Podcasts about Householder

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Best podcasts about Householder

Latest podcast episodes about Householder

Two Mikes with Michael Scheuer and Col Mike
Eric Householder: If You Want More Prosperity For West Virginia And Its People, Decrease Taxes

Two Mikes with Michael Scheuer and Col Mike

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 33:19


"If you want more prosperity for West Virginia and its people, decrease taxes." So said Eric Householder, a Republican delegate in the West Virginia assembly, when The Two Mikes spoke with him this afternoon. Mr. Householder is a graduate engineer, but spent his working life starting and building a private mechanical business. Mr. Householder made this blue-collar company into an outstanding success. He retired from this business in the first decade of the 21st century, and in 2010 ran for and won -- in the Tea Party wave -- a seat in the WV assembly. T he Republicans won a majority in the state assembly in 2014 -- the first in 83 years -- and he now is the Republican delegate in charge of budget matters. “Listening to Two Mikes will make you smarter!”- Gov Robert L. Ehrlich, JrSponsors
 
EMP Shield: https://www.empshield.com/?coupon=twomikesOur Gold Guy: https://www.ourgoldguy.comwww.TwoMikes.us

Deeper Dhamma
MN54: Potaliya Sutta - With Potaliya The Householder | Ajahn Dhammasiha | 13 June 2004

Deeper Dhamma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 95:43


Ajahn Dhammasiha discusses sutta 54 from the Majjhima Nikaya, the collection of middle-length discourses: Potaliya Sutta, "Potaliya The Householder". "When Potaliya got upset at being referred to as “householder”, the Buddha quizzed him as to the true nature of attachment and renunciation..", Sutta Central. Read MN54 on Sutta Central here. Please support the BSWA in making teachings available for free online via Patreon. To find and download more precious Dhamma teachings, visit the BSWA teachings page: https://bswa.org/teachings/, choose the teaching you want and click on the audio to open it up on Podbean.

Network Radio
Two Mikes Eric Householder: If You Want More Prosperity For W-Virginia & Its People, Decrease Taxes

Network Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 33:18


"If you want more prosperity for West Virginia and its people, decrease taxes." So said Eric Householder, a Republican delegate in the West Virginia assembly, when The Two Mikes spoke with him this afternoon. Mr. Householder is a graduate engineer, but spent his working life starting and building a private mechanical business. Mr. Householder made this blue-collar company into an outstanding success. He retired from this business in the first decade of the 21st century, and in 2010 ran for and won -- in the Tea Party wave -- a seat in the WV assembly. T he Republicans won a majority in the state assembly in 2014 -- the first in 83 years -- and he now is the Republican delegate in charge of budget matters. Through his political career, Mr. Householder has focused on reducing taxes for West Virginians and his work has helped to eliminate the state's personal property tax, and now is nearing a deal amongst the assembly, the state senate, and the governor to begin the gradual elimination of the state's income tax. Mr. Householder said that West Virginians of all political persuasions have seen the direct connection between lower taxes and greater and more widespread prosperity. This is especially true for small-businesses, which are 98-percent of the business operations in West Virginia. Mr. Householder said that West Virginia has successfully reformed labor law and tort law and income-tax law reform is approaching. In a closing comment, Mr. Householder spoke of Senator Joe Manchin's support for Biden's latest massive spending bill as a disaster for West Virginia, one which has earned the ire of most West Virginians, regardless of party. Manchin, by voting for that bill and so enabled its passage, has created a situation that will devastate the state's coal industry. Sponsors EMP Shield: https://www.empshield.com/?coupon=twomikes Our Gold Guy: https://www.ourgoldguy.com www.TwoMikes.us

TBC Glassboro Sermons and More
The Dragnet, The Householder, And The Kingdom - Matthew 13:47-53

TBC Glassboro Sermons and More

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 56:09


Now in the final two parables, The Dragnet and The Householder, Jesus presents The Judgment of the Kingdom. The spiritual Kingdom will merge into the physical Kingdom. However, their merger will come with judgment. The theme of phase four is one of responsibility. Hence, in Matthew 13:47-53, Jesus presents the dragnet, the householder, and the Kingdom.

Chicago Bears Podcast: Bears Banter
Bear With Me: Instant Reactions from Preseason Week 1 (with Sam Householder!)

Chicago Bears Podcast: Bears Banter

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 50:52


The Chicago Bears are officially back in action, and they have a win to show for it! Who played well in the Bears' 19-14 comeback thriller against the Chiefs? Who played poorly? I bring on Sam Householder to discuss on this episode of Bear With Me! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Windy City Gridiron: for Chicago Bears fans
Bear With Me: Instant Reactions from Preseason Week 1 (with Sam Householder!)

Windy City Gridiron: for Chicago Bears fans

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 50:52


The Chicago Bears are officially back in action, and they have a win to show for it! Who played well in the Bears' 19-14 comeback thriller against the Chiefs? Who played poorly? I bring on Sam Householder to discuss on this episode of Bear With Me! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

‘Your Instruction Manual for Exceptional Living’; What NoOne Explained to You & Thank God, It’s not too Late...!

Yoga Farm Ithaca Director and Educator Daniela Hess Grant explores the Path of Love according to Buddhist philosophies; she provides insights from a householder's view and encourages someone who wants to explore more to do so instinctually towards what calls to you.

Daily Wisdom - Walking The Path with The Buddha
Ep. 326 - (Group Learning Program) - Chapter 7 - The Five Precepts: A Householder's Guide to Daily Practice

Daily Wisdom - Walking The Path with The Buddha

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 144:42


(Group Learning Program) - Chapter 7 - The Five Precepts: A Householder's Guide to Daily Practice Gotama Buddha gave us guidance to conduct life without harm to other beings or ourselves. This is titled “The Five Precepts”. These are not commandments nor rules to follow, rather how to ensure you are not causing harm to others or yourself. By causing harm to others, we cause harm to ourselves by the Natural Law of Kamma. Through practice of these precepts, you will drastically eliminate unwholesome Kamma production and, thus, experience a more peaceful and content existence. Gotama Buddha's Teachings are not to control an individual nor dictate what they should or should not do. But instead, provide guidance that when practiced will lead to Enlightenment, liberation of the mind, a peaceful and content mind and, thus, a peaceful and content life. Everything in this practice is attained through personal choice. In this Podcast, David will help you understand what Gotama Buddha taught regarding The Five Precepts and how to apply them to your daily life in modern times. ——- Daily Wisdom - Walking The Path with The Buddha Dedicated to the education of Gotama Buddha's teachings to attain Enlightenment. https://www.BuddhaDailyWisdom.com (See our website for online learning, courses, and retreats.) Group Learning Program - LIVE Interactive Online Classes, Book, Audiobook, Videos, Podcast and Personal Guidance https://bit.ly/GroupLearningProgram The Words of The Buddha - Pali Canon in English Study Group https://bit.ly/PaliCanonStudyGroup FREE Book - Developing a Life Practice: The Path That Leads to Enlightenment https://www.buddhadailywisdom.com/freebuddhabooks Facebook: https://bit.ly/DailyWisdom-Facebook YouTube: https://bit.ly/DailyWisdom-Youtube Podcast: https://bit.ly/DailyWisdom-Podcast Support our efforts to share The Teachings of Gotama Buddha with you and worldwide for all people using this link. https://www.buddhadailywisdom.com/supportbuddha

The Pinkleton Pull-Aside Podcast
Interview with Mark Householder and Jerry Dendinger

The Pinkleton Pull-Aside Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 49:11


Welcome to the Pinkleton Pull-Aside Podcast. On this podcast, let's step aside from our busy lives to have fun, fascinating life giving conversation with inspiring authors, pastors, sports personalities and other influencers, leaders and followers. Sit back, grab some coffee, or head down the road and let's get the good and the gold from today's guest. Our host is Jeff Pinkleton, Executive Director of the Gathering of the Miami Valley, where their mission is to connect men to men, and men to God. You can reach Jeff at GatheringMiamiValley.org or find him on Facebook at The Gathering of the Miami Valley.

Enjoy The Bible
Summary: The Parable of the Householder

Enjoy The Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 49:55


Series: Mysteries of the Kingdom of the Heavens Program: BibleStudy.net Aired: July 2003

UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud
90. Politics & Design

UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 19:32


Such a lovely world —if it weren't for the people!Let's get rid of them.* * *In the last segment on Precepts & Putin, I finally got around to asking what all these ethical and political issues have to do with Design thinking, pointing out that even such large-scale dilemmas are subject to analysis and problem definition, with design intent being the underlying premise. What kind of intent rationalizes waging war, visiting death and destruction upon fellow human beings? What is the intent behind the design of the defense of Ukraine? Which of these is worthy of admiration and emulation?Usually we ascribe good intentions to those programs of action designed to yield the greatest good for the greatest number. And usually the politicos profile their cause in those terms. But it seems that the majority of actions ostensibly taken on behalf of something greater than ourselves, upon closer examination, reveal the same old group of benefactors benefitting from corruption and graft, with other groups, such as draftees, conscripted or mercenaries, suffering the negative consequences. Not to mention innocent civilians. Designing around such human faults is the central problem of government.Hypothetical solutions to international tensions include designing governing systems that will meet the needs of the populace without requiring the acquisition of goods and services, revenue and resources, from others, especially against their will. Setting aside the human motives in prosecuting a war of aggression, which may range from relatively rational impulses, such as gaining access to seaports and land bridges, to fantasies of power and glory, or myths and cultural memes. Self-sufficiency seems to be a worthy aspiration that has fallen by the wayside in a world-around pursuit of ever-greater consumption and materialistic lifestyles. The age-old question of how much is enough, manifested in traditional Zen monastics as limited to seven possessions, and in Design as the self-sustaining systems of minimal life support on the International Space Station. The question of reliability of the replenishment of supplies through a Russian-sponsored program came up as a sideshow of the Ukraine debacle.So it is self-evident that Design as a problem-solving process has limitations. In cases of widespread madness, which is a known issue in history, but even more acute in an age of global interconnectedness through the internet of satellite-supported mobile media, the most we can do is design our personal response to the continuing crisis. In doing so, we may come up with an approach that has scalability, in other words that is widely adaptable by others. Hunkering down in basements and fortified buildings is the last-resort option we witness the survivors in the cities of Ukraine that are under siege. But we are all under siege, whether we recognize it or not.During the Cold War we were told that the Soviet Union not only posed the threat of nuclear Armageddon, but actually had designs on invading the USA. I would try to imagine what that would be like. The logic of invading and trying to control something as sprawling and ungovernable as a whole country escapes me. It is now clear that even a small country like Ukraine is not going to be a pushover.But in the absence of an aggressive incursion ever materializing — knock wood — we are still facing homegrown takeovers of the political system by factions that may not preserve the precious freedoms we have come to take for granted. Behind that wave of anxiety recycling at a frequency of every two years or less — the endless election campaign — we have the threat of another pandemic. And looming over all, on the not-too distant horizon, the emerging, relentless cataclysm of climate change. On what planet do you have to live, to decide that now would be the perfect time to wage a war?Instead of throwing up our hands in despair, let's consider the Design approach.As designers, we are trained to approach development of the new in a systematic way, usually for a client group with fairly clear goals and objectives. One of the fundamental principles of applied design is that we focus our efforts on altering the environment, rather than attempting to alter the people directly, or for that matter, the various members of client organizations. Design stops short at the edge of psychology, or management training, although those systems are also subject to design, in a sense.Another important principle is that the design process works best when conducted as a dialog, or an evolutionary group process. Methods have evolved for gathering and integrating input from large numbers of “stakeholders” or end-users into the design of any program. In fact, this was the topic of my Master's thesis at the Institute of Design. Executed well, this approach generally results in more satisfactory, long-lived solutions than an “ivory-tower” approach, where a strong individual or subgroup develops and dictates decisions on design intent with little or no input from the folks they are trying to effect, the end users and purchasers of the product or service.The process necessarily proceeds in phases, which, while not truly distinct and separate, have rather logical starting and ending points. These are usually defined as something like the following:Phase I — Problem DefinitionPhase II — Concept DesignPhase III — Design DetailingPhase IV — Prototyping & Beta-testingPhase V — Production & DistributionWe might be well-advised to look at our daily Zen practice in the light of these phases. While the design of anything new involves creative intuition, insight, and other immeasurable attributes, the process inevitably cycles through some version of these stages, with measurable results based on acceptance of the target market segments. Of course, the whole project often goes “back to the drawing board” — nowadays the computer interface — again and again, for revisions and re-development. In fact, the design process can be said to never be truly final, as it is responsive to ever-changing conditions and needs. This open-ended viewpoint may be frustrating to those who long for instant closure. In that, it is like zazen training. Design is akin to the Zen outlook, which regards nothing so dependable or “given,” as change. Let's look more thoroughly at the first phase, Problem Definition.The word “problem” has a somewhat negative connotation. Because in the business environment we generally want to emphasize the positive (business can be a somewhat paranoid context), we tend to use the word “opportunity” instead. Or we will refer to it as “Project Definition.” For our purposes, let's stick with “problem,” at least for now.What, exactly, is the “problem”? Why do we want, or feel we need, to establish a Zen Center, for example? Why not just practice alone, assuming we've decided we want, or need, to practice? We can point to many teachings of the Ancestors which admonish us that the “real” Zen is not the province of the loner, but is to be found in the “marketplace” in concert and interaction with our fellow beings. We can also point to the practical, enlightened self interest aspects of forming a sitting group: the social and psychological support of the group for the individual, and the sharing of responsibilities, as well as understanding.As we discussed at length in the “Priest & Householder” segment of the podcast, dana, the practice of generosity, includes providing the conducive environment for practice. Part of that aspect of being truly conducive to Zen practice is the respected tradition of face-to-face training, which has been set aside during the last two years of enforced isolation and social distancing owing to the covid pandemic. As in any creative process, it is natural to challenge any assumptions, including that the in-person form of training may not be necessary. So the stressors around the social dimensions of training — in any area of endeavor, including Zen — become a salient factor in redefining the problem of personal practice.The haiku poem at the beginning of another segment reads:Dharma and KarmaDharma trumps karma,but it is not an escape —Consequences comeSome would fault Zen or Buddhism for failing to adequately address larger issues, the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse: Pestilence, War, Famine, and Death, “…given authority over a quarter of the earth, to kill with sword, famine, and plague, and by means of the beasts of the earth…” Revelations chapter 6, according to Wikipedia, our current Bible, or Tower of Babble, depending on your viewpoint. Add to that the causes and conditions of climate change, covid, and access to nukes, and you have the devil not only in the details, but consequences on a global scale. Great timing for waging a war. But it is not the fault of Zen Buddhism that we are facing these disasters. In fact, Buddhism teaches this very Dharma lesson, that karma is not individuated but collective. We share karmic consequences of the decisions of our leaders, however benighted. It is their very lack of dharma that is the problem.It is possible, from the perspective of Design, to anticipate problems caused by human ignorance and willfulness resulting in interventions in the predictability of natural processes, such as climate cycles. It is within the realm of possibility that we can design and build personal sanctuary to survive the worst that Mother Nature can throw at us, in her efforts to bring about a rebalancing of the planetary forces that we have trifled with for the sake of short-term profit, ephemeral power, and self-aggrandizement. For example, some tried and true approaches can limit the impact of weather upon our domiciles. Such as earth berm housing, covering the shelter with layers of earth to protect and insulate the interior from the elements. Use of unconventional building materials and joining systems can result in earthquake- and hurricane-proof construction, as one of the members of our former affiliate in Charleston, SC specialized in. He and friends rode out Hurricane Hugo in 1989 in one of his buildings, which didn't lose so much as a shingle. Homes in the direct path of blowtorch-like tornadic winds face a different dilemma, but clearing surrounding forest, controlled brush fires and the like, as Native Americans performed as stewards of the forestland, can mitigate the damage.Individual householders can take these drastic steps to protect themselves and their properties, if they have the wherewithal and perseverance. Survivalists have historically built bomb shelters and taken other extreme measures, including arming themselves to the teeth, in preparation for the worst dystopian futures imaginable. But the cost is enormous, both in resource investment, and quality of life.On the other hand, persuading large groups of people, and governments, to forego their wasteful and indulgent lifestyles for the sake of practical adaptation to predictable outcomes of depleting and wasting resources for the sake of short-term goals, is, to say the least, a known issue.The design of government, in the context of a world economy, where every functioning component is increasingly interdependent with every other — another familiar Buddhist principle — is another seemingly intractable problem. It is the “tragedy of the commons” writ large, where so-called leaders of local government gain power running on platforms of populism or nationalism, playing to the weakness of the people who want to believe that their lives and fortunes are independent of those of the rest of humanity around the globe.It is apparently even a daydream in the eye of the wealthy that they, or their heirs, can escape Earth to settle another globe, such as Mars, in due time. This is where science fiction meets fantasy. And reality is left to take the hindmost, along with the Devil. Disposable planets.On yet the other hand, we could adopt a stoic stance of resignation in the face of seemingly insolvable problems, doing what we can on a very local level to prepare for the worst. R. Buckminster Fuller, affectionately referred to as “Bucky,” called his approach “comprehensive anticipatory design science.” The idea is to anticipate emerging problems, causes and conditions — including human survival — on a more comprehensive basis, as predicted by “world-around” trends in resources, technology and behavior. And then, turning the trick, come up with solutions that we will be ready and able to deliver, when everyone else finally recognizes the problem. If it is not already too late, that is.Fuller also had an interesting take on politicians and their role in this recurring dilemma. Paraphrasing, he said that we turn to the politicians for answers. But if they had any answers they wouldn't be politicians. They would be out doing something positive, rather than doing their utmost to maintain status quo for themselves, their sponsors, and their constituents.The latest example is the late Orrin Hatch, who just passed into his next cycle of “rebirth into the cycle of creation of suffering for ourselves or for others,” the last line of the Loving Kindness Sutra. His belief system as a lifelong member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints would not allow that notion. A United States Senator from Utah from 1977 — the year we incorporated Atlanta Soto Zen Center — to 2019, Hatch's 42-year tenure made him the longest-serving Republican U.S. Senator in history. Whether that record of feeding at the trough is worthy of emulation I leave to your discretion.But I urge you to recognize that none of this would surprise Buddha. His teaching was described as his tongue, wide and long. There is nothing so outrageous as to be outside its all-inclusive embrace.* * *Elliston Roshi is guiding teacher of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center and abbot of the Silent Thunder Order. He is also a gallery-represented fine artist expressing his Zen through visual poetry, or “music to the eyes.”UnMind is a production of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center in Atlanta, Georgia and the Silent Thunder Order. You can support these teachings by PayPal to donate@STorder.org. Gassho.Producer: Kyōsaku Jon Mitchell

Daily Wisdom - Walking The Path with The Buddha
Ep. 307 - (Pali Canon Study Group) - The Foremost Householder - Volume 8 - (Chapter 31-41)

Daily Wisdom - Walking The Path with The Buddha

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 112:04


(Pali Canon Study Group) - The Foremost Householder - Volume 8 - (Chapter 31-41) Explore The Teachings of The Fully Perfectly Enlightened Buddha through "The Words of The Buddha" Book Series in the Pali Canon in English Study Group. To learn more about this program, visit this link: https://bit.ly/PaliCanonStudyGroup Using The Words of The Buddha book series, this program is offered to guide you in learning and practicing The Teachings of The Buddha on The Path to Enlightenment. You can access The Words of The Buddha Books Series using this link. https://www.buddhadailywisdom.com/freebuddhabooks In this Podcast, David will guide you in understanding the Pali Canon in English through The Words of The Buddha which will help you to learn, reflect, and practice The Teachings of Gotama Buddha on The Path to Enlightenment. ——- Daily Wisdom - Walking The Path with The Buddha Dedicated to the education of Gotama Buddha's teachings to attain Enlightenment. https://www.BuddhaDailyWisdom.com (See our website for online learning, courses, and retreats.) Group Learning Program - LIVE Interactive Online Classes, Book, Audiobook, Videos, Podcast and Personal Guidance https://bit.ly/GroupLearningProgram The Words of The Buddha - Pali Canon in English Study Group https://bit.ly/PaliCanonStudyGroup FREE Book - Developing a Life Practice: The Path That Leads to Enlightenment https://www.buddhadailywisdom.com/freebuddhabooks Facebook: https://bit.ly/DailyWisdom-Facebook YouTube: https://bit.ly/DailyWisdom-Youtube Podcast: https://bit.ly/DailyWisdom-Podcast Support our efforts to share The Teachings of Gotama Buddha with you and worldwide for all people using this link. https://www.buddhadailywisdom.com/supportbuddha

Daily Wisdom - Walking The Path with The Buddha
Ep. 304 - (Pali Canon Study Group) - The Foremost Householder - Volume 8 - (Chapter 21-30)

Daily Wisdom - Walking The Path with The Buddha

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 127:36


(Pali Canon Study Group) - The Foremost Householder - Volume 8 - (Chapter 21-30) Explore The Teachings of The Fully Perfectly Enlightened Buddha through "The Words of The Buddha" Book Series in the Pali Canon in English Study Group. To learn more about this program, visit this link: https://bit.ly/PaliCanonStudyGroup Using The Words of The Buddha book series, this program is offered to guide you in learning and practicing The Teachings of The Buddha on The Path to Enlightenment. You can access The Words of The Buddha Books Series using this link. https://www.buddhadailywisdom.com/freebuddhabooks In this Podcast, David will guide you in understanding the Pali Canon in English through The Words of The Buddha which will help you to learn, reflect, and practice The Teachings of Gotama Buddha on The Path to Enlightenment. ——- Daily Wisdom - Walking The Path with The Buddha Dedicated to the education of Gotama Buddha's teachings to attain Enlightenment. https://www.BuddhaDailyWisdom.com (See our website for online learning, courses, and retreats.) Group Learning Program - LIVE Interactive Online Classes, Book, Audiobook, Videos, Podcast and Personal Guidance https://bit.ly/GroupLearningProgram The Words of The Buddha - Pali Canon in English Study Group https://bit.ly/PaliCanonStudyGroup FREE Book - Developing a Life Practice: The Path That Leads to Enlightenment https://www.buddhadailywisdom.com/freebuddhabooks Facebook: https://bit.ly/DailyWisdom-Facebook YouTube: https://bit.ly/DailyWisdom-Youtube Podcast: https://bit.ly/DailyWisdom-Podcast Support our efforts to share The Teachings of Gotama Buddha with you and worldwide for all people using this link. https://www.buddhadailywisdom.com/supportbuddha

Center for Spiritual Living Bellingham
Walking the Householder Path – Celebration-Service

Center for Spiritual Living Bellingham

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 27:03


DATE:   May 1, 2022 MONTHLY THEME:  Contemplation and Action SPEAKER: Rev. Dr. Andrea Asebedo

UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud
88. Zen Priest & Householder

UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 22:09


Who is this Zen for?Yes, you can practice alone —sangha will survive.* * *No, this is not the beginning of a bad joke about a priest and a householder entering a bar. Though that certainly has happened a lot in history. No, this is about the anomalies and apparent contradictions that arise in the propagation of Zen in a hyper-secular society such as the good old USA, where a lay Zen priest, the very idea, lands with a thud, like the proverbial lead balloon. Another can of worms to open.This issue has raised its head with furrowed brow again and again in the history of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center (ASZC) and its umbrella organization, the Silent Thunder Order (STO), and is sure to keep coming back like a bad penny, to coin another cliché, no pun intended. My role as guiding teacher and Zen priest has been the occasion, or the excuse, for mass defections of disgruntled senior students taking entire boards of directors with them, once in 2000 and again in 2010. So we are overdue for a repeat performance. And this is not an unknown issue at other Zen centers, if only in America.Some feel that nowadays there is no more reason to have to have a physical Zen center, what with the advent of online meetings via Skype or Zoom, or whatever the yet-to-be-named inevitable successor applications arise as antithesis in the internet realm. Why pay for upkeep and maintenance of brick and mortar, not to mention supporting a priest? The entire world of retail, along with much of office space, is going virtual, after all. I must admit to a bias here, which you may interpret as selfish on my part, in that I have some skin in the game. A significant portion of my income — thankfully not a majority — is in the form of what is called, in IRS lexicon, a “minister's household expense,” provided by donors to ASZC. I began receiving compensation for the first time in 2007, after formal transmission as a priest.Let me address the personal dimension for a moment, as this is one of many examples of the friction that arises between the social and personal realms that I have modeled as nesting spheres. The choice of the word “nesting” lends a comfortable coloration to the association, like little birdies nesting in the tree, under the care of mommy and daddy birds, who bring them juicy worms. This analogy is not as off-base, or as quaint, as it may sound. Sangha, the Zen community, is our “dharma family” after all.One reason that this issue comes bubbling up again to the surface of the pond that is the modern sangha, is partially that boards of directors are as impermanent as anything else. Corporate memory is ephemeral. Terms expire in a few years, BOD officers playing musical chairs in a game that most are neither trained to handle with equanimity, nor have the time and patience to become educated in governance of a 501c3.All boards are widely acknowledged to be somewhat dysfunctional, especially for not-for-profit corporations. Member donors, who are usually paid nothing for their services, volunteer to help with administration of the very program that attracted them, i.e. Zen practice and meditation. But they often find that this duty, however well-intentioned on their part, is not what they came to Zen for. In fact, the sausage-making, as it is popularly caricatured, is precisely what they came to escape in daily life, or at least learn how to cope with on a more balanced basis. Thus, time on the board of directors, or its more demanding committee functions, is the number one burnout venue for earnest and erstwhile Zen practitioners. It is the third rail of Zen. At least in my experience of a half century.One adverse element is meetings in and of themselves. The old Chinese adage: “Meetings are the bane of progress,” rings true. The accompanying stress is a recurrent surprise for participants. They cannot resolve the seeming contradiction that Zen should require such a level of humdrum. Conflicts arise as to apparently competing needs. Primarily the need to sustain a supportive communal practice, while minimizing turning Zen into just one more tiresome chore that adds to our personal stress rather than reducing it. This I call the “substitution effect,” one of many. Those doing yeomen service on the board, or in maintaining the facility, find that they are not meditating so much anymore, or as well as they used to. They begin to interpret their practice in terms of time they spend on intractable issues or trivial BOD matters, rather than on the cushion.A quote from Master Dogen's Jijuyu Zammai [Self-fulfilling Samadhi] may surprise with its relevance to what seems a modern malady:Because earth, grass, trees, walls, tiles and pebbles all engage in buddha activity, those who receive the benefit of wind and water caused by them are inconceivably helped by the buddha's guidance, splendid and unthinkable, and awaken intimately to themselves.This is the true point of the practice, more likely to occur in the zendo than the BOD room.A bit later:Grass trees and lands, which are embraced by this teaching, together radiate a great light, and endlessly expound the inconceivable, profound dharma.Here is the fruit of the practice, found in the natural sphere, leapfrogging the social trappings. But Dogen is reminding us that all aspects of life, including even walls and tiles, are expounding the dharma impeccably at all times, for those who have the eyes to hear and the ears to see.Further:Grass trees and walls bring forth the teaching for all beings, common people as well as sages, and they in accord extend this dharma for the sake of grass trees and walls.Not only is nature constantly preaching full-throated dharma, but the very walls of zendos and buildings that Zen teachers and communities raise, providing places dedicated to Zen practice, constitute direct manifestations of the “realm of self-awakening and awakening others,” another Dogen construction.Achok Rinpoche, one of HH the Dalai Lama's inner circle, visited ASZC as a guest speaker in 2004, at the invitation of one of my senior students, who is a major supporter of Dharamshala, their home in exile in India. This was shortly after we had moved into the whole building, tearing down the concrete block wall that divided what is now our commodious meditation hall, and renovated the zendo to reflect a Japanese-like simplicity of interior design. The venerable monk paused briefly after mentioning that “Dana is providing the place conducive to meditation…” As his twinkling eyes wandered over the prevailing white walls and natural wood trim of the zendo, he complimented us for our very nice environment. But, he said, in Tibet, everything is white “…so we like a little more color!” It got a big laugh, but also brought home the same message that Master Dogen is trying to convey.We do not own the building and grounds ASZC occupies. When the opportunity to purchase arose, we were recovering from the second defection of the BOD. So the current officers did not have the bandwidth to take on the responsibility. Because we do not own the property, we frequently hear complaints about the landlord. The 100-year-old bungalows that we call our Zen home, joined by the concrete block cube we call our zendo, would probably qualify as a tear-down, in real estate terms. It would definitely not be a wise investment to put much capital into the existing facility. Another Chinese saying applies: “When the opportunity is there, the capital is missing. When the capital is there, the opportunity is missing. When both capital and opportunity are there, then I am missing. What a world!”This blame game harks back to similar complaints in an ancient story. A monk groused to the head master that the rain was dripping in on him in zazen. The master's response? “Move down.” Why waste a great deal of time and effort in propping up a building, whose destiny is to eventually fall down? Even Eiheiji is ultimately impermanent. Rather than focus on your Zen practice, and perhaps lose your opportunity to wake up in this lifetime. Those who complain about the rent, unsatisfactory upkeep on the part of the landlord, are missing the point, in this sense. They are also misinformed.Our landlady has generously cut the rent in half repeatedly during hard times over the twenty-plus years that we have practiced in this location. She replaced the peaked gable roofs of the two bungalows, and has patched and finally re-engineered the flat roof of the zendo, after the heavy rains of last year. (Incidentally, all flat roofs tend to leak. Frank Lloyd Wright's famous flat-roofed buildings all leak. You can't fool Mother Nature for long. Water will find a way.) Our landlady's support of our little enterprise amounts to tens of thousands of dollars in investments and concessions. She and her husband, who had me at the revelation that he is a jazz guitarist, are two of our biggest supporters, dollar for dollar. Those who would complain should remember that had we purchased the place, those big projects, with their big numbers, would have fallen in our laps, and decimated ASZC's budget, instead of theirs. Of course, we have been good tenants as well. We have probably purchased the place a few times over.So at the risk of compulsively repeating myself, let me remind all that the outer pomp and circumstance of Zen — the robes, the walls of the zendos, et cetera — are not for us. They are for them. We are losing sight of the societal mission of Zen. As Master Dogen speculated on returning from China, bringing Ch'an to Japan may amount to a true mission. Them includes Dogen, Bodhidharma, and everyone in between, back to the founder Shakyamuni. We are indebted to them. They opened the gate wide. It is not for us to close it. Wearing ridiculous robes pays due obeisance to the lineage.“Them” also includes a local minister of a neighborhood church with a vital congregation, a long-time member and zazen practitioner who invited me to speak and initiate a program of meditation at the church. When I let him know that we are gingerly moving back toward in-person or hybrid practice program, he texted: “Sensei — thanks for the note about the zendo being open again. That's wonderful news!” and: “Would you like to meet for coffee sometime after this week?” So that is the reason we have a Zen center, in a nutshell. Our dharma-opening verse chanted before a talk says it a bit differently:The unsurpassed, profound and wond'rous Dharma Is rarely met with, even in a hundred thousand million kalpas; Now we can see and hear it, accept and maintain it — May we unfold the meaning of the Tathagata's truthIf we can manage to take off our blinders so that we can actually see and hear the true dharma, another Dogenism, we should not have much trouble accepting and maintaining it. First things first. We might usefully recall the Three Minds, Sanshin in Japanese: Magnanimous, Nurturing and Joyous. Sanshinji is the name of Okumura Roshi's temple, which by the way is the humble basement of his home. It is magnanimous to open your doors to others, nurturing to offer them a place to practice, and joyous to share the dharma. Of course, that last can be done rather efficiently online. But if you imagine that getting shed of the physical Zen center would be a move in the right direction, please imagine again. Setting aside that ASZC is also the training center for the affiliates of STO, for which we are caretakers. That vagabond world of homeless Zen is where we came from. Indulge a look in the rear-view mirror.Moving to Atlanta in 1970, I took a hiatus from public practice to reconstitute my personal and professional life. Four years later, I began offering meditation at the largest Unitarian church in town. Every week, I would haul large trash bags full of sitting cushions — the familiar Japanese zafu — into the building, and carry them home after. To make room for sitting, I would have to clear the clutter and shove the donated furniture out of the way to clear the walls, and put it all back before leaving. Later others helped. This went on for years.When we moved to a suburban home, the commute became unworkable. I made the mistake of offering zazen in our little bungalow. Not a happy balance of personal and social spheres, having the public showing up twice a week in your living room. In the intervening years before ASZC landed in Little Five Points, we sat in storefronts, loft studio space, and for a while, once again in the living room of our first purchased home, where we still live. All this wreaked a certain amount of havoc on normal life.Those who think, as some have suggested, that we can just rent a hall when and if we need it, and otherwise all sit at home, have not been there and done that. They were not around to witness the downsides of the itinerant, floating zendo. They are unaware of the hundreds who came before and made it possible to just walk in the door and join us on that fateful day they found their way to the center.It is not just for us that we practice. It is also for others. Arousing Bodhi Mind is inseparable from the Bodhisattva vow. Without a center, newcomers have no place to come to for face-to-face training. Remember your first time.Without walls, you can forget about hosting retreats, let alone practice periods of thirty or ninety days, formal practice for credentialing the next generation of practice leaders and priests. But I know where these folks are coming from, and fundamentally agree. I will continue practicing no matter what. I do not need the robes. I do not personally need the Zen center to practice Zen. But others do.To anyone finding themselves sliding down this particular slippery slope, why not just stay home? Stay away from the Zen center for another year or so, post-covid, and maybe they will discover why we bother. If engaging the administrative side — which I feel is the highest form of service to the sangha — is too stressful, simply stay off the board. Don't join a committee. Focus on zazen.Meanwhile, my undying gratitude for those who find it possible to make the commitment. To those who give unstintingly of their time and treasure to the cause of propagating genuine Zen meditation and buddha-dharma: “You are the real one” as Matsuoka Roshi would often say. Please do all you can to encourage yourself and others in Zen practice. It is the most a bodhisattva can do.* * *Elliston Roshi is guiding teacher of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center and abbot of the Silent Thunder Order. He is also a gallery-represented fine artist expressing his Zen through visual poetry, or “music to the eyes.”UnMind is a production of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center in Atlanta, Georgia and the Silent Thunder Order. You can support these teachings by PayPal to donate@STorder.org. Gassho.Producer: Kyōsaku Jon Mitchell

Daily Wisdom - Walking The Path with The Buddha
Ep. 301 - (Pali Canon Study Group) - The Foremost Householder - Volume 8 - (Chapter 11-20)

Daily Wisdom - Walking The Path with The Buddha

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 136:35


(Pali Canon Study Group) - The Foremost Householder - Volume 8 - (Chapter 11-20) Explore The Teachings of The Fully Perfectly Enlightened Buddha through "The Words of The Buddha" Book Series in the Pali Canon in English Study Group. To learn more about this program, visit this link: https://bit.ly/PaliCanonStudyGroup Using The Words of The Buddha book series, this program is offered to guide you in learning and practicing The Teachings of The Buddha on The Path to Enlightenment. You can access The Words of The Buddha Books Series using this link. https://www.buddhadailywisdom.com/freebuddhabooks In this Podcast, David will guide you in understanding the Pali Canon in English through The Words of The Buddha which will help you to learn, reflect, and practice The Teachings of Gotama Buddha on The Path to Enlightenment. ——- Daily Wisdom - Walking The Path with The Buddha Dedicated to the education of Gotama Buddha's teachings to attain Enlightenment. https://www.BuddhaDailyWisdom.com (See our website for online learning, courses, and retreats.) Group Learning Program - LIVE Interactive Online Classes, Book, Audiobook, Videos, Podcast and Personal Guidance https://bit.ly/GroupLearningProgram The Words of The Buddha - Pali Canon in English Study Group https://bit.ly/PaliCanonStudyGroup FREE Book - Developing a Life Practice: The Path That Leads to Enlightenment https://www.buddhadailywisdom.com/freebuddhabooks Facebook: https://bit.ly/DailyWisdom-Facebook YouTube: https://bit.ly/DailyWisdom-Youtube Podcast: https://bit.ly/DailyWisdom-Podcast Support our efforts to share The Teachings of Gotama Buddha with you and worldwide for all people using this link. https://www.buddhadailywisdom.com/supportbuddha

Daily Wisdom - Walking The Path with The Buddha
Ep. 298 - (Pali Canon Study Group) - The Foremost Householder - Volume 8 - (Chapter 1-10)

Daily Wisdom - Walking The Path with The Buddha

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 127:44


(Pali Canon Study Group) - The Foremost Householder - Volume 8 - (Chapter 1-10) Explore The Teachings of The Fully Perfectly Enlightened Buddha through "The Words of The Buddha" Book Series in the Pali Canon in English Study Group. To learn more about this program, visit this link: https://bit.ly/PaliCanonStudyGroup Using The Words of The Buddha book series, this program is offered to guide you in learning and practicing The Teachings of The Buddha on The Path to Enlightenment. You can access The Words of The Buddha Books Series using this link. https://www.buddhadailywisdom.com/freebuddhabooks In this Podcast, David will guide you in understanding the Pali Canon in English through The Words of The Buddha which will help you to learn, reflect, and practice The Teachings of Gotama Buddha on The Path to Enlightenment. ——- Daily Wisdom - Walking The Path with The Buddha Dedicated to the education of Gotama Buddha's teachings to attain Enlightenment. https://www.BuddhaDailyWisdom.com (See our website for online learning, courses, and retreats.) Group Learning Program - LIVE Interactive Online Classes, Book, Audiobook, Videos, Podcast and Personal Guidance https://bit.ly/GroupLearningProgram The Words of The Buddha - Pali Canon in English Study Group https://bit.ly/PaliCanonStudyGroup FREE Book - Developing a Life Practice: The Path That Leads to Enlightenment https://www.buddhadailywisdom.com/freebuddhabooks Facebook: https://bit.ly/DailyWisdom-Facebook YouTube: https://bit.ly/DailyWisdom-Youtube Podcast: https://bit.ly/DailyWisdom-Podcast Support our efforts to share The Teachings of Gotama Buddha with you and worldwide for all people using this link. https://www.buddhadailywisdom.com/supportbuddha

New Books in South Asian Studies
Patrick Olivelle, "Grhastha: The Householder in Ancient Indian Religious Culture" (Oxford UP, 2019)

New Books in South Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 55:42


Today I talked to Patrick Olivelle about his book Grhastha: The Householder in Ancient Indian Religious Culture (Oxford UP, 2019). For scholars of ancient Indian religions, the wandering mendicants who left home and family for a celibate life and the search for liberation represent an enigma. The Vedic religion, centered on the married household, had no place for such a figure. The central finding of these studies is that the householder bearing the name grhastha is not simply a married man with a family but someone dedicated to the same or similar goals as an ascetic while remaining at home and performing the economic and ritual duties incumbent on him. The grhastha is thus not a generic householder, for whom there are many other Sanskrit terms, but a religiously charged concept that is intended as a full-fledged and even superior alternative to the concept of a religious renouncer. Raj Balkaran is a scholar, educator, consultant, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/south-asian-studies

New Books in History
Patrick Olivelle, "Grhastha: The Householder in Ancient Indian Religious Culture" (Oxford UP, 2019)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 55:42


Today I talked to Patrick Olivelle about his book Grhastha: The Householder in Ancient Indian Religious Culture (Oxford UP, 2019). For scholars of ancient Indian religions, the wandering mendicants who left home and family for a celibate life and the search for liberation represent an enigma. The Vedic religion, centered on the married household, had no place for such a figure. The central finding of these studies is that the householder bearing the name grhastha is not simply a married man with a family but someone dedicated to the same or similar goals as an ascetic while remaining at home and performing the economic and ritual duties incumbent on him. The grhastha is thus not a generic householder, for whom there are many other Sanskrit terms, but a religiously charged concept that is intended as a full-fledged and even superior alternative to the concept of a religious renouncer. Raj Balkaran is a scholar, educator, consultant, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Patrick Olivelle, "Grhastha: The Householder in Ancient Indian Religious Culture" (Oxford UP, 2019)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 55:42


Today I talked to Patrick Olivelle about his book Grhastha: The Householder in Ancient Indian Religious Culture (Oxford UP, 2019). For scholars of ancient Indian religions, the wandering mendicants who left home and family for a celibate life and the search for liberation represent an enigma. The Vedic religion, centered on the married household, had no place for such a figure. The central finding of these studies is that the householder bearing the name grhastha is not simply a married man with a family but someone dedicated to the same or similar goals as an ascetic while remaining at home and performing the economic and ritual duties incumbent on him. The grhastha is thus not a generic householder, for whom there are many other Sanskrit terms, but a religiously charged concept that is intended as a full-fledged and even superior alternative to the concept of a religious renouncer. Raj Balkaran is a scholar, educator, consultant, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Hindu Studies
Patrick Olivelle, "Grhastha: The Householder in Ancient Indian Religious Culture" (Oxford UP, 2019)

New Books in Hindu Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 55:42


Today I talked to Patrick Olivelle about his book Grhastha: The Householder in Ancient Indian Religious Culture (Oxford UP, 2019). For scholars of ancient Indian religions, the wandering mendicants who left home and family for a celibate life and the search for liberation represent an enigma. The Vedic religion, centered on the married household, had no place for such a figure. The central finding of these studies is that the householder bearing the name grhastha is not simply a married man with a family but someone dedicated to the same or similar goals as an ascetic while remaining at home and performing the economic and ritual duties incumbent on him. The grhastha is thus not a generic householder, for whom there are many other Sanskrit terms, but a religiously charged concept that is intended as a full-fledged and even superior alternative to the concept of a religious renouncer. Raj Balkaran is a scholar, educator, consultant, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/indian-religions

New Books in Religion
Patrick Olivelle, "Grhastha: The Householder in Ancient Indian Religious Culture" (Oxford UP, 2019)

New Books in Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 55:42


Today I talked to Patrick Olivelle about his book Grhastha: The Householder in Ancient Indian Religious Culture (Oxford UP, 2019). For scholars of ancient Indian religions, the wandering mendicants who left home and family for a celibate life and the search for liberation represent an enigma. The Vedic religion, centered on the married household, had no place for such a figure. The central finding of these studies is that the householder bearing the name grhastha is not simply a married man with a family but someone dedicated to the same or similar goals as an ascetic while remaining at home and performing the economic and ritual duties incumbent on him. The grhastha is thus not a generic householder, for whom there are many other Sanskrit terms, but a religiously charged concept that is intended as a full-fledged and even superior alternative to the concept of a religious renouncer. Raj Balkaran is a scholar, educator, consultant, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/religion

New Books in Ancient History
Patrick Olivelle, "Grhastha: The Householder in Ancient Indian Religious Culture" (Oxford UP, 2019)

New Books in Ancient History

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 55:42


Today I talked to Patrick Olivelle about his book Grhastha: The Householder in Ancient Indian Religious Culture (Oxford UP, 2019). For scholars of ancient Indian religions, the wandering mendicants who left home and family for a celibate life and the search for liberation represent an enigma. The Vedic religion, centered on the married household, had no place for such a figure. The central finding of these studies is that the householder bearing the name grhastha is not simply a married man with a family but someone dedicated to the same or similar goals as an ascetic while remaining at home and performing the economic and ritual duties incumbent on him. The grhastha is thus not a generic householder, for whom there are many other Sanskrit terms, but a religiously charged concept that is intended as a full-fledged and even superior alternative to the concept of a religious renouncer. Raj Balkaran is a scholar, educator, consultant, and life coach. For information see rajbalkaran.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The WTF California Podcast
Householder Recall Ends, Frank Somerville DUI's and Early Prison Release Policy Stinks

The WTF California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 51:48


On this episode of the WTF California Podcast, we share that efforts to recall Antioch School Board Trustee Ellie Householder have ended, however, the community should still focus on recalling Antioch Mayor Lamar Thorpe. State Lawmakers advocate for end of early release policy for prison inmates. Democrats try and "strike" gas tax changes from Kiley Bill that would have taken gas tax relief to a tax increase. The West Contra Costa Unified School District is built on a "house of cards" budget. Deputy loses 3 guns from truck. Oakland has 31 homicides and Los Angeles set to lift moratorium on towing RV's and pledges to move problem campers.  Articles From the Show Efforts to recall Antioch school trustee are ended Lawmakers, advocates call for end to early release policy for inmates Assembly Republicans Say Sacramento Shooting Should Serve as a Wake Up Call Assemblyman Kevin Kiley Issues Statement on Supermajority's Bizarre Vote to “Strike” AB 1638 District attorney office warns public about possible early release of inmates New Assemblywoman sworn in before election certified, but state Constitution allows it Laptops meant for families of kids being treated at UCSF stolen in brazen nonprofit break-in Sheriff's deputy loses 3 guns on San Jacinto road Homicide near Oakland's Lake Merritt was robbery that resulted in shooting, police say DA declines to charge Alameda police for death of Mario Gonzalez Los Angeles lifts moratorium on towing RVs, pledges to move problem campers Fresno Bans Journalists—and Everyone Else—From Filming Cops Clearing Out Homeless Camps 11 SoCal residents charged with arranging sham marriages to get green cards This East Bay school district's finances were built on ‘house of cards,' California official warns San Mateo County Community College District ex-chancellor charged with tax evasion, misappropriating public funds Alameda County DA charges former TV anchor Somerville with DUIs San Jose Mayor Liccardo's Twitter hacked; becomes 'Sam SneakerHeads' account

Organization Conversation
LIVE from WORKBENCHcon 2022: Tamara Robertson, Maker Science, and Nick Householder, Midnight Science Club

Organization Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022


Organization Conversation LIVE from WORKBENCHcon 2022: Tamara Robertson, Maker Science, and Nick Householder, Midnight Science Club (Organization Conversation, Episode 9) Nick Householder and Tamara Robertson, now co-collaborators on Midnight Science Club, joined host Richard Grove in the booth at WORKBENCHcon 2022. Nick and Tamara each describe how they each discovered their passions and followed them […] The post LIVE from WORKBENCHcon 2022: Tamara Robertson, Maker Science, and Nick Householder, Midnight Science Club appeared first on Business RadioX ®.

Northern Heights Baptist Church
03-20-2022 - Because of the Gospel-Responding to Challenges_Householder

Northern Heights Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2022 38:39


03-20-2022 - Because of the Gospel-Responding to Challenges_Householder by Matthew Gilmore

Friendly Fire
Friendly Fire 3/12/22 Pastor Aaron Householder, Southern Baptist Regional Director

Friendly Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2022 41:33


Senior Pastor Stu Kerns talks with local clergy, politicians, and news-makers about the news of the week

Troubled
Amanda Householder sues Circle of Hope, Agape Boys Ranch, Berean & Agape Baptist Churches, as a Birthday Gift to Herself

Troubled

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 29:08


Welcome back to Troubled, a podcast by/for Survivors of Institutional Youth Abuse. THANK YOU for being here for the third season of our Independent self archival project. Two seasons bootlegged together over a cell phone, recorded in an old Prius wasn't too much for you? Well, masochism may pay off here as we embark on our most personal missions yet and play the cards we've held closest throughout the collective crucible of advocacy in a time of Covid. Super quick 31st birthday catch-up with Amanda Householder, who just filed a lawsuit against her parents, Boyd and Stephanie Householder, owners of Circle of Hope Girls Ranch AND their complicit and culpable cohorts - Agape Boarding School for Boys, Agape Baptist Church and Berean Baptist Church. We won't be getting into the nitty gritty of the details today, out of respect for Amanda, but we HIGHLY recommend you read the Kansas City Star Article "I was born into this." Daughter of Missouri reform school sues parents over abuse" by Judy Thomas and Laura Bauer, two rare gems of journalistic integrity. It is incredibly difficult to find ethical media allies of this caliber and we would just like to thank these women for how they have treated Survivors of Institutional Abuse throughout the last year of consistent coverage in Missouri. We wish they weren't an exception, but we are infinitely grateful they're both committed to exposing this crime against humanity as it plays out in their backyards. Forgive us our ADHD and self-defense, in this and every episode. We look forward to exploring the specific traumas of ourselves and our peers who were forever altered relationally by peer-on-peer attack therapy, but we'll also briefly address it in this update. We hope that Survivors will see other Survivors making moves and taking names as invitations or challenges to do so themselves. We hope that you will join us on the frontlines at every fork in the road. We also understand that for a historically invalidated community, and collectively gaslit community, that it can be triggering to see the mic passed to the next advocate. Often we can feel as if we are being spoken for, or over, or disregarded entirely. But every opportunity for a Survivor to speak, is an opportunity for Survivors to be heard. If we believe that we are stronger together, then we cannot continue to allow our community to reenact our trauma. MANY Survivors are neurodiverse, many of us experience RSD (Rejection Sensitivity Dysphoria) - especially since it's the most common symptom of ADHD. Even if we don't have RSD dialing up the perception of rejection, we HAVE been abandoned, excluded, silenced, and otherwise pariah-ed to the point where you don't even need 'confirmation bias' to perceive the world as wholly unsafe, as well as the people in it. I dig it. I'm living in this world with you. PLEASE let us be aware of how we deflect and project ourselves onto the world around us. We cannot move towards an exclusionary policy as we curate our collective movement. Please join us in advocating for youth rights to liberate all kids in cages, from the border, through foster care, to the ToughLove so-called Troubled Teen Industry. Until next time, #iseeyousurvivor and THANK YOU to all of our allies --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/troubled/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/troubled/support

Redeemer Covenant Church
The Parable of the Householder

Redeemer Covenant Church

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 36:00


The WTF California Podcast
Recall Proponent Talks Recalls of Lamar Thorpe and Ellie Householder in Antioch

The WTF California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 64:38


On this episode of WTF California Podcast, we sit down with recall proponent Lindsay Amezcua who discusses recalls for Antioch Mayor Lamar Thorpe and City Clerk Ellie Householder. Householder is also being recalled for her position as trustee at the Antioch Unified School District.  She gives an update on the recalls and explains the why they are being done regardless of false rhetoric being stated by Mayor Thorpe--in fact, many of the proponents are actually Democrats. For more information www.recalllamarthorpe.com www.recallelliehouseholder.com

UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud
71. Finding Your Way Trio 2: Dhyanayana II

UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 16:45


Skillful means or not,it is still all up to you —not your teacher's fault!* * *In the last segment, we ended with Matsuoka Roshi's simple but stunning summation of the essence of Zen training, or skillful means:Ultimately, what form the upaya take are the conjunction of a particular teacher, and all that he or she is, with a particular student or group of students and all that they are. In the free flow of Zen the teaching will teach itself as long as the teacher doesn't interfere, and as long as the student is receptive.As promised, we reveal his conclusion from the above:Really, this should lead to a conclusion. Next to conviction and perseverance in Zen training, picking the right teacher is most important. In ancient China and Japan, monks, nuns and laymen used to wander from temple to teacher and teacher to temple seeking the right teacher consonant with their own zeal, temperament and moment of development, a free soul who could show them very effectively the way from blindness to happiness.It should be remembered that this does not mean that we look for a teacher who agrees with our understanding of Zen, however primitive. It is recommended to find one we do not agree with, in order that we can learn something new and different. After remarking that all the teachers of the past had their quirks and personality traits, as well as different methods of teaching, Sensei explains the mystery of transmission in greater detail:This is the meaning of the heart-to-heart transmission of Zen understanding in masters and disciples of complimentary or contrasting affinity. Simply stated, how the schools of Zen developed were that the right disciples found the right teachers, and so learned about Zen in the very marrow of their bones. They achieved by that an understanding so deep, so pervasive, as never to be forgotten or disregarded again. This is the source and the life of Zen heart-to-heart transmission, tamashii to tamashii.This illustrates that nothing is actually “transmitted” from master to disciple, but that the latter comes to apprehend the reality the former naturally occupies.Then Sensei generalizes the place and process of Zen training in the larger context of history in general:Whenever one looks at history, it is a play of great men and women in a boiling ocean of popular sentiment, stirred by distinctive currents of patriotism and war, of trade and poverty, and of culture and peace. Personal greatness and tragedy, collective order and chaos, are in continual ebb and flow.Here is a global embrace of duality from the perspective of nonduality. It sounds as if he is describing the world of the 21st century, though this talk was given in 1985.He goes on to issue some cautionary tales in looking for and evaluating a Zen teacher for yourself:I warn you not to rely only on a particular human tradition, or a name alone, as an emblem of true transmission of wisdom. There are lazy, self-important and -indulgent priests who do possess the “right” credentials, not because they have penetrated to the core of life-and-death, but because they are clever in a worldly sense. Absolutely, you cannot trust them. It would be disastrous emotionally and mentally to do so. And yet, you can find this sort in Zen centers throughout the United States and Asia, urging those who are confused and lack conviction to seek the ultimate freedom and pay the proper tribute, or pay the proper tribute first, then seek the meaning of enlightenment later.So a bit cynical take on the Americanization of Zen, but well-founded, even at that time in history. Unfortunately, his skepticism has been proven out in the decades since.Then on a positive note:Seek rather a teacher of genuine understanding, someone who may have a known name and high rank, or someone who may have neither. Nor should you simply judge a teacher by the number of disciples and students gathered around in what appears to be prosperous circumstances; judge rather by the nature and perseverance of the Zen practice of that teacher.The formal path is something we offer, for those misfits who lean toward Zen as a serious preoccupation in retirement, when family and business obligations have been met. Lay practice may have some of the traditional trappings of the monastic model, but in America it is finding its own, creative path.Yet more:Most important in choosing a Zen path and a Zen teacher is your “root connection,” if it is there at all. You may not fully discover your root connection in a meeting, or in a week, or a month, or a short season of practice; but from the first, you will know, something of that connection. It will seem right for you. From the very beginning, the same things that motivate and fool you about the study of Zen have motivated and fooled others before you. They too have sought out a special teacher, school, sect, or way of Zen practice.So it is on you to be proactive in this pursuit of a true Zen or Dharma father or mother, as the expression goes. We consider our relationships in Zen as an extended family, siblings and cousins, even the occasional in-law. In which we can be deceived, just as within any other family or group. Additionally:I would like to discuss something about what your predecessors in the sangha, or group of Zen practitioners, have found to be deceptive and effective through the history of Zen. Actually, history is the first great deceiver, or, at least the little bit we do know about history. Just as the finger pointing to the moon is not the moon of enlightenment, neither is the record of history anything like the real experience. The common story, as it goes, is that Zen was handed down from Shakyamuni Buddha to Mahakasyapa, then from Mahakasyapa to Ananda, and so on to Bodhidharma, and so on to Dogen, and so on to the present.It is true that there is this heart-to-heart transmission, but it is a romantic fallacy that there has been only one person in each generation since the death of Gautama Buddha who has carried the Zen flame of wisdom, who in turn taught and transmitted it to the next generation. The historical Buddha had many disciples, many who were very able.So take your dose of Zen history with a large dose of salt. Historicity in Zen is trumped by direct experience, which reduces reliance on the brute facts of what in fact happened; the only important fact is what happens in your experience in the presence. The testimony of history is only valuable as a form of encouragement and a prod to your practice.From such a practical perspective, Sensei continues:You will find if you read enough, or reason it out long enough, that there have been many capable students throughout the past 2,500 years. Some were famous. Some made it their business to teach in large monastic communities, and some did not. Some were householders, as many of us are, who went about their regular lives. Those lives never got recorded by the historians, but they are there. Perhaps it is nothing more than a personal opinion, but my view of transmission is that in each generation, there has been one, or maybe several teachers, that have stood out, and who have embodied the spirit of that age in their personalities. These greater teachers have been more skillful at “skillful means” than their contemporaries.Here is the parallel track of householders and monastics. Householder practice has always been held in high regard, from India through China, Korea and Japan, and the far East, and should be in the West of current times. Monastics change clothes and environment, but the basic elements of existence do not change, no matter how romantic or severe the surroundings. Further, the writers write the history:There have been others in each age who have led enlightened lives who may have been teachers, but who simply were not remembered in collective history. Those who were in fact remembered were so popular in their time that historians could not have deleted their accomplishments from the record. Or perhaps, those Zen masters were very literary, or very talented at the arts. Because of this, either they, their literary disciples, or contemporary journalists and historians, wrote some account of what they did. The farther in time a generation or a century receded, the dimmer our collective recollection in oral stories is.In retrospect, then, the notion surfaced that only those one-in-a-generation teachers carried the flame of Zen. In all that time, the heart-to-heart transmission has been occurring many times each generation as it did between Shakyamuni Buddha and Mahakasyapa. Very, very few have had the talent or words to even hint at this most subtle culmination of the Zen teaching. So, they did not.The different perspectives of the scholar-historian and the practitioner of Zen also come into play, and this is a point of contention yet today, in consideration of continuing Buddha's and Dogen's mission:Most historians of Buddhism, then, drew misleading conclusions about the lineage of Zen from the great silence and the few generational great voices. However, it is not one or two in a generation that are the sangha and who stand in the lineage of Zen. It is all of us who do study Zen seriously in any one generation who stand in the lineage of Zen in the Rinzai, Obaku and Soto sects.The misleading conclusions of scholars include the notion that Master Dogen experienced a “decline” when he had established Eiheiji, and stopped actively writing. From our perspective as practitioners, that was the opposite of a decline, when he started live teachings to his monastics, who wrote them down. Then, with a typically creative turn of a phrase, he proposes:Perhaps we will have to employ an army of psychics to reconstruct what actually happened in the history of the transmission of Zen.This is a great example of Sensei's ironic sense of humor.Then with the practical twist of the observer, he suggests a dispassionate view of the present, to inform our rear-view-mirror impressions of the past:Or, maybe we can just look at what is going on today that is similar. There are many teachers and many, many more students in any single generation. Just look at Zen in our own time in all of the United States, Western Europe, China, Japan, Korea, Viet Nam and all the other places that Zen is practiced.Of course, we cannot follow all the living Zen teachers in the world today, nor can we rely on the visibility and celebrity of a given individual to sort out the who's who of contemporary proponents of Buddhism. Social media and online access have opened the door to a far more ecumenical and interfaith approach to apprehending and appreciating the spreading of the gospel of Zen, but we must remain skeptical:In all the world now there are many genuine teachers and many more pretenders. The popular Zen teachers of today may fade in a year or two. It may be someone else who is remembered better five hundred years from now, and will have a profound impact of the development of Zen.The view from 30,000 feet, as we say today, is different from that of the boots on the ground. We may be in the traditional period of semblance, or even decline, of Buddhism, but that should not dissuade us from plodding on with our own practice, be it ever so humble. Whether we are remembered or not, five hundred years from now or next week, makes not a spitting bit of difference to our Zen lives today.* * *Elliston Roshi is guiding teacher of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center and abbot of the Silent Thunder Order. He is also a gallery-represented fine artist expressing his Zen through visual poetry, or “music to the eyes.”UnMind is a production of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center in Atlanta, Georgia and the Silent Thunder Order. You can support these teachings by PayPal to donate@STorder.org. Gassho.Producer: Kyōsaku Jon Mitchell

Grace Presbyterian Church of the North Shore

Sermon | Jesus Teaches: The Treasure, the Pearl, and the Householder, Rev. Marshall Brown

Sutta Meditation Series
4.4 THE BENEFIT OF REGRET & ASKING FORGIVENESS (YOUTH DHAMMA SESSION)

Sutta Meditation Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 22:00


Welcome back to the Sutta Meditation Series Podcast. Another session to accompany the third module in the Youth Dhamma Gradual Teachings series looking into Buddha's Gradual Instructions to Lay People on HEAVENLY REALMS (saggakathaṁ) In this additional session, we delve into THE BENEFIT OF REGRET & ASKING FORGIVENESS as an answer to questions around what can we do if we've transgressed or undertaken wrongdoing and how to possibly neutralise some of the unwholesome kamma. In this short session we examine: — the difference between a fool and a wise person when it comes to transgressions and wrongdoing — Buddha's teaching to Rahula of the importance of admitting wrongdoing, and a framework for doing so — the example of Venerable Sudhamma behaves poorly and must ask forgiveness of Citta, the Householder — how to ask forgiveness of the Triple Gem — as more of a preventative measure, developing the powers of shame (hiri) and fear of wrongdoing (ottappa) Some of the suttas that are mentioned directly or indirectly in this session: — Accaya Sutta (AN 3.4) — Ambalaṭṭhikarāhulovāda Sutta (MN 61) — Kusalākusalasamavisamapañha (Pli Tv Kd 11) — Sukkadhamma Sutta (Iti 42) — Vitthata Sutta (AN 5.2) — Anumāna Sutta (MN 15) — Vatthūpama Sutta (MN 7) — Karaṇīyametta Sutta (Sn 1.8) An electronic copy of the slide on "Asking forgiveness of the Triple Gem" has been posted (and pinned) to the Sutta Meditation Series Telegram channel (https://t.me/suttameditationseries/347). If you have any questions or comments regarding this talk, please email them to suttameditationseries[at]gmail.com or leave a voicemail message via anchor.fm A VIDEO of this FULL SESSION with presentation slides has been published to the Sutta Meditation Series YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ePt0fVI8ZVA AND on Spotify as a video podcast. Blessings of the Triple Gem. Theruwan saranai --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/suttameditationseries/message

The MLO Bros
Abbie Householder- Canfield Volleyball Allstar and soon to be Youngstown State Penguin

The MLO Bros

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 82:30


Abbie Householder from Canfield joins the show with her mom and former coach Maria. These two also are cousins to THE MLO BROS and Abbie brings her boyfriend Will, who ends up getting tortured by THE MLO BROS. Coaching issues, player issues and all around awesome conversation along with HYSTERTICAL conversations with the Boyfriend ensue! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Daily Wisdom - Walking The Path with The Buddha
Ep. 233 - (Group Learning Program) - Chapter 7 - The Five Precepts: A Householder's Guide to Daily Practice

Daily Wisdom - Walking The Path with The Buddha

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 144:42


(Group Learning Program) - Chapter 7 - The Five Precepts: A Householder's Guide to Daily Practice Gotama Buddha gave us guidance to conduct life without harm to other beings or ourselves. This is titled “The Five Precepts”. These are not commandments nor rules to follow, rather how to ensure you are not causing harm to others or yourself. By causing harm to others, we cause harm to ourselves by the Natural Law of Kamma. Through practice of these precepts, you will drastically eliminate unwholesome Kamma production and, thus, experience a more peaceful and content existence. Gotama Buddha's Teachings are not to control an individual nor dictate what they should or should not do. But instead, provide guidance that when practiced will lead to Enlightenment, liberation of the mind, a peaceful and content mind and, thus, a peaceful and content life. Everything in this practice is attained through personal choice. In this LIVE Stream and Interactive Learning Session, David will help you understand what Gotama Buddha taught regarding The Five Precepts and how to apply them to your daily life in modern times. ——- Daily Wisdom - Walking The Path with The Buddha Dedicated to the education of Gotama Buddha's teachings to attain Enlightenment. https://www.BuddhaDailyWisdom.com (See our website for online learning, courses, and retreats.) Group Learning Program - LIVE Interactive Online Classes, Book, Audiobook, Videos, Podcast and Personal Guidance https://bit.ly/GroupLearningProgram The Words of The Buddha - Pali Canon in English Study Group https://bit.ly/PaliCanonStudyGroup FREE Book - Developing a Life Practice: The Path That Leads to Enlightenment https://www.buddhadailywisdom.com/freebuddhabooks Facebook: https://bit.ly/DailyWisdom-Facebook YouTube: https://bit.ly/DailyWisdom-Youtube Podcast: https://bit.ly/DailyWisdom-Podcast Support our efforts to share the teachings of Gotama Buddha with you and worldwide for all people using this link. https://www.buddhadailywisdom.com/supportbuddha

Immanuel Baptist Tucumcari
Psalm 23 - In God's House

Immanuel Baptist Tucumcari

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 42:01


Exploring the two metaphors of Shepherd and Householder.

The WTF California Podcast
Halloween Recap, Householder Recall Begins, Oakley Districting

The WTF California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 58:25


 On this episode of the WTF California Podcast, we discuss the masking mandate changes in Contra Costa County, Brentwood Freedom Rally and get into the "Lets Go Brandon" chant and where it comes from. We also discuss the KPIX article which highlights the recall effort to remove Antioch School Board President Ellie Householder. A Bay Area Survey shows hardships of retiring in the Bay Area. Thanksgiving dinner to be more expensive and we talk boy bullied for going as Tony Stark for Halloween. Articles From the Show Indoor mask rules changing Monday for several Bay Area counties Contra Costa to Lift Masking Requirements in Some Indoor Settings on Nov. 1 Video: Freedom Rally in Brentwood City Park ‘Let's Go Brandon': Conservatives use phrase to insult Joe Biden without foul language Embattled East Bay School Board President Faces Recall Drive Gilroy police announce arrest in deadly shooting at council member's home Families mourn after Halloween party shooting leaves 2 dead, 5 injured in Sacramento County Sedan drives onto Long Beach sidewalk striking 6 people; police searching for driver California police shoot, wound man with paintball gun Animal rights activists hold 'Squid Game' themed protest outside In-N-Out in San Francisco Bay Area retirement: ‘I'm going to have to move away — and I'm actually wealthy' Thanksgiving dinner may be more expensive as holiday staples in short supply Boy bullied for Tony Stark Halloween costume makes superhero return to school Follow Us & Subscribe Apple Podcast – click here Google Podcast – click here PodBean – click here Spotify – click here Stitcher – click here TuneIn-Alexa: click here Official Website Follow us on Facebook

ISKM Vedic Lectures
[SB 4.29.85] Pitfalls of Householder Life | His Grace Sundar Gopal Prabhu

ISKM Vedic Lectures

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 53:58


To know more about ISKM visit us at https://www.iskm.international/ Lets stay connected by Subscribing to our channel now: http://www.youtube.com/c/SriKrishnaMandirSG?sub_confirmation=1 - Connect with us: https://www.iskm.international/temples/ - Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/skm.sg/ - Follow us on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/iskm.sg - Subscribe to our ISKM Newsletter http://eepurl.com/cEEaXz Have more Questions Email us at: submit.iskm@srikrishnamandir.org

pitfalls subscribing gopal prabhu sundar householder iskm srikrishnamandirsg
Bible Story Evangelism
S2 E64/2e Householder Parable.

Bible Story Evangelism

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 27:52


…Matthew 13:51-53

The Ted Dabney Experience
TDE EP20 - Gottlieb, Atari and Epyx alumnus Matt Householder

The Ted Dabney Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021


Matt Householder co-designed Gottlieb's underrated arcade adaptation of Peter Yates's ill-fated Krull, before going on to join Atari's consumer division to work on home adaptations of video arcade hits. With his partner Candi Strecker he went on to create and produce the critically acclaimed California Games (and much more) for Epyx. We chat with Matt about programming in the Seventies, video poker, high-voltage electrocution, Tim Skelly and Komedy Krull.

Geneseo Evangelical Free Church Sermon Podcast
The Hidden Treasure, the Pearl Merchant, the Fishing Net and the Householder

Geneseo Evangelical Free Church Sermon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021


As chapter 13 winds down Jesus teaches his disciples through four different parables what the kingdom of heaven will look like between his first and second coming. Our Lord does not go into great detail about the first two parables which are paired...

The Brian Stewart Podcast
Ep 5 - Rep. Carfagna interview; Householder expulsion vote; Budget Wins

The Brian Stewart Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2021 66:48


Brian talks about his role in the resolution to expel Larry Householder, budget wins, the rise and fall of "Stewart For Congress", before interviewing Rep. Rick Carfagna, Assistant Majority Floor Leader in the Ohio House. Also, Stew Reviews of "Memories of Murder," "Nobody," "The Tomorrow War," and "Wrath of Man."

Covenant Life Baptist Church
The Church in God's Kingdom Program - The Householder

Covenant Life Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2021 55:05


Sutta Meditation Series
WHO ARE OUR ROLE MODELS? - Citta the Householder, lay role model for our sons

Sutta Meditation Series

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2021 33:25


Role models play an important part in all of our lives, whether we seek them out or not. And whether we walk the Buddhist Path or not, they can have the power to shape the direction we take and the ability to influence the decisions that follow on from there. For Buddhist practitioners, the Buddha is our most eminent role model, teacher and the Perfectly Enlightened One. And there are also many noble and great disciples of the Buddha. Today we will focus on lay men disciples of the Buddha, and one in particular, Citta the Householder, who was declared by the Buddha as his foremost male disciple who excelled in expounding the Dhamma (dhammakathikānaṃ) - AN1.250. In learning about such noble beings, we can delight in their lives and accomplishments; recognise the importance of seeing them as worthy role models; and use it as inspiration towards progress on the Buddha's Noble Eightfold Path. To access videos and shorter clips, you can go to the Sutta Meditation Series YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwrSrkvP4mJRPWyPGliNDuA --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/suttameditationseries/message

Anchor of Hope Baptist Church
The Large Net and the Householder.

Anchor of Hope Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2020 34:30


"The Large Net and the Householder," with brother Dan Mouw.

Aging Matters
Caregiving During COVID-19 with Colleen Duewel & Lisa Householder

Aging Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2020 56:39


Conversation with Colleen Duewel, Aging Life Care Manager, Lionheart Elder Care, and Lisa Householder, Client Care Director, Home Helpers of Northern Virginia, about nursing homes/assisted living facilities COVID-19-related issues, decisions about caring for loved ones at home, and home health care provider assistance to help families make choices.

Nuclear Hotseat hosted by Libbe HaLevy
NH #475: Nukegate in Ohio: Nuclear Bailout Scandal – Attorney Terry Lodge Explains

Nuclear Hotseat hosted by Libbe HaLevy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2020 59:01


Nukegate in Ohio:  Activists against Ohio’s bailout of failing nuclear reactors were gamed out of their referendum to block it in 2019.  Now, there’s a scandal with criminal indictments against the Ohio House of Representatives Speaker Larry Householder for taking First Energy money (aka “bribes”).  This may show the way to bailout reversal.  Attorney Terry...

The Mark Blazor Show
Ohio Speaker of the House, Larry Householder

The Mark Blazor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2020 10:49