Podcasts about Hinduism

Religion and way of life

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Latest podcast episodes about Hinduism

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast
0641 - TALKS: On Nisargadatta Maharaj, XIV

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021


Episode 0641 - On Nisargadatta Maharaj, XIV (Click on the above link, or here, for audio.) Introduction to the life & teachings of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj, based on 200 direct quotations. Passages 63-69. Comments on Nisargadatta's personal path, students & devotees, core Advaita Vedanta teaching & dialogues. Tatsat and inconceivable 'ultimate reality.' Additional references from Pali

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast
0640 - TALKS: Reading Chuang Tzu, XXVI

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021


Episode 0640 - Reading Chuang Tzu, XXVI (Click on the above link, or here, for audio.) Concluding discussion of Chuang Tzu, chapters 5 ("The Sign of Virtue Complete") and 7 ("Fit for Emperors and Kings") translated by Burton Watson. Core Taoist teachings: wu-wei (non-interference) & the sage; essential life-values; conventional assumptions vs. non-dual reality; fate, destiny & making harmony with

Stories of Astonishing Light with KJ Nasrul
Surrender With Wonder | Yasmin Afrazeh

Stories of Astonishing Light with KJ Nasrul

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 44:07


When was the last time you experienced divine play? "Lila" is a Sanskrit word used in Hinduism and yogic philosophy, loosely translated as "play", and "delight in the moment." Today's new episode explores these concepts and is the first interview of a new mini-series: Astonishing WOC Healers. KJ will share conversations held with healers, social activists and educators who are Women of Color. Meet Yasmin Afrazeh, a Certified Kundalini Yoga instructor, Radiant Child-trained Children's Yoga teacher and Therapeutic Art Life Coach. She is the founder of House of Lila, a space for children to learn mindfulness through Kundalini Yoga and expressive arts including movement and storytelling. House of Lila grew from Yasmin's vision to help children preserve their natural wisdom and radiance, and regain their inherent state of being--of joy, awareness, creativity.  Spanning across Persia and Australia and solo road trips within the badlands of Montana, KJ and Yasmin recall the lessons on how to wholly surrender with wonder.  Takeaways: We already know what to do. We have innate wisdom within .  House of Lila could be a  mantra and lifestyle. "Lila" means "to divinely play".  Hold the space for delight and embrace the outcome of fluid, creative energy.  Are we missing opportunities for living in the present? We're always planning the next step,  doing instead of being. Our natural state is joy, lightness, innocence and possibility. Observe and admire children, as they are the most wonderful teachers.  Admire their freedom, and their wild imagination. They remind us, Everything's possible. Bow into service, of something greater than us.  “I am a small part. I am held. I am fine.” Please Rate and Review This Podcast if our stories have astonished you as well. https://ratethispodcast.com/astonishingstories  Episode Mentions: Website: www.houseoflila.netInstagram: @house.of.lilaPoem:  Inquire Within by In-QAd and show background music: Original piano compositions by  KJ Nasrul Intro  & Outro music: Canada Lo Res by Pictures Of The Floating World Connect With KJ and Bliss Begins Within Website: https://blissbeginswithin.com  Instagram:  @MusingsOnOther @BlissBeginsWithin @AdopteeSociety Clubhouse: @kjnasrul  Facebook & TwitterWant to create and send beautiful emails? Try Flodesk for free your first 30 days! Use this link here to get startedSupport the show (https://paypal.me/KJNasrulMFT )

Kings and Generals: History for our Future
History of the Mongols SPECIAL: Religious Tolerance

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 22:54


One of the most enduring images of the Mongolian Empire is that it was a model of religious tolerance, one where each of the Khan's subjects were free to worship as they pleased. This is not a new belief;  in the 18th century, Edward Gibbon presented Chinggis Khan as a forerunner of the enlightenment, and for modern audiences the notion was repopularized with Jack Weatherford's book Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World. Some use the notion to counter the common presentations of Mongol brutality, usually accompanying blanket terms that all religious clergy were exempted from taxation, labour and were respected- or go as far as to present the Mongols as the inspiration for modern liberal religious toleration. While there is an element of truth to be had here, as with so much relating to the Mongols, describing the Chinggisid empire as a state of religious tolerance where all religions east and west lived in harmony fails to capture the reality of the period.       Even before the founding of the empire, Chinggis Khan interacted with a variety of religions. During his war to unify Mongolia, Chinggis Khan was supported by men of various religious backgrounds: Mongolian shamanist-animists, Nestorian Christians, Buddhists and Muslims, one of whom, Jafar Khoja, was supposedly a descendant of the Prophet Muhammad, and stood with him at the muddy waters of Lake Baljuna during one of his lowest moments. The most prominent tribes in the Mongolian steppe in the 12th century were Nestorian Christians such as the Kereyid and Naiman, and on the declaration of the Mongol Empire in 1206 Chinggis Khan's army and administration were quite mixed. Chinggis Khan himself was an animist: in Mongolian belief, all things in the world were inhabited by spirits which had to be consulted and placated. It was the job of shamans to intercede with these spirits on the Mongols' behalf. Generally, shamanism is not an exclusive religion; one can consult a shaman and still practice other faiths. The shaman was not like a Christian priest or Islamic imam, but a professional one could consult with regardless of other religious affiliation. The persuasion and power of religion in the Mongol steppe  came from the charisma of specific holy men -such as shamans- and their power to convene with spirits and Heaven on the Khan's behalf in order to secure his victory.        This seems to have been the guiding principle for how Chinggis Khan, and most of his successors, approached religion. Some Mongols viewed the major religions they encountered -Daoism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam- as all praying to the same God via different methods. This was more or less the statement that in the 1250s, Chinggis' grandson Mongke Khaan provided to the Franciscan friar William of Rubruck during an interview, stating that “We Mongols believe that there is only one God through whom we have life and through whom we die, and towards him we direct our hearts [...] But just as God has given the hand several fingers, so he has given mankind several paths.”       Usually for the Khans, it did not matter who was right, as basically all of the major religions were. What mattered was that these religions should pray to God on behalf of the Chinggisids to ensure divine favour for their rule. Heaven's will was manifested through victories and rulership, while it's displeasure manifested in defeats and anarchy. Much like the concept of the Chinese Mandate of Heaven, the right to rule provided by heaven could be rescinded, and thus the Mongols hoped to continually appease Heaven.       But the Mongols' views on religion were not static and took years to develop into their political theology- and nor were they inherently tolerant, and favours were allotted more on a personal basis. For example, in 1214 Chinggis Khan, or one of his sons, had an encounter with a Buddhist monk named Haiyun. Haiyun, with his head shaved bare in accordance with his role as a monk, was told by the Khan to grow his hair out and braid it in Mongolian fashion- for at that time, the Mongols were attempting to order the general population of north China to do so as a sign of their political subordination.  Religions in China dictated how one should maintain their hair; Buddhist monks had to shave their heads, Daoist monks could keep their hair long, while the general Chinese population, on Confucian teaching, could not cut their hair in adulthood, as it was a gift from the parents, and thus was kept in topknots. Demanding that the general population adopt the unique, partly shaved Mongolian hairstyle, was therefore a decree against all of China's major religions. The Mongols did not succeed in this policy and soon abandoned it's implementation on its sedentary subjects, though other sources indicate it was enforced on nomadic Turkic tribes who entered Mongol service, indicating their submission to the Great Khan. Notably the Manchu would successfully implement such a policy after their conquest of China 400 years later, forcing the population to adopt the long queues at the back of the head. When the Chinese revolted against Manchu rule, the cutting of the queue was one of the clearest signs of rejecting the Qing Dynasty.   Back to the Buddhist monk Haiyun, who Chinggis had ordered to grow out his hair in Mongol fashion. Haiyun told Chinggis that he could not adopt the Mongol hairstyle, as growing his hair out violated his duty as a monk. Learning this, Chinggis Khan allowed Haiyun to maintain his baldness, then in time extended this allowance to all Buddhist and Daoist clergy.  Even with this first privilege, Haiyun and his master did not receive coveted tax exempt status until 1219, and then on the recommendation of Chinggis' viceroy in North China, Mukhali. This is the earliest indication of Chinggis Khan granting of such a favour, followed soon by the extensive privileges granted to the Daoist master Qiu Chuji. The Daoist had made the journey from North China to meet Chinggis Khan in Afghanistan on the Khan's urging, ordered to bring Chinggis the secret to eternal life, as the Mongols had been told Qiu Chuji was 300 years old. Master Qiu Chuji told Chinggis that not only did he not have such power, but Chinggis should also abstain from hunting and sexual activity. Not surprisingly, Chinggis Khan did not take this advice, but he did grant the man extensive privileges, tax exempt status and authority over all Daoists in China. Importantly, Chinggis' edict was directed personally at Qiu Chuji and his disciples, rather than Daoism as a whole. The value Qiu Chuji had to Chinggis was on his individual religious charisma and ability to intercede with the heavens on the Khan's behalf, as well as his many followers who could be induced to accept Mongol rule. In Chinggis' view, the fact that Qiu Chuji was a Daoist leader did not entitle him to privileges. Neither did the Mongols initially differentiate between Buddhism and Daoism. In part due to the vaguely worded nature of Chinggis' edicts, Qiu Chuji's Daoist followers used these decrees to exert authority over Buddhists as well, seizing Buddhist temples and forcing Buddhist monks to become Daoists, beginning a Buddhist-Daoist conflict that lasted the rest of the 13th century.       The point of these anecdotes is to demonstrate that the conquests did not begin with a specific policy of general religious tolerance or support for local religious institutions. Governmental support and privilege was provided on an ad hoc basis, especially when a group or individual was seen as influential with the almighty. Toleration itself was also advertised as a tool; in the Qara-Khitai Empire, in what is now eastern Kazakhstan and northwestern China, an enemy of Chinggis Khan, prince Kuchlug of the Naiman tribe, had fled to Qara-Khitai and eventually usurped power. Originally an Eastern Christian, that is a Nestorian, in Qara-Khitai Kuchlug converted to a violent strang of Buddhism and began to force the Muslim clerics, particularly in the Tarim Basin, to convert to Chrisitanity or Buddhism on pain of death. When Chinggis Khan's forces under Jebe Noyan arrived in 1217 pursuing the prince, they recognized the general resentment against Kuchlug and, in order to undermine his support, declared that anyone who submitted to the Mongols would be free to practice their religion. The announcement worked well, as the empire was quickly and successfully turned over to the Mongols, and the renegade prince Kuchlug cornered and killed. Notably, this announcement did not come with statements of privileges or tax exemptions at large for the Islamic religious leaders. It was a decree spread to deliberately encourage the dissolution of the Qara-Khitai and ease the Mongol conquest- in this region, it was a comparatively peaceful conquest, by Mongol standards. But it was not coming from any specific high-mindedness for the treatment of religion, but an intention to expand into this territory and defeat the fleeing Kuchlug.       By the reign of Chinggis' son Ogedai in the early 1230s, the Mongol stance towards religions became more solidified. A major advancement, on the insistence of advisers like the Buddhist Khitan scholar Yelu Chucai, was that privileges were to be granted on religious communities and institutions rather than based on individual charisma, which made them easier to regulate and manage. Chucai also impressed upon the Mongols that Buddhism and Daoism were distinct beliefs, though the Mongols seem to have often continually erroneously thought both creeds worshipped a supreme deity a la Christianity and Islam. Buddhist and Daoism became, alongside Christianity and Islam, the four main “foreign religions” which the Mongols would issue edicts regarding privileges. It was not an evenly applied thing. With Islam, for instance, it can be said the Mongols often had the greatest difficulties. For one thing, the rapid annihilation of the Khwarezmian empire, the world's single most powerful islamic state at the time, resulted in the deaths of perhaps millions of Muslims as well as the belief that the Mongols were a punishment sent by God- a belief the Mongols encouraged. The reduction of Islam from “the state religion” to “just another religion of the Khan's subjects,” was a difficult one for many an imam and qadi to accept. For a universalist religion like Islam, subjugation to a pagan entity was a difficult pill to swallow, and the destruction of cities, mosques, agriculture and vast swathes of the population would not have been eased by statements of how tolerant the Mongols supposedly were.        Further, it is apparent that the Mongols' rule for the first decade or two of their interaction with the Islamic world was not tolerant. Part of this comes to an inherent conflict between the sharia law of Islam, and the yassa of Chinggis Khan. The yassa and yosun of Chinggis Khan were his laws and customs set out to provide a framework for Mongol life, which regulated interactions for the state, individuals, the environment, the spirits and the heavenly. As a part of this, it was decreed that animals had to be slaughtered in the Mongolian fashion; the animal usually knocked unconscious, turned onto its back, an incision made in the chest and its heart crushed. The intention was to prevent the spilling of the animals' blood needlessly upon the earth, which could beget misfortune. Contravening this was forbidden and punishable by death. The problem was that this is inherently conflicting with halal and kosher slaughter, which entailed slitting the throat and draining the blood. At various times over the thirteenth century, this was used as an excuse to punish and lead reprisals against Muslims. A number of Persian language sources assert that Ogedai Khaan's brother Chagatai was a harsh enforcer of the yassa on the empire's Muslim population. In the 1250s ‘Ala al-Din Juvaini asserted that Muslims in Central Asia were unable to make any halal killings due to Chagatai, and were forced to eat carrion from the side of the road. The Khwarezmian refugee Juzjani meanwhile said Chagatai planned a genocide of the Muslims. While these sources like to depict Chagatai as a foil to Ogedai's more ‘friendly to islam' image, it remains clear that for many Muslims, it was felt that the Mongol government had a particular hatred for them. But Chagatai was not the only one to enforce this. Ogedai himself briefly sought to enforce this rule, and the famous Khubilai Khan grew increasingly unfriendly to religion in his old age, and in the 1280s launched anti-muslim policies, banning halal slaughter and circumcision on pain of death. The incident which apparently set him off was a refusal of Muslim merchants in Khubilai's court to eat meat prepared in the Mongolian manner, though it may also have been an attempt to appease some of the Chinese elite by appearing to reduce Islamic and Central Asian influence in his government, particularly after the assassination of Khubilai's corrupt finance minister Ahmad Fanakati.        Even Daoism, favoured early by the Mongols thanks to the meeting of Qiu Chuji and Chinggis Khan, suffered stiff reprisals from the Mongol government. As the conflict between the Daoists and Buddhists escalated, in the 1250s on the behest of his brother Mongke Khaan, prince Khubilai headed a debate between representatives of the two orders. Khubilai, inclined to Buddhism on the influence of his wife and personal conversion, chose the Buddhists as the winners. Declaring a number of Daoist texts forgeries, Khubilai ordered many to be destroyed and banned from circulation, while also reducing their privileges. This failed to abate the tensions, and in the 1280s an older, less patient Khubilai responded with the destruction of all but one Daoist text, Lau Zi's Daodejing, and with murder, mutilation and exile for the offending Daoists.       Privileges only extended to religions the Mongols saw as useful, or offered evidence that they had support from heaven. Judaism, Zoroastrianism, Manicheism and Hinduism were usually totally ignored by the Mongols and did not receive the same privileges as the Christian, Buddhist, Daoist and Islamic clergy. Judaism may have received tax exemption status in the Ilkhanate for a brief period in the 1280s  and 90s due to the influence of a Jewish vizier, Sa'd al-Dawla, while in the Yuan Dynasty it took until 1330 for Judaism to earn such a status. As these religions lacked states which interacted with the Mongols, the Mongols saw these religions as having no power from heaven, and were therefore useless to them. Without any political clout, and of small representation within the Empire, these groups largely escaped the notice of the Khans.       The Mongols were also not above ordering the annihilation of a religion or religious groups when they defied them. The most well known case was a Shi'ite sect, the Nizari Ismailis, better known as the Assassins. Due to their resistance against the Mongol advance, the sect was singled out for destruction not just politically, but religiously, as Mongke Khaan had become convinced of this necessity by his more orthodox Islamic advisers. This task fell to his brother Hulegu, who enacted his brother's will thoroughly. Soon after the destruction of the Ismaili fortresses, which was lauded by Hulegu's Sunni Muslim biographer ‘Ala al-Din Juvaini,  Hulegu famously sacked Baghdad and killed the Caliph in 1258. Juvaini's chronicle, perhaps coincidentally, cuts off just before the siege of Baghdad. This attack on Baghdad was not religiously motivated; the Caliph had refused to accept Mongol authority. As a seemingly powerful head of a religion, his independence could not be abided. It was not a specifically anti-Islamic sentiment here, but a political one. Had the Mongols marched on Rome and the Pope also refused their mandate, such a fate would have awaited him as well. The presence of Christians in Hulegu's army, many from the Kingdom of Georgia and Cilician Armenia who partook with great enthusiasm in the slaughter of Muslims on Hulegu's request at Baghdad and in his campaign into Syria, as well as the fact that Hulegu's mother and chief wife were Chrisitans, would not have been lost on many Muslims, as well as the fact that Hulegu himself was a Buddhist.  Hulegu after the conquest of Baghdad ordered its rebuilding, but placed a Shi'ite Muslim in charge of this task and sponsored the restoration of Christian churches and monasteries, and other minority religions in his majority sunni-islam territories.     When the Mongols did convert to the local religions, they were not above carrying out with zeal assaults on other religious communities in their empire. Such was the case for Khans like Ozbeg in the Golden Horde or Ghazan in the Ilkhanate, who converted to Islam and struck against Christian, Buddhist and shamanic elements in their realms. These were as a rule very brief rounds of zealousness, as the economic usage of these groups and the uneven conversion of their followers to Islam made it politically and economically more useful to abandon these measures.        This is not to say of course, that there is no basis for the idea of Mongol religious tolerance, especially when compared to some contemporary states: just that when the favours, privileges and state support were granted, they were usually done to the four main religious groups the Mongols designated: again, Muslims, Christians, Daoists and Buddhists. So entrenched did these groups become as the “favoured religions” that in the Yuan Dynasty by the 14th century it was believed these four groups had been singled out by Chinggis Khan for their favours. This is despite the fact that Chinggis Khan had no recorded interactions with any Christian holymen.   But not idly should we dismiss the notion of there being a certain level of religious toleration among the Mongols. Not without reason was Ogedai Khaan portrayed as friendly in many Islamic sources, and he regularly gave the most powerful positions in the administration of North China to Muslims.  European travellers among the Mongols, such as John De Plano Carpini, Marco Polo and Simon of St. Quentin, along with Persian bureaucrats like ‘Ala al-Din Juvaini and the Syriac Churchman Bar Hebraeus, generally reported Mongol indifference to what religions were practiced by their subjects, as long as said subjects accepted Mongol command. Sorqaqtani Beki, the mother of Mongke and Khubilai, was a Nestorian Christian famous for patronizing and supporting mosques and madrassas. Mongke Khaan held feasts to mark the end of Ramadan where he would distribute alms and at least one such feast held in Qaraqorum, listened to a qadi deliver a sermon. He show respect to his Muslim cousin Berke, and for him had halal meat at one imperial banquet. If the yassa of Chinggis Khan was upheld thoroughly, then the Khans and all princes present would have been executed. In the four level racial hierarchy Khubilai Khan instituted in China, Muslims and Central Asians were second only to Mongols and nomads, and ranked above all Chinese peoples.    Religious men visiting the Khans usually left with the belief that the Khan was about to convert to their religion, so favourably had they been received. Khubilai Khan asked Marco Polo's father and uncle to bring him back  100 Catholic priests and holy oil from Jerusalem, and likely sent the Nestorian Rabban bar Sauma to Jerusalem for similar purposes. Marco Polo then goes on to present Khubilai as a good Christian monarch in all but name. Qaraqorum, the Mongol imperial capital, held Daoist and Buddhist temples across the street from Mosques and Churches. In Khubilai's capital of Dadu and the Ilkhanid capital of Sultaniyya were Catholic archbishoprics by the early 14th century. So there certainly was a level of toleration within the Mongol Empire that contemporaries, with wonder or frustration, could remark truthfully that it was quite different from their own homelands.    Such religious syncretism survived well into the century, when claimants to the fragmenting successor Khanates in western Asia, in order to define their legitimacy amongst the largely converted Mongol armies and stand out amongst the many Chinggisids, latched onto Islamic identities. Eager to prove their sincerity, they pushed back violently against even traditional Mongol shamanism. Despite it's early difficulties, in the end Islam largely won amongst the Mongols of the western half of the empire and their descendants, overcoming the brief revitalization Nestorian Christianity and Buddhism had enjoyed thanks to Mongol patronage. Such was the final outcome of the Mongols' religious toleration     Our series on the Mongols will continue, so be sure to subscribe to the Kings and Generals podcast to follow. If you enjoyed this, and would like to help us keep bringing you great content, please consider supporting us on patreon at www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals, or sharing this with your friends. This episode was researched and written by our series historian, Jack Wilson. I'm your host David, and we'll catch you on the next one.

The Classical Ideas Podcast
EP 214: Social Media and Hinduism w/Dr. Dheepa Sundaram

The Classical Ideas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 57:00


Dr. Dheepa Sundaram (she/her/hers) is scholar of performance, ritual, yoga, and digital culture in South Asia at the University of Denver which sits on the unceded tribal lands of the Cheyenne and Arapahoe people. Her research examines the formation of Hindu virtual religious publics through online platforms, social media, apps, and emerging technologies such as virtual reality and artificial intelligence. Dr. Sundaram's current monograph project titled Globalizing Dharma examines how commercial ritual websites fashion a new, digital canon for Hindu religious praxis, effectively "branding" religious identities through a neoliberal "Vedicizing" of virtual spaces. Her most recent article explores how West Bengal's Tourism initiatives use Instagram to foster virtual, ethnonationalist, social networks during Durga puja. Spotlighting issues of access/accessibility to religious spaces and the viability and visibility of online counter-narratives, especially those from minoritized/marginalized caste, gender, and class communities, Dr. Sundaram shows how Asur tribal groups who seek to recover an alternative history of their ancestor Mahisasura, are not only excluded, but, effaced through this kind of digital cultural marketing campaign. A forthcoming piece examines so-called YouTube yogis and how the commercial landscape of yoga as part of lifestyle "cures" becomes an unwitting partner in Hindu nationalist project of repatriating yoga as a national cultural artifact. Follow Dr. Dheepa Sundaram on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themodsisyphus Visit Sacred Writes: https://www.sacred-writes.org/

Here's Tom with the weather...
Islam & The Alcoholics Anonymous 12 Steps

Here's Tom with the weather...

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 76:04


Today we're talking … about Islam as it applies to the 12 Steps - with Andrea Travers. Andrea Travers was born in New York, where she was also ordained in 2003. Aside from her doctor's degree in ministry, which she acquired in 2010, she also has a bachelor's degree in journalism and a master's degree in mass communication from the University of Oregon and University of Portland respectively. Married with three children, she now lives in the city of Wilsonville in Oregon with her family.Andrea's study of Islam was conducted as part of her doctoral work that studied the eight faith traditions as well as two years at an interfaith seminary in New York City where she was ordained. She is an author of several books including theTwelve Wisdom Steps: Unifying Principles of the 12 Steps of A.A. Found in the Wisdom Traditions,is described as thus:Beneath the well-known twelve steps of Alcoholics Anonymous (A.A.) are the universal principles of spiritual practice as they are expressed in traditional religions and wisdom traditions; including Buddhism, Christianity, Cosmology, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Native American Spirituality, and Taoism. This wisdom expressed itself in the 20th century movement known as A.A. The purpose of her book is to ensure that seekers from all faith traditions have an opportunity to realize and appreciate the universality of transformative spiritual practices.https://www.12wisdomsteps.com/Help us Keep Tom going – please donate a few bucks/quid/sheckels here at Paypal: Gilwriter@hotmail.co.uk See us every Friday at zoom https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88215498348Zoom ID 882 1549 348 password TomOur website is at www.HTWTW.comJoin our Facebook Page ‘Here's Tom with the weather' at https://www.facebook.com/groups/314088509589654To see past episodes, join the ‘Here's Tom with the Weather' Youtube Channel here: https://youtube.com/channel/UCdW7K07ZZUPZZ-t0s7XmURQ

Called to Communion
2021-09-10 - Does Catholicism Have Some Pagan Elements?

Called to Communion

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 51:00


Does #Catholicism have some pagan elements?, is #Hinduism more true than the Catholic #faith because it is older?, is Purgatory in the #Bible?, and why go to Church when some people are so rude there? #God #Jesus #Christianity #Church

C4C Apologetics
Ep 65 - Religious Cults in America: New Age, Eastern Religion Influences (Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism, Taoism)

C4C Apologetics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 9:14


This is part of a 10-episode series in which we break down the New Age Movement. In this episode we're see Eastern religious influences in the New Age Movement philosophy.Open Door Baptist Church:https://odbaptist.com/C4C Apologetics Website:https://odbaptist.com/pages/c4c-apologeticsFinancially Support C4C Apologetics Ministry:https://odbaptist.com/giveDon't forget to check out C4C Apologetics on these platforms:YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTCXAxWY9WPV1hzq5WH-OTw

Weekly Sanga
Caitanya-bhāgavata Antya-khaṇḍa Chapter 3 Texts 446 – September 8, 2021

Weekly Sanga

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 56:01


Caitanya-bhāgavata Antya-khaṇḍa Chapter 3 Texts 446 ei prabhu sei pāpa-karma saṅarite anukṣaṇa citta mora dahe sarva-mate   TRANSLATION “O Lord, when I now remember those sinful activities my heart constantly burns with repentance.”

The Missions Podcast
Sent From Zambia to South Asia: Joshua Bowman Explains

The Missions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021


What is it like being sent out from a Zambian church as an American missionary to serve in a Hindu context? Joshua Bowman of Cedarville University shares his unique story. Joshua Bowman holds a Ph.D. in Missiology from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary and is Assistant Professor of Missions and Theology at Cedarville University. He served with his wife Amy and their four children in Zambia and South Asia with the International Mission Board for seventeen years as a church planter, church strengthening strategist, and team leader. Prefer video? Watch the video version of this episode. Support this podcast and impact God's mission. Want to ask a question or suggest a topic? Email us. The Missions Podcast is sponsored by ABWE's Global Gospel Fund.

All Things All People Podcast
BASECAMP- Hinduism

All Things All People Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 73:42


The smell of incense being burned as an offering to a false god really stays with you. You'll be able to hear it in the voices of the guys on this episode. This week, the ATAP guys detail Hinduism and the various beliefs that can be found in it. Even more, they share their own stories of visiting Hindu temples in the states and in South Asia and the effect that witnessing Hindu worship has had on them as they seek to share the Gospel in the darkest places. Come hear their stories about sharing the Gospel in places where the name of Jesus is not known. Reach out to Jeremy- Jeremy@allthingsallpeople.org Follow ATAP on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/allthings.allpeople/

Weekly Sanga
Caitanya-bhāgavata Antya-khaṇḍa Chapter 3 Text 434 – September 6, 2021

Weekly Sanga

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 61:45


In addition to today's class, Dhanurdhara Swami speaks on the passing of his mother, Doris Winiker. Caitanya-bhāgavata Antya-khaṇḍa Chapter 3 Text 434 ye prabhu dekhite sarva deve kāmya kare se prabhu nācaye sarva-gaṇera gocare   TRANSLATION All the demigods desire to see the Lord who was now dancing before the eyes of one and all.

Be Here Now Network Guest Podcast
Ep. 83 – Present Moment Awareness

Be Here Now Network Guest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 25:57


In this practice-steeped dharma talk, a hilarious and engaging Mingyur Rinpoche invites the audience into an array of guided meditations and thought experiments around relaxed open awareness.Continuing last episode's 2010 dharma talk hosted at Spirit Rock, aptly titled, The Neuroscience of Meditation, Mingyur Rinpoche picks back up answering audience questions on using meditation to work with fear of pain, if he would like people to pray for him during his next three-year retreat, and how to meditate properly with disabilities or physical difficulties. From there, he naturally and hilariously shares a smorgasbord of guided meditations and experiments highlighting open awareness.Born in 1975, Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche is a much-loved and accomplished Tibetan Buddhist meditation teacher. From a young age, he was drawn to a life of contemplation. In addition to extensive training in the meditative and philosophical traditions of Tibetan Buddhism, Rinpoche has maintained a lifelong interest in Western science and psychology. Rinpoche currently teaches throughout the world, with centers on four continents. His candid and often humorous accounts of his own personal difficulties have endeared him to Buddhist and non-Buddhist students alike. Learn more about Rinpoche and find his worldwide teaching schedule at tergar.org.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast
0639 - TALKS: On Nisargadatta Maharaj, XIII

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021


Episode 0639 - On Nisargadatta Maharaj, XIII(Click on the above link, or here, for audio.) Introduction to the life & teachings of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj, based on 200 direct quotations. Passages 58-64. Comments on Nisargadatta's personal path, students & devotees, core teaching & dialogues. Additional references from Pali Buddha-Dhamma, Bhagawan Nityananda, Ra Material, core Taoism,

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast
0638 - TALKS: On Nisargadatta Maharaj, XII

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021


Episode 0638 - On Nisargadatta Maharaj, XII (Click on the above link, or here, for audio.)Introduction to the life & teachings of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj, based on reminiscences of disciple & author, David Godman (pages 9-10) and 200 direct quotations (passages 56-58). Comments on Nisargadatta's personal path, students & devotees, core teaching & dialogues. Additional references from Pali

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast
0637 - TALKS: Reading Chuang Tzu, XXV

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021


Episode 0637 - Reading Chuang Tzu, XXV (Click on the above link, or here, for audio.) Concluding discussion of Chuang Tzu, chapter 4 ("In the World of Men"), and re-reading of chapter 5 ("The Sign of Virtue Complete"), translated by Burton Watson. Core Taoist teachings: wu-wei (non-interference) & the sage; essential life-values; conventional assumptions vs. non-dual reality; fate, destiny &

Sippin' Tea
Episode 36: Religion Histori-tea: Hinduism

Sippin' Tea

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 33:15


This week Meda decided to talk religion! This is part 1 of a 5 part series where we take a look at the top 5 religions in the world. Join us while we learn about one of the oldest religions in the world- Hinduism!

Weekly Sanga
Caitanya-bhāgavata Antya-khaṇḍa Chapter 3 Texts 418-419 – September 1, 2021

Weekly Sanga

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 56:27


Caitanya-bhāgavata Antya-khaṇḍa Chapter 3 Texts 418-419 brahmaloka-śivaloka-ādi yata loka ye sukhera kaṇā-leśe sabei aśoka yogīndra munīndra matta ye sukhera leśe pṛthivīte kṛṣṇa prakāśila nyāsi-veśe   TRANSLATION Even a particle of the happiness distributed in this world by Kṛṣṇa in the dress of a sannyāsi freed the inhabitants of planets headed by Brahmaloka and Śivaloka from...

Weekly Sanga
Srila Prabhupada's Vyasa-puja – August 31, 2021

Weekly Sanga

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 82:52


Śrīla Dhanurdhara Swami is joined by His Grace Brahma Tirtha Prabhu as they share their realizations and remembrances of Śrīla Prabhupāda on his Vyāsa-pūjā.

Revealing The True Light
10 Yoga Poses that Offer Worship to Hindu Deities (86)

Revealing The True Light

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 29:45


Do you think going to a yoga class is harmless? Think again. The poses assumed, according to the teachings of Hinduism, are offerings to specific Hindu deities. Ten yoga poses will be examined in this teaching. Shiva, the god of destruction, is referred to in Hinduism as “the Lord of yoga.” It is a system intentionally designed to carry practitioners into an altered state of mind called “God-consciousness,” which means “a conscious awareness that YOU ARE GOD!”

Belle, Book & Candle
S3 E29: A Millennial View on Positivity & Spirituality | A Southern Dialogue with Himanish Goel

Belle, Book & Candle

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 39:15


It was such a pleasure to have a millennial view on positivity, spirituality, and chakras. We also chat a little about Hinduism, and Himanish shares with us some of the major deities in the Hindu religion. We discuss living a positive life, how our language affects positivity, as well as social media and toxic positivity - all from a millennial viewpoint. He also shares his views on yoga and how it can be a practice that'll keep you young and energetic! Y'all come on in, this is a treat! OUR GUEST Himanish Goel not only provides career advice, but he helps people use spirituality and breathing techniques for their next big thing through believing in the universe. He guides them to understand the effects of positivity, how to use breathing exercises, and how to deepen their belief in the connectivity of the universe. https://www.linkedin.com/in/himanish-goel/ CONTACT MELA www.podpage.com/belle-book-candle FB & IG @bellebookcandlesc YT: Belle, Book & Candle Support by becoming a patron: www.patreon.com/bellebookcandle Or, buy Mela a coffee! www.buymeacoffee.com/bellebookcandle Interested in our upcoming Greenwild Festival on November 13, 2021? Check it out here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/greenwild-festival-for-witches-mystics-tickets-152286885173 CREDITS My dad wrote the lyrics to my theme song, and we sing it together at the beginning. Thanks to my husband for his contributions. Thank you to our guest, Himanish Goel. Original Broadcast: 8.31.21 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bellebookcandle/message

Weekly Sanga
Sri Krishna Janmastami – Śrīmad-Bhāgavatam Canto 10 Chapter 3 Texts 1-5 – August 30, 2021

Weekly Sanga

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 71:44


Śrīmad-Bhāgavatam Canto 10 Chapter 3 Texts 1-5 śrī-śuka uvāca atha sarva-guṇopetaḥ kālaḥ parama-śobhanaḥ yarhy evājana-janmarkṣaṁ śāntarkṣa-graha-tārakam diśaḥ prasedur gaganaṁ nirmaloḍu-gaṇodayam mahī maṅgala-bhūyiṣṭha- pura-grāma-vrajākarā nadyaḥ prasanna-salilā hradā jalaruha-śriyaḥ dvijāli-kula-sannāda- stavakā vana-rājayaḥ vavau vāyuḥ sukha-sparśaḥ puṇya-gandhavahaḥ śuciḥ agnayaś ca dvijātīnāṁ śāntās tatra samindhata manāṁsy āsan prasannāni sādhūnām asura-druhām jāyamāne 'jane tasmin nedur dundubhayaḥ samam   TRANSLATION Thereafter,...

Keys For Kids Ministries

Bible Reading: Luke 5:1-11As Ming and Dad were fishing, Ming got restless. "We've been here for more than an hour and haven't caught anything. I wanna go home." "That reminds me of a story in the Bible," said Dad. "The one about how Peter and the fishermen fished all night and caught no fish." "What? All night?" asked Ming in surprise."That's right," answered Dad. "It was only when Jesus told them to cast the net again that they managed to catch any fish--so many the boat could barely hold them!""I wish Jesus was here right now!" exclaimed Ming. "Then we'd catch some fish." Dad smiled. "Even though we can't see Jesus, He is with us. He helps us fish in a different way. After He performed the miracle in front of Peter and the other fishermen, He told them He would make them fishers of people.""Fishers of people? What does that mean?" asked Ming. "Wellthink of it this way," said Dad. "I grew up in Singapore, which is a multiethnic country. Over there, many people practice religions such as Buddhism, Islam, and Hinduism. Your grandparents used to worship Chinese gods and our ancestors when I was young." "Really? I thought they had always been Christians," said Ming.Dad shook his head. "No, I had never heard about Jesus until my best friend James explained the gospel to me when we were in middle school. I was confused and found it hard to understand the concept of one God. It wasn't until I went to college that I began to understand. I'm thankful to James for not giving up on me. He continued to talk to me about Jesus and invited me to church and Bible studies. Slowly, I began to understand that there is only one true God and that I needed to be forgiven for my sin. I finally trusted Jesus as my Savior and became a Christian.""Wow, so Uncle James is like Peter having a miraculous catch," said Ming."Exactly. Eventually your grandparents became Christians too. That's what it means to be fishers of people. Jesus helps us bring more people to Him." Just then, Ming noticed a tug in the fishing rod. "Look, Dad! We caught a fish!" Dad smiled. "Jesus must have heard us." -Kelly ChoyHow About You?Have you told your friends the good news of Jesus? Do you feel like giving up when they don't accept it right away? Don't give up. Remember that Jesus is always there to help you. Keep telling others about Him and showing them His love. Share what He's done to save us with your family and friends, and trust Him to do the rest.Today's Key Verse:"Come, follow me," Jesus said, "and I will send you out to fish for people." (NIV) (Matthew 4:19)Today's Key Thought:Tell others about Jesus

Company of Disciples' Recordings
"Hinduism: Choose Your Religion Part 2" with Jonny Cage

Company of Disciples' Recordings

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 32:09


"You can't kill a Hindu!" Jonathan continues his "Choose your religion" series with part 2: Hinduism. Hinduism is the 3rd largest religion in the world. How does this religion respond to questions such as: "What is wrong with the world today?" "Why is it happening?" "Where should we be going?" and "How do we get there?" Join Jonathan as he provides a brief overview of Hinduism and explores how Hinduism responds to the above questions. Enjoy! Did you enjoy our recording? How about check us out at www.companyofdisciples.com and learn more about what we do for business professionals! Are you church shopping? Try Crucible Church in Richmond, B.C. Email community@cruciblechurch.com for more info or visit www.cruciblechurch.com

Weekly Sanga
Śrīmad-Bhāgavatam Canto 10 Chapter 13 Text 45 – August 29, 2021

Weekly Sanga

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 54:33


Śrīmad-Bhāgavatam Canto 10 Chapter 13 Text 45 tamyāṁ tamovan naihāraṁ khadyotārcir ivāhani mahatītara-māyaiśyaṁ nihanty ātmani yuñjataḥ   TRANSLATION As the darkness of snow on a dark night and the light of a glowworm in the light of day have no value, the mystic power of an inferior person who tries to use it against a...

Weekly Sanga
Caitanya-bhāgavata Antya-khaṇḍa Chapter 3 Text 403 – August 29, 2021

Weekly Sanga

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 60:38


Caitanya-bhāgavata Antya-khaṇḍa Chapter 3 Text 403 viśārada-caraṇe āmāra namaskāra sārvabhauma vācaspati nandana yāṅhara   TRANSLATION I offer my humble obeisances at the feet of Viśārada, who had Sārvabhauma and Vācaspati as his sons.

Up is Down Podcast
Ep 106: A Hole In The Shape Of God

Up is Down Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 138:46


Greetings to all living and dead. Thank you for listening to the Up Is Down podcast and double thank you to all who support this work. Following episode 101, The Sheep and The Goat, I had the opportunity to speak with someone who is not only far along his own individual path, but who also provides a school and the tools for others to carve out their own spiritual journey. Of course I'm speaking of Thomas LeRoy, founder of The Sect Of The Horned God, whose inspiring words were included in episode 101.Thomas LeRoy and I had a wonderful, stimulating conversation about philosophy, psychology and myth. It's such a pleasure to speak with someone on a purely philosophical level and it reminded me of the origin of Up Is Down before the fascistic scientism takeover. In this conversation Thomas revealed how it was that he embarked on his own spiritual path, a Left Hand Path, and what it is that draws one to the "darker side" of art, history, and philosophy and how the spiritual figures of antiquity have been, and are still co-opted and misrepresented for better or worse. We discuss the archetypal origin of the horned deities, the roots of Left Hand Path spirituality, the difference between Sinisterism and the Left Hand Path vs. cereal box satanism so prevalent in modern culture, as well as the benefits of both Left and Right Hand Paths. What is the Shadow and why integrate it into one's consciousness? What is sigil magick?How does Hinduism translate to the Left Hand Path? Is there any truth to Sinisterism and the LHP being a vehicle for neo fascism?Is it necessary to exclude oppositional philosophy and spiritual practice from your own Left Hand Path?These questions and more are answered in this fascinating talk with the founder of The Sect Of The Horned God, Thomas LeRoy.Beneath the pointy veneer of this man I found much grace and common ground. Through his studies and discipline Thomas holds up a philosophical mirror and asks a simple question, "Do you see yourself?"Please check out his diverse and meaty youtube channel and learn for yourself more about which path you might already be on, perhaps even before you were born.Thomas LeRoy's youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0lyfnDD2_ijrPr_IQGWTJgThe Sect Of The Horned God:thesectofthehornedgod.comMusic used for this episode: A Hole In The Shape Of God by Anicon /used by expressed permissionhttps://anicon.bandcamp.com/album/anicon***Executive Producers Ep 106***Larry Bleidner - thatlarryshow.comBoo_Bury Mothman - behindthesch3m3s.com***Associate Executive Producers Ep 106***Shane WagnerErin NeviusSloan BushJordan Dyer++T H A N K Y O U A L L S O M U C H++((((S U P P O R T THE S H O W))))https://paypal.me/frankenbones?locale.x=en_USBitCoinCash BCH: qzgwfjeu5vp634h84zzurw8kdah5j3cuxg8daq6qrk. Venmo: @Dean-Reiner-1VALUE-FOR-VALUE: Consider the value you have for yourself as a free person with the ability to think for yourself. Next, consider the value you received from this production. Then consider the money value you'd place on that value and consider returning that value in the form of a donation to this production. You can decide for yourself what amount feels right for you. You don't need a PayPal account, just the generosity and will to support something you value and believe in. It all helps. This work is enjoyable but not easy, it takes time and costs money. Your support is needed and highly appreciated.https://paypal.me/frankenbones?locale.x=en_USBitCoinCash BCH: qzgwfjeu5vp634h84zzurw8kdah5j3cuxg8daq6qrk. Venmo: @Dean-Reiner-1Follow me on them Twitters: @upisdownpodcastEmail me at upisdownpodcast@gmail.comYou will never find me on Youtube, they'd shut me down instantly, and it's only a matter of time before the podcast platform and hosting services become as compromised as the mainstream media. I will never accept sponsorships that require me to try and sell you bullshit products you not only don't need, but likely cannot afford anyway. I believe that Value-For-Value is indeed the future of free speech and expression, as anything else has already proved itself to be more than compromised at all levels; you can actually just sit back and watch monetized platforms disintegrate each and every day. That cannot happen with Value-For-Value, because only YOU decide what's valuable and only YOU decide how that is determined and returned. Now that's power!Of course you can always listen (and donate) at:deanreiner.comS U B S C R I B ED O N A T ED O W N L O A DR E P O S TS H A R EC O M M E N TS U P P O R TS U P P O R TS U P P O R TR A T E / R E V I E WE M A I L upisdownpodcast@gmail.comdeanreiner.com for more arthttps://paypal.me/frankenbones?locale.x=en_UST H A N K Y O U F O R L I S T E N I N GThis podcast contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. It is being made available in an effort to advance the understanding of society, economics and social engineering. It is believed that this constitutes a ‘fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and education purposes.

The Jaipur Dialogues
End of Islam in 21st Century? | End of Islam

The Jaipur Dialogues

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 68:24


While some were talking about 'End of Hinduism', the two ex-Muslims Sachwala and Azad contend that while Hinduism is safe, it will be difficult for Islam to survive the 21st century because Islam has survived through the 1400 years by suppressing a critical examination of its basics. In this talk with Sanjay Dixit, they argue that Islam cannot withstand the light of knowledge. As a philosophy that focuses on afterlife, it has nothing to do with economics.

That's So Hindu
The humanities keeps talking about Hindus without including our voices | Dr. Indu Viswanathan

That's So Hindu

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 52:16


In this episode Suhag Shukla speaks with Dr. Indu Viswanathan. Viswanathan has worked in education for more than two decades as a teacher, curriculum developer, teacher educator, and non-profit research director. They talk about the conference on Hinduphobia she helped organize at Rutgers University, the problems with controversial upcoming Dismantling Global Hindutva conference, and how Hindu practices and Hindus continue to be misunderstood by Western academia and researchers. Indu Viswanathan on Twitter

Core Christianity
Can Christians Kill in Self-Defense?

Core Christianity

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 25:01


Episode 780 | Adriel Sanchez and Bill Maier answer caller questions. Show Notes CoreChristianity.com Questions in this Episode 1. When we stand before the Lord at the judgment, will all of our iniquities and sin be broadcast for all to see? 2. We hear that currently in Afghanistan, Christians could possibly be killed. My question is: In such a situation, what is the Biblical view of attempting to defend oneself? Is it a sin to kill people who are trying to kill you? 3. People seem to be afraid about being in “the last days.” Are there any passages you recommend us looking at? 4. There are a lot of different religions in the world. From Judaism, Hinduism, Jehovah's Witness, etc. Because these religions do not recognize Jesus as the Son of God, does that mean their adherents will not be in heaven? 5. In Romans 6, it says that Christians are supposed to be “dead to sin.” But I still struggle with habitual sins that I have not been able to completely leave behind. This makes me doubt the assurance of my salvation and wonder if I really am saved. Today's Offer How Do We Know That Christianity is Really True? by Chris Morphew Request our latest special offers here or call 1-833-THE-CORE (833-843-2673) to request them by phone. Want to partner with us in our work here at Core Christianity? Consider becoming a member of the Inner Core. Resources GALATIANS BIBLE STUDY

Live Vedanta
Joy of the Spirit

Live Vedanta

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 19:10


What prevents us from going deeper into meditation? How do we reach the state of full absorption? Vivekji, in this next episode of the Meditation in Life series, magnifies the methods to get us closer to the joy of the Spirit.Want to catch up on the first year of Meditation in Life? Start here.For those on the journey of self-development, Chinmaya Mission Niagara provides a community forum to listen, reflect, and contemplate. This podcast is produced by young adults of Chinmaya Mission, an international non-profit organization working to transform individuals through the knowledge of Vedanta.

mike media inc
Pvndorv joins to discuss Ted Kazynski, hinduism, Slim, performances, and more on HASSDISCUSSES 123

mike media inc

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 55:13


https://soundcloud.com/pvn6orv  https://music.apple.com/us/artist/1564135395  Support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/mikemediainc For awesome old and new audio books join audible. Click this link and get a 1 month free trial of audible!!!!!!!!!!!!! https://www.audible.com/ep/creator?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R Use site123 for website and join using this link right here to support the channel! https://www.site123.com/?aff=4413186 If you wanna make the move into spending money digitally, use cashapp! You can send and receive money with the app and invest in stocks and bitcoin. Try using my code and you'll get $5. VZPMWHJ Click the link and you will support the channel and be able to digitally spend and receive money! https://cash.app/app/VZPMWHJ Merch: https://teespring.com/stores/mike-hass-merch Linktree: https://linktr.ee/mikemediainc Official Mike Hass Website: mikemediainc.xyz Support the channel through donations! Here is the donation Link for Paypal: https://www.paypal.me/michaelhassiepen1 Venmo: https://venmo.com/mikehass0845 Cashapp me @ : $Moneyman0845 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mikemediainc/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mikemediainc/support

The Jaipur Dialogues
Can Islam cause the End of Hinduism

The Jaipur Dialogues

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 56:36


The provocative 'End of Hinduism' podcast of Abhijit Iyer Mitra was challenged by Sanjay Dixit. Last Saturday, we saw the premise of Christian style capture of Hinduism discussed. Today, they discuss the Islamic premise. Which model does AIM consider most potent - Arabic, Turkic, or Afghan?

The Quarantine Tapes
The Quarantine Tapes: Quotation Shorts - Rabindranath Tagore

The Quarantine Tapes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 0:25


Today's Quotation is care of Rabindranath Tagore.Listen in!Subscribe to the Quarantine Tapes at quarantinetapes.com or search for the Quarantine Tapes on your favorite podcast app! Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941) was the youngest son of Debendranath Tagore, a leader of the Brahmo Samaj, which was a new religious sect in nineteenth-century Bengal and which attempted a revival of the ultimate monistic basis of Hinduism as laid down in the Upanishads. He was educated at home; and although at seventeen he was sent to England for formal schooling, he did not finish his studies there. In his mature years, in addition to his many-sided literary activities, he managed the family estates, a project which brought him into close touch with common humanity and increased his interest in social reforms. He also started an experimental school at Shantiniketan where he tried his Upanishadic ideals of education. From time to time he participated in the Indian nationalist movement, though in his own non-sentimental and visionary way; and Gandhi, the political father of modern India, was his devoted friend. Tagore was knighted by the ruling British Government in 1915, but within a few years he resigned the honour as a protest against British policies in India.Tagore had early success as a writer in his native Bengal. With his translations of some of his poems he became rapidly known in the West. In fact his fame attained a luminous height, taking him across continents on lecture tours and tours of friendship. For the world he became the voice of India's spiritual heritage; and for India, especially for Bengal, he became a great living institution.Although Tagore wrote successfully in all literary genres, he was first of all a poet. Among his fifty and odd volumes of poetry are Manasi (1890) [The Ideal One], Sonar Tari (1894) [The Golden Boat], Gitanjali (1910) [Song Offerings], Gitimalya (1914) [Wreath of Songs], and  Balaka(1916) [The Flight of Cranes]. The English renderings of his poetry, which include The Gardener(1913), Fruit-Gathering (1916), and The Fugitive (1921), do not generally correspond to particular volumes in the original Bengali; and in spite of its title, Gitanjali: Song Offerings (1912), the most acclaimed of them, contains poems from other works besides its namesake. Tagore's major plays are  Raja (1910) [The King of the Dark Chamber],  Dakghar (1912) [The Post Office],  Achalayatan(1912) [The Immovable], Muktadhara (1922) [The Waterfall], and Raktakaravi (1926) [Red Oleanders]. He is the author of several volumes of short stories and a number of novels, among them Gora (1910),  Ghare-Baire (1916) [The Home and the World], and  Yogayog (1929) [Crosscurrents]. Besides these, he wrote musical dramas, dance dramas, essays of all types, travel diaries, and two autobiographies, one in his middle years and the other shortly before his death in 1941. Tagore also left numerous drawings and paintings, and songs for which he wrote the music himself.From https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/literature/1913/tagore/biographical/. For more information about Rabindranath Tagore:“From the Archive: Rabindranath Tagore”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/articles/69232/from-the-archive-rabindranath-tagore“Poetry and Reason: Why Rabindranath Tagore Still Matters":https://newrepublic.com/article/89649/rabindranath-tagore

Weekly Sanga
Śrīmad-Bhāgavatam Canto 10 Chapter 13 Text 35 – August 22, 2021

Weekly Sanga

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 68:25


Śrīmad-Bhāgavatam Canto 10 Chapter 13 Text 35 vrajasya rāmaḥ premardher vīkṣyautkaṇṭhyam anukṣaṇam mukta-staneṣv apatyeṣv apy ahetu-vid acintayat   TRANSLATION Because of an increase of affection, the cows had constant attachment even to those calves that were grown up and had stopped sucking milk from their mothers. When Baladeva saw this attachment, He was unable to...

Six Unseemly Questions
What's The Best Religion?

Six Unseemly Questions

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 20:28


Host Victor Varnado asked comedian Taj Osorio what the best religion is. He replied with Hinduism, and sidekick Dave Rosinsky made an unrelated movie reference.Produced by: Rachel Teichman & Rebecca Trent@Sixunseemly#6UQ #SixUnseemlyQuestionshttps://www.facebook.com/sixunseemlyhttps://www.instagram.com/sixunseemly/https://twitter.com/SixUnseemlyhttps://www.instagram.com/tajosorio/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast
0636 - TALKS: On Nisargadatta Maharaj, XI

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021


Episode 0636 - On Nisargadatta Maharaj, XI (Click on the above link, or here, for audio.) Introduction to the life & teachings of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj, based onreminiscences of disciple & author, David Godman and 200 direct quotations. Passages #50 - 55. Comments on Nisargadatta's personal path, students & devotees, core teaching & dialogues. Additional references from Pali Buddha-Dhamma,

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast
0635 - TALKS: Reading Chuang Tzu, XXIV

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021


Episode 0635 - Reading Chuang Tzu, XXIV (Click on the above link, or here, for audio.) Final reading & discussion of Chuang Tzu, chapter 4 ("In the World of Men"), translated by Burton Watson. Core Taoist teachings: wu-wei (non-interference) & the sage; essential life-values; conventional assumptions vs. non-dual reality; fate, destiny & making harmony with all. Related teachings from the Ra

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast
0634 - TALKS: On Nisargadatta Maharaj, X

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021


Episode 0634 - On Nisargadatta Maharaj, X (Click on the above link, or here, for audio.)Introduction to the life & teachings of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj, based on reminiscences of disciple & author, David Godman (pages 6-7) and 200 direct quotations. Comments on Nisargadatta's personal path, students & devotees, core teaching & dialogues. Additional references from Pali Buddha-Dhamma, Bhagawan

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast
0633 - TALKS: Reading Chuang Tzu, XXIII

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021


Episode 0633 - Reading Chuang Tzu, XXIII (Click on the above link, or here, for audio.)Final reading & discussion of Chuang Tzu, chapters 2 ("Discussion on Making All Things Equal") and 3 ("The Secret of Caring for Life"), translated by Burton Watson. Core Taoist teachings: wu-wei (non-interference) & the sage; essential life-values; conventional assumptions vs. non-dual reality; fate, destiny &

Soul Nectar Show
Question Everything with Dr. Vic Manzo Jr.

Soul Nectar Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 49:48


Growing up in a Roman Catholic Italian household, Dr. Vic Manzo Jr. was not allowed to question anything. Yet the things he was being taught did not settle in his stomach. So when he left home at 19 years old, he began studying other religions, and what he learned from Buddhism and Hinduism opened his […]