter @aliontherun1 Support on Patreon Blog Strava Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Spotify SoundCloud Overcast Stitcher Google Play SUPPORT the Ali on the Run Show! If you're enjoying the show, please subscribe and leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. Spread the run love. And if you liked this episode, share it with your friends!

Runner Girls
Season 10, Episode 28: Just Like Finn

Runner Girls

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 89:53


This week Meagan runs 20 miles, Sue also runs some miles, we recap The Rise of the Ultra Runners in Meagan's Book Club, our Runner Girl of the Week runs a solo half marathon, listeners share their race recaps in Feedback, and we discuss the Boston Marathon in Running News.   Meagan's Book Club Current selection: The Rise of the Ultra Runners: A Journey to the Edge of Human Endurance by Adharanand Finn   Runner Girls Book List on Amazon   Runner Girl of the Week Sara on Strava

RunRunLive 4.0 - Running Podcast
Episode 4-466 – John from Sqoosh

RunRunLive 4.0 - Running Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 45:58


The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-466 – John from Sqoosh  (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4466.mp3] Link   Zero Prostate Cancer 2021 Boston - MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - Chris' other show à Intro: Hello my friends and welcome to episode 4-466 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  It finally turned to the nice cool fall weather this week.  The leaves are falling.  I've done a couple of easy runs out on the trails this week with Ollie.  The knee is ok, but I'm in such poor shape that it's hard to tell.  Everything hurts so a little extra pain doesn't really stand out. But I have a plan. Of course I have a plan.  I'm consulting with a friend of mine to start building abase of core strength and balance that I can leverage to come back healthy.  I'll talk a little bit today about how to treat these seasonal transitions where your body is talking to you.  It's marathon season.  I watched all the folks running the big events like Boston and Chicago and London. Great job everyone.   People were really emotional at these races after waiting so long to run in person.  I forget how important and impactful getting to Boston can be for people.  People ask me if I ran.  I don't know how to answer.  I completed the distance.  I did not run the course on the day.  I  ran loops over in my home town of Groton on Sunday morning.  I ran a 30 second run, 30 second walk cadence and ended up with a time of 5:05ish.  So I guess, technically I ran.  My friends came out and joined me for the first lap.  Tim hung in for the second lap.  I did 5 laps of different lengths and sizes.  I'm not a very prescriptive person.  I just show up and run.  I know roughly what distance the loops are from the town hall in Groton.  I was aiming for 5 plus miles each.  That seemed like a good distance at that pace so I could have a refuel every 80-90 minutes.  The weather was cool, but oddly humid.  I carried one of the soft bottles in my vest.  I did not take Ollie.  I ended up coming back from the 4th loop at 23 miles and change, so to keep it simple I just did that last 3 miles as an out and back on the rail trail.  I won't lie, my legs were not happy with me for the last 10 miles.  That 4th loop ended up being 6ish miles and ran out of water.  But, with the 30-30 cadence I was able to pick up my feet and move each time and did not suffer unduly.  I wasn't' really sore the next days either.  I did see others out on the rail trail who were obviously running their own virtual races.  I listened through some podcasts and had a nice long thoughtful outing.  For nutrition I had a handful of dates.  I had water and a change of shirts and hat at my truck.  It worked out without much fuss.  I was pretty beat up at the end. Felt like I had run a marathon.  So – there ya go – for the veteran runner – you can complete a marathon on zero training using a 30-30 run-walk.  Today we talk to John from Squoosh bands.  It's an interesting interview.  John is really tied in with my friend Kevin over at the Extra Mile Podcast.  In section one we'll talk about the mindful crux of determining what to do in the later seasons of your running life.  In section two I'm going to do an old-man rant on hustle culture.  I love this fall weather, don't you?  Of course it's only fall weather in this hemisphere. We are moving into a stressful period of our lives. These few weeks before the holidays tend to be very busy and can be overwhelming. Remember to be mindful.  Straighten up.  Relax your shoulders and jaw.  Bring your head high like the top of your head is being pulled up into the sky. Take a deep breath.  Fill your whole abdomen, all the way down to your belly.  Hold it for a count of two and feel the peace and energy in your body. Let it out slowly. Feel gratitude for that simple act. On with the show. About Zero ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action. Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations) … I'll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don't have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member's only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.   … The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  Section One – Seasons -   … John Fournier Re; social media we're on  Instagram: @sQoosh        Twitter: @sQoosh1      Facebook: sQoosh sweatbands    Here's our website:   and also our link on etsy (for custom sweatbands for runners)     Blurb,   sQoosh is the first sweatband designed by and for runners. It's non constricting, won't stay saturated, they're super lightweight, cool & soft. Worn on wrist, fist or palm. Easily zaps sweat out of your eyes/face (wipes runny noses in winter) plus when it fills with moisture- just sQoosh it out.    We're running an October special too (attach) Free pink ribbon with order.    . Let me know anything else you'd like Plus ... What's a good mailing address and I'll send something up to you (if you have a logo you'd like I can personalize it for you)  -Johnny     John Fournier Owner: sQoosh Products 1410 Holly Dr Amelia Isl Fl 32034 904-624-3251                        Mt 6:33                Section Two – Hustle Culture -   Outro Ok my friends we have squooshed through the ed of episode 4-466 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  Squish. Squoosh.    So – what's the future hold?  Well, Here's my current plan.  I've signed up for the Thanksgiving 5k.  I'm also outing team in for the Mill cities relay.  I need a couple over 50 men for that team if any of you locals are interested, it's the first week of December. I'm running, not walk-running, running 2-3 times a week now.  Just easy.  I'm going to go back to the heart chest strap to get a better handle on my HR so I can stay in zone 2 for all this preliminary work.  I'm working with a friend of mine, Gina, on rebuilding my core strength and balance.  I may drop my gym membership, because this is all going to be body-weight and yoga.  The gym served its purpose this summer.  Letting me feel my oats. Get some muscle bulk and testosterone.  By the way ‘feel your oats' is an American saying.  It refers to how frisky horses get after you feed them.  I am grateful for that interlude.  Now it's time to transition to something else.  It's also getting past bike weather up here.  We'll still keep riding.  We go out until the snow and ice stops us.  I don't want to put boundaries on what I can do, or still do.  I think your body is strong and amazing and will do far more than you think.  At the same time I want to be smart and not abusive in this new season.  Ollie is doing fine.  I took him to the vet this week for his checkup and shots.  He got a clean bill of health.  I'm practicing running on leash with him.  It's a struggle some times but I think eventually we'll come to some sort of agreement, he and I.  I signed him up for the second course of dog-stuff training.  Frankly I think it's worth it just to get him out of the house.  … As we head into this stressful time of year remember to stay centered.  Remember to be in the now.  Let's practice, shall we.  Straighten up again.  Smile.  Take in that deep breath, hold it for a second and let it out slowly. You can do anything, You can be anything, You have the power.  You are a good person, You add value to this world, You are loved. You do what is right for you, your family, and your friends with no regrets. … Your life is magical, You are unimaginably powerful Your life is beautiful, fair, rich, abundant, and filled with meaning … Your body is strong.  You have all the strength You need to do the things that You want to do. You are worthy. You are unique. You are loved. And I'll see you out there. My Apocalypse show ->     MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - Rachel -> Coach Jeff ->  

RunRunLive 4.0 - Running Podcast
Episode 4-466 – John from Sqoosh

RunRunLive 4.0 - Running Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 45:58


The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-466 – John from Sqoosh  (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4466.mp3] Link   Zero Prostate Cancer 2021 Boston - MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - Chris' other show à Intro: Hello my friends and welcome to episode 4-466 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  It finally turned to the nice cool fall weather this week.  The leaves are falling.  I've done a couple of easy runs out on the trails this week with Ollie.  The knee is ok, but I'm in such poor shape that it's hard to tell.  Everything hurts so a little extra pain doesn't really stand out. But I have a plan. Of course I have a plan.  I'm consulting with a friend of mine to start building abase of core strength and balance that I can leverage to come back healthy.  I'll talk a little bit today about how to treat these seasonal transitions where your body is talking to you.  It's marathon season.  I watched all the folks running the big events like Boston and Chicago and London. Great job everyone.   People were really emotional at these races after waiting so long to run in person.  I forget how important and impactful getting to Boston can be for people.  People ask me if I ran.  I don't know how to answer.  I completed the distance.  I did not run the course on the day.  I  ran loops over in my home town of Groton on Sunday morning.  I ran a 30 second run, 30 second walk cadence and ended up with a time of 5:05ish.  So I guess, technically I ran.  My friends came out and joined me for the first lap.  Tim hung in for the second lap.  I did 5 laps of different lengths and sizes.  I'm not a very prescriptive person.  I just show up and run.  I know roughly what distance the loops are from the town hall in Groton.  I was aiming for 5 plus miles each.  That seemed like a good distance at that pace so I could have a refuel every 80-90 minutes.  The weather was cool, but oddly humid.  I carried one of the soft bottles in my vest.  I did not take Ollie.  I ended up coming back from the 4th loop at 23 miles and change, so to keep it simple I just did that last 3 miles as an out and back on the rail trail.  I won't lie, my legs were not happy with me for the last 10 miles.  That 4th loop ended up being 6ish miles and ran out of water.  But, with the 30-30 cadence I was able to pick up my feet and move each time and did not suffer unduly.  I wasn't' really sore the next days either.  I did see others out on the rail trail who were obviously running their own virtual races.  I listened through some podcasts and had a nice long thoughtful outing.  For nutrition I had a handful of dates.  I had water and a change of shirts and hat at my truck.  It worked out without much fuss.  I was pretty beat up at the end. Felt like I had run a marathon.  So – there ya go – for the veteran runner – you can complete a marathon on zero training using a 30-30 run-walk.  Today we talk to John from Squoosh bands.  It's an interesting interview.  John is really tied in with my friend Kevin over at the Extra Mile Podcast.  In section one we'll talk about the mindful crux of determining what to do in the later seasons of your running life.  In section two I'm going to do an old-man rant on hustle culture.  I love this fall weather, don't you?  Of course it's only fall weather in this hemisphere. We are moving into a stressful period of our lives. These few weeks before the holidays tend to be very busy and can be overwhelming. Remember to be mindful.  Straighten up.  Relax your shoulders and jaw.  Bring your head high like the top of your head is being pulled up into the sky. Take a deep breath.  Fill your whole abdomen, all the way down to your belly.  Hold it for a count of two and feel the peace and energy in your body. Let it out slowly. Feel gratitude for that simple act. On with the show. About Zero ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action. Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations) … I'll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don't have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member's only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.   … The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  Section One – Seasons -   … John Fournier Re; social media we're on  Instagram: @sQoosh        Twitter: @sQoosh1      Facebook: sQoosh sweatbands    Here's our website:   and also our link on etsy (for custom sweatbands for runners)     Blurb,   sQoosh is the first sweatband designed by and for runners. It's non constricting, won't stay saturated, they're super lightweight, cool & soft. Worn on wrist, fist or palm. Easily zaps sweat out of your eyes/face (wipes runny noses in winter) plus when it fills with moisture- just sQoosh it out.    We're running an October special too (attach) Free pink ribbon with order.    . Let me know anything else you'd like Plus ... What's a good mailing address and I'll send something up to you (if you have a logo you'd like I can personalize it for you)  -Johnny     John Fournier Owner: sQoosh Products 1410 Holly Dr Amelia Isl Fl 32034 904-624-3251                        Mt 6:33                Section Two – Hustle Culture -   Outro Ok my friends we have squooshed through the ed of episode 4-466 of the RunRunLive Podcast.  Squish. Squoosh.    So – what's the future hold?  Well, Here's my current plan.  I've signed up for the Thanksgiving 5k.  I'm also outing team in for the Mill cities relay.  I need a couple over 50 men for that team if any of you locals are interested, it's the first week of December. I'm running, not walk-running, running 2-3 times a week now.  Just easy.  I'm going to go back to the heart chest strap to get a better handle on my HR so I can stay in zone 2 for all this preliminary work.  I'm working with a friend of mine, Gina, on rebuilding my core strength and balance.  I may drop my gym membership, because this is all going to be body-weight and yoga.  The gym served its purpose this summer.  Letting me feel my oats. Get some muscle bulk and testosterone.  By the way ‘feel your oats' is an American saying.  It refers to how frisky horses get after you feed them.  I am grateful for that interlude.  Now it's time to transition to something else.  It's also getting past bike weather up here.  We'll still keep riding.  We go out until the snow and ice stops us.  I don't want to put boundaries on what I can do, or still do.  I think your body is strong and amazing and will do far more than you think.  At the same time I want to be smart and not abusive in this new season.  Ollie is doing fine.  I took him to the vet this week for his checkup and shots.  He got a clean bill of health.  I'm practicing running on leash with him.  It's a struggle some times but I think eventually we'll come to some sort of agreement, he and I.  I signed him up for the second course of dog-stuff training.  Frankly I think it's worth it just to get him out of the house.  … As we head into this stressful time of year remember to stay centered.  Remember to be in the now.  Let's practice, shall we.  Straighten up again.  Smile.  Take in that deep breath, hold it for a second and let it out slowly. You can do anything, You can be anything, You have the power.  You are a good person, You add value to this world, You are loved. You do what is right for you, your family, and your friends with no regrets. … Your life is magical, You are unimaginably powerful Your life is beautiful, fair, rich, abundant, and filled with meaning … Your body is strong.  You have all the strength You need to do the things that You want to do. You are worthy. You are unique. You are loved. And I'll see you out there. My Apocalypse show ->     MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - Rachel -> Coach Jeff ->  

RunChats with @RonRunsNYC
Stephen England - Running 100 Miles for 100 Years of Insulin: Completing A Quad Boston Marathon | RunChats Ep.56

RunChats with @RonRunsNYC

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 97:30


At 3PM Sunday, most running the 125th Boston Marathon were getting ready for a carb-loading dinner and sorting through their pre-race anxiety and rituals. Stephen England, a type one diabetic, had far bigger aspirations in mind, and had just set out to run 100 miles to commemorate the development of insulin 100 years ago! (Hello, Quad Boston!) Stephen is an accomplished distance runner, having completed the Western States 100, Tor des Géants, and the Cocodona 250, but what would make this infinitely more challenging; he would have to run 4xBoston unsupported—with no crew and no aid stations open except for during the 4th marathon. We discuss: highs & lows, funny moments, unexpected meetups with cyclists riding the course through the night, run-ins with Boston's finest using a vending machine at 2am, a late night pizza and snacks delivery from friend Mike Saleh, who also ran Boston in morning, meeting another Quad runner, Henry Ward, on his 5th in a row, fueling at CVS and Dunkin Donuts, and sharing miles with two women (one 14-weeks postpartum) and NYC friend and Sherpa, Terrence, on the final leg of the hugely INSPIRING Quad Journey. We closed the convo on 'what is you why?' It's powerful stuff. Stephen's why: To inspire and empower Type 1's that there are no limits. What an accomplishment! Give Stephen a follow for more INSPO and look for him pacing the 3:30 group at the 50th NYC Marathon. I hope you all enjoy this convo as much as we did! If you enjoy the episode, it would mean the world to me if you would rate the podcast or write a review and share feedback wherever you get your podcast groove on. Connect With Stephen: Instagram: @rundiabetes Connect With Ron: Personal Instagram: @ronrunsnyc Podcast Instagram: @runchats_with_ronrunsnyc Facebook: https://fb.me/runchats Website: https://ronrunsnyc.com ---- Produced by: David Margittai | In Post Media Website: https://www.inpostmedia.com Email: david@inpostmedia.com Social: @_margittai © 2021 Ron Romano

I'll Have Another with Lindsey Hein Podcast
Episode 343: Nell Rojas – 6th place in Boston, Patience is the way forward

I'll Have Another with Lindsey Hein Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 39:47


Nell Rojas just finished 6th at the Boston Marathon as the first American woman! What an exciting race for Nell. She ran a 2:27:12 which is around a minute PR... The post Episode 343: Nell Rojas – 6th place in Boston, Patience is the way forward appeared first on Lindsey Hein.

The Running for Real Podcast
Kyle Robidoux: The Running Community Is More than Just Running - R4R 271

The Running for Real Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 68:44


Kyle Robidoux was ready to run the Boston Marathon this year, with Tina as his guide, until fate intervened in the form of a stress fracture.  Any runner would be gutted to have to DNS, and Kyle is no exception.  However, he's well versed in overcoming adversity and tough situations. When he was eleven, he was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a degenerative eye disease that can lead to blindness, and he was declared legally blind at nineteen.  Today he shares the story of his journey, how he ensures that he isn't defined by the boundaries that others place on him, and a few beer recommendations. “I had high cholesterol, high blood pressure in my early 30s and I knew I needed a lifestyle change.”  In 2010 Kyle found that he got tired playing with his two year old daughter; he got tired bending over to tie his shoelaces, for that matter.  He was overweight, his biomarkers were bad, and he knew he had to improve his health. He started walking, then running, gradually increasing the time he ran.  He didn't have a goal in mind, other than trying to run a few minutes longer every week.   “When I hit two hours I said, ‘wow, when am I ever going to be able to run two hours again? I should sign up for a race.'  And that was when I signed up for my first half marathon.”  One day, his intended 90 minute run extended to an hour and 45 minutes. He felt great, so he kept going, and when he hit two hours, he realized he was ready for a half marathon. Since then, he's  completed over 25 marathons and ultras, including five 100 milers and the grueling six-day, 120 mile Transrockies Run. Getting to that point wasn't easy, not only in the sense of the physical training, but coming to terms with the progressive loss of his eyesight. “I felt angry because all these things were being taken away from me, and what I realized at the end was I was giving up on all those things that I loved and I just needed to adapt and change things up a little bit in order to continue doing them.” When Kyle was diagnosed with RP, doctors said that he would be totally blind by college.  He and his parents talked about some aspects of the prognosis, but didn't address the emotional impact of vision loss.  And for a time, they didn't have to.  Kyle was declared legally blind at 19, but it wasn't until his late twenties, he says, that “it really started taking things away from me that I loved, like skiing independently and playing recreational baseball and pick up leagues for baseball and softball. And I was just becoming really bitter and angry.”   At the urging of his then girlfriend, now his wife, he started seeing a therapist.  It was hard for him at first, but ultimately it helped him work through the loss and anger, and gave him tools to cope with his diminishing eyesight.  Now he encourages anyone struggling emotionally to at least give therapy a try.  As he says, “you don't have to commit 100%, but  if folks go once or twice, I feel like you start to see the benefits really quickly, even if it's just once a week for an hour.  I think there's tremendous value in that and I certainly feel like if I would have started it earlier, it would have been much more beneficial to my overall well being, and quite possibly my physiological and physical health, in addition to my mental health.”  “And then I asked, I'm like, ‘well, you know because I am an idiot and have an ego sometimes, what happens if I do run Boston?” The coping mechanisms that he's learned through therapy are helping Kyle now, as he processes not being able to run the Boston Marathon.  He's run it the past eight or nine years, and was ready to continue that streak this year, with Tina as his guide.  But shortly before race day he was diagnosed with a stress fracture in his foot, and reluctantly accepted that it would be best not to run.  He could have done it, albeit painfully, but it would have resulted in having to take up to four months off from running, rather than 3 - 8 weeks.  The tradeoff, he concluded, wasn't worth it. Since he's usually running Boston, he's only spectated there once, so this year, he says, “I'm gearing myself up to get really excited to cheer.”  Oh, and also to get together with friends to have a few beers and possibly fill squirt guns with Fireball to shoot at people as they walk by.  Basically, he says, “I'm hoping to truly embrace the spectator side of what is so special about the Boston marathon.” “I would just say that anyone and everyone can be a guide.” Kyle runs accompanied by a guide.  Guides are needed for runners of all abilities, and there's training and support available for anyone who would like to be one.  United in Stride can help you locate runners who are visually impaired in your community and connect with them.  Achilles International has a list of their chapters around the country.  Kyle strongly believes that “with a little bit of training and support and strong communication everyone can be a sighted guide.” “I tell folks also that part of being a sighted guide, it's great because you're volunteering while doing something you'd already be doing if you're an active runner, right?” Resources: Kyle's website Kyle's Instagram Kyle's Twitter United in Stride Running for Real podcast with Rich Hunter, founder of United in Stride Achilles International Thank you to goodr, Athletic Greens, and Beam for sponsoring this episode. I have been a fan of goodr for YEARS and I literally have their sunglasses all over my house. I recently had an episode with co-founder Stephen Lease where he tells the story behind his company and I appreciate him being honest with me about it. The design behind these sunglasses really takes into consideration look and comfort. They are 100% carbon neutral and a part of 1% for the Planet.   Go here and use the code TINA15 for 15% off your order. Athletic Greens is a simple and easy way to get 75 vitamins, minerals, and whole food source ingredients to help strengthen your immune system. It's simple to make and it tastes good! Go here to get a FREE year's supply of Vitamin D and five FREE travel packs with your subscription. A new product that I've been trying out is Beam; they help athletes with balance, performance, and recovery. I've used “elevate energy” and “elevate balance” and the flavors were great. I felt that the hydrating electrolyte energy powder, formulated with beetroot, green coffee bean, and citrulline, really helped me and I know it will help you too. Go here and use code TINA for 15 % off your order or 20% off a subscription. Thanks for listening! We know there are so many podcasts you could be listening to, and we are honored you have chosen Running For Real.  If you appreciate the work that we do, here are a few things you can do to support us: Take a screenshot of the episode, and share it with your friends, family, and community on social media, especially if you feel that the topic will resonate with them.  Be sure to tag us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram If you are struggling through something a guest mentions, chances are others are too, and you will help them feel less alone.  Leave an honest review on iTunes or your favorite podcast player. Your ratings and reviews will really help us grow and reach new people. Not sure how to leave a review or subscribe?  You can find out here. "Thank you" to Kyle.  We look forward to hearing your thoughts on the show.

The Rambling Runner Podcast
#379 - Andrea Pomaranski: 10th American at Boston at Age 39

The Rambling Runner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 58:20


For today's show notes I'm going to quote Andrea Pomaranki's Instagram post about her amazing finish at least week's Boston Marathon: "My heart is so full of gratitude …..10th American in the Boston Marathon in my very first pro start at a major marathon at the age of 39, which to be honest is the least of why I couldn't stop smiling through the streets of Boston yesterday. Every step felt like such a celebration….8 years ago this week I had just given birth to severely premature twins and spent every single day for the next 5 months in a hospital room for hours upon hours until we eventually lost both of our sons. 11 years ago this week, doctors told me I'd never run another marathon. So to be here now, exactly 8 years later with 3 wonderful children and the love and support from such incredible family and friends, running through the streets of Boston in the fall after a worldwide pandemic I can't help but feel utterly overwhelmed with gratitude and joy. I wouldn't be here without so many beautiful people in my life, so from the bottom of my heart, thank you.

Pushing The Limits
Address Your Trauma and Start Mental Healing with Dr Don Wood

Pushing The Limits

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 69:10


How do you handle stressful situations? Everyone's built a little different — some people can take their hits on the chin and come out smiling. But not everyone can take those hits. The pandemic has taken its mental toll on so many people. Others might still be struggling with past traumas and dealing with anxiety. Their situation keeps them in a state of constant worry and hypervigilance. That state of mind doesn't only harm their mental and emotional health — it can make them sick and more prone to physical diseases. More than ever, it's time to begin mental healing from past traumas, so we can better cope with our daily stresses.  Dr Don Wood joins us again in this episode to talk about the TIPP program and how it facilitates mental healing. He explains how our minds are affected by traumas and how these can affect our health and performance. If we want to become more relaxed, we need to learn how to go into the alpha brainwave state. Since mental healing is not an immediate process, Dr Don also shares some coping strategies we can use in our daily lives.  If you want to know more about how neuroscience can help you achieve mental healing, then this episode is for you.    Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode: Learn how trauma can put you in a constant state of survival and affect your performance and daily life.  Understand that it's not your fault. Achieving mental healing will require you to learn how to go into an alpha brainwave state.  Discover healthy habits that will keep you from entering survival mode.   Resources Gain exclusive access and bonuses to Pushing the Limits Podcast by becoming a patron!  A new program, BOOSTCAMP, is coming this September at Peak Wellness! Listen to other Pushing the Limits episodes:  #183: Sirtuin and NAD Supplements for Longevity with Dr Elena Seranova #189: Understanding Autophagy and Increasing Your Longevity with Dr Elena Seranova  #199: How Unresolved Trauma Prevents You from Having a Healthy Life With Dr Don Wood Check out Dr Don Wood's books:  Emotional Concussions: Understanding How Our Nervous System is Affected By Events and Experiences Throughout Our Life You Must Be Out Of Your Mind: We All Need A Reboot   Connect with Dr Don Wood: Inspired Performance Institute I Facebook I LinkedIn     Get Customised Guidance for Your Genetic Make-Up For our epigenetics health programme, all about optimising your fitness, lifestyle, nutrition and mind performance to your particular genes, go to  https://www.lisatamati.com/page/epigenetics-and-health-coaching/.   Customised Online Coaching for Runners CUSTOMISED RUN COACHING PLANS — How to Run Faster, Be Stronger, Run Longer  Without Burnout & Injuries Have you struggled to fit in training in your busy life? Maybe you don't know where to start, or perhaps you have done a few races but keep having motivation or injury troubles? Do you want to beat last year's time or finish at the front of the pack? Want to run your first 5-km or run a 100-miler? ​​Do you want a holistic programme that is personalised & customised to your ability, goals, and lifestyle?  Go to www.runninghotcoaching.com for our online run training coaching.   Health Optimisation and Life Coaching If you are struggling with a health issue and need people who look outside the square and are connected to some of the greatest science and health minds in the world, then reach out to us at support@lisatamati.com, we can jump on a call to see if we are a good fit for you. If you have a big challenge ahead, are dealing with adversity, or want to take your performance to the next level and learn how to increase your mental toughness, emotional resilience, foundational health, and more, then contact us at support@lisatamati.com.   Order My Books My latest book Relentless chronicles the inspiring journey about how my mother and I defied the odds after an aneurysm left my mum Isobel with massive brain damage at age 74. The medical professionals told me there was absolutely no hope of any quality of life again. Still, I used every mindset tool, years of research and incredible tenacity to prove them wrong and bring my mother back to full health within three years. Get your copy here: https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books/products/relentless. For my other two best-selling books Running Hot and Running to Extremes, chronicling my ultrarunning adventures and expeditions all around the world, go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books.   Lisa's Anti-Ageing and Longevity Supplements  NMN: Nicotinamide Mononucleotide, an NAD+ precursor Feel Healthier and Younger* Researchers have found that Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide or NAD+, a master regulator of metabolism and a molecule essential for the functionality of all human cells, is being dramatically decreased over time. What is NMN? NMN Bio offers a cutting edge Vitamin B3 derivative named NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) that can boost the levels of NAD+ in muscle tissue and liver. Take charge of your energy levels, focus, metabolism and overall health so you can live a happy, fulfilling life. Founded by scientists, NMN Bio offers supplements of the highest purity and rigorously tested by an independent, third party lab. Start your cellular rejuvenation journey today. Support Your Healthy Ageing We offer powerful third party-tested, NAD+ boosting supplements so you can start your healthy ageing journey today. Shop now: https://nmnbio.nz/collections/all NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 capsules NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 Capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 Capsules Quality You Can Trust — NMN Our premium range of anti-ageing nutraceuticals (supplements that combine Mother Nature with cutting edge science) combats the effects of aging while designed to boost NAD+ levels. Manufactured in an ISO9001 certified facility Boost Your NAD+ Levels — Healthy Ageing: Redefined Cellular Health Energy & Focus Bone Density Skin Elasticity DNA Repair Cardiovascular Health Brain Health  Metabolic Health   My  ‘Fierce' Sports Jewellery Collection For my gorgeous and inspiring sports jewellery collection, 'Fierce', go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/lisa-tamati-bespoke-jewellery-collection.   Episode Highlights [06:05] The Pandemic-Induced Mental Health Crisis The pandemic forced many people into a state of freeze mode, not the typical fight or flight response.  As people get out of freeze mode, there will be a rise in mental health issues.  Teenagers are robbed of the opportunity to develop social and communication skills during this time.  [08:24] How Dr Don Wood Started Studying Traumas Dr Don's wife grew up in a household with an angry father who instilled fear. He used to think that she would be less anxious when they started to live together, but she struggled with mental healing.  She had an inherent belief that misfortune always follows good things. Her traumas and fears also led to a lot of health issues.  She also was hyper-vigilant, which she used as a protective mechanism. However, this prevented her from being relaxed and happy. A person's environment can dictate whether they go into this hyper-vigilant state, but genetics can also play a factor.  [15:42] How Trauma Affects the Brain Trauma is caused by a dysregulation of the subconscious. If your brain is in survival mode, it will access data from the past and create physiological responses to them. These emotions demand action, even when it is no longer possible or necessary. This dysregulation prevents you from living in the present and initiating mental healing.  In this state, people can be triggered constantly, which interferes with their day-to-day life.  [21:07] The Role of the Subconscious Your conscious mind only takes up around 5%, while the subconscious takes up 95%. Your subconscious mind cannot tell the difference between real and imagined.  In survival mode, people will keep replaying the past and think about different scenarios and decisions.  You're left stuck because the subconscious mind only lives in the now. It does not have a concept of time.  This process is the brain trying to protect you. [25:04] What Happens When You're Always in Survival Mode Being in survival mode will take a physical toll since it's constantly activating the nervous system, increasing cortisol and adrenaline. When you're in this state, your body and mind cannot work on maintenance and recovery. It is more focused on escaping or fixing perceived threats. Over time, this will affect your immune system and make you sick.  To truly achieve mental healing, you need to get to the root cause of your problems.  However, you also have to develop coping strategies to manage your day-to-day activities.  [30:18] Changing Your Brainwave State Traumatic events are usually stored in a beta brainwave state. Changing your response to traumatic events starts with going into an alpha brainwave state.  The beta state is usually from 15 - 30 hertz, while the alpha is lower at 7 - 14 hertz. Anything below that is the delta state, usually when you're in deep meditation or sleep. People who have trouble sleeping are usually in that beta state, which keeps processing information.  It's only in the delta state that your mind and body start the maintenance phase. This phase helps not only with mental healing but also physical recovery.  Learn more about Lisa and Dr Don's personal experiences with these brainwave states in the full episode!  [34:30] Mental Healing and Physical Recovery Starts with the Brain Recovery is about genetics and the environment. In sleep, your mind will always want to deal with the threats first. It can only get to the delta state once it finishes processing these dangers. Your risk for developing sickness and depression rises if your brain can't do maintenance. Living in the beta state will make it difficult to focus.  [41:40] It's Not Your Fault If you have a lot of trauma, you are predisposed to respond in a certain way. It's not your fault.  There's nothing wrong with your mind; you just experienced different things from others.  Dr Don likened this situation to two phones having a different number of applications running.  Predictably, the device that runs more applications will have its battery drained faster.  [44:05] Change How You Respond Working on traumas requires changing the associative and repetitive memory, which repeats responses to threats. You cannot change a pattern and get mental healing immediately—it will take time.  That's the reason why Dr Don's program has a 30-day recovery phase dedicated to changing your response pattern.  Patterns form because the subconscious mind sees them as a beneficial way of coping with traumas.  This function of your subconscious is how addictions form.  [47:04] Why We Can Be Irrational The subconscious lives only in the present. It does not see the future nor the past.  It will want to take actions that will stop the pain, even if the actions are not rational.  At its core, addiction is all about trying to stop the pain or other traumatic experiences.  Survival mode always overrides reason and logic because its priority is to protect you. [50:57] What to Do When You're in Survival State In this survival state, we're prone to movement or shutting down completely.  The brain can stop calling for emotions to protect you, and this is how depression develops.  When in a depressed state, start moving to initiate mental healing. Exercise helps burn through cortisol and adrenaline.  Once your mind realises there's no action required for the perceived threats, the depression will lift.   [53:24] Simple Actions Can Help There's nothing wrong with you.  Don't just treat the symptom; go straight to the issue.  Don't blame genetics or hormonal imbalances for finding it hard to get mental healing. Find out why.  Also, seek things that will balance out your hormones. These can be as simple as walking in nature, taking a break, and self-care.  [56:04] How to Find a Calming Symbol Find a symbol that will help you go back into the alpha brainwave state.  Lisa shares that her symbol is the sunset or sunrise, and this helps her calm down. Meanwhile, Dr Don's are his home and the hawk.  Having a symbol communicates to all parts of your brain that you're safe.  [59:58] The Power of Breathing  Stress may lead to irregular breathing patterns and increase your cortisol levels and blood sugar. Breathing exercises, like box breathing, can also help you calm down because the brain will take higher oxygen levels as a state of safety.  If you're running out of oxygen, your brain will think you're still in danger.  Make sure that you're breathing well. It's also better to do nasal breathing.    7 Powerful Quotes ‘The purpose of an emotion is a call for an action. So the purpose of fear is to run.' ‘People who have a lot of trauma have trouble sleeping. Because not only is their mind processing what it experienced during the day, it's also taking some of those old files saying “Well, okay, let's fix that now. Right. Let's get that.”' ‘I was getting maximum restorative sleep. So an injury that I would have that could heal in two or three days, my teammates would two or three weeks. Because they were living in these, which I didn't know, a lot of my friends were dealing with trauma: physical, emotional, sexual abuse.' ‘There's nothing wrong with anybody's mind. Everybody's mind is fine except you are experiencing something different than I experienced so your mind kept responding to it, and mine didn't have that.' ‘That dysregulation of the nervous system. That's what we want to stop because that is what is going to affect health, enjoyment of life, and everything else.' ‘I talked about addiction as a code. I don't believe it's a disease. Your mind has found a resource to stop pains and your subconscious mind is literal. It doesn't see things as good or bad, or right or wrong.' ‘If there's a survival threat, survival will always override reason and logic because it's designed to protect you.'   About Dr Don Dr Don Wood, PhD, is the CEO of The Inspired Performance Institute. Fueled by his family's experiences, he developed the cutting-edge neuroscience approach, TIPP. The program has produced impressive results and benefited individuals all over the world.  Dr Wood has helped trauma survivors achieve mental healing from the Boston Marathon bombing attack and the Las Vegas shooting. He has also helped highly successful executives and world-class athletes. Marko Cheseto, a double amputee marathon runner, broke the world record after completing TIPP. Meanwhile, Chris Nikic worked with Dr Wood and made world news by becoming the first person with Down Syndrome to finish an Ironman competition. Interested in Dr Don's work? Check out The Inspired Performance Institute. You can also reach him on Facebook and LinkedIn.    Enjoyed This Podcast? If you did, be sure to subscribe and share it with your friends! Post a review and share it! If you enjoyed tuning in, then leave us a review. You can also share this with your family and friends so they can learn steps to mental healing. Have any questions? You can contact me through email (support@lisatamati.com) or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. For more episode updates, visit my website. You may also tune in on Apple Podcasts. To pushing the limits, Lisa   Transcript Of Podcast Welcome to Pushing the Limits, the show that helps you reach your full potential with your host Lisa Tamati, brought to you by lisatamati.com.  Lisa Tamati: Hi, everyone and welcome back to Pushing the Limits. Today, I have Dr Don Wood who, you may recognise that name if you listen to the podcast regularly. He was on the show maybe a couple of months ago, and he is the CEO and founder of The Inspired Performance Institute. He's a neuroscience guy, and he knows everything there is to know about dealing with trauma and how to get the mind back on track when you've been through big, horrible life events or some such thing. Now, when we talked last time, he shared with me his methodology, the work that he's done, how he can help people with things like addictions as well and depression, and just dealing with the stresses of life, whether they be small stressors or big stressors.  We got to talking about my situation and the stuff that I've been through in the last few years, which many of you listeners know, has been pretty traumatic. From losing babies, to losing my dad, to mom's journey. So I was very privileged and lucky to have Dr Don Wood actually invite me to do his program with him. We share today my stories, how I went with that, and he explains a little bit more in-depth the neuroscience behind it all and how it all works. So if you're someone who's dealing with stress, anxiety, PTSD, depression, if you want to understand how the brain works and how you can help yourself to deal with these sorts of things, then you must listen to the show. He's an absolutely lovely, wonderful person.  Now, before we get over to the show, I just love you all to do a couple of things for me. If you wouldn't mind doing a rating and review of the show on Apple, iTunes or wherever you listen to this, that would be fantastic. It helps the show get found. We also have a patron program, just a reminder if you want to check that out. Come and join the mission that we're on to bring this wonderful information to reach to people.  Also, we have our BOOSTCAMP program starting on the first of September 2021. If you listen to this later, we will be holding these on a regular basis so make sure you check it out. This is an eight-week live webinar series that my business partner, my best buddy, and longtime coach Neil Wagstaff and I will be running. It's more about upgrading your life and helping you perform better, helping you be your best that you can be, helping you understand your own biology, your own neuroscience, how your brain works, how your biology works. Lots of good information that's going to help you upgrade your life, live longer, be happier, reduce stress, and be able to deal with things when life is stressful. God knows we're all dealing with that. So I'd love you to come and check that out. You can go to peakwellness.co.nz/boostcamp.  I also want to remind you to check us out on Instagram. I'm quite active on Instagram. I have a couple of accounts there. We have one for the podcast that we've just started. We need a few more followers please on there. Go to @pushingthelimits for that one on Instagram, and then my main account is @lisatamati, if you want to check that one out. If you are a running fan, check us out on Instagram @runninghotcoaching and we're on Facebook under all of those as well. So @lisatamati, @pushingthelimits, and @runninghotcoaching.  The last thing before we go over to Dr Don Wood, reminder check out, too, our longevity and anti-aging supplement. We've joined forces with Dr Elena Seranova and have NMN which is nicotinamide mononucleotide, and this is really some of that cooler stuff in the anti-aging, and longevity space. If you want to check out the science behind that, we have a couple of podcasts with her. Check those out and also head on over to nmnbio.nz. Right. Over to the show with Dr Don Wood.  Hi, everyone and welcome back to Pushing the Limits. Today, I have a dear, dear friend again who's back on the show as a repeat offender, Dr Don Wood. Dr Don Wood: I didn't know I was a repeat offender. Oh, I'm in trouble. That's great.  Lisa: Repeat offender on the show. Dr Don, for those who don't know, was on the show. Dr Don is a trauma expert and a neuroscientist, and someone who understands how the brain works, and why we struggle with anxiety, and depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. We did a deep dive last time, didn't we, into the program that you've developed. Since then, everyone, I have been through Dr Don's pro program. He kindly took me through it. Today, I want to unpack a little bit of my experiences on the other side, s the client, so to speak. Talk about what I went through.  Dr Don, so firstly, welcome to the show again. How's it all over in your neck of the woods? Dr Don: Well, it's awesome over here in Florida. COVID is basically non-existent. Oh, yeah. Well, in terms of the way people are treating it, that's for sure. Very few people you see in masks now, everything is pretty much wide open. You can't even get reservations at restaurants. It's unbelievable. The economy is exploding here. There's so much going on. Yeah, I know the rest of the country, a lot of different places are still struggling with whether they're going to put mask mandates back on and all this kind of stuff but Florida seems to be doing very well.  Lisa: Well, I'm very glad to hear that because any bit of good news in this scenario is good because this keeps coming and biting everybody in the bum.  Dr Don: I know. Especially down there. You guys are really experiencing quite severe lockdowns and things, right? Lisa: Yeah and Australia, more so. Australia has gone back into lockdown. I've got cousins in Sydney who are experiencing really hard times in Melbourne and we've stopped the trans-Tasman bubble at the moment. Trans-Tasman was open for business, so to speak, with Australians being able to come to New Zealand without quarantine, but it's been shut down again. So yeah, we're still struggling with it, and the economy is still struggling with it but actually, in our country, we've been very lucky that we've managed to keep it out because they've had such tight controls on the borders. But yes, it's a rocky road for everybody, and it's not over yet, I think. Dr Don: Looks like it's going to continue, and that's creating a lot of stress.  Lisa: Oh, yeah, perfect.  Dr Don: This is what I've said. I think we're coming up to a tsunami of mental health issues because a lot of people have gone into freeze mode as opposed to fight or flight. Some people are in fight or flight. You're hearing about that on airlines: people just losing it, and getting mad, and fighting with flight attendants and passengers, and you see a lot of that. But I think that's obviously not the majority. I think most people are in that mode of just get through this, do what they ask, don't cause any waves, and just get this over with. So that's a freeze mode, and I think when people come out of freeze, you're going to start to see some of these mental health issues.  Lisa: Yes, I totally agree and I'm very concerned about the young people. I think that being hit very hard especially in the places that have the hardest lockdowns. If you're going through puberty, or you're going through teenagehood, or even the younger kids, I think, they're going to be affected massively by this because it's going to be a big before and after sort of situation for them.  Dr Don: And just the social. When we were teenagers, social was everything, I suppose. Learning how to communicate, and talk, and get along with other people, and good and bad. There were always struggles in school with learning how to get along with everybody but that is just sort of squashed. It's going to be fascinating to see when they do a study on the real true results of this pandemic. It's going to be a lot different than many people think.  Lisa: Yes, and I think the longer you ignore stuff, is we're going to see it's not just the people are unfortunately dying and being very sick from the actual COVID, but the actual effects on society are going to be big. That's why talking about the topic that we're talking about today, dealing with anxiety, and dealing with stress, and being able to actually fix the problem instead of just managing the problem, which I know you're big on.  So let's dive in there, and let's recap a little bit. Just briefly go back over your story, how you got to here, and what your method sort of entails in a helicopter perspective. Dr Don: Yeah, basically how I developed this was really because of the life that my wife led first and my daughter. My wife grew up in a very traumatic household with a very angry father that created tremendous fear. So everybody was... Just constant tension in that household. When I met her, I just realised how this was so different than my life. My life was in the complete opposite: very nurturing, loving. So I didn't experience that. I thought when she started moving in and we got married at 19, we were very young, that this would all stop for her. Because now, she's living in my world, my environment, and it didn't.  She just kept continuing to feel this fear that something was going to go wrong and nothing is going to go right. She struggled with enjoying things that were going well. I would say to her, 'We've got three beautiful children. We've got a beautiful home. Everything's going pretty good; nothing's perfect. You have your ups and downs, but it's generally a pretty good life.' She couldn't enjoy that because as a child, whenever things were going okay, it would quickly end and it would end, sometimes violently. So the way she was protecting herself is don't get too excited when things are going well because you'll get this huge drop. So that was what she was doing to protect herself. I just had a lady come in here a couple months ago, who very famous athlete is her husband: millionaires, got fame, fortune, everything you want, but she had a lot of health issues because of trauma from her childhood. When I explained that to her, she said, 'That's me. Your wife is me. I should be enjoying this, and I can't get there. I want to. My husband can't understand it.' But that's really what was going on for her too. Lisa: So it's a protective mechanism, isn't it? To basically not get too relaxed and happy because you've got to be hyper-vigilant, and this is something that I've definitely struggled with my entire life. Not because I had a horrible childhood. I had a wonderful childhood but I was super sensitive. So from a genetic perspective, I'm super sensitive. I have a lot of adrenaline that makes me code for, for want of a better description, I'm very emotionally empathetic but it also makes me swung by emotional stimuli very much. So someone in my environment is unhappy, I am unhappy. I'm often anxious and upset. My mum telling me she took me to Bambi. You know the movie Bambi? From Disneyland? She had to take me out of theatre. I was in distraught.  That's basically me. Because Bambi's mother got killed, right? I couldn't handle that as a four-year-old, and I still can't handle things. Things like the news and stuff, I protect myself from that because I take everything on. It's even a problem and in our business service situations because I want to save the world. I very much take on my clients' issues. I'm still learning to shut gates afterwards, so to speak, when you're done working with someone so that you're not constantly... So there's a genetic component to this as well.  Dr Don: Absolutely. So yours was coming from a genetic side but that's very, very common amongst people who have had a traumatic childhood. They're super sensitive.  Lisa: Yes. Hyper-vigilant.  Dr Don: Hyper-vigilant. That was my wife. She was constantly looking for danger. We'd come out of the storage and go: 'Can you believe how rude that clerk was?' 'What do you mean she was rude? How was she rude?' ‘You see the way she answered that question when I asked that, and then the way she stuffed the clothes in the bag?' And I'm like, 'Wow.' I never saw her like that. She was looking for it because that's how she protected herself because she had to recognise when danger was coming. So it was protection, and I hadn't experienced that so that made no sense to me; it made perfect sense to her.  Lisa: Yeah, and if someone was rude to you, you would be just like, 'Well, that's their problem, not my problem, and I'm not taking it on.' Whereas for someone your wife and for me... I did have a dad who was  a real hard, tough man, like old-school tough. We were very much on tenterhooks so when they came home, whether he was in a good mood today or not in a good mood. He was a wonderful, loving father but there was that tension of wanting to please dad. Mum was very calm and stable, but Dad was sort of more volatile and just up and down. It was wonderful and fun and other times, you'd be gauging all of that before he even walked in the door. That just makes you very much hyper-vigilant to everything as well.  Then, you put on, on top of that, the genetic component. You've got things like your serotonin and your adrenaline. So I've got the problem with the adrenaline and a lack of dopamine. So I don't have dopamine receptors that stops me feeling satisfaction and... Well, not stops me but it limits my feeling of, 'Oh, I've done a good job today. I can relax.' Or of reward. And other people have problems, I don't have this one, but with a serotonin gene, which is they have dysregulation of their serotonin and that calm, and that sense of well-being and mood regulation is also up and down. While it's not a predisposition that you'll definitely going to have troubles because you can learn the tools to manage those neurotransmitters and things like nutrition and gut health and all that aspect. Because it's all a piece of that puzzle, but it's really just interesting, and it makes you much more understanding of people's differences.  Why does one person get completely overwhelmed in a very trivial situation versus someone else who could go into war and come back and they're fine? What is it that makes one person? Then you got the whole actual neuroscience circuitry stuff, which I find fascinating, what you do. Can you explain a little bit what goes on? Say let's just pick a traumatic experience: Someone's gone through some big major trauma. What is actually going on in the brain again? Can we explain this a little bit?  Dr Don: Yeah, this is one of the things that... When I did my research, I realised this is what's causing the dysregulation: is your subconscious your survival brain is fully present in the moment all the time. So everything in that part of our brain is operating in the present. which is what is supposed to be, right? They say that that's the key, that success and happiness is live in the present. Well, your survival brain does that. The problem comes in is that only humans store explicit details about events and experiences. So everything you've seen, heard, smelled, and touched in your lifetime has been recorded and stored in this tremendous memory system. Explicit memory.  Animals have procedural memory or associative memory. We have that memory system too. So we have both. They only have procedural, associative. So they learn through repetition, and they learn to associate you with safety and love, but they don't store the details about it. But we store all the details about these events and experiences. So this is where this glitch is coming in. If you've got the survival brain, which is 95% of everything that's going on, operating in the present, accessing data from something that happened 10 years ago because something looks like, sounds like, smells like it again, it's creating a response to something that's not happening. It's looking at old data and creating a physiological response to it, and the purpose of an emotion is a call for an action. So the purpose of fear is to run, to escape a threat. But there's no threat. It's just information about the threat. That disrupts your nervous system and then that creates a cascade of chemical reactions in your body because your mind thinks there's an action required. Lisa: This is at the crux of the whole system really, isn't it? This is this call for action to fix a problem that is in the past that cannot be fixed in the now. So if we can dive a little bit into my story, and I'm quite open on the show. I'm sharing the good, the bad, and the ugly. When I was working with Dr Don, I've been through a very, very traumatic few years really. Lost my dad, first and foremost, last July, which was the biggest trauma of my life. And it was a very difficult process that we went through before he died as well. And there's a lift, as you can imagine, my brain in a state of every night nightmares, fighting for his life, he's dying over, and over, and over, and over again.  Those memories are intruding into my daily life, whereas in anything and at any time, I could be triggered and be in a bawling state in the middle of the car park or the supermarket. Because something's triggered me that Dad liked to to buy or Dad, whatever the case was, and this was becoming... It's now a year after the event but everything was triggering me constantly. Of course, this is draining the life out of you and interfering with your ability to give focus to your business, to your family, to your friends, every other part of your life. I'd also been through the trauma of bringing Mum back from that mess of aneurysm that everyone knows about. The constant vigilance that is associated with bringing someone back and who is that far gone to where she is now, and the constant fear of her slipping backwards, and me missing something, especially in light of what I'd been through with my father. So I'd missed some things, obviously. That's why he ended up in that position and through his own choices as well.  But this load, and then losing a baby as well in the middle, baby Joseph. There was just a hell of a lot to deal with in the last five years. Then, put on top of it, this genetic combination of a hot mess you got sitting before you and you've got a whole lot of trauma to get through. So when we did the process, and I was very, super excited to do this process because it was so intrusive into my life, and I realised that I was slowly killing myself because I wasn't able to stop that process from taking over my life. I could function. I was highly functional. No one would know in a daily setting, but only because I've got enough tools to keep my shit together. so to speak. But behind closed doors, there's a lot of trauma going on.  So can you sort of, just in a high level, we don't want to go into the details. This is a four-hour program that I went through with Dr Don. What was going on there. and what did you actually help me with?  Dr Don: So when you're describing those things that were happening to you, what was actually happening to your mind is it was not okay with any of that. It wanted it to be different, right? So it was trying to get you into a state of action to stop your father from dying: Do it differently. Because it kept reviewing the data. It was almost looking at game tape from a game and saying 'Oh, had we maybe run the play that way, we would have avoided the tackle here.' So what your mind was saying 'Okay, run that way.' Well, you can't run that way. This is game tape. Right? But your mind doesn't see it as game tape. It sees it as real now, so it's run that way. So it keeps calling you into an action.  And especially with your dad because you were thinking about, 'Why didn't I do this?' Or 'Had I just done this, maybe this would have happened.' What your mind was saying is, 'Okay, let's do it. Let's do that.' What you just thought about. But you can't do that. It doesn't exist. It's information about something that happened but your mind sees it as real. That's why Hollywood have made trillions of dollars because they can convince you something on the screen is actually happening. That's why we cry in a movie or that's why we get scared in a movie. Because your mind, your subconscious mind cannot tell the difference between real or imagined. So that's actually happening.  You were just talking about the movie with Bambi, right? When you were little. 'Why is nobody stopping this from happening?' So your mind was not okay with a lot of these things that were happening, and it kept calling you to make a difference. That's what I never understood my wife doing. That before I really researched this, my wife would always be saying, 'Don't you wish this hadn't have happened?' Or 'Don't you wish we hadn't done this?' What I didn't understand at the time, because I used to just get like, 'Okay, whatever.' She'd go, 'Yeah, but wouldn't it have been better?' She wanted to get me into this play with her, this exercise. Lisa: This is going on in her head. Dr Don: Because it's going on in her head, and she's trying to feel better. So she's creating these scenarios that would make her feel like, 'Well, if I had just done that, gosh that would have been nice, thinking about that life.' And her mind seeing that going, 'Oh, that would be nice. Well, let's do that. Yes.' So she was what if-ing her life. And it was something that she did very early as a child because that's how she just experienced something traumatic with her father. In her mind, she'd be going, 'Well, what if I had to just left 10 minutes earlier, and I had have escaped that?' Or 'What if I hadn't done this?' So that's what she was doing. It made no sense to me because I hadn't experienced her life, but that's what she was doing. Her mind was trying to fix something. It's never tried to hurt you. It was never, at any point, trying to make you feel bad. It was trying to protect you. Lisa: Its job is to protect you from danger and it sees everything as you sit in the now so it's happening now. I love that analogy of these... What was it? Two-thirds of the car or something and... Dr Don: So goat and snowflake? Lisa: Goat and snowflake. And they're going off to a meeting and they're late. And what does the goat says to snowflake or the other way around? Dr Don: So snowflake, which is your conscious mind, your logical reasonable part of your mind, there's only 5, says the goat 95%, which is your subconscious mind. Who runs into a traffic jam says, 'Oh, we're going to be late. We should have left 15 minutes earlier.' To which goat replies 'Okay, let's do it. Let's leave 15 minutes earlier because that would solve the problem.'  Lisa: That analogy is stuck in my head because you just cannot... It doesn't know that it's too late and you can't hop into the past because it only lives in the now. This is 95% of how our brain operates. That's why we can do things like, I was walking, I was at a strategy meeting in Auckland with my business partner two days ago. We were walking along the road and he suddenly tripped and fell onto the road, right? My subconscious reacted so fast, I grabbed him right, and punched him in the guts. I didn't mean to do that but my subconscious recognised in a millimeter of a second, millionth of a second, that he was falling and I had to stop him. So this is a good side of the survival network: stopping and falling into the traffic or onto the ground.  But the downside of it is that brain is operating only in the now and it can't... Like with my father, it was going 'Save him. Save him. Save him. Why are you not saving him?' Then that's calling for an action, and then my body is agitated. The cortisol level's up. The adrenaline is up, and I'm trying to do something that's impossible to fix. That can drive you to absolute insanity when that's happening every hour, every day. Dr Don: Then that's taking a physical toll on your body because it's activating your nervous system, which is now, the cortisol levels are going up, adrenaline, right? So when your mind is in that constant state, it does very little on maintenance. It is not worried about fixing anything; it's worried about escaping or fixing the threat, because that's the number one priority.  Lisa: It doesn't know that it's not happening. I ended up with shingles for two months. I've only just gotten over it a few weeks ago. That's a definite sign of my body's, my immune system is down. Why is it down? Why can that virus that's been sitting dormant in my body for 40-something years suddenly decide now to come out? Because it's just becoming too much. I've spent too long in the fight or flight state and then your immune system is down. This is how we end up really ill.  Dr Don: We get sick. I was just actually having lunch today with a young lady and she's got some immune system issues. And I said, 'Think about it like the US Army, US military is the biggest, strongest military in the world. But if you took that military and you spread it out amongst 50 countries around the world fighting battles, and then somebody attacks the United States, I don't care how big and strong that system was, that military system was. It's going to be weakened when it gets an attack at the homefront.' So that's what was happening. So all of a sudden, now that virus that it could fight and keep dormant, it lets it pass by because it's like, 'Well, we can let that go. We'll catch that later. Right now, we got to go on the offensive and attack something else.' Lisa: Yeah, and this is where autoimmune, like your daughter experienced... Dr Don: About the Crohn's? Yep.  Lisa: Yep. She experienced that at 13 or something ridiculous? Dr Don: 14, she got it. Then she also got idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis which is another lung autoimmune disorder where the iron in the blood would just cause the lungs to release the blood. So her lungs just starts filling up with blood. They had no idea what caused it, that's the idiopathic part of it, and they just basically said, ‘There's no cure. She just needs to live close to a hospital because she'll bleed out if she has another attack.' Only 1 in 1.2 million people ever get that. So it's very rare so there's no research being done for it. They just basically say, ‘If you get it, live close to a hospital.' That's the strategy. Lisa: That's the way of fixing it.  Dr Don: And so both of those are autoimmune, and ever since we've gone to the program, she's hasn't had a flare-up of either one of those. Because I think our system is directly now able to address those things.  Lisa: Yeah, and can calm down. I think even people who haven't got post-traumatic stress like I've had or whatever, they've still got the day to day grind of life, and the struggle with finances, and the mortgage to be paid, and the kids to feed, and whatever dramas we're all going through. Like we talked about with COVID and this constant change that society is undergoing, and that's going to get faster and more. So this is something that we all need to be wary of: That we're not in this. I've taught and learned a lot about the coping and managing strategies, the breathing techniques, and meditation, the things, and that's what's kept me, probably, going. Dr Don: Those are great because they're... Again, that's managing it but it's good to have that because you've got to get to the root of it, which is what we were working on. But at the same time, if you don't have any coping, managing skills, life gets very difficult. Lisa: Yeah, and this is in-the-moment, everyday things that I can do to help manage the stress levels, and this is definitely something you want to talk about as well. So with me, we went through this process, and we did... For starters, you had to get my brain into a relaxed state, and it took quite a long time to get my brainwaves into a different place. So what were we doing there? How does that work with the brainwave stuff?  Dr Don: Well, when we have a traumatic event or memory, that has been stored in a very high-resolution state. So in a beta brainwave state because all your senses are heightened: sight, smell, hearing. So it's recording that and storing it in memory in a very intense state. So if I sat down with you and said, 'Okay, let's get this fixed.' And I just started trying to work directly on that memory, you're still going to be in a very high agitated state because we're going to be starting to talk about this memory. So you're going to be in a beta brainwave state trying to recalibrate a beta stored memory. That's going to be very difficult to do.  So what we do is, and that's why I use the four hours because within that first an hour and a half to two hours, we're basically communicating with the subconscious part of the brain by telling stories, symbols with metaphors, goat and snowflake, all the stories, all the metaphors that are built-in because then your brain moves into an alpha state. When it's in alpha, that's where it does restoration. So it's very prepared to start restoring. And then, if you remember, by the time we got to a couple of the traumatic memories, we only work on them for two or three minutes. Because you're in alpha, and so you've got this higher state of beta, and it recalibrates it into the same state that it's in. So if it's in alpha, it can take a beta memory, reprocess it in alpha, takes all the intensity out of it.  Lisa: So these brain waves, these beta states, just to briefly let people know, so this is speed, and correct me if I'm wrong, but it's the speed at which the brain waves are coming out. So in beta, like you'd see on ECG or something, it's sort of really fast. I think there's a 40 day... Dr Don: It's 15 to 30 hertz. Lisa: 15 to 30 hertz and then if you're in alpha, it's a lot lower than that? Dr Don: 7 to 14. Lisa: 7 to 14, and then below that is sort of when you're going into the sleep phase, either deep meditative or asleep. Dr Don: You're dreaming. Because what it's doing in dreaming is processing. So you're between 4 and 7 hertz. That's why people who have a lot of trauma have trouble sleeping. Because not only is their mind processing what it experienced during the day, it's also taking some of those old files saying, 'Well, okay, let's fix that now. Right. Let's get that.' That's where your nightmares are coming from. It was trying to get you into a processing to fix that. but it couldn't fix it. So it continues, and then when you go below 4 hertz, you go into delta. Delta is dreamless sleep and that's where the maintenance is getting done.  Lisa: That's the physical maintenance side more than the... Dr Don: Physical maintenance. Yeah, because that's not processing what it experienced anymore. What it's really now doing is saying, 'Okay, what are the issues that need to be dealt with?' So if you're very relaxed and you've had a very... Like me, right? I played hockey, so I had six concussions, 60 stitches, and never missed a hockey game. The only reason now that I understand I could do that is because I'm getting two or three times more Delta sleep than my teammates were. Lisa: Physical recuperative sleep.  Dr Don: Yeah, I was getting maximum restorative sleep. So an injury that I would have that could heal in two or three days, my teammates would two or three weeks. Because they were living in these, which I didn't know, a lot of my friends were dealing with trauma: physical, emotional, sexual abuse. I didn't know that was going on with my friends. Nobody talked about it. I didn't see it in their homes, but they were all dealing with that.  Lisa: So they are not able to get... So look, I've noticed since I've been through the program. My sleep is much better, and sometimes I still occasionally dream about Dad. But the positive dreams, if that makes sense. They're more Dad as he as he was in life and I actually think Dad's come to visit me and say, ‘Hi, give me a hug' rather than the traumatic last days and hours of his life, which was the ones that were coming in before and calling for that action and stopping me from having that restorative sleep.  I just did a podcast with Dr Kirk Parsley who's a sleep expert, ex-Navy SEAL and a sleep expert that's coming out shortly. Or I think by this time, it will be out, and understanding the importance, the super importance of both the delta and... What is the other one? The theta wave of sleep patterns, and what they do, and why you need both, and what parts of night do what, and just realising...Crikey, anybody who is going through trauma isn't experiencing sleep is actually this vicious cycle downwards. Because then, you've got more of the beta brainwave state, and you've got more of the stresses, and you're much less resilient when you can't sleep. You're going to... have health issues, and brain issues, and memory, and everything's going to go down south, basically.  Dr Don: That's why I didn't understand at the time. They just said 'Well, you're just super healthy. You heal really fast.' They had no other explanation for it. Now, I know exactly why. But it had nothing to do with my genetics. It had to do with my environment. Lisa: Just interrupting the program briefly to let you know that we have a new patron program for the podcast. Now, if you enjoy Pushing the Limits if you get great value out of it, we would love you to come and join our patron membership program. We've been doing this now for five and a half years and we need your help to keep it on here. It's been a public service free for everybody, and we want to keep it that way but to do that, we need like-minded souls who are on this mission with us to help us out. So if you're interested in becoming a patron for Pushing the Limits podcast, then check out everything on patron.lisatamati.com. That's patron.lisatamati.com.  We have two patron levels to choose from. You can do it for as little as 7 dollars a month, New Zealand or 15 dollars a month if you really want to support us. So we are grateful if you do. There are so many membership benefits you're going to get if you join us. Everything from workbooks for all the podcasts, the strength guide for runners, the power to vote on future episodes, webinars that we're going to be holding, all of my documentaries, and much, much more. So check out all the details: patron.lisatamati.com, and thanks very much for joining us.  Dr Don: That's, at the time, we just thought it was all, must have been genetics. But I realised now that it was environment as well. So maybe a genetic component to it as well, but then you take that and put that into this very beautiful, nurturing environment, I'm going to sleep processing in beta what I experienced that day and then my mind basically, at that point, is 'What do we need to work on? Not much. Let's go. Let's start now doing some maintenance.' Because it wants to address the top of item stuff first. What is it needs to be taken care of right now? Right? Those are the threats.  Once it gets the threats processed, then it can then start working on the things that are going to be the more long-term maintenance. So then it'll do that. But if it never gets out of that threat mode, it gets out for very little time. Then, if you're getting 30 minutes of delta sleep at night and I'm getting two hours, it's a no-brainer to figure out why I would heal faster.  Lisa: Absolutely, and this is independent of age and things because you've got all that that comes into it as well. Your whole chemistry changes as you get older and all this. There's other compounding issues as it gets more and more important that you get these pieces of the puzzle right.  Do you think that this is what leads to a lot of disease, cancers, and things like that as well? There's probably not one reason. There's a multitude of reasons, but it's definitely one that we can influence. So it's worth looking at it if you've got trauma in your life. People were saying to me 'Oh my God, you don't look good.' When you start hearing that from your friends, your people coming up to you and going, 'I can feel that you're not right.' People that are sensitive to you and know you very well, and you start hearing that over and over, and you start to think, 'Shit, something's got real. Maybe I need to start looking at this.'  Because it's just taking all your energy your way, isn't it, on so many levels. The restorative side and the ability to function in your life, and your work, and all of that, and that, of course, leads into depressive thoughts and that hyper-vigilant state constantly. That's really tiresome rather than being just chill, relax, enjoying life, and being able to... Like one of the things I love in my life is this podcast because I just get into such a flow state when I'm learning from such brilliant... Dr Don: You're in alpha. Lisa: I am. I am on it because this is, 'Oh. That's how that works.' And I just get into this lovely learning in an alpha state with people because I'm just so excited and curious. This is what I need to be doing more of. And less of the, if you'd see me half an hour ago trying to work out the technology. That's definitely not an alpha state for me. Dr Don: That's where they said Albert Einstein lived. Albert Einstein lived in alpha brainwave state. That's why information just float for him because there was no stress. He could then pull information very easily to float into. But if you're in a high beta brainwave state, there's too much activity. It has trouble focusing on anything because it's multiple threats on multiple fronts. So when we have a traumatic event, that's how it's being recorded. If you remember, what we talked about was there's a 400 of a millionth of a second gap in between your subconscious mind seeing the information and it going to your consciousness. So in 400 millionths of a second, your subconscious mind has already started a response into an action even though your conscious mind is not even aware of it yet.  Lisa: Yeah. Exactly what I did with rescuing my partner with the glass falling off the thing. I hadn't reached that logically. Dr Don: It's funny because that's one of the things that I talked about ,which is sort of, give us all a little bit of grace. Because if you've had a lot of trauma, you're going to respond a certain way. How could you not? If your mind's filtering into all of that, of course you're going to respond with that kind of a response because your mind is prone to go into that action very, very quickly. So we can give ourselves a little bit of grace in understanding that of course, you're going to do that, right? And not beat ourselves up.  Because you know what I talked about with everybody, there's nothing wrong with anybody. There's nothing wrong with anybody's mind. Everybody's mind is fine except you are experiencing something different than I experienced so your mind kept responding to it, and mine didn't have that. So you had multiple... Think about we have a hundred percent of our energy on our phone when we wake up in the morning, right? Fully powered up. You fire the phone up and eight programs open up, right? And mine has one.  Lisa: Yeah. You're just focusing on what you need to. Dr Don: Then noon comes, and you're having to plug your phone back in because you're out of energy.  Lisa: That's a perfect analogy. You're just burning the battery. My all is a hundred windows open in the back of my brain that is just processing all these things and so now, I can start to heal. So having gone through this process with you, like you said, we worked on a number of traumatic experiences, and I went through them in my mind. And then you did certain things, made me follow with my eyes and track here, and my eyes did this, and then, we pulled my attention out in the middle of the story and things. That helped me stay in that alpha state, brainwave state as I probably now understand while I'm still reliving the experience. That's sort of taking the colour out of it so that it's now sort of in a black and white folder. Now, it can still be shared, and it hasn't taken away the sadness of... Dr Don: Because it is sad that these things happen but that's not the response for an action which is that fear or anger, right? That dysregulation of the nervous system. That's what we want to stop, because that is what is going to affect health, enjoyment of life and everything else.  Lisa: Wow, this is so powerful. Yeah, and it's been very, very beneficial for me and helped me deal. For me, it also unfolded. Because after the four hour period with you, I had audiotapes and things that are meditations to do every day for the next 30 days. What were we doing in that phase of the recovery? What were you targeting in those sort of sessions?  Dr Don: So if you remember what we talked about, we have two memory systems. The explicit memory is what we worked on on that four hours. That's detail, events, and experiences. Once we get the mind processing through that, then we have to work on the same memory animals have, which is that associative repetitive memory. So you've built a series of codes on how to respond to threats, and that has come in over repetition and associations. So the audios are designed to start getting you now to build some new neural pathways, some new ways to respond because your mind won't switch a pattern instantly. It can switch a memory instantly, but a pattern is something that got built over a period of time. So it's like a computer. If I'm coding on my computer, I can't take one key to stop that code. I have to write a new code. Yeah, so what we're doing over the 30 days is writing new code. Lisa: Helping me make new routines and new habits around new neural pathways, basically.  Dr Don: You don't have that explicit memory interfering with the pathways. Because now, it's not constantly pulling you out, going back into an action call. It's basically now able to look at this information and these codes that got built and say, 'Okay, what's a better way? So do we have a better way of doing it?' Or 'Show me that code. Write that code.' If that code looks safer, then your mind will adopt that new code. Lisa: This is why, I think for me, there was an initial, there was definitely... Like the nightmares stopped, the intrusive every minute, hour triggering stopped, but the process over the time and the next... And I'm still doing a lot of the things and the meditations. It's reinforcing new habit building. This is where... Like for people dealing with addictions, this is the path for them as well, isn't it?  Dr Don: Yeah. Because I talked about addiction as a code. I don't believe it's a disease. Your mind has found a resource to stop pains, and your subconscious mind is literal. It doesn't see things as good or bad, or right or wrong. It's literal. 'Did that stop the pain? Let's do that.' Because it's trying to protect you. So if you've now repeated it over and over, not only have you stopped the pain, but you've built an association with a substance that is seen as beneficial. Lisa: Because your brain sees it as medicine when you're taking, I don't know, cocaine or something. It sees it as essential to your life even though you, on a logical level, know that, ‘This is destroying me and it's a bad thing for me.' Your subconscious goes, 'No, this is a good thing and I need it right now.' Dr Don: Because it's in the present, when does it want the pain to stop? Now. So it has no ability to see a future or a past. Your subconscious is in the moment. So if you take cocaine, the logical part of your brain goes, 'Oh, this is going to create problems for me. I'm going to become addicted.' Right? Your subconscious goes, ‘Well, the pain stopped. We don't see that as a bad thing.' I always use the analogy: Why did people jump out of the buildings at 911? They weren't jumping to die. They were jumping to live because when would they die? Now, if they jump, would they die? No. They stopped the death. So even jumping, which logically makes no sense, right? But to the subconscious mind, it was going to stop the pain now.  Lisa: Yeah, and even if it was two seconds in the future that they would die, your brain is going...  Dr Don: It doesn't even know what two seconds are.  Lisa: No. It has no time. Isn't it fascinating that we don't have a time memory or understanding in that part of the brain that runs 95% of the ship?  Dr Don: It's like what Albert Einstein said, ‘There's no such thing as time.' So it's like an animal. If an animal could communicate and you say, 'What time is it?' That would make no sense to an animal. 'What do you mean? It's now.' 'What time is it now?' 'Now. Exactly.' Lisa: It's a construct that we've made to... Dr Don: Just to explain a lot of stuff, right? When something happens.  Lisa: Yeah, and this is quite freeing when you think of it. But it does make a heck of a lot of sense. So people are not being destructive when they become drug addicts or addicted to nicotine, or coffee, or chocolate. They're actually trying to stop the pain that they're experiencing in some other place and fix things now. Even though the logical brain... Because the logical brain is such a tiny... Like this is the last part of our evolution, and it's not as fully...  We can do incredible things with it at 5%. We've made the world that we live in, and we're sitting here on Zoom, and we've got incredible powers. But it's all about the imagination, being able to think into the future, into the past, and to make correlations, and to recognise patterns. That's where all our creativity and everything, or not just creativity, but our ability to analyse and put forth stuff into the world is happening. But in actual, we're still like the animals and the rest of it. We're still running at 95%, and that's where we can run into the problems with these two.  Dr Don: Because you got two systems. You got a very advanced system operating within a very primitive system, and it hasn't integrated. It's still integrating, right? So if there's a survival threat, survival will always override reason and logic, because it's designed to protect you. So there's no reason and logic that will come in if there's a survival threat. It's just going to respond the way it knows, does this Google search, 'What do we know about this threat? How do we know to protect ourselves, and we'll go instantly into survival mode.' Again, there's the reason and logic. Why would you jump out of a building, right? If you applied reason and logic, you wouldn't have jumped, right? People will say, 'Well, but they still jumped.' Yes, because reason and logic didn't even come into the process. It was all about survival.  Lisa: Yeah. When the fire is coming in it was either... Dr Don: 'Am I going to die out now or I'm going to move and not die now?'  Lisa: Yeah, and we're also prone to movement when we're in agitation and in an agitated state, aren't we? Basically, all of the blood and the muscles saying, 'Run, fight, do something. Take action.' Dr Don: That's why when people get into depression, it's the absence of those emotions.  Lisa: Yeah, and people feel exhaustion.  Dr Don: Yeah. The mind kept calling for an action using anger, for example, but you can't do the action because it's not happening, so it shuts down to protect you and stops calling for any emotion, and that's depression. So the key to get out of depression is actions. It's to get something happening. So in a lot of people who are depressed, what do I tell them to do? 'Start moving. Start exercising. Get out. Start doing things.' Right?  Lisa: So I run ultras. Dr Don: Exactly. Perfect example, right?  Lisa: Yeah, because I was. I was dealing with a lot of shit in my life at the time when I started doing ultra-marathons. To run was to quiet the pain and to run was to be able to cope and to have that meditative space in order to work through the stuff that was going on in my life. And I know even in my husband's life, when he went through a difficult time, that's when he started running. So running can be a very powerful therapeutic, because there is a movement, and you're actually burning through the cortisol and the adrenaline that's pouring around in your body. Therefore, sitting still and that sort of things was just not an option for me. I had to move. And it explains what, really. It's calling the movement. Like it was a movement because I couldn't fix the other thing.  Dr Don: That's what they'll tell you to do. To get out of depression is to move. What I say is the way to get out of depression is to get your mind to resolve what it's been asking for. Lisa: It's going a little deeper.  Dr Don: Yeah. So it's going down and saying, 'Okay, why has it been getting you angry and now, it shut down from the anger?' Because it's been trying to get you in your situation. 'Don't let Dad die. Don't let this happen.' Right? So because you couldn't do it, it just shuts down. Makes perfect sense but when we get to the resolution that there is no action required, there's no need for the depression anymore. The depression will lift because there's no more call for an action.  Lisa: I can feel that in me, that call. Anytime that anything does still pop up, I sort of acknowledge the feeling and say, 'There is no call for action here. This is in the past. This is a memory.' So I do remind myself that when things do still pop up from time to time now, as opposed to hourly. I go, 'Hey, come back into the now. This is the now. That was the then that's calling for an action. This is why you're doing thing.' Even that understanding

Two Fit Crazies and a Microphone
Episode 244: Episode 244 - Christine’s Boston Marathon Recap

Two Fit Crazies and a Microphone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 53:28


Episode 244 - Christine's Boston Marathon Recap “There is nothing like being in Boston during marathon weekend!” - Brian Prendergast“In-person races are back! Boston was my first big race since the pandemic, and I felt at ease with all of the new safety protocols and social distancing guidelines in place.” - Christine Conti Get ready for the hottest post-pandemic marathon news straight from the mouth of one Fit Crazie! Listen up as Christine recaps her experience running the 125th Boston Marathon and first big in-person event since the world went virtual. After an almost two year long hiatus from live events, the city of Boston did not disappoint. “The fans came out in droves, the Wellesley College girls were still screaming, and the Boston College students were as drunk and sloppy as ever once you got to Heartbreak Hill.” In this episode, Christine will walk you through what to expect before booking your next airline flights, riding public transportation, and navigating through large groups of people without feeling the least bit concerned or anxious. Hear about the new processes now in place for major races to be held around the globe, but be sure you don't forget your vaccination card or your negative Covid test results before picking up race bibs! As for Boston, while Christine discusses how strange it was to run this historic race in October with a 40% decrease in runners to allow for social distancing, there is still nothing like the Boston Marathon. If you are a runner, a running spouse, or simply just a fitness fanatic, put this on your bucket list! Be Boston Strong! Stay Fit! Stay Crazie!Christine and Brianwww.TwoFitCrazies.comtfcpro@twofitcrazies.com Website: www.TwoFitCrazies.com Facebook: Two Fit Crazies and a Microphone PodcastInstagram: @twofitcrazies#podcast #fitcrazie #BostonMarathon2021 #BostonStrong #Altra #Gatorade #Run #Marathon #MarathonPacing #PersonalBest #WellesleyCollege #BostonCollege #HeartbreakHill #NewtonRunningClub #Nike #JoeStrummer #YesYouCan #TeamHoyt #Believe #AnythingIsPossible

Ali on the Run Show
434. Nell Rojas, 2021 Boston Marathon Recap

Ali on the Run Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 61:06


“I hope that brands see the value in me and my future in running and what I have to offer to the running community.” On October 11, Nell Rojas ran her fourth marathon. In her Boston Marathon debut, Nell finished sixth overall, ran a personal best time of 2:27, and was the first American woman across the finish line. We heard from Nell before the race, and now she's back to recap every detail of race day. On this episode, Nell shares how she was feeling heading into the race, what race morning was like, and what it was like doing breathing exercises in a church nursery. She reflects on why her goal was to be first American that day, what that goal means to her now, and whether or not it matters. Plus, she shares fun stories from her post-race interviews and talks about what's next. SPONSOR: AfterShokz — Visit ontherun.aftershokz.com for 15% off wireless headphones. What you'll get on this episode: Was Boston the best day of Nell's life? (2:45) How Nell spent the day before the race (7:15) On lining up behind Des Linden at the start, and what the pre-race technical meetings are like (10:45) Choosing a race day outfit (15:00) How Nell was feeling on race morning (18:20) Nell's goals and her plan for race day (23:45) Why Nell's goal was to be top American at Boston (32:20) How Nell's race played out (38:25) The finish line experience (48:00) On being unsponsored, and what happens next (50:50) Nell answers a listener question about protein (54:20) What's next? (57:00) Follow Nell: Instagram @nell_rojas_running Twitter @nellrojas Follow Ali: Instagram @aliontherun1 Join the Facebook group Twitter @aliontherun1 Support on Patreon Blog Strava Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Spotify SoundCloud Overcast Stitcher Google Play SUPPORT the Ali on the Run Show! If you're enjoying the show, please subscribe and leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. Spread the run love. And if you liked this episode, share it with your friends!

For Your Run
25: Stephen Mohring

For Your Run

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 89:06


What happens when you get two unexpected stress fractures just months before you're planning to run the 125th Boston Marathon? Stephen has those answers and it's one fantastic story! He joins Blaire and Shawn for episode 25 of For Your Run! Bring them along for your miles!Follow Stephen on InstagramFollow For Your Run on InstagramKeep up with Shawn & Blaire on Instagram

Run Farther & Faster — The Podcast!
Episode 107: If I was Disappointed with My Marathon, Should I Run Another Marathon within the Same Training Cycle? Tips for Racing after Racing with Special Guest Caetlin Benson-Allott

Run Farther & Faster — The Podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 49:16


After sharing our post-Boston Marathon recovery experiences, we talked about whether and and when it's appropriate to run another marathon in the same training cycle. After reviewing the factors one should consider when making the decision to run a second marathon in the same cycle, Lisa talks with one of our clients, Caetlin, who successfully ran (and PR'd) a second marathon after running a disappointing first marathon. We have been coaching Caetlin since 2017, when she came to us with the ultimate goal of getting her 3:50 marathon PR down enough to qualify for Boston. We worked with Caetlin to chip away at that time, also setting a half marathon PR along the way. When her initial attempt at a BQ at the 2018 Marine Corps Marathon fell short due to a virus, we helped Caetlin regroup and target a second marathon six weeks later, the 2018 Rehoboth Marathon, where she set a huge PR and qualified for the 2020 Boston Marathon with a 3:33 finish time. She returned to Rehoboth in December 2019, just before the pandemic, for a repeat performance and a new PR of 3:26. The pandemic meant Caetlin's first Boston Marathon was virtual, but she earned an entry to the October 2021 Boston and was able to toe the start line in Hopkinton with us last week. Be sure to listen to this week's podcast episode, as we welcome Caetlin as our guest and hear about her back-to-back marathons in an attempt to earn her BQ, as well as how she came to embrace and appreciate the "Plan B" approach to Boston following a back injury just three weeks before race day. Congrats, Caetlin! Thanks to our newest sponsor, RunMitts! Use the code RFFR10 for 10 percent off any order. Thank you to our additional sponsors, @soupergirl—use the code RUN20 for 20 percent off—-@oofos, @lilytrotterscompression, and @SPIbelt. If you enjoy our tips, consider checking out our coaching services. We provide individualized coaching for runners of all levels and have been doing so successfully for over 11 years. Head over to https://www.runfartherandfaster.com/programs/virtual-coaching/ to check out our services or send us an email at julieandlisa@runfartherandfaster.com. Don't forget to follow us on Instagram (www.instagram.com/runfartherandfaster) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/runfartherfaster). Check us out on Twitter at @Runfartherfast. Leave us a five star review! Thanks for listening! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/runfartherandfaster/message

The Mark White Show
Retired Teacher Tony Garcia & Kelly Peoples with Down Syndrome Alabama

The Mark White Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 42:08


On this edition of TWMS, I have retired teacher Tony Garcia joining me! Tony recently had a post go viral as he wrote a letter to students challenging them to share kindness. In addition to that, Tony just finished the Boston Marathon and we'll talk some about that as well. Tony also has a former co-worker, Liz McGrew, who currently needs a kidney donor and we are getting that message out as well. After my conversation with Tony, I'll have Down Syndrome Alabama Executive Director Kelly Peoples to share about DSA and the upcoming Step Up for Down Syndrome Walk! I hope you will listen and share.

Marathon Training Academy
On the Ground at the Boston Marathon

Marathon Training Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 53:35


In this episode we recap the 2021 Boston Marathon.  Feel the energy from the crowds and come with Angie as she takes you along the historic Boston course (with a bad hamstring)!  You will hear inspiring stories from the world's oldest marathon plus soundbites from fans of the MTA Podcast. Sponsor Links: UCAN -SAVE 20% on your order with code MTACHALLENGE MetPro -get $500 off their concierge nutrition coaching

Running Rogue
Episode #254: Post Marathon Musings

Running Rogue

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 46:33


October 10th and 11th brought an epic return to marathon racing in the US via the Chicago and Boston Marathons. The conditions were tough for many, but the energy and magic were amazing anyway. I was in Boston to run and experience one part of that myself. In this episode, I break down my post-marathon musings that might be helpful in you processing your races too.

The Triathlete Hour
Triathlete Hour: Ep. 75 - Tim Don does everything

The Triathlete Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 64:47


This week we have another all British show! We're talking to Tim Don—the Olympian and former Ironman world record holder is maybe best known these days as "the man with the halo," after breaking his neck when he was hit by a car in Kona and spending months in a halo device that was screwed into his skull and held his neck in place. He came back from that to run the Boston Marathon and race Kona. Now we talk about all the things he's involved in: serving as a team captain for Super League, a back-up guide for the Paralympics, and don't count him out yet at the age of 43, he's training in the UK rain and getting ready for next year's races. He's also a dad and his kids interrupt us a couple times, because they want to play! We also first do a quick preview of the showdown going on this weekend at Ironman California and why the pros are battling for end-of-year rankings. For more questions with Tim, check out our Q&A on Super League and what's next at Triathlete. This week's episode is brought to you by Muc-Off, the world's fastest race lube.

We Run This
Episode #66: Jonathan Levitt on stress & poor sleep killing your runs

We Run This

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 55:34


My guest this week is Jonathan Levitt. Jonathan is a runner, cyclist and hosts his own podcast for runners called "For The Long Run." He's also the Sales and Endurance Team Manager for InsideTracker, a personalized nutrition system that analyzes your blood, DNA, and lifestyle to help you optimize your body and reach your goals. In this episode, Jonathan and I discuss the stress of moving (he's moving this week) and how that impacted his Boston Marathon performance, the importance of sleep and why people just don't get enough, and the highs and lows of running a 50K. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/werunthis/support

Inside Running Podcast
207: Eloise Wellings & her debut marathon

Inside Running Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 157:58


207: Eloise Wellings & her debut marathon   Brad assesses his workouts relative to his age and considers options as Sydney reopens. Julian's back at work and in the tribulations of running while still learning to be a Dad. Brady has a bit of a challenging week in Echuca as he prepares for the Melbourne Marathon. Boston Marathon won by Benson Kipruto in tactical 2:09:51, after CJ Albertson led from the gun for most of it, while Diana Kipyokei won in 2:24:45, with Edna Kiplagat closing in the later stages. Boston Marathon Elite Leaderboard Jess Stenson returns to the marathon after three years and to top form, taking out line honours in the Perth Marathon with a time of 2:25:15, a World Championships Qualifier and 4th fastest Australian Woman of all time. Nic Harman won in 2:14:55, just 40 seconds off his PB set in the 2019 Fukuoka Marathon. Perth Marathon Results https://www.runnerstribe.com/latest-news/trengove-is-back-and-harman-impresses-at-perth-marathon/?fbclid=IwAR1lEYVb4xpTVVjN9XFRjJRbjzV17GiHrkpAWMNiB5ZoXU8QWCGsimh997M  Agnes Tirop 4th place finisher in Tokyo 5000m & World Championship Bronze Medallist in the 10000m was found murdered in her home in Kenya. https://www.runnerstribe.com/latest-news/r-i-p-agnes-tirop/  Eloise Wellings returns to the show during her hotel quarantine, to debrief with James Constantine to recap of her day at the London Marathon where she ran 2:29:42 in her debut at the distance. Eloise goes through the splits of the race and her pacing strategy through the race, while fielding listener questions about her training, making comparisons to other athletes, transitioning to the longer distances and running to the different crowds. Eloise rounds out this conversation about how she's passing the time in quarantine, her work with Love Mercy Foundation, and the What's Right Within Podcast with co-host Rory Darkins. https://www.instagram.com/p/CUpF_9GgRRb/   Patreon Link: https://www.patreon.com/insiderunningpodcast Opening and Closing Music is Undercover of my Skin by Benny Walker. www.bennywalkermusic.com For shoes or running apparel contact Julian at: https://www.facebook.com/therunningcompanyballarat/ Join the conversation at: https://www.facebook.com/insiderunningpodcast/ To donate and show your support for the show: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=9K9WQCZNA2KAN

Another Mother Runner
AMR Answers: Post-marathon Recovery Time + Aid Station 101

Another Mother Runner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 36:26


Whether you just finished your fall race or it's coming up, you want to listen as Dimity and Sarah suggest: -recovery protocol for Amanda who's fresh off the Boston Marathon; -hydration-station tactics for first-time race participant Esther; and, -ways for Carey to get her relay partner's rear in gear! Shiver as Sarah details her final open-water swim sessions, and Dimity divulges her post-race attitude. The answers commence at 8:18. When you shop our sponsors, you help AMR. We appreciate your—and their—support! Feel supported: Save 15% at Handful.com with promo code HandfulAMR15  Hop to it: Save 20% off your first purchase at Jiminys.com/amr and use code AMR20.  Relight your spark: Enjoy 30 days free of the Dipsea app by going to DipseaStories.com/amr Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

News Updates from The Oregonian
Oregon's vaccine mandate kicks in Oct. 18 for thousands of workers

News Updates from The Oregonian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 3:20


Rent assistance delays leave thousands of Oregon renters on brink of eviction. Portland's construction crane count has dropped by nearly half. Gresham firefighter running the Boston Marathon helps save life See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Marathon Running Podcast by We Got the Runs
74. Boston Marathon Race Recap and Review

Marathon Running Podcast by We Got the Runs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 32:05


In this episode we are doing a recap of the 2021 Boston Marathon. With perfect weather and a roll-out start, we share with you our first experience running the Boston Marathon and weather it lived up to the hype. We also share with you a few reviews form other participants who tell us what stood out to them from this epic race weekend.

The World and Everything In It
10.18.21 Legal Docket, Moneybeat, History Book

The World and Everything In It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 31:49


On Legal Docket, Jenny Rough details oral arguments in the Boston Marathon bomber's death sentence challenge at the Supreme Court; on the Monday Moneybeat, Nick Eicher talks to financial analyst David Bahnsen about the latest economic news; and on History Book, Katie Gaultney recounts significant events from the past. Plus: artwork at auction, and the Monday morning news.Support The World and Everything in It today at wng.org/donate. Additional support for The World and Everything in It comes from Christianbook.com. Christian books, Bibles, music, toys, and gifts—at Christianbook.com. From Covenant College, a distinctly Christian, liberal arts college on beautiful Lookout Mountain, Georgia. Explore more at covenant.edu.And from Samaritan Ministries, connecting Christians who care for one another spiritually and financially when a medical need arises. More at samaritanministries.org/worldpodcast.

This Is Gonna Hurt - the Podcast of J. Gordon Duncan

Thanks for listening! I'm excited to share with you all the details (good and bad) of my Boston Marathon experience. Thank you for all your support! In this episode, I talk about: All the waiting you had to do How the crowd played a part in the race The mindshift that took plance in the last half All the great people I met! Thanks for listening! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thisisgonnahurt/support

The Rambling Runner Podcast
#378 - Alexis McCoy: Marathon Milestone Part II - Boston Marathon

The Rambling Runner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 45:28


Part II of Marathon Milestone with Alexis McCoy is here and it's a doozy! Alexis just rocked the Boston Marathon for a PR of 3:13 and did it in unique fashion. This was no walk in park. Her race featured some huge highs and frustrating lows. She was well prepared to run well and showcased admirable toughness along the way. Now she's on to New York! Background: Alexis is a dedicated amateur runner who is taking a big leap this fall. She is running the Boston, New York, and California International Marathons. Not only that, we will be following her every step of the way. Tune-in to Alexis's last appearance on the show by downloading episode #368. Follow Matt: Instagram - @rambling_runner Twitter - @rambling_runner YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ83E0U8M4V7klqZB8BF3wA Rambling Runner Podcast Community Corner private Facebook group - www.facebook.com/groups/125544686229661 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Interesting Humans
LISA HESSE: REDISCOVERING THE ATHLETE IN US

Interesting Humans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 85:36


I've known Lisa Hesse for decades. When you live in a community like Ann Arbor for as long as I have and also are part of a smaller, tighter community--the running community--one is bound to bump into the same people from time to time.I knew Lisa coached runners, particularly women. And I knew she was a Girls on the Run coach as well. What I didn't know is the depth to this person and the many challenges she's faced.Lisa is a 59-year-old runner who expresses with absolute certainty that running has been her North Star. Running has been the activity that has helped her through any number of "lifequakes", those messy, twisty challenges of life. It has been, she says, both her superpower and kryptonite. She is a Nationally Board-certified Health and Wellness Coach, an ICF Professional Coach,  a "neuroscience nerd," and "a big believer in the idea that it's never too late to change our narrative while honoring what we bring with us from the past." She also is the founder of the Southeaster Michigan Chapter of Girls on the Run in 2001. Lisa started running at age 13. She has 19 marathons, including four Boston Marathon finishes, to her credit. Lisa now is a Life and Mindset coach focused on helping women, particularly former women athletes, rediscover the athlete inside each of them. Her approach is one of self-discovery. I believe that people who have been through life challenges with understanding, compassion, and empathy make better coaches.  But one of the things I admire about her approach to coaching is that she does not apply her own life experience as the template for what she advises her clients to do. Rather, as she says, it allows the space for her to help her clients change their narratives. Just after this podcast was recorded Lisa let me know she has been diagnosed with a rare autoimmune disorder known as Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy or CIDP. It is a disorder of the peripheral nerves characterized by gradually increasing sensory loss and weakness associated with loss of reflexes. CIDP is caused by damage to the covering or sheath of the nerves (myelin). "I know, without a doubt, that because I see my world through the lens of my body, I caught this early," she wrote to me. Now in another of her own "lifequakes" Lisa is facing a potentially existential threat to part of her identity: Athlete.  "It's yet another threat to my sense of Who am I? "I hope you enjoy my conversation with Lisa. Where to find Lisa: https://lisahesse.com/LinkedIn profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lisa-hesse-6b606a7/What is CIDP?: https://www.cedars-sinai.org/health-library/diseases-and-conditions/c/chronic-inflammatory-demyelinating-polyradiculoneuropathy.htmlBook and website, The Body is Not an Apology with Sonya Renee TaylorIntro and Outro Music by https://www.wildesmusic.com/Thank you for listening. 

Unpredictable
Future proof your success and a Race report #113

Unpredictable

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 35:33


Sara talks all things vitual Boston Marathon. Judy did a 10 miler. Need to reset for the rest of the year? Future proof your success. Recalibrate, you can still do it!!

Steep Life Media
Mountain Outpost Podcast #30

Steep Life Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 33:30


This week on the pod, Jam Jam (Jamil Coury) and Skizzle Fresh (Schuyler Hall) return with an update on the Chicago and Boston Marathons, as well as a preview of Big's Backyard Ultra.

The Run Ohana Podcast
Chasing Unicorns. The 125th Boston Marathon Race Recap

The Run Ohana Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 89:31


It's been a long time coming for Ryan, but he has finally raced the Boston Marathon! In-person! In October? In this episode, we recap the race weekend from spectator to runner and all of the carbs in-between.

Mile High Endurance Podcast
Ironman Events This Week

Mile High Endurance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 39:48


Any given weekend there are half a dozen IRONMAN races.  What is driving the weekly surplus of IRONMAN races?  How are they not canalizing themselves?  How can a single island support both IRONMAN and CHALLENGE races on the same day?  Speaking of big races on the same weekend, we are also discussing the Boston and Chicago Marathons that just happened this past weekend.  Plus "Remote Racing" by RemoteRacing.com and USAT.   Show Sponsor: VENGA CBD Thanks very much to Venga CBD for helping make the show possible. Venga CBD is not like most CBD companies. Venga was started in Colorado by athletes like you who wanted a better way to use CBD to help fight pain, train longer, race harder and recover faster. That's why they created a SYSTEM of CBD products that cover 100% of your CBD needs. I use it every day in one form or another! Each product is specifically made to support an area of your endurance life from training to racing to recovery.  All Venga CBD products are 100% THC Free and water soluble! Save a whopping 30% off & get free shipping when you buy the Venga Endurance System versus buying the products separately  - seriously, this is the best deal on the market. Just go to https://vengaendurance.com/303podcast to order yours today. First-time order is 30% off with code (303PODCAST).  We've also added 50% off your first month's subscription with code (303SUBSCRIPTION).   In Today's Show Discussion IRONMAN Races This Weekend and Next - Are there too many? Endurance News Chicago (Oct 10) and Boston (Oct 11) Marathon Results Remote National Championship, RemoteRacing.com and RaceX What's new in the 303 Utah's Unique Mountain Bike Hut System Unites a Group of Colorado Cyclists Behind the Scenes with Racing Underground Video of the Week Justin Metzler doing Ironman California   Interview Sponsor: UCAN Take your performance to the next level with UCAN Energy and Bars made with SuperStarch®  UCAN uses SuperStarch instead of simple sugars to fuel serious athletes.  UCAN keeps blood sugar steady compared to the energy spikes and crashes of sugar-based products.  Steady energy equals sustained performance! You put in the training, so don't let nutrition limit your performance.  Use UCAN in your training and racing to fuel the healthy way, finish stronger and recover more quickly!  Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co,    Discussion: Upcoming IRONMAN Races - Too Many? IRONMAN Races Next Two Weekends 10/16: 70.3 and 140.6 Alcúdia-Mallorca Spain (east) 10/16: Challenge Peguera Mallorca (west) 77k away 10/17: AZ 70.3 10/23: NC 70.3, 140.6 Portugal, 140.6 Waco 10/24: 70.3 Portugal, 70.3 Greece Costa Navarino, 70.3 Waco, 70.3 Sardegna, 140.6 California   IRONMAN California IM California (ironman.com) American River (Folsom), CA water temperature in October (seatemperature.info) Ironman California 2021 (MPRO-only, Oct 24th) – Entry List | TriRating   Our News is sponsored by Buddy Insurance. It's big time training and racing season.  Buddy Insurance is the kind of peace of mind so you can enjoy your training and racing to their fullest.  Buddy's mission is simple, to help people fearlessly enjoy an active and outdoor lifestyle.  You can now get on-demand accident insurance to make sure you get cash for bills fast and fill any gaps between your current coverage.  Go to buddyinsurance.com and create an account.  There's no commitment or charge to create one.  Once you have an account created, it's a snap to open your phone and in a couple clicks have coverage for the day.  Check it out!   Endurance News:   2021 Boston Marathon results: The winners list and official times Men's race: Benson Kipruto won his first Boston Marathon after finishing 10th in 2019. Kipruto made a decisive move in Mile 23, running it in just 4:29. He then upped the tempo in Mile 24 (4:25), finishing with an average mile pace of 4:58 and a 46-second margin of victory. Benson Kipruto (2:09:51) Lemi Berhanu (2:10:37) Jemal Yimer (2:10:38)   Women's race: Diana Chemtai Kipyogei won her first Boston Marathon after withstanding a late charge from 2017 champion Edna Kiplagat. Kipyogei pulled away from Netsanet Gudeta at Mile 23. Diana Chemtai Kipyogei (2:24:45) Edna Kiplagat (2:25:09) Mary Ngugi (2:25:20)   2021 Chicago Marathon Results and Tracking: How To Track Runners For The 2021 Chicago Marathon - LetsRun.com Top 10 Men's Tura Abdiwak, Seifu (ETH) 02:06:12 – 0:06:28 (2:06:12) Rupp, Galen (USA) 02:06:35 – 0:06:42 (2:06:35) Kiptanui, Eric (KEN) 02:06:51 – 0:06:46 (2:06:51)   Top 10 Women Chepngetich, Ruth (KEN) 02:22:31 – 0:08:11 (2:22:31) Bates, Emma (USA) 02:24:20 – 0:07:33 (2:24:20) Hall, Sara (USA) 02:27:19 – 0:08:04 (2:27:19)   https://www.teamusa.org/USA-Triathlon/Remote-National-Championships USA Triathlon has partnered with RemoteRacing™ to host the first first Remote National Championships, an opportunity for athletes from across the United States to compete for an Olympic and sprint-distance national championship regardless of where they live and train. Using RaceX's RemoteRacing™, results are normalized to create a fair and level playing field and final results are localized to the course at the 2021 Age Group National Championships in Milwaukee. Finish times for all athletes will be as if everyone was competing on the same course, in the same climate, on the same day. RemoteRacing™ accounts for both environment and terrain, including heat, humidity, wind, elevation, and elevation gain. What is equalized? Results are equalized for both age and gender, so you can get a true sense of how you stack up. Note: RaceX is a sister company to TriDot.  Amazing software that solves a lot of problems with training.  Listen to episode 299 for more on that topic, and tune in in a couple weeks for our interview with Matt Bach from TriDot.   Event Details Dates – November 11–21 (registration opens October 7) Format – Sprint and Olympic distances   Cost – $45 for athletes who register by Oct. 21 and $50 starting on Oct. 22. A portion of the proceeds will support USA Triathlon Foundation's mission to transform lives through sport by opening pathways for all to swim, bike, and run. Qualification – No qualification is required to compete and competing in the event does not qualify you for anything, including 2022 Toyota Age Group National Championships nor Team USA. This event also does not earn you points toward your ranking. This competition is solely for bragging rights (and fun awards!). Race Format and Rules The Race Window will open at 12:01am CT, Thursday, November 11, 2021, and close at 6:00pm CT, Sunday, November 21, 2021. Race activities must be done in swim, bike, run order. Swim – Swims must be done in standard-length pools (25 yards, 25 meters, 50 meters) due to inconsistent access to open water for many athletes and inaccurate results from open-water swims due to various water conditions. Athletes may complete their swim at any time during the Race Window prior to starting their bike or run. T1 – The time between the swim and bike is unregulated due to inconsistent pool accessibility and proximity to adequate bike and run route Bike – The bike may be completed indoors or outdoors either with or without a bike power sensor. Differences in power sensor accuracy ratings is handled automatically by the system. T2 – The run must start within 10 minutes of finishing the bike Run – The run must be done outdoors Register today! For more details, please visit RemoteRacing.com.   What's New in the 303: Deb Connelly, Running Hall of Fame, Denver Athletic Club Deb Conley started running for the first time the summer before attending the University of Colorado at Boulder. She ran just to run with a new boyfriend. Like three miles. A couple of months later she walked on to CU's cross country team and has been running ever since. And just recently, she was inducted into the Colorado Running Hall of Fame. Wow. She never played sports growing up, never ran, never did anything but work and go to school. In this video interview, Deb expresses a surprised happiness after being selected for the Colorado Running Hall of Fame. But she also shares something vulnerable; how running in college was the first time she ever experienced feeling truly happy.  Whats not really discussed, is the rocky and almost impossible path she took to get here. If you knew Deb in high school you probably would never have foreseen her making the Colorado Running H.O.A.  But like 99% of her classmates, I had no idea how hard her life was until we reconvened about this honor almost 40 years later. My high school experience differed greatly from Deb's even though we both went to Wheat Ridge and graduated in 1983. I played sports, didn't work, had a car, stayed busy with practices and homework and hanging out with friends. Admittedly, I led the “Leave it Beaver” lifestyle (yes I'm dating myself), like a good chunk of my fellow “Farmers” (our mascot). Deb, living just a few miles away lived in poverty. Her mom forged her birth certificate when she was 13 so she could work. Her bed was an old army cot. They had no refrigerator and the house was in disrepair. Her parents didn't want her to go to college but rather help with the other kids. There was no modeling of “success” or “ambition” in her home. Yet she excelled at school and knew she had to figure out a way to go to college. She admittedly didn't understand true happiness and felt lonely. Her friend and fellow classmate, Chris Tomlinson, one of the few who knew of Deb's tough childhood said, “she was very smart, but seemed anxious and isolated. It seemed touch and go for her.”   Wendy Koenig A middle distance runner, Wendy Koenig competed seven times for the United States in international dual meets. She was a three-time AIAW Champion, in 1975 in the 880 yards, and in 1976 at both 800 and 1,500 metres. Koenig also won three AAU titles, outdoors in the 1973 880 and in 1976 in the 1,500, and indoors in the 1979 800. On 24 March 1973, she set one of the very early world records for the 400 hurdles with 59.08, the first woman to run the event under one minute. Koenig ran for Colorado State University, and competed at the 1972 Olympics as Wendy Koenig and the 1976 Olympics as Wendy Knudson. Personal Bests: 440y – 54.60 (1975); 800 – 1:59.91 (1976); 1500 – 4:21.80 (1976); Mile – 4:47.7i (1976); 3000 – 9:49.0 (1976); 2 Miles – 10:34.0 (1976); 100H – 14.8 (1971); 400H – 59.08 (1973); HJ – 5-5 [1.65] (1974); LJ – 19-10¾i [6.06] (1979); Pen - 4167 (1971).     Utah's Unique Mountain Bike Hut System Unites a Group of Colorado Cyclists Posted on October 12, 2021 By Bill Plock In south central Utah surrounded by National Parks, ancient river beds and views of what was once the floor of a great sea bed, lies a system of huts sheltering mountain bikers as they wind through the Escalante Plateau. The area, more than twice the size of Rhode Island is bordered by Zion, Bryce, Capitol Reef National Parks and Lake Powell. It offers a huge variety of terrain tempting all levels of cyclists to explore the high deserts, deep canyons, daunting plateaus and sandy washout basins.  Coming from Colorado, a beautiful drive takes you from Green River, Utah southwest to the town of Escalante where the 190 mile Aquarius Trail Hut System ends. When you arrive, someone from Aquarius takes you and your bike West to Brian Head where the adventure begins. The “huts” are shipping containers repurposed and carved up to make sleeping accommodations and a kitchen for 12 cyclists. As Jared Fisher, owner of Escape Adventures, who dreamed up this hut system says, “It's like putting together a lego house. It takes four containers to make a “hut” and we cut them, install windows and doors and add the bunks and appliances.” The huts are “off the grid” operating by solar and propane complete with compostable toilets and showers. When all the expenses are accounted for, a hut will cost about $200,000 to build and install. They are serviced by staff each day bringing in fresh food, linens, and fuel. Scattered on the Escalante Plateau National Monument, the huts are a welcome reprieve from some challenging days on single track and dirt roads taking riders up epic climbs to amazing views. They are fully stocked with gourmet food, snacks, beverages, water, showers and everything to make it as comfortable as possible. Guest can cook on the grills outside and cozy up to fire pits to take the high desert chill away. The group I joined is mostly from Colorado and gather once in a while at destinations like this. They had a sag truck to carry some provisions and the group dog. All seemed to love the hut and the route and the abundance of food and snacks. Said one rider, “they even have Peanut M&M's” which seemed to be an important provision. The daily routes are between 25 and 40 miles with options for longer treks to scenic spots. After the group breakfast, riders had all day to make it to the next hut and when possible the sag truck would park somewhere in between with refreshments. Said Jeff Oehm of Lakewood, “The huts are well thought out and stocked with good food and comfortable beds. The trails and roads were great and very challenging in places. This part of Utah is stunning and so uncrowded, was well worth the drive from Denver.” Fisher's company provides destination, endurance oriented travel experiences all over the world and discovered this area about 10 years. He lives in Las Vegas, operates three bike shops and has built a company revolving around the bike. It took a while to get the permits to start installing the huts and connecting the trails. He said, “Covid actually helped push this project to the finish as the Forest Service was able to re-evaluate the situation and we got approval last year. This is our first year of operations and it's gone very well. We have accommodated over 500 cyclists this summer. Any tour operator would be happy with that I think.” The experience can be customized to accommodate a private group or open to a single rider with a variety of diets and food preferences. They also have bikes, and e-bikes for rent.   Upcoming Guests Matt Bach from TriDot Jared Fisher Escape Adventures   Video Of The Week Deb Conley--Talks about her amazing journey landing her in the Colorado Running Hall of Fame   I'm doing IRONMAN CALIFORNIA - Justin Metzler   Closing: Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us @303endurance and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We'd really appreciate it! Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

TAC Right Now
Transgender Trouble in Virginia

TAC Right Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 54:50


Emile, Helen, and Micah discuss the bombshell report that Loudoun County Public Schools covered up a sexual assault by a "gender nonconforming" boy in a girls' bathroom earlier this year--and transferred him to a nearby school, where he committed another assault. Plus, Southwest Airlines cancels thousands of flights, triggering speculation that employees are protesting vaccine mandates, and the Supreme Court reconsiders the death penalty for the Boston Marathon bomber.   Picks of the week: Helen: River Warrior, David Randall Micah: Eric Zemmour, France's Buchanan, Krzysztof Tyszka-Drozdowski Emile: On the Value Of Memory, And Remembering the South, Bradley G. Green

How Was Your Run Today? The Podcast
Episode 239 – Pam Rickard Returns!

How Was Your Run Today? The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 53:22


Bryan and Peter end Marathon Week with their take on the 125thrunning of the Boston Marathon. Then they go to the phones to welcome back Herren Project's Pam Rickard to the show. If you or any one you know needs help with addiction, please visit www.herrenproject.org This episode is sponsored by www.pathprojects.com Visit our Web site here: www.HWYRT.com Join our Strava Group here: https://www.strava.com/clubs/HWYRT  

Off The Couch
Running Through the News (Sep / Oct 2021)

Off The Couch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 43:03


Sanjay Rawal joins Jonathan Ellsworth to discuss the Boston Marathon being held on Indigenous People's Day; why the sport of long-distance running is particularly well-positioned to create a far more equitable situation for indigenous people; what it means to have had so many high-profile marathons held so close to one another; and the mission of Shalane Flanagan.TOPICS & TIMES:Update: Self Transcendence 3100 Run (1:04)Major races are back (5:05)Boston Marathon on Indigenous Peoples' Day (8:15)Running traditions of Indigenous communities (11:30)Shalane Flanagan's multi-marathon mission (30:38) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
SCOTUS101: COVID & The Constitution (#2)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021


Two weeks into the term, the full Court is back on the bench and hearing oral arguments in their storied courtroom. Among the arguments this week was the death-penalty appeal of the Boston Marathon bomber. Your hosts discuss how in-person oral arguments are going, and some of the newly granted cases. Zack interviews George Mason […]

If We Were Riding
#171 Going Nuts

If We Were Riding

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 39:12


This week: Acorn hiding facilities, Alyssa's advice, Sarah's school update, Boston Marathon drama, Lizard brains, And Sara's Outlander romance. *Support the podcast & get great discounts* InsideTracker: 25% off at insidetracker.com/riding Orca Sportswear: 15% off with code ironwomen15 at https://www.orca.com/us-en/ Nuun Hydration: code StayFeisty for 30% off at nuunlife.com

SCOTUS 101
COVID & The Constitution

SCOTUS 101

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 37:59


Two weeks into the term, the full Court is back on the bench and hearing oral arguments in their storied courtroom. Among the arguments this week was the death-penalty appeal of the Boston Marathon bomber. Your hosts discuss how in-person oral arguments are going, and some of the newly granted cases. Zack interviews George Mason professor Todd Zywicki and they talk about his career and his recent lawsuit against the university's vaccine mandate. Lastly, Zack grills GianCarlo with some very surprising SCOTUS trivia.Follow us on Twitter @scotus101 and send questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes to scotus101@heritage.org.Don't forget to leave a 5-star rating!Stay caffeinated and opinionated with a SCOTUS 101 mug. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The NPR Politics Podcast
The Boston Marathon Bomber Is Undoubtedly Guilty, But Should He Be Executed?

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 13:04


The Supreme Court heard arguments for and against reinstating the death penalty for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the Boston Marathon bomber. President Biden himself has argued against ever using the death penalty, but here his administration is arguing that Tsarnaev should receive the harshest punishment.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg, and WBUR's Deborah Becker.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

Pete and Sebastian Show
Pete and Sebastian Show 477

Pete and Sebastian Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 66:11


Sebastian gets a horse massage and Pete's wife plans for the Boston Marathon! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

C Tolle Run
246: CJ Albertson - I Ran To Win

C Tolle Run

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 42:14


Carrie chats with CJ Albertson, the man who led the 2021 Boston Marathon for 20 miles before finishing 10th overall (and second American)! They talk about his race and his strategy, why he thought it was important to keep the crowd engaged, how he broke through the wall to finish out the race, how his friends and family reacted to his performance, his history in the sport (including several world records), and much more!

The News with Shepard Smith
Supply Chain Issues, Boston Marathon Bomber, Shatner to Space

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 49:25


CNBC's Jane Wells and Kayla Tausche report on the supply chain issues and the response from the Biden administration to address them ahead of the holiday season. CNBC's Kate Rogers updates on the closures of five Walgreens stores due to a rise in crime. “Time” senior economics correspondent Alana Semuels breaks down why she thinks workers are realizing it's the perfect time to go on strike. “Mad Money” host Jim Cramer discusses the winners and losers when it comes to the U.S. labor shortage. CNBC's Seema Mody reports on the latest Uber features designed to improve airport travel. CNBC's Perry Russom updates on whether or not the U.S. Supreme Court will reinstate the death penalty for one of the Boston Marathon bombers. CNBC's Contessa Brewer reports on the dangerous roadside assistance jobs and how a grieving mother is working to get a Move Over Law passed in New Mexico. Plus, William Shatner becomes the oldest person ever to visit space.

PBS NewsHour - Full Show
October 13, 2021 - PBS NewsHour full episode

PBS NewsHour - Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 52:46


Wednesday on the NewsHour, we talk with U.S. Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo as delays in shipments from overseas pushes inflation to hit record highs. Then, the Supreme Court hears the Boston Marathon bomber case after an appeals court found errors in the original trial. And, COVID-19 exacerbates an already serious lack of nurses in American hospitals -- especially in rural areas. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
2 reasons why Boston Marathon bomber case is being heard in the Supreme Court

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 5:20


With all nine justices back in the courtroom Wednesday, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case of the Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's death sentence, eight years after the attack. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis
The O'Reilly Update, October 12, 2021

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 12:44


Climate protesters swarm the White House, Far-left Activists harass Senator Sinema at the Boston Marathon, Australia ends the lockdown, a new study finds smoking marijuana could lead to breakthrough cases of COVID. Plus, Bill's Message of the Day, CRT and America's parents. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Ali on the Run Show
431. LIVE at the Boston Marathon with Nell Rojas

Ali on the Run Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 72:40


"My goal is to be the top American. That's my goal. And I think I can do it... To be the top American would probably be the best day of my life." Racing is back! Major marathons are back! And, after 19 long and lonely months, live shows are back! It was such a privilege to get to host a live recording of the Ali on the Run Show at the Tracksmith Trackhouse during Boston Marathon weekend, with very special guest Nell Rojas. During the show (recorded on Saturday, October 9), Nell said that finishing as the top American during the Boston Marathon would make Marathon Monday the best day of her life — and she went on to do just that. In her fourth marathon and her Boston Marathon debut, Nell — who is currently, somehow, unsponsored — finished sixth, was the first woman from the U.S. to cross the line, and earned a personal best time of 2:27. This show was so much fun. I promise you will laugh at least once, and, special treat, you'll get to hear from Nell's dad, running legend Ric Rojas. Thank you to Tracksmith for hosting us, thank you to Nell for being a legend, and thank you to everyone who was part of the fun! SPONSOR: Tracksmith. Click here and use code AliBoston for 15% off your next Tracksmith order! Follow Nell: Instagram @nell_rojas_running Twitter @nellrojas Follow Ali: Instagram @aliontherun1 Join the Facebook group Twitter @aliontherun1 Support on Patreon Blog Strava Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Spotify SoundCloud Overcast Stitcher Google Play SUPPORT the Ali on the Run Show! If you're enjoying the show, please subscribe and leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. Spread the run love. And if you liked this episode, share it with your friends!

David Feldman Show
Sinemas And Saints, Episode 1281

David Feldman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 374:04


Arizona Senator Krysten Sinema is running the Boston Marathon. Sinema says she doesn't hope to win, she just plans to slow it down to a painful crawl by drawing needless attention to herself Guests With Time Stamps: (4:06) David Does The News: The Pandora Papers; America is the world's biggest tax haven; Congressman Allen West is unvaccinated and has Covid; IATSE about to strike; Kellogg's workers on strike; Kaiser Permanente workers on strike; (1:32:15) Jon Ross (comedy writer and farmer) has a problem with Attorney General Merrick Garland (2:00:43) Howie Klein (founder and treasurer of The Blue America PAC and author of Down With Tyranny) has a problem with Amazon and Facebook. (2:32:41) David Cobb (environmental activist and Green Party Presidential candidate) explains how Biden and Schumer could strong-arm Manchin and Sinema if they really wanted to pass Build Back Better. (3:05:03) Paul Lebow (Alliance for Just Money) explains money. (3:34:30) Mark Breslin (founder and president of Yuk Yuk's, largest comedy chain in North America) is interrupted by his handsome son. (4:04:30) Dan Frankenberger's Community Billboard (4:16:05) Professor Mary Anne Cummings (physicist and parks commissioner Aurora, Illinois) questions how much Biden really wants to pass Build Back Better. (4:44:00) Peter B. Collins (Bay Area Radio Hall of Fame) unravels the Supreme Court orals last week on Abu Zubaydeh and Guantanamo (5:16:21) Professor Mike Steinel (Jazz historian and Dylanologist) unveils his new song, "Daddy Don't."

the morning shakeout podcast
Episode 177 | Bill Rodgers

the morning shakeout podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 67:38


“Talent is an interesting question. What is it really? It means, can you avoid injuries? It means, can you back off? When you get crushed, will you come back? I didn't like that part. I think it's a lot of different things. It's not maybe a physical thing, but it's a mental thing. When you see a lot of these athletes—a lot of you are here because you have that wherewithal. And maybe you got beat up, because we all get beat up in this sport—it's part of it, it's like a rite of passage. It's just part of it. But it's OK, it's good.” This week on the podcast I'm excited to share a wide-ranging conversation I had this past Saturday with the legendary Bill Rodgers at Tracksmith's Trackhouse in Boston. Bill is a hero of mine and I've long wanted to have him on the show and Boston Marathon weekend turned out to be the perfect opportunity for it. In this conversation, we talk all things Boston, of course, but also get Bill's thoughts on his career, talent, training, how his own relationship with running has evolved over the course of his lifetime, and a lot more. This episode is brought to you by: — Tracksmith. Tracksmith crafts performance running apparel, inspiring publications, and distinct experiences that allow runners to indulge in the sport's rich culture. Tracksmith is offering new customers $15 off your first purchase of $75+. Just use code MARIO15 when you check out at tracksmith.com/mario. — Goodr: If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodr sunglasses, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for 15% off your order. Look good, run goodr! Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-177-with-bill-rodgers/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: https://themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

Wally Show Podcast
Aftercast: I Knew Love Was in There!: October 11, 2021

Wally Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 26:46


We recap our weekends, Betty did not get a puppy, we talk about going to different churches and how different denominations do things, Southwest cancelled one thousand weekend flights, and 20,000 people will be running the Boston Marathon this fall, You can sponsor a child through Food for the Hungry at www.fh.org/wallyshow You can join our Wally Show Poddies Facebook group at facebook.com/groups/WallyShowPoddies/.