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Place of refuge for animals

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  • May 15, 2022LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about Nest

Doctor Who: Radio Free Skaro
Radio Free Skaro #852 - Happy Times and Places

Doctor Who: Radio Free Skaro

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 111:01


BREAKING NEWS KLAXON! Everything old is new again as only a week after the introduction of Ncuti Gatwa as the new Doctor, the BBC and Russell T Davies have announced the return of David Tennant and Catherine Tate to the show in a series of specials that…could be pretty much anything, given Mr. Davies' proclivity for mystery. What are the Three Who Rule's take on this stunner of an update? You can probably guess from our previous rantings and/or praise, but tune in anyway! All of this is not to overshadow a corker of an interview with Who expert, actor, podcaster and Friend Of The Show Toby Hadoke, along with news of tat, annuals, Big Finish goings-on, and the Timelash! So please, if you will, Allons-y! Links: Support Radio Free Skaro on Patreon The Timelash Whittaker's finale to air in October, will be 90 minutes James Cooray Smith writes about Ncuti Gatwa as The Doctor Moffat talks Gatwa McCoy & Capaldi congratulate Gatwa, Gatwa replies to McCoy Big Finish War Doctor Begins: Battlegrounds released Big Finish Doctor Who Unbound: Doctor of War – Destiny due September 2022 Hornet's Nest signed vinyl collection available Legend of the Sea Devils script available at the BBC Writer's Room site Nothing at the End of the Lane breakdown on Shada Unofficial 1988 Annual due this month Interview: Toby Hadoke Toby's Hadoke's Podcasts

MDR SACHSEN Krümel-Geschichten
Wer hat die Silberkanne geklaut? - neue Krümelgeschichte

MDR SACHSEN Krümel-Geschichten

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 12:53


Grünäuglein und Willi haben die Elstern im Verdacht, die erst vor kurzem ihr Nest im Hasenwald gebaut haben. Schließlich gelten Elstern als diebisch, aber stimmt das überhaupt?

The Totally Football Show with James Richardson

Jimbo, Duncan Alexander, Tom Williams and Natalie Gedra bring you a slightly later pod than usual after Thursday night's pivotal North London derby. Have Spurs now seized the momentum in the battle for Champions League football? And given their streakiness and the collective age of the players and the coach, is it a wonder Arsenal are even in this top 4 race? Man City look imperious in their march towards the title, thanks to Kevin De Bruyne. Fantastic player, frustrating interviewee. Erling Haaland will be arriving in the summer. But could he be another Ibra or Lukaku? It's the FA Cup final on Saturday. Will it be another in the long line of enthralling Chelsea Liverpool contests this season? Plus the panel lament the lack of football wackiness, Ajax's coach hiring process and the curious case of Lyon's Marcelo. RUNNING ORDER:  • PART 1: Spurs 3-0 Arsenal (03m 00s) • PART 2: Wolves 1-5 Man City and the signing of Erling Haaland (21m 00s)  • PART 3: FA Cup final preview (36m 00s) • PART 4: The rest of the Premier League weekend (45m 00s) SIGN UP TO THE ATHLETIC TODAY FOR £1 A MONTH FOR THE FIRST 6 MONTHS • theathletic.com/totally   GET IN TOUCH: • follow us on Instagram • find us on Facebook • send us a tweet: @TheTotallyShow   READ STUFF ON OUR WEBSITE: • check out thetotallyfootballshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Don't Get Lost in the Laundry
Episode #106 Reset Your Nest with Jen Martin

Don't Get Lost in the Laundry

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 29:06


Jen Martin founded Reset Your Nest, a luxury home organization business, in 2020 right at the onset of Covid-19. In two years she went from hustling on her own to sending out multiple teams of trained organizers each day to transform clients' homes. She has helped hundreds of clients find calm in the chaos. She now has over 30 women who work for her and is expanding to multiple new locations in 2022. Reset Your Nest is known for its distinct aesthetic and curated systems that are created for each client.Click the link to learn more: Professional Home Organizer in Utah | Decorating, Organization and Styling (resetyournest.com)

Plant Girl Magic
5. Chef Lisa Brooks Pt. 2: Social Media Haters, Black Women in the Culinary Industry, and Competing on the Food Network

Plant Girl Magic

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 80:17


We are BACK with Part 2 of my wine down session with Chef Lisa Brooks! In this episode, we talk about content creation, social media haters, what it was like to compete on Chopped, her biggest cooking motto, and why she's so passionate about working with Black women If you want to become a personal chef, check out Chef Lisa's free training on how to make six figures in the first year of business! Listen to Part 1 with Chef Lisa Connect with Chef Lisa Brooks! TikTok Instagram Website In this episode: Why I struggled to ask Chef Lisa to assist me in the Charlotte SHOUT! Festival The behind-the-scenes tea of the competition I never told Chef Lisa… until now Vegan does NOT mean skinny or even healthy lol Chef Lisa's core value of “The Joy of the Feast” and what that means to her Whether Chef Lisa feels restricted by dietary restrictions at dinner parties or events The ups and downs of content creation on different platforms How we deal with mean comments on social media How we really feel about social media influencers Whether content creating actually pays off Chef Lisa's experience and strategy on Chopped on Food Network and whether she'd do another cooking competition in the future Why Chef Lisa is so passionate about hiring and mentoring Black women in the culinary industry Welcome to Plant Girl Magic! I'm Chef Joya, a celebrity vegan chef known for making the vegan versions of your favorite soul food and afro-caribbean dishes so good they rival the originals. On this podcast, I'm sharing the stories behind the magic, from my own vegan journey and celebrity stories, to topics I care deeply about like food injustice, family, and life as an influencer. If you have a topic you want me to cover on the podcast, please send me a DM on Instagram @cookingwithjoya. The Plant Girl Magic theme music is produced by my brother, Y'oMusic. Connect with Chef Joya! Instagram TikTok YouTube Facebook Website Chef Joya's Nest

Hey Human Podcast
Dedrick Warmack: Chicago’s Son Also Rises

Hey Human Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 65:41


E311 Dedrick Wormack grew up in Chicago, a kid with great potential: smart, savvy, and godly. Navigating the bonds of family, corruption, gang life, church, and tragedy, he watched as the determined and deliberate destruction of the neighborhoods he loved through the open-air drug markets. Now, he's an author (Unrest in an Eagle's Nest), social […]

The Karen Kenney Show
Resisting A Rest

The Karen Kenney Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 46:40


It can feel challenging sometimes, especially if you were raised as a “blue collar kid” to take time to rest even when it's needed. But the push back against resting is really just an old pattern of societal pressure and subconscious programming, that we can not only let go of, but we can replace with a more helpful way of thinking. Today on The Karen Kenney Show, we're talking about how the brain loves to keep us “safe” by keeping us in what is familiar. When we start to move into areas that are outside of our known comfort zone, like slowing down and taking a break - our brain can go into the “Danger Will Robinson” panic mode. Knowing this, we sometimes need to give each other and ourselves a permission slip to let go and stop resisting the rest our body needs. Call it a sick day, a day of Sabbath or a sabbatical - sometimes it's just what the doctor ordered. The truth is just because we could keep going and doing, doesn't mean we should. Just because we can, doesn't mean it makes a whole lot of sense to do it. As a Generator (in my Human Design) I can do a lot of things. But it doesn't mean that it's what's best for me, the other people, the program, the product, or the project I'm working on to do that. So, I'm going to let you in on a little secret; take it from a “blue collar kid” who was taught to bust her ass and knows how to work really hard… It's okay to take a rest and doing so is not a weakness. Stop resisting a rest when you need it and you'll probably find that you're even more present, positive and productive in the end as a result. KK's Takeaways: I Suck At Being Sick (4:08) We Were Ingrained (9:19) Subconscious Reprogramming Tool (13:15) No Such Thing As Multitasking(16:49) My Own Theory (19:15) We Fall Apart (25:56) False God Of Busyness (28:52) Enough Is Enough (31:49) When We Get Still (35:29) Present Moment (41:45) Karen Kenney is a certified https://www.karenkenney.com/spiritual-mentoring (Spiritual Mentor), Certified Hypnotist, writer, speaker, and the host of https://www.karenkenney.com/podcast (The Karen Kenney Show Podcast). She's also the founder of https://www.karenkenney.com/nest (THE NEST) - an online spiritual membership & community. She's been a student & guide of A Course in Miracles for close to three decades, a certified yoga teacher for 20+ years and is a longtime practitioner of Passage Meditation. She's also a Gateless Writing Instructor and transformational retreat leader. KK grew up in Lawrence & Boston, MA, and graduated from Boston University with a degree in Communications. She's known for her storytelling, her sense of humor and her “down-to-earth”, no BS approach to Spirituality. She helps people to rewrite their old stories, shift their perception from fear to Love, and deepen their connection to Self, Source & Spirit. Using her signature process - Your Story to Your Glory™ - people learn how to transform themselves and their lives from the inside out, so they can feel empowered, play a proactive part in their own healing, and experience more fun, flow, and freedom! A sought-after speaker, spiritual teacher, and thought leader for podcasts, shows, live events, group retreats and entrepreneurial mastermind programs, Karen has been invited to speak & teach on various platforms, stages & retreat centers across the country, including leading four week-long workshops at the https://www.eomega.org/workshops/teachers/karen-kenney (Omega Institute for Holistic Studies). You can learn more & connect with KK at:http://www.karenkenney.com/ ( www.karenkenney.com) Thank you so much for listening! If you're digging the show, I'd be wicked grateful if you would go to Apple Podcasts, hit Follow and then leave a star rating & review. If something I shared from my heart today somehow landed in yours, I'd love to hear about it. So please tag me on Facebook or Instagram and let me know what your favorite part was or what you found most...

Crews Control
94: Eagle's Nest with Gregory Heinz (Andy Bridges)

Crews Control

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 56:48


Grant eats a sand-sandwich-wich and remembers his sister Susan, you know, from CERN, Leo may be behind the death of a famous dancer and takes part in yet another experimental test, and Dorsch is at the Derby! Joining the Crew this week is deli meat master, Gregory Heinz, no, not Gregory Hines (Andy Bridges). Gregory and the present crew chat about gimmicky rideshare options, updated food pyramids, and if it's possible to make Ronda Rousey smile. Questions, comments, or the desire to chat? You can reach the crew at Crewscontrolpodcast@gmail.comWe're mostly on Instagram @crewscontrolpodcastFind us on slightly on Twitter @PodCrewsControlCheck out our woefully undermanaged TikTok @crewscontrolpodcastIf you like the show, help us grow! Rate, review, and subscribe on Apple Podcasts and Dorsch will bake you an authentic Moosekrainian cake!Cover art by Dave BenderTheme composed by Steve SarroSound design and editing by Mike Crockett of Crackpot Podcast Production.A part of the Asylum Podcast Network.(We can't promise that Dorsch won't eat your authentic Moosekrainian cake)

From the Crows' Nest
Sustaining EMS Superiority

From the Crows' Nest

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 48:00


The Association of Old Crows (AOC) wants to make our podcasts the best they can be. To help us succeed, we'd like to hear your thoughts. Please take just a few minutes to complete our 2022 listener survey, because your opinion is very important to us. Thank you!In this episode, host Ken Miller sits down with Col. William “Dollar” Young, Commander of the USAF 350th Spectrum Warfare Wing to discuss how the Air Force is addressing the challenges of achieving and sustaining EMS Superiority. Ken and Dollar talked at the AOC Dixie Crow Symposium 2022 in March in Warner Robins, GA.Let us know what you think of From the Crows' Nest! The Association of Old Crows wants our podcasts to serve you, our audience, in the best ways possible. Please take just a moment to rate us or comment wherever you down our podcast.Thank you!

The Georgia Songbirds
Dustin Chapman & Ryleigh Madison Live from the Digital Bird's Nest

The Georgia Songbirds

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 75:50


Let's welcome this weeks guests Dustin Chapman and his niece 16 year old Ryleigh Madison. Ryleigh was recently on this season's American Idol and Dustin was on last season's. They came on the show and we talked about everything from chapstick, Loretta Lynn and Patsy Cline, American Idol and more we even listened to a few of their songs. So pull up a seat and listen to this weeks episode. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thegeorgiasongbirds/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thegeorgiasongbirds/support

Interview Plus
Pavla Gomba: Dřív se na humanitární pracovníky nestřílelo. Na Ukrajině jsou terčem

Interview Plus

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 25:52


Na Ukrajině už od roku 2014 poskytuje humanitární pomoc Dětský fond Organizace spojených národů (UNICEF). Ve spolupráci s Červeným křížem se podílel i na evakuaci lidí, rodin a dětí z Mariupolu a zdejší ocelárny Azovstal. „Podařilo se zachránit čtyřicet dětí, zajistili jsme vodu, zdravotní péči, výživu i psychologické poradenství. Ale dětí jsou tam desítky tisíc a otázka je, kdy se k nim dostane pomoc,“ popisuje Pavla Gomba, výkonná ředitelka české pobočky UNICEF.Všechny díly podcastu Interview Plus můžete pohodlně poslouchat v mobilní aplikaci mujRozhlas pro Android a iOS nebo na webu mujRozhlas.cz.

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20 Product: iPhone Creator, Tony Fadell on Marketing Lessons Learned from Steve Jobs, What is Truly Great Product Marketing, How The Best Product Teams Do Post-Mortems and Product Reviews & Is Product Art or Science, Data or Gut?

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 53:53


Tony Fadell, often referred to as the father of the iPod is one of the leading product thinkers of the last 30 years as one of the makers of some of the most game-changing products in society from the iPhone and iPod to more recently founding Nest, creating the Nest Thermostat, leading to their $3.2BN acquisition by Google. Tony recently released Build, this is a masterclass taking 30 years of product and company building lessons and packaging them for you, check it out here. In Today's Episode with Tony Fadell: 1.) Everything Great Starts Small: How did Tony make his way into the world of product in the early days? What were his biggest takeaways from the massive flop of General Magic? How did Tony come to Apple and what were the early creation days of iPod and iPhone? 2.) Data and Brand: Does Tony believe great product building is art or science? When should teams listen to their gut vs the data? When was a time that Tony listened to his gut? When was a time Tony listened to the data? How did each situation evolve and turn out? How does Tony think about creating a truly special first mile experience? Where do so many companies go wrong in the first mile today? How does Tony balance between business decisions (COGs etc) and product decisions that will delight customers? 3.) Lessons from Steve Jobs on Product Marketing: How does Tony define great product management? Why do so many people get it wrong? What are Tony's biggest lessons from working with Steve Jobs on what makes great product marketing? Where does Tony see so many companies make the biggest mistakes when it comes to messaging? What is the difference between messaging, marketing and communications? 4.) Hiring Product Teams: What are the clearest signals of the best product talent when interviewing them? What questions does Tony always ask product people to determine quality? How do great product teams remain upbeat when launches fail and remain modest when they are wildly successful? 5.) Apple Watch, iPod and Apple HiFi: Why was the product messaging for the Apple Watch wrong in the early days? How did it change? Why was the iPod a bad business until the 3rd Generation? What changed? Why did the Apple HiFi fail? How did that impact Tony's mindset? Mentioned in Today's Episode with Tony Fadell: Tony's Favourite Book: Only the Paranoid Survive

Christian Science | Daily Lift
When I stepped on a wasps' nest…

Christian Science | Daily Lift

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022


Linda Berckmann, from Windsor, California, USA

Moms Meet World
Moms Meet The Pursuit of Happi-Nest, Helping Offspring Steer Clear of Pornography, and More

Moms Meet World

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 14:03


In which we learn about pursuing happi-nests and a second book in current production (about helping children steer away from inappropriate media) and I ask a singing question "What's It All About Alfie?"

Best to the Nest with Margery & Elizabeth
EP. 299 Best to the Nest: The Survey Says...

Best to the Nest with Margery & Elizabeth

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 48:21


Motherly just released its State of Motherhood annual survey. It's not surprising women with ch ildren struggled during the pandemic. The biggest issue? Childcare. Yup, we're talking about it. Read about it in Forbes. Best to the Nest is our podcast all about creating strong, comfortable, beautiful nests that prepare us to fly.

Decorate Like a Design Boss
50. Sustainability and Stone with Heather Bernstein

Decorate Like a Design Boss

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 56:42


Kimberly Grigg welcomes Heather Bernstein of HKB Interior Design out of San Francisco to the show. Kimberly and Heather discuss sustainability in design elements, shifting away from stark white in color palettes, and Heather's love of using stone in design. Heather shares ideas for how versatile stone can be throughout the home.   Heather Bernstein grew up with design as second nature, surrounded by her designer mother's work and influence. After graduation she taught English in Thailand for 14 months and came home to work in real estate before spending time in the corporate world. Design proved to be her calling, however, and after working with a business partner on a co-owned design firm, she branched out on her own with HKB Interior Design just over two years ago. Heather describes her aesthetic as very different from her mother's but with the use of antiques and sustainability always at the core.   Kimberly's use of color is well known but Heather prefers a more neutral palette and they discuss how when working with neutrals, texture becomes your color. Heather has been working away from stark white recently, embracing warmer tones, and she has a vast knowledge of and love for stone in her designs. Kimberly learns the best sealant Heather recommends for stonework to avoid patina. And Heather shares some inspired design ideas from her own new home, stone elements beyond countertops, and insight from her years of experience with thinking outside the box to create a beautiful vibe. Resources discussed in this episode: HKB Interior Design HKB Interior Design Instagram Quartz and Quartzite Caesarstone MORE AntiEtch   About Heather Bernstein:   Heather Bernstein, owner of HKB Interior Design, is a master interior designer with over a decade of experience in the industry. Heather's bubbly yet professional personality leaves its mark on every home she touches with her personalized, warm approach to interiors. Heather's love for beautiful spaces originated from her time spent absorbing her mother's skill in interior design and running her independent firm. After graduating college, Heather moved to Thailand to teach English which expanded her senses and empathy for other cultures that commonly shows in her designs. Soon after, Heather accepted a corporate position for a Fortune 500 leading specialty retailer of high-quality products. This experience not only enhances her passion for design but can also be attributed to her well-rounded creativity and organizational skills that now come as second nature. When Heather isn't working with clients, you will find her chasing around her two boys and golden retriever. Heather continues to embrace travel as a necessary pleasure, is constantly seeking out the best sushi on the market, and is frequently socializing in her community, enjoying laughs over a good glass of wine. --    Contact Me: Email me at kimberly@kimberlygriggdesigns.com Visit my website: www.kimberlygriggdesigns.com Follow me on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest Check out my Youtube channel You can find the show on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and Spotify.   Transcription Heather Bernstein  00:00 Yeah, and you just said, the, I think, the biggest thing - you said, clients get afraid. So this, I think, is the biggest thing you can do in design. If you really want to elevate your space, be afraid, have a touch of fear that it's too bold or too much. And go for it.   Kimberly Grigg  00:23 Welcome to Decorate Like A Design Boss, a podcast for design lovers who want to create beautiful spaces in their very own homes. My name is Kimberly Grigg. And I'm a professional interior designer who teaches design lovers like yourselves how to decorate. And when I say decorate, I mean decorate like a design boss. If you're ready to create a space that your family loves, and your neighbors can't stop raving about, well, buckle up honey, because it's time to design. So hello there design lovers and enthusiasts, thank you as always for being here. And I'm so excited to be bringing you this episode. In fact, I've been talking to my guest ahead of time, and I just learned something that I didn't know about marble. And I'm going to be sharing that with you, as is Heather, and I can't wait. So today's guest is Heather Bernstein of HKB Designs. They're out of San Francisco. And we're going to talk a lot about sustainable design, interior design, and specifically about how to incorporate natural stone into your home and designs and, more importantly, how to take care of it. So welcome Heather Bernstein, glad to have you here.   Heather Bernstein  01:48 Thank you. I'm glad to be here.   Kimberly Grigg  01:50 Thank you. So I know you've been home battling COVID. Sorry to hear that. And I hope it wasn't horrible. But we forgive you in advance if your throat gets scratchy or whatever. Because, like, that is no joke. I haven't had COVID yet, but seems like everyone I know has, including my children and all that stuff, and I know it's no picnic.   Heather Bernstein  02:14 Rough nights, for sure.   Kimberly Grigg  02:16 I'm sure. So you're in the Bay Area, as is my number five child. I have six children and number five moved to San Francisco. And I've been out quite a few times, and oh my gosh, what a beautiful area architecturally. Like, wow. I can't even imagine what it's like to actually get to design there. Because the architecture is on fire.   Heather Bernstein  02:41 It's amazing. I think the best part about it is that no two projects are the same there. You have sprawling ranchers, you have Victorians that are straight up and down, you have every different kind of home, which is amazing. And especially in Marin, where we are, we're in the mountains. And so all the homes are so different based on where they are in the land. If they're on a hill, it's, you know, they're on stilts, and if there happened to be in the flats, then you know, they build for that.   Kimberly Grigg  03:19 Yeah, I actually was in Marin, and beautiful area and intriguing. So do you do different aesthetic styles? Or do you kind of focus on one?   Heather Bernstein  03:32 I would say we stay true to who we are. Meaning, we don't like to do anything that doesn't speak to our brand and what we're about and what we love. But we definitely can span from traditional to contemporary and everything in between, depending on what the client wants in the style of the home. I will say, though, our favorite thing is to take a very traditional home. We just did one of the classic Victorians on Steiner Street in San Francisco where 'Full House' was filmed. And we did a very contemporary interior, which was really, really fun to juxtapose against the classic kind of all the wood paneling. And it was just unexpected. And everybody that walks in there is surprised and it's fun and exciting.   Kimberly Grigg  04:29 How cool. So how'd you make your way into the design space? Because I think you have a corporate background, right?   Heather Bernstein  04:36 Yes. So I grew up actually here in the East Bay, so in the Bay Area but just through the Caldecott Tunnel, in a little town called Alamo, and my mom was a designer all growing up. So for 35 years, it's all I knew. We - and she, when she started out, she did all of her own sewing, all of her own upholstery, she made every window treatment, every roman shade out of our dining room. And I remember being in middle school or even elementary and most kids have to take their shoes off when they go in the house, we had to leave ours on because there was always pins and needles on the floor. And so I just, I grew up with it, and then, I guess it was about junior or senior year, my mom would start - by the time I think I was in college, like I'd gotten into school, so it must have been senior year - she would pull me out of school and say, 'Hey, let's go to the Design Center. You can come help me for the day'. And I just thought it was magical, and getting to shop and put things together for people to make their spaces something that they loved, was really just magical. So then I went to school, I went to Boulder. I graduated, I moved to Thailand for about 14 months, I taught English to high schoolers there, I just wanted to get out and experience something different. And travel, which I did, I spent a month in India, and really just - and that was after my junior year abroad in Italy - so I really tried to, like, just see different places in the world. And then I came back and I got my real estate license. And I was selling apartments downtown south of Market in San Francisco, where it was completely undeveloped, and it was like a ghost town. And now it's the sprawling amazing gentrified neighborhood, which is incredible. But real estate was not for me, I called one of my dear friends who worked at William Sonoma corporate and I said 'I need a job'. And she said, 'Great, come be an assistant, my assistant buyer'. And so I did. And I was there for five or six years, climbed up the ladder to a senior buyer, which was really, really fun and exciting. I for sure drink the Kool Aid for the first three years. And then I started to become a little disillusioned and the world was faltering as, you know, we neared 2008. And then I was laid off and I remember crying the night before they were gonna announce layoffs thinking, this is my chance, if I don't get laid off I don't know if I'll be brave enough to start my design business. And so I wanted to be laid off, which was very counterintuitive, because the world was ending. But I was laid off, with 700 others, and that was in January. And by March, I had started our S corp and I had a business partner, we joined forces and said, 'Let's do this together'. We were both going to start our own businesses, and we just said that's silly. And so I started Nest about 15 years ago. And we worked alongside each other for 12 great years. And then when COVID hit, it just kind of felt like things were changing in my life. I had been through a divorce and met a wonderful man. We joined our families and had a Brady Bunch. And I was really just, like, cleaning house and making sure that everyone around me... and it was it was a positive experience every day. And I wanted to feel that in my work and create that space, and so we both went out on our own, and that's when I started HKB. And it's been about two, two and a half years. And I have one of my oldest employees, who has been with me for 10 years. And then we have an assistant buyer who is amazing. She came from the corporate event space and when COVID hit she she jumped ship and came on to try this whole new world and she loves it, and we love having her, so it's been really positive.   Kimberly Grigg  09:08 Sounds like things just kind of lined up. Which always tells me that you're in the right space. And based on your website, you're definitely definitely in the right space. So I got to know, is your aesthetic similar to your mother's?   Heather Bernstein  09:26 No. Definitely not. She was like the consummate traditionalist with the fringe and the Sweet Pea wallpaper and the Laura Ashley and very froofy, and so, no, I actually went the opposite. And my old business partner was very traditional, and I just, I think I ran from that and became very contemporary. Anything clean lined, even mid century, modern, I was more drawn to. But now I'm starting to have this appreciation, I don't know if it's getting older, or just learning that having pieces that are from family from, you know, 100 years ago is really special. So I think I'm definitely being able to merge my style. And we just built a house for the past year, my partner and I, to fit all six of us. And it's been such a labor of love. And it will be photographed, hopefully, in the next couple of months once we get our final furniture pieces. But it definitely has a combo of very clean lines, but also some traditional pieces thrown in.   Kimberly Grigg  10:55 Sure. And I think that, I'm sure you're experiencing supply chain issues as most of us are, and, you know, my original aesthetic incorporated antiques and older pieces really juxtaposed with modern, and it was always my favorite style. But as I got busier and busier, it was just easier to order than to go antiquing on the weekends, or go antiquing, and just, like, be looking for these pieces. And I... my aesthetic sort of shifted because I was doing so many installations every single week, I didn't have time or energy, except to get it ordered. And I had assistance for all of that. So that's kind of my business in those middle years became all about ordering, tracking, ordering, tracking, ordering tracking. But, now with all of this supply chain, I'm back to my roots, I feel like Kunta Kinte. Like, let's start with that antique, baby. Let's get rid of some of those antiques that are leftover in the warehouse. Let's repurpose, let's rethink, let's re-upholster, let's do all of these things, because I don't have the patience for 28 months for upholster to arrive. And I know my clients don't have that kind of patience, either. So I think that necessity is the mother of invention. And I know that on your site, you do talk a lot about sustainability. And I think that's a, sounds like maybe a really big part of your brand. So talk to me a little bit about sustainability, why it's important to you, and how you incorporate sustainability into your designs.   Heather Bernstein  12:38 Yeah, I think just living in the Bay Area, it's kind of been hammered into us for our whole lives. You know, like, we recycled before recycling was even a thing, I think. And so it really allows you to design consciously and with thought and care. And antiques are such a beautiful part of that because there's only one, and it's available, like you said - I'm not, you know, we just got a quote for a client and it said 36 weeks, and I was trying to even calculate that in my head-   Kimberly Grigg  13:17 - it doesn't sound that big. But when you're calculating 36 weeks, you're like, whoa!   Heather Bernstein  13:24 Yeah, the client was like 'is that a joke?' Yeah, I could make that in 36 weeks.   Kimberly Grigg  13:29 Right? Exactly.   Heather Bernstein  13:31 And so, I think, really incorporating pieces that are already out there, that don't take any footprint to make, and to just infuse them in our designs is really special, and also conscious for the environment. So I think it's important to think that way and to infuse that in your design, and really be smart about it.   Kimberly Grigg  14:02 Yes. So agree. So tell me, Heather, what inspires you?   Heather Bernstein  14:08 You know, I just, I love being outside. It's so funny because I had a girlfriend over last night. We're newly friends, she's going through a divorce, so I'm kind of helping her through it.   Kimberly Grigg  14:22 Right.   Heather Bernstein  14:22 And my partner and I went on a mountain bike ride yesterday for, like, two hours just in nature, huffing and puffing, it was so beautiful. And I was telling her about it - and we had our bikes stolen a couple months ago and so we just got her new bikes, yesterday was our first ride, we were breaking them in, we were so excited - and she was like, 'you mountain bike. I did not know that about you'. And I was laughing. My dad was a mountain bike coach in high school, and I really, I think, am a girly-girl but I love to get down and dirty, and yesterday was my favorite day. We spent three hours in the garden planting, and then got on our bikes and went on a ride for two hours. And it just felt so productive. And the vitamin D, I don't know, there's something, for me, about being outside. And we clearly live, like, in the redwoods, and in this beautiful space where we can do that. And I think that is the number one thing that inspires me. Because, yeah, travel inspires me, but we can't travel every day. But we can be outside every day in nature and take it in and just revel in the beauty of it. And that is... and then, of course, my family inspires me every day. And they're just, we're an evolving, very fun family, you know - the boys are 9 and 10, the girls are 13 and 16 - and just watching their personalities and the hormones and I'm just always so curious.   Kimberly Grigg  14:29 It's so true. And I've never thought about it as family being inspiring. Supportive. But, you know, when I think back on things that we've been through - because we're a blended family as well, we're definitely the Brady Bunch. Three and three. And so, three girls, three boys.   Heather Bernstein  16:26 Oh my gosh.   Kimberly Grigg  16:26 Two were his, two we adopted, and two are biological. So it is, like.... but their spaces in life have really been an inspiration that I've probably just taken for granted as my personal life that does merge with my work life. You know, I don't necessarily know that I process that on a daily basis, until you just said it. But I can think of times when yes, my - like right now, one of my daughters is very much into boho chic. And, you know, it's just a boho chic moment. And yet I have a client with three daughters, and they are in their boho chic periods, and I can do that very well because of the inspiration that I've garnered from my daughter - what she sees on social media, what she likes, what she follows, what she wants in her own spaces, all those things - you know, has brought about an inspiration that I probably wouldn't have been interested in that style. I just wouldn't. It's just not, it doesn't necessarily speak to my personal aesthetic, but I champion being versed in all styles. And I usually get versed when someone asked me to do one. And then it's, like, I study for days and hours, and, you know, when you do this I do think that you can study a particular genre for long periods of time. And you can do it, like it's in us, we have to be a certain amount of chameleon to be able to do what we do, unless we have a particular style that we repeat, and we repeat, and we repeat. That's a little bit different. But that brings me to this question, you know, my listener is, she's not necessarily a DIYer, but she is someone who wants to make her home beautiful. And for whatever reason, she's probably not going to hire a designer, she's going to want to do it herself. She wants to be successful. But she wants her own stamp. And, again, there's many reasons that this person ends up in this space. But I'm curious, do you think that creativity can be learned?   Heather Bernstein  18:45 Hmm, I definitely think... I believe in the right brain / left brain, and, you know, the very cerebral right brain and mathematical - which I know did not come easy for me, like, even in corporate America when I lived in spreadsheets, I just, it was heavy. I felt heavy.   Kimberly Grigg  19:12 Sure.   Heather Bernstein  19:12 And so the left brain creative space, definitely think... everybody has a left brain. And so it's in them. It's just drawing it out. So what is it? You can be creative in your cooking, in your food, and how you plate something or how you think to make something that you're going to put in your body. You can be creative in your garden, and what.... My partner just made this amazing trellis for his green beans - he's so excited about his green beans, and his cucumbers climb on this trellis - that he sat out there for hours and made, and I watched him, like, that's so creative. Like how, I wouldn't have thought of that. So I definitely think there are avenues of creativity that are different for everybody. You know, obviously you think of an artist and you're like, yes, you're creative. I think what we do is definitely, you have to have some creative bones in your body, and your left brain working, but there are so many different ways to be creative. So I think...   Kimberly Grigg  20:22 For sure. And I do find, I think this, like, sometimes when people are hiring me to do a job, they don't have confidence in their creativity, or time, you know, it takes a lot of time to do what we do. And so.... but I do think that it's in there, almost with everyone, left and right brain. Like I'm... definitely my left brain is more trained than my right brain, my right brain came out of the womb screaming, 'I'm here and I'm creative' and my other brain is like, 'alright, bring her along, bring her along, you got this'. And I exercise that muscle very often, because I want it, I want the balance of the two. And, as you know, running a business requires the two. But I do find that a person who doesn't necessarily think they're very creative, it's also maybe they're not as passionate as you and I are about the subject.   Heather Bernstein  21:28 Or like you said, they're nervous. And once you put one foot in front of the other, and you just start doing, you become more confident in your creativity.   Kimberly Grigg  21:37 And I think you can exercise that muscle. And I thought a long time about this, since I teach classes to people who are, who think, who want to aspire to have that beautiful home on their own. And I really had to sit with this, do I think that they can do this? Because if they can't, you're just beating your head against the wall. And if they can, and there's ways that you can do it, then you probably can get somewhere.   Heather Bernstein  22:06 Even if they can come away with one or two, like, a-ha moments, it can help them transform one space, and then two, and then three spaces... and do this one or two things. That's, that's beautiful, because they're making their space more their own and more....   Kimberly Grigg  22:27 And I encourage people at that stage, especially if they don't have the confidence yet, 'all right, you do you and you go through the process' but then it's okay to hire someone to consult with you. It's okay to hire a professional to say, 'move this to the right three inches' because you will learn from that experience as well. I think sometimes people are afraid that, you know, someone like you and I are going to come in with all this vast experience and, like, intimidate them in some way. But it really is, like, I know when I'm doing my own work, heck, I come into my office and say to the other designers here, 'hey, what do you think about this?'   Heather Bernstein  23:11 100%!   Kimberly Grigg  23:12 Like, you know, because it's mine. It's personal. It's intimate, and, like, oh god.   Heather Bernstein  23:17 And it's hard.   Kimberly Grigg  23:20 It's so hard, so you know, I'm glad you're a kindred spirit in that way. So I'm anxious to hear your answer to this. So here's an empty space, Heather, what's your process? Like, what do you do?   Heather Bernstein  23:34 Hmm. Well, in the traditional sense, we put pen to paper and, you know, draw it in CAD and lay it out. But, throw that away because so often we check our measurements from our CAD drawing in the space and we're like, huh, that doesn't feel right. And so then we get out our old fashioned tape measure, which I literally have one every spot I am in.   Kimberly Grigg  24:05 It's attached to my fingers.   Heather Bernstein  24:08 And we measure it out and we think through, like, how does this person live? How do they entertain? Do they have a family? We go through all the process and we know - whether it's for our client or, I'm just thinking of my home that I just did - and, you know, okay this is our living room but it is not a formal living room, it has a TV, and we want it to be comfy and cozy. And it was like, okay yes a sofa, but how about a day bed where you can literally just lounge with a couple of the kids. So really thinking through who's going to use the space, how the space is going to be used, and then laying it out with your trusty tape measure, and just knowing 'okay, we're going to do a sofa, a day bed, and a pair of chairs, and then maybe we'll throw in a bench or two little benches at the, you know, by the fireplace just to pull up for extra seating because we need that'. Because there are so many of us, there are not eight of us, but there are six of us... so yeah, that's I think. But then if I back up and think through, like, the very first thing we do, is we create a vibe board. And this is the most important step because it dictates the design for every room in the house. And that offers consistency in our designs. And so we start with our vibe board, we send it to the client, we have a meeting, and we go through every image. And it's not like you're going to have this in your home, it's more like, how does this vibe board feel? It evokes a mood and what is that and you love it? And if you don't, we're back to the drawing board. So that is how we start. And then, obviously, you know, our handy tape measure comes into play.   Kimberly Grigg  26:18 Well, I tell people, like, they'll bring me plans - I do a lot of design builds, where I'm making all the selections, and it's a year and a half of building, and I love that kind of work - but when it comes to, like, I'll get, you know, into the project, and I inevitably have clients say, 'well, okay, let's order furniture, let's order our furniture right now, right now', we're still 12 months out. And, like, I understand the backlog more than most, however, I start saying it's different on paper than it is in person. It just is. And I want to feel the space before I commit. And yes, this sofa fits, yes, this is probably where we're going with this, however, I want this feeling, this vibe, to feel like you - client - and I also want it to be respectful of the architecture and the home itself. And sometimes you can't get that from a blueprint. And I think that's what you're saying, this vibe board does have this significant role, because this is what - whether every little piece in that vibe board is going in this house, probably not - but it does speak volumes to how this space is going to feel. Right?   Heather Bernstein  27:45 100%. We... when we did my home, and I say 'we' because my senior designer, Reed, was such a big part of it. It's so hard to design for yourself, I don't know why, maybe it's just me, but I've learned that from many other designers, I've heard them say the same thing. But we found this image from this amazing artist, and it's this woman with a blank face being hugged by this big, fat, wonderful, what looks like cashmere ,blanket. And I was like 'THAT - that is my home. That is what I want'. I want you to walk in and feel like you are being hugged by a cashmere blanket. And just settle into the comfort of it and the cozy.   Kimberly Grigg  28:33 I love this.   Heather Bernstein  28:35 And so, I can kind of, I can show you, my - if you can see - there she is. And so this was the start of our vibe. And it just, it all came to, you know, to be from that one image. So often times, you know, we find one image and it's amazing, and just describes the whole thing.   Kimberly Grigg  29:02 And I like to say to people, you know, when you're scrolling on Pinterest or whatever, you're not just looking for rooms, like rooms are important. Like, I get a lot from people out of the rooms that they select. But I say don't just look at rooms, look at images that speak to you. Because what you just showed me was more of a piece of art with this woman in this cashmere blanket this big, thick fluffy... that sparks 'How do I want to feel in my home?'   Heather Bernstein  29:33 Yes.   Kimberly Grigg  29:33 And that's the thing that I sometimes think people miss. They'll bring me a picture of something on Pinterest and I'm, like, so you sort of want me to copy this room? Like, because you got the wrong girl for that. Like, I don't know how to do that very well. I can look at something, I can get a vibe, and I certainly can give you a different version of that that feels that way, but it won't be that. Like, that's just not in me, it's just not. But I think it's more if people can settle into what that space needs to feel like to them, as the people who live there, then I think you tap into something that resonates with a person. And, in the end, I say this, I'm not gonna live here, I'm probably going to come visit you because we will become friends over this, but you're gonna live here.This house should look like you, not me, and get comfortable with that. Because if you don't know who that is, we're going to find out. And it sounds like you have a similar process. And, which, I love that process. I'm not the girl who does this look. And I don't have a look, I have your look. And that's the best I can say about that. So I want to segue, in a minute, into materials. And this is really how we were introduced, is you're kind of known for your use of materials. And I know that you deal a lot in stone. So first define for people what a natural stone is versus a synthetic stone, because I think there's a lot of product in the market and people get confused with materials.   Heather Bernstein  31:14 Yeah. Yeah, there's so many options out there, which is amazing and been really wonderful to design with all these options. But yes, natural stone is cut from the quarry, whether it's from Italy, Portugal, South America, it is a block of magnificent stone, cut from a quarry, and then sliced up into pieces. And what you see is what you get, no two are alike, they're like snowflakes. Synthetic stone is conglomerate, so they grind it up and glue it together, and it's very hardy. It can also be porcelain. I do think synthetic materials, synthetic slabs, have come a long way. We used to, you would see like Corian or quartz, everybody's heard of quartz, a lot of people call it Caesarstone. It's like Kleenex versus tissue: Kleenex is the brand, tissue is the thing. The Caesarstone is the brand, is one brand out of millions, it seems like these days, and quartz is the synthetic material. And there's a time and a place for it. And we have to love all materials because we're blessed to get to do many different spaces and many different places. But if you think about it, a man-made material can't live outside. So, like, if we're doing a built-in kitchen outside, we would never put a quartz outside because the heat can do things to it. Whereas a natural stone has already lived outside and it's totally fine outside. So - and there is something about natural stone that we love, that none are the same, and so every project with natural stone is unique. So we love, love, marble quartzite - not to be confused with quartz - limestone, soapstone, slate. We love these natural materials, but, you know, some of them are more porous than others. And that's where the proper sealant comes in, and treating them so that they last a lifetime.   Kimberly Grigg  33:39 So before we get into this sealant, I think that this is appropriate to say.... because a lot of people get really, really nervous about using natural stone as countertops. And I understand it, and most vendors that I work with will, you know, they'll terrify my client even though I say do not open your mouth and tell clients. But, like, let's just say I want to use marble on my kitchen countertops. And they're like, oh, no, no, no, no, no, and we won't, and all that stuff. So, first question is: Do you ever use natural stone as countertops?   Heather Bernstein  34:22 Every day. All the time.   Kimberly Grigg  34:24 Yay girl. That's what I wanted to hear.   Heather Bernstein  34:26 I had marble in my last kitchen, I have quartzite in this kitchen, I have a soapstone vanity in my powder room, I have a Calcutta vanity in my master bathroom. And, yes, it's all porous but it's beautiful and there are ways, there are two ways to think about it. One is this is a natural stone. It can be, it can last 1000 years as your countertop and you can let it patina as it will. Meaning you will see rings from water, wine, you will see spots from lemon or lime acid etching it. Think about the oldest bar you've been to in Italy, and that counter is marble and it has been there for 100 years, and it's, that is the patina you will get. The other side of it is, you can seal it and it will look as beautiful as it did on install day, as it does four years later. So do not be afraid.   Kimberly Grigg  35:36 What is the sealant? This is so exciting.   Heather Bernstein  35:40 It's called MORE AntiEtch. A gentleman named Steve Wolf used to work for DuPont and he had a lot of experience in mixing these compounds, and he left, and said 'I'm gonna make this sealant that you roll on to natural stone that is impenetrable'. And you only have to seal it like once every 10 to 20 years versus every year. And it works. It's a matte finish so it looks, if you have honed stone, it looks just like the stone. I mean you can't tell that there's any sealant on it. And it truly helps stop the effects of citrus and etching and staining, and you can leave coffee and red wine rings on your counter overnight, and then wipe the next day, and it's fine.   Kimberly Grigg  36:42 And this is M O O R?   Heather Bernstein  36:46 MOOR. MORE AntiEtch.   Kimberly Grigg  36:49 AntiEtch.   Heather Bernstein  36:49 No, M O R E. MORE AntiEtch.   Kimberly Grigg  36:52 MORE AntiEtch. Because I'm going to link it, of course. It'll be in the show notes, everyone. But I have marble countertops in my kitchen and I'm very particular about them, I don't like the patina for that particular area. And someone recently said to me there's a product now that you can use to seal. And I thought I'm gonna wait till I hear a little more about this before - because I have a lot of countertop in my kitchen - but I bet you it's the same product and I would be a fan. When you say matte, how does it work on a glossier finish or does it matte it down?   Heather Bernstein  37:30 They have two. They have a polished option and a honed option. Yeah  MoreSurfaceCare.com - M O R E. And they have different sealants for the different stones. So I have a different sealant on my quartzite than I did on my marble. So they really honed in on what the product is and created something spectacular. I don't understand what the compound is but I don't need to, I just know that it works.   Kimberly Grigg  38:03 Which is so amazing. And when we started this conversation, you've had this product in your homes for, now, a couple of years. So you know it's tried and true, because you tried it and it's true.   Heather Bernstein  38:14 Yep.   Kimberly Grigg  38:15 Which is so exciting because people will say to me, 'oh my god, I love that marble, but I'm not doing that, I'm too scared, my husband is sloppy, I spill red wine', all those things that, you know... and then I, as a designer, don't want to live with 'oh my gosh, like, I'm gonna get a phone call in three years and you're gonna be upset'. So this is a way to offset that and I'm thrilled to know about it and I'm going to be talking about it a lot too on my show. Because, you know, I love a product that will solve. Design is a lot about finding the best solutions to problems in your home and this solves a problem. And, you know, not spending hours on it, I do have a couple of questions, though, about stone because, like, I think there's also unusual ways to use stone, not just on a countertop. And I noticed on your site, you do some things. Tell me some things, other things, you've done with stone that are beautiful, that, you know, someone could incorporate into their homes.   Heather Bernstein  39:23 Yeah, I think our favorite thing right now is doing integrated sinks. So for a powder room just taking a slab and cutting it up to make a sink look like it was carved out of a block of soapstone or marble or quartzite, where the sink is fully integrated, I think is so beautiful. Because it's seamless and it looks like it was just carved out of a chunk of stone, and I love that heft, and that feel. We also use slab for fireplace surrounds all the time. Not only are they so functional because of their heat resistant qualities, but they're beautiful. And there's so many designs you can do with different mantles and, really, you can do anything with stone. It's amazing. Of course outdoor spaces. Even just with a remnant we have leftover, we'll, you know, cut a round top and put it on an iron base for outside. And clients are like, 'oh my gosh, this is amazing, I love our table', and nobody has it. And that's beautiful. So, yeah, that is... we use stone in every room. It's wonderful.   Kimberly Grigg  40:42 Yeah. It is wonderful. And I do the same with remnants. I'm doing a top for a coffee table right now. And it was just a little leftover piece, and, you know, it's so pretty, and it's so important. And it can elevate something to an entirely different level.   Heather Bernstein  41:01 Yeah.   Kimberly Grigg  41:01 And it can make it unique to you. Which are all the things that, to me, scream good design. So in your portfolio, you tend to have more neutral palettes. But... so tell me, how do you insert color? Or do you?   Heather Bernstein  41:18 I will say we used to use color a lot more than we did, and something shifted. And I think it was a combination of things. For me, my old business was being dissolved and I was transitioning to this new business where it was mine, solely mine. And then, you know, we're all stuck at home. And I was looking around, and I was - I don't want to say getting sick of - but I was finding myself, like, with really bold colors and patterns. I was... it was jarring to me. And I felt like I just wanted to take it down 10 notches and just breathe in more neutral tones, but lots of texture. And that's where our shift happened. And I don't know, I don't know if it was gradual or if it was one day, but we just started doing these vibe boards that evoked this very calm, soothing feeling. And nothing, like, too bright or jarring. And so that's kind of the direction where we've gone. Like, I'm looking at this as like a rug that's going in my bedroom, it's just, like, soft blue-gray. And then this is the headboard fabric. And the texture is what made us swoon for it.   Kimberly Grigg  42:53 You know, I say - especially when someone comes to me for a neutral palette, because I'm known for color, but can I do a neutral palette, I have done bazillions - but if you're going to do a neutral palette, then texture becomes your color.   Heather Bernstein  43:11 So do you have certain things that you do in homes that is unique to you, your aesthetic, something more like signature?   Heather Bernstein  43:11 100%. I actually think it's harder sometimes than designing with color, because that is like play on play on play, and you're layer layer layer. With textures, it's like, okay, this is velvet, we don't want another velvet, so we need to really think through the next, you know... okay, what is it? Oh, it's a chunky linen. And so really thinking through that is almost harder. But, in the end, it feels so natural and so warm and comfy and cozy. And so we love that.   Heather Bernstein  43:55 You know, I would say right now, the past couple of years, we have moved away from white kitchens - white, white, white, white, white - and we are going warm. And so we are doing wrist white oak cabinets, or custom walnut cabinets, or a color like this deep rich almost hunter green that brings in nature. And so I think right now, our signature is not a white kitchen. And I have seen white kitchens on our website because that's how we did it for so many years.   Kimberly Grigg  44:44 And it's white kitchen to death. It's white everything today.   Heather Bernstein  44:47 And a client will come and say 'I want a white kitchen, I'm coming to you' and we're like 'oh no'. And then we're like, 'well what if we do a soft gray?' and they're like 'oh, oh, can I see what that would look like?' And then they're like, 'oh, that feels nice'. And so, just warming it up, I think, has been... and also, everything has been so stark white for so long, that white, gray, white, gray, that we're really warming it up. So, like, more of, like, a warm white or an ivory. It just, it feels - and I'm saying this as my office is white white - but this canvas, this natural colored canvas, is where we are right now. We're warming it up.   Kimberly Grigg  45:44 And probably using warmer whites when you're using white.   Heather Bernstein  45:48 100%. So instead of super white.   Kimberly Grigg  45:52 Warmer whites. Yes, yes. And then that plays well with other warm colors that are branching off into other rooms and spaces. And I think it's kind of important, because subliminally we're all over-exposed to whatever is trending, even us. I mean, we get, we start seeing so so so so much of something and the next thing you know, we're doing it. And I think the average person is as well. And before you know it, and really by the time you've - not us necessarily - but by the time the person who doesn't do this professionally is incorporating into their homes, this subliminal image, it's already trending out. And, you know, I mean, think of the gray in the last 10 years. Think of the white white white, think of the white with millennial pink. I mean, all my, like, it's everywhere, right? And then I'm so sick of it, like I don't really want to do it, I want to give you something special, even though your heart is set on that white with millennial pink pop. It's the pop that's doing it for you, probably. And it's not that I don't like either color, or it's not that I don't like those looks, it's just been in my face.   Heather Bernstein  47:08 Yes.   Kimberly Grigg  47:09 And an overexposure. So it does make me, though, want to ask this - because I think about this from the perspective of someone listening to this show and gaining and garnering - like, what are things we can leave them with? So what are tips that people can incorporate that they can elevate their home to more of a designer level? Like what kinds of things can somebody really pull off?   Heather Bernstein  47:39 Yeah, you know, I think there are a few just, like, tricks that aren't even tricks. They're just inherent in what we know. But to explain it to someone and someone to say, 'oh, yeah, I never thought, I never knew that'. Like, an area rug. If you have a sprawling living room, you know, family room, whatever it is, and you put a five by eight postage stamp rug in there, your room is going to come crashing in and feel this big. But if you do a 10 x 14 rug, or a custom size to fit the space, your room will feel the size that it is. And so, I think that is something that we see all the time. That we walk in and we're like, 'oh yeah, it feels small, because you have the wrong size rug'. And that helps define your space so easily. It's like dummy proof. You know, like, once you learn like, 'oh, this is the right size rug for this room'. And that's why there are those standard rug sizes - 8 x 10, 9 x 12, 10 x 14 - because those are some standard room sizes.   Kimberly Grigg  48:55 And your point - nothing kills a space worse than that 5 x 7 rug in this huge room. And yes, it does support the furniture, perhaps, but it - I've never really thought about, I've never put it into those words, you did it so eloquently - but all of a sudden your room just shrinks. And you've got this pretty massive space. I mean people get afraid to go big. Don't you think?   Heather Bernstein  49:23 Yeah. 100%   Kimberly Grigg  49:25 Like they'll get these little bitty accessories, or they'll buy this little bitty lamp, and I'm like, 'oh, love, like, we cannot put that lamp by this high headboard'.   Heather Bernstein  49:37 Yeah. And you just said, I think the biggest thing, you said clients get afraid. So this, I think, is the biggest thing you can do in design. If you really want to elevate your space, be afraid. Have a touch of fear that it's too bold or too much, and go for it. Do a title that scares you. We, my boys' bathroom - there's no window, we put a skylight in, but there's no window - and I was like, you know what, I'm just going to enhance the darkness and do black. Black tile, black floors, black everywhere with an oak vanity and a big mirror to reflect as much light as I can get in this space. And it is by far our favorite bathroom.   Kimberly Grigg  50:31 It sounds amazing.   Heather Bernstein  50:33 Yeah, it's so fun.   Kimberly Grigg  50:35 So bold.   Heather Bernstein  50:36 And even as a designer - and I know everything that's out there, and even the stuff I don't know, I'll learn about and, you know, be like, 'oh, that's so much cooler than what I did' - but even I have to tell myself to be brave sometimes. And, like, yes, do that. Don't play it safe.   Kimberly Grigg  50:57 But you know what, I think it's why you're successful. I know that it has a lot to do with my success. Because, you know, we can all pick some things that go nicely, play nicely together. And we can break some rules and, you know, get the scale off a little bit, get this off a little bit. But I think that the reason people use me as their designer - and I have a feeling it's you too - is because we will take that risk. And we'll believe in it so hard that our clients know that if we believe in it that much, that it's worth the risk. And that we'll fix it if it goes wrong. Like, you know, I've taken risks that haven't worked. But I'd rather take that risk than cheat my client out of what it could have been, if I had stayed in the box. And, you know, I think, like, I can't wait to get out of the box when I'm working on a job, like I cannot. But I also have a lot of years of experience. So I'm not afraid to get out of the box. Yet when we don't get out of the box, and I play it safe, the room is flat to me, or the project is flat. And sometimes people just won't let you and you finally just give up in, like, frustration, and you're like, 'okay, if you won't do it, then I'm not gonna lose any more sleep about this, I'm telling you, it would be 1000 times better if you let me do it this way, but you're not doing it so here we go'. And eventually, you can get to that. But when you get to get out - and I can tell the girl that puts black tile all over a dark bathroom, I know you can take a risk, and I love it. Love it. I can't wait to see the photographs of this bathroom. I think it sounds spectacular. So.   Heather Bernstein  52:47 Yeah, no. Breaking rules. Breaking the rules is so fun.   Kimberly Grigg  52:51 Yeah, exactly. And allow yourself, yeah, allow yourself to do it. So is - obviously beauty is important to you - so, but why? Why should people care? Why is beauty important?   Heather Bernstein  53:09 My partner and I have this conversation quite a bit because he's like, 'function is better'. And I'm like, 'no beauty is better'. I mean women were high heels, you think they wear them because they're comfortable? No. We wear them because they're beautiful, right? And they elongate our calf and our leg. And there are reasons for why we do things. And I think I have learned, through this project over the past year, my own project, that beauty - the most beautiful is where it functions and is beautiful. Because that appeals to everyone. Yeah, you can just have beauty. But it also can be functional. It's like a 10 out of 10. And so I've really tried to instill in my gals, like, 'Okay, but how are they going to use that? And does it, will it work for them?' Because just pulling something that's beautiful is easy. But making sure that it works for the people, the place, the space, is the ultimate beauty. And so I've really - just in doing my own project - I've really put a focus on that. And it's been, it's been really helpful. For us and for our clients.   Kimberly Grigg  54:38 Well said, well said Heather. So it's time for my signature question, which goes a little like this. If you had a hashtag that really spoke to your legacy of design, what would it be?   Heather Bernstein  54:58 So funny. I am looking in my notes because I used to have, when I started this company two years ago, I had this saying... ah, this is it. Are you ready?   Kimberly Grigg  55:14 I'm ready.   Heather Bernstein  55:15 I should have it memorized. The courage to grow requires the ability to let go. Oh, it is that... let's be brave and mighty and go for it. Then you will grow.   Kimberly Grigg  55:33 Yes, Heather. I cannot believe this time has flown. Like, you and I could just do this...   Heather Bernstein  55:40 I know.   Kimberly Grigg  55:40 I could tell. Maybe when I come to the Bay Area, I'm going-   Heather Bernstein  55:44 - it's my roots. My grandmother was from Georgia.   Kimberly Grigg  55:48 Yeah. Oh, wow. So there we are. So how can people find you?   Heather Bernstein  55:53 HKB Interior Design.com. And I would love to... we travel. We have a project in Denver right now. So yeah, reach out.   Kimberly Grigg  56:08 So great. Well, Heather, I thoroughly have enjoyed getting to know you. It's so funny because our introduction was over the sealant. But, gosh, there's many more layers to you, girl.   Heather Bernstein  56:21 Oh, thank you.   Kimberly Grigg  56:25 Thank you. I appreciate this so much. And you guys got to go take a look at this girl's work. She's spectacular. And I can't wait to get to know you more. And so I'm going to say to our listeners, bye for now and I will see you next time and thanks for listening. And of course be sure to go rate, review, and subscribe to our show.   Kimberly Grigg  56:49 Thanks for listening to Decorate Like A Design Boss. If you want more info on how to decorate your space like a pro, visit KimberlyGriggDesigns.com. See you next week!

Ask Lisa: The Psychology of Parenting
80: Should I Push My Child Out of the Nest?

Ask Lisa: The Psychology of Parenting

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 28:27


How much should we shield our kids from risk? And how much should we go out of our way to make their lives more comfortable? Dr. Lisa explains the importance of fostering independence and encouraging our children to take safe risks. Reena asks if we should try to make our kids' lives easier when we can, especially given all that they have gone through in the pandemic. Dr. Lisa and Reena discuss how much distress we should allow our kids to tolerate and when we should offer support.  Follow us on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn @AskLisaPodcast, @Lisa.Damour, @ReenaNinan Checkout Dr. Lisa's website for more resources.  Ask Lisa is produced by Good Trouble Productions Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sixteen:Nine
Geoff Bessin, Intuiface

Sixteen:Nine

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 38:26


NOTE - Podcasts normally come out on Wednesdays, but as a favor to Intuiface - which is at this week's ISE trade show in Spain - I moved it up a day to coincide with the show's opening day ... The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT One of the big trends in the software world is the whole idea of no code development - the premise that both programmers and mere mortals can create applications without getting their typing fingers dirty and brains fried doing traditional computer programming. The proposition is that no code development platforms can cut out a lot of time and cost associated with pulling applications together, and also deal with the reality that good programmers are in high demand and therefore scarce. The French software firm Intuiface is in the interesting position of having offered a no code platform long before no code was a discussion point, so the folks there are a great resource for discussing the implications for the digital signage and interactive display market. I spoke with Geoff Bessin, the CMO and main voice for Intuiface, about the distinctions between no code and low code development platforms, and how they differ from the simple drag and drop, what you see is what you get user interfaces that are common in digital signage content management systems. We also dig into the benefits, the limitations, and more than anything, why you should know and care about no code. Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes * Google Play * RSS TRANSCRIPT Geoff, thank you for joining me. Can you give me the rundown first on what Intuiface is all about?  Geoff Bessin: Will do, Dave, thank you for having me. So Intuiface is a no-code platform dedicated to the creation of interactive digital content. That includes digital signage, but really it can anything in the venue. It could be a museum exhibition, could be a sales pitch for a movie sales team, could be anything at a trade show, something in a real estate office, et cetera. So you create it, you deploy it, you can do analytics with it. It's all good. And the company is based in France, correct?  Geoff Bessin: We are headquartered in a town called Labège, which is right outside Toulouse in France. Although I'm not, but it's funny, my name is Geoffrey Besson, so both my first and last name look French. So people always assume it's French, but that's not the case. I'm in Boston. Can you speak a lick of French? Geoff Bessin: Oui. Yes.  Good for you! I wanted to talk about no-code software, cause you guys have been no-code before people were even using that term and no-code is one of these trends, just like headless CMS, that seems to be bubbling up and maybe people don't understand a lot about it yet. Geoff Bessin: Yeah, you could go back to the 80s and find things like HyperCard where you were enabling non-developers to create an application of some sorts. So it goes back a long way, but in terms of a movement, generating notice, gaining investment and having companies spend money on it, it's only been the past few years.  I can tell you that statistics are now saying that the market size, the amount of money being spent on no-code software used to create apps is almost $14 billion. It's a lot of money being pumped into these apps. And in fact, more than 65% of apps are now created using no-code tools. So more than 50%, more than half of apps are being built with no-code software. It is the predominant means of delivering applications these days.  What's the distinction between no-code and low-code, because I've heard both terms. Geoff Bessin: There's no formal distinction. You can't point at it and go, “Oh, this one's no-code” like you just went over the line. But the idea is that with low-code, there are back doors. There are means to enhance, to extend, to facilitate integration that might involve a little bit of coding. Even that coding could be simplified based on maybe either a scripting language that is native to the tool or a public scripting language like Ruby.  Whereas no-code is just 100%, you're not going to see code anywhere, and so you are in a way limited to the sandbox provided by the no-code platform, what it is you're able to deliver is limited by what you can piece together with the Lego blocks of that platform. no-code gives you those little back doors to branch yourself out.  So what does it mean for development? Does it distance or mediate the need for application developers completely, and just any old end-user can produce an application without having to engage developers or is it more something that accelerates the development process and just gets some cost and time out of the way? Geoff Bessin: I think that question brings us to who's doing it, and why are they doing it? As I mentioned, no-code has exploded recently, and it is due to a set of developments that have driven application development to what is now called the “citizen developer.”  Trends such as a shortage of developers, it's not that we're trying to get rid of them. It's that there's not enough. I saw one statistic that back in 2020, there were 1.2 million unfilled developer jobs in the United States, just the US but 1.2 million developer jobs unfilled in the US and colleges and universities were only cranking out about 400,000 developers. There's a shortage. So it's not that we don't want them, we don't have them. What do you do about that? There was also COVID, which has greatly accelerated investment in these no-code platforms, because everything moved online, and when everything moved online, everything needed to be digitized and companies realized we have to move now but we don't have enough resources, so how the heck are we going to digitize these things?  And then there's also tangential, but influential, the fact that even in our own home, we're not coders, but we are programmers. If I'm working with my Nest thermostat, that's programming. I just got a puppy and they have these apps that you can then program to see how many steps they've taken and how much water they drink, that's programming, and the digital native is used to controlling their environment digitally. There are tools out there that enable them to realize their ideas as an application, and somebody has to build it because there's not enough developers to go around. That's what really kicked the no-code market in the butt. What we're seeing subsequently is that the developer shortage is being filled by these citizen developers producing applications, maybe for personal use, maybe for internal employee use, maybe for customer us, it depends. Those developers are now being transitioned to work on larger projects, more intricate projects. They have more time arguably to focus on the big tickets stuff that still needs the hardcore development, offloading their responsibility from the simpler things that can now be handled by that citizen developer. Are there trade offs that you have to accept, to use no-code instead of just doing your own thing? Geoff Bessin: Certainly. There are obvious advantages, there's speed and there's costs benefits. There's a big productivity boost, but of course there's trade offs. I like this notion of Legos. You have these prebuilt blocks and this is a finite number of block options that you can combine in an infinite number of ways. At the end of the day, you're still limited to those blocks, right? And so if I'm using a no-code platform and I need a block that doesn't exist, I'm stuck.  Now, I suppose if it's a low-code platform, depending on what I need to achieve,okay, maybe I can put something together if I have the skill, maybe I don't, but if I don't have the skill or if the opportunity with the platform doesn't exist, I am limited, and I think that might be the fundamental challenge is what can I do? What can I realize? Cause recognize that a lot of these platforms are built to be generic, to address sort of breadth, not always depth, and so that can be a challenge. You are also, of course, relying on them to be responsible for performance and reliability. You are handing over that duty, that responsibility to the provider, the no-code platform. I hope they're doing a good job. Because it's out of my hands, I can't control that, and so those are the big risks: can I achieve exactly what I want or am I making compromises? Am I achieving the level of performance? My ability to deploy? My ability to collect data analytics? My ability to manage that deployment?  There's 150-200 platforms across the spectrum offering no-code and low-code options. You might be making some compromises on the way, certainly are, but as I shared with you, 65% of apps are now built with no-code platforms. So companies have decided it's worth the risk.  What's the distinction between no-code and what you see is what you get (WYSIWYG) user interfaces? Geoff Bessin: No-code, I think it's more of a connotation, not a denotation. I think you could argue that a lot of no-code platforms are WYSIWYG. Intuiface is a no-code platform, it's a drag and drop tool. It's a WYSIWYG. The connotation of WYSIWYG, it could be for a developer. It could be for anybody of any skill set. So it's more of a generic catchall for applications enabled to create other applications by dragging components and you can see what they look like at design time and development time.  No-code connotes the non-developer, the citizen developer that you don't have coding skills and you're not expected to have those skills. So I think that's it.  You sent me a white paper that kind of goes into this and you're making the argument that while no-code is out there, it's exploding and growing and everything else, there's really no application, I think you called it a ‘no-code blind spot' in terms of in-venue applications. What do you mean by that?  Geoff Bessin: So let's define in-venue because that is exactly our contention. In-venue is an encapsulation of any digital deployment out of the home. It could be digital signage, could be all those things I mentioned with Intuiface as well, the museum exhibition, the sales presentation, real estate office, et cetera. It is out of the home. It is not my phone though. It is not my PC. I'm not browsing the web at home. I'm out of my home, I'm in a venue and there is some digital content trying to communicate to educate, to promote, to sell to me.  That domain has been, I think with the exception of Intuiface, untouched by the no-code movement. For sure, if you look at the landscape of companies delivering solutions to address the needs of the citizen developer, there is nothing out there addressing these in-venue deployments. It's all about web and mobile apps and some websites, that's it. So if you want to create digital signage, if you want to create that museum exhibition, the sales pitch, there is no option out there now, and which brings us David, I know you're going to want to ask this, which is, will, aren't all digital signage platforms, no-code? Which is great question, Dave, by the way... You are a psychic! Geoff Bessin: That's a yes, but, it is absolutely true that you don't write code, but there are certain expectations of a no-code platform that the traditional digital signage CMS cannot fulfill, and it's interesting if I take a step back, really by definition, it has always been the non-developer on the digital signage side, hasn't it? You buy a platform, there's a CMS, the user of the content management system is the content person. They're not coding anything. They're working with the CMS, they're assigning content to zones and they're day partying. By definition from day one, digital signage was always a non-developer domain, whereas web and mobile apps and these sorts of things were always the developer domain.  The no-code movement was, “Hey, this complicated stuff, we gotta make it simpler. We need the citizen developer involved.” So they brought no-code to the domain that started with developers, which I think is one of the explanations for why it didn't really come over to the in-venue side yet, because it was always non-coder users, but there are certain expectations of the no-code platform, that is not really in scope of the platform delivering in-venue content. A simple example, just to give you one would be the notion of context. To react to the user, react to the environment, in real time in that context, and do something as a result that is inherently this notion of logic. If this, then that. That's coding, right? It's got the whiff of coding and how do you do that? And there's a list of things we can discuss about what makes in-venue unique. But it requires the accommodation of additional concerns that are beyond the scope of what a traditional CMS does and that no other no-code platform does across the no-code spectrum.  I guess what you're saying in certain respects is you can develop a playlist, do all the basic functionality of a digital sign, you can target content and everything else, but the moment you get into a request to do something different, that's interactive, that as you say, maybe responds to triggers and so on, that gets a lot more complicated, and at that point you're putting in, if you're an end user, you're putting in a request to your reseller or to the software company directly saying, can you do this? And they'll say, yes, we can, but it's going to take this amount of time, this amount of money and, we can't get this to you for six months cause it's off of our roadmap or whatever… Is that one of the arguments you'd make?  Geoff Bessin: I would say that for sure. You see, a lot of companies have libraries. Here's our template library, here's our plugin library, here's our integration library. Oh, you want something we don't have? We can build that for you. Here's the cost. Here's how long it's going to take. That's one example. I can tell you that from a Intuiface perspective, we don't have any libraries. We haven't really prebuilt anything. Our paradigm is to enable integration with any web service, to create any UI, to integrate with any content management system, to have that ubiquity, which means that we don't have to build anything for our clients. The customer can do that. But it also means that, well, you better have a good idea and you better need to know what you. Because you're starting with a tabula rasa, but yes, that is certainly one good example of how you fulfill these sort of unique needs you might have thought about. I'll give you another example, which is retail point of sale. How would you build that thing? To me, that qualifies as an in-venue application. That's in the venue, right? I can order through a website, but do I want to put a website on a kiosk? It's a different domain. It's a different paradigm. It has different design requirements, different expectations, different issues about security, about being able to run potentially offline. But having to work with peripherals, having hyper-local context dependence, there are all of these concerns that will impact that user experience in the venue that may not be relevant or at all to a web experience. If I want to build that thing, how much flexibility am I going to have? Now there are companies like Grubber, which are pretty much pre-built everything, right? All you do is you push your menu into their back office system, and you're good to go. You just have to hope it does exactly what it is you want because you're constrained within the confines of what they offer for design, with the offer for business process, what they offer in terms of context, awareness, and reaction and if you need to make any kind of changes, you're dependent on them to make those changes, and that has a cost and a time penalty to it.  What kind of skillsets do you realistically need to use a no-code particularly in the context of Intuiface? I'm assuming the proposition is anybody can sit down, but you still have to plan out, you have to have some methodical thinking about what you want to do with what the decision tree is on all that stuff, right? Geoff Bessin: You do, and that gives me an opportunity to give you just a brief history of Intuiface because we were never a no-code company, that wasn't how we were oriented. The company was actually founded back in 2002. It was founded by a couple of PhDs with expertise in touch technology. And from day one, it was about bringing user experiences to a lot of it was, believe it or not, the defense industry, but also retail, touch-driven user experiences for something, to accomplish something. The company was always about the user experience.  At the end of the day, as great as your touch technology might be, nobody cares if it's not usable. If it doesn't make it easy to achieve some goal, and so Intuiface, when it was born it was all about the user experience, and in fact, most of its early hires were focused on that, on how to make something intuitive and that where the company name comes from, an intuitive interface. To make intuitive user experiences that we're driven by interaction like touch. What happened was we were servicing all of these organizations, again, a lot of defense, Intuiface is headquartered just outside the Toulouse, as i mentioned. So you have the big aerospace and defense industry located in Toulouse like Airbus. So a lot of those clients, but also retail, commerce. Focused on user experience, and it was hard to scale the business because you had this deep technical dependency underneath because it's driven by touch and we're going back 15 years, so expensive hardware, challenging technology, and at the same time, trying to come up with these really intuitive user interfaces, it was a challenge, and we decided internally, I say we, but I wasn't here yet. Intuiface decided internally that we need to come up with something that can accelerate our ability to deliver good user experiences on top of this touch technology. The company builds something called Intuikit, it was used internally by user experience experts, designers, and people good at aesthetics, people good at thinking about the customer. They were not developers. Ultimately, we decided this thing called Intuikit is pretty awesome, maybe that's our business, and so we're. It's a short story about how the software platform Intuiface was born. We were always about the user experience. It is our expectation that our users are experts in the users, creating intuitive interfaces, not In having any necessary knowledge about development. So that is our expectation, and that's what we think is appropriate. You need to be creative. You need to understand the user. You need to understand the domain. You don't have to worry about the platform you're building it on. That should not be your problem. You should be all about solving the customer's problem. I realize you work with a bunch of industries, but a lot of your activity is in digital signage. If I am an end-user and I'm using ACME digital signage software, can I use the Intuiface with it? Does it plug into it or are there restrictions? Do you have to go through door number one or door number two, you can't use both doors? Geoff Bessin: Probably, you can't do. Typically the content management system used by the DS platform is proprietary. It's a closed system. It doesn't have a published API. So we couldn't read from it. Intuiface conversely has its own runtime as well. We can run side by side. In fact, on Windows, we have the ability to run side by side with other applications, we have had customers who are not ready to transition off their existing DS investment. So they were sort of a cohabitating interactive Intuiface based content at one part of the screen and traditional DS content and others were cohabitating that screen. But normally no, that wouldn't be how one would do it.  Certainly Intuiface is positioned around interactivity. We believe that by definition, once you introduce interactivity and the need to be responsive and context, and to accommodate not just touch, but sensors and voice and computer vision, when you need to account for all of these things, you need to be very good at that if-when, right? And that notion of conditional responses to events which are completely typically outside the realm of the traditional DS platform. That's where we start, and then clients can decide, do I want these Intuiface to co-exist with this DS platform? Or do we need to make some sort of transition. If I'm an end-user and I start with Intuiface and have a series of interactive screens that are doing some sort of functionality, whatever it may be and then I decide, I want to also have an expanding network of “dumb screens” that are just running traditional digital signage content in some sort of a sequence. Can you do that too?  Geoff Bessin: Sure, the content doesn't know it's in a dumb playlist, right? The content is fine. Certainly you can do that. The Intuiface was born, solving the interactive problem. And it's interesting, Dave, because in the early days of selling our platform, digital signage was something else. You didn't touch signage. So our communication to the marketplace was not interactive signage. There wasn't such a thing. There was interactive content for kiosks. That was the world when we first walked in, you were touching something such as a table or a kiosk. There were touch screens, very expensive touch screens. You could be bound on a wall, never a perceptive pixel from a million years ago. Like those CNN screens and that sort of thing. You spend $2,500, you can have a touchscreen, but bylarge, it was kiosks and that sort of thing.  What happened was that they had this largely commoditized, digital signage space, hundreds of companies offering traditional digital signage and customers had iPhones in their pocket and they had iPads at home, and they started thinking about interactivity. They see the voting coverage on CNN and people tapping screens. So can you do that? That's why we started getting questions about traditional digital signage. Can you fulfill that as well? We were like yeah, we can, and over the years we developed additional capability to accommodate it.  The paradigm is still different. We don't have a traditional notion of a playlist for example, but you can create a playlist within Intuiface. We're using our Lego blocks, not just to build interactive content, but non-interactive content as well. You can do both.  So it was something you could do, but it's not your focus?  Geoff Bessin: I would say, we'res interactive first, but the traditional broadcast signage, and I don't mean this in a judgy way, it's not typically that complicated. So if it is a playlist of stuff, images, videos, documents, it's very easily done, but people very rarely come to us, Dave, with traditional first. They're coming to us because they need to solve an interactive need, and oh, by the way, long-term you can transition to traditional content as well. I agree that, the conventional side of digital signage, the meat potatoes, run this stuff at this time and these locations and all that is commoditized and pretty simple, and I always say that the complicated stuff is behind the scenes, the device management, the API integrations and all that sort of stuff. Are you at a level now where you can provide the building blocks, the Lego blocks to do the interactive piece, but also enable the end user to monitor and remotely manage all that?  Geoff Bessin: We do offer that, and in fact we offer both of what you mentioned, cause you also mentioned the API integration, we can accommodate that as well. On the device management side, certainly we have an awareness of the devices in the field and you can set up notifications if things are going wrong, that sort of thing, you can see what's running on those devices. On certain platforms, you can remotely update on runtime, that sort of thing. We're not averse to working with a device and platform management options, to collaborate with them in a deployment, but we do offer some of that. And with API integration, we've actually offered for six years. It's been a long time and it's one of those things, Dave, where, as I said, we weren't born with no-code. We were born worried about user experience and we realized we looked in the mirror and wen, oh, we're actually no-code.  We've been offering a software called API Explorer.  You can automatically create an integration, an integration with a web API without writing code And it is a real time integration reading from writing to that web API. It could be a back office system, ERP application, CRM application could be a database wrapped in an API, could be a device on the internet of things, all of these options can be integrated with a running Intuiface experienced by a non-developer, using API Explorer. So we've offered that for some time.  We now have our own CMS but you don't have to use it. Our original value prop is to use whatever you want. We have API Explorer, you can plug into whatever you want. We have now introduced our own because depending on the scenario and the requirements of the project, it just makes better sense to use ours. But we still have customers that would rather use that other thing, or Dave, they're integrated with the ERP application. They're building a retail point of sale application with Intuiface, and they have integrated with the ERP system, they need to work with the API and you can do that. Who would you describe as your kind of core end-users, core customers?  Geoff Bessin: I would say 50 to 60% of our customers are agencies and integrators. So we can discuss with the actual user might be, but I would say more than half of our installed base are agencies and integrators with their own clients. And there is a spectrum of reasons why they're using Intuiface. Some of them, they don't have the development skill, but they want to offer interactivity. Others have men and women on the bench with the skill, but they don't have the scale. That's the problem with people is that they can work on one thing at a time. And what we find is that a lot of the integrators in particular will be taking Intuiface so they can scale. They can take on a larger volume of maybe small and mid-sized projects that they can do with Intuiface, and then put the men and women on the bench onto the bigger high value projects. We find that customers are saving 80% of time and 60% of costs versus customer that don't use Intuiface. So it's very easy for them, and it's an easy pitch. Conceptually, if you can build an interactive application, doing exactly what you want with a no-code platform is probably cheaper and faster than if I wrote code, so it's an easy idea to wallow and it is what our customers experience. So that's what you'll find. I would say the majority 60%-55% agencies and integrators, the rest are the small and midsize museums, schools, retailers, sales offices, marketing, and sales teams, they want to do it themselves. And do they want to do it themselves because of cost or control? Geoff Bessin: Often it's because of cost. They have ambition or they've been bitten, Dave, where they have outsourced it. You don't see this going in, but you meet an agency. You tell them what you want, they agree and deliver something in two months that doesn't resemble what you wanted, so you ask for revisions, and this cycle continues while you pay for the time. It's not an agile process, and again, I'm not casting aspersions at the agency, they are our customers. But their sales pitch is we use Intuiface so we can deliver what you want faster than the other guys that do exactly what you want, and by the way, if you don't like the work we did, you can take it with you. If I pay an agency to write custom code and I'll be dissatisfied, I'm starting from zero with another agency. So you have that kind of portability benefit as well. So yes, a lot of the small and midsize, it's budget driven or based on their experience, they have limited budgets. They outsourced it, and they were just satisfied. We do have the occasional large enterprise. They want to have maybe an interactive sales pitch. So the marketing and sales team is driving the creation of the collateral, hiring a developer to make. I could use PowerPoint. Why am I hiring? It's hard to justify this pay developers to code a sales pitch, I can just use PowerPoint. Hold on a second, here's this thing called Intuiface. I can build an interactive sales pitch for my Salesforce. I'm still using the tool. I'm the creative team on the marketing sales team. But I'm creating something that is far more novel and engaging than a PowerPoint. When the pandemic hit, I speculated and I'm sure many people speculated that this was going to be a difficult time for people who were in the touch and interactive business. What happened instead is that touch actually went up in demand and self service applications became very much a big development initiative. Have you seen that happening in the last couple of years?  Geoff Bessin: We have, and then ultimately it turns out people are more afraid of other people than touch screens. And our business has rebounded quite well. What we were hoping for, and it seems to be the case is that demand didn't drop. It got stuck behind a wall. There was a dam and the demand was building behind the dam, and you couldn't open the dam cause nobody was out of the house and the waters were rising, people are finally out of the house, and you opened up the floodgates. So we're seeing a really nice rebound that is complimented, not just by the building interest anyway, but the kind of renewed interest in facilitating a non-human interaction, which sounds horrible culturally, in their place of business or what have you. And again, it's not just touch. Yes, I think probably most people would rather take a little Purell. They're fine with that, but still some people are not, and maybe they can use their mobile phone or scan a QR code.  But it's also a labor issue. It's harder to hire people and if you can use self service, then you don't have to worry so much about staffing. Geoff Bessin: There's that whole other thing too which is the cost of staffing and training and enabling and equipping and there's that as well. So for sure, there is certainly a perceived increase in interest, and interactivity of any kind and Intuiface has always been focused on any kind of interactivity, not just touch, and certainly this ability to use my mobile phone to interact with content is an increasingly interesting example, using gestures to interact, using voice to interact. So I'm not touching but I'm still working with technology directly rather than mediating through somebody else. So all of that is going on.  Last question: you guys have certainly in the last few years had a presence at ISE and at other trade shows, what are you doing in the next few weeks and months? Is Intuiface going to be something that people can walk up and get demos for?  Geoff Bessin: We will be at ISE, so that'll be our first trade show in however many years we'll be there. So you and I are speaking on April 26th and that's why I say in just a couple of weeks, we will be there with a booth, and we certainly hope we'll see others there.  We used to actually have our user conference in parallel with ISE, in-person and the pandemic put the kibosh on that. We've done virtual user conferences every year since then, and we like that because you don't have to travel, and so our user conference will be forever more be virtual. We actually have our user conference in three weeks that people are welcome to join. It's free, it'll be online, but we plan to be at ISE. We plan to be a DSE in the US and I think it's now November, and we'll be participating when your colleagues at Avitas are running DSE in parallel and ISE will be participating in that as well. So we're starting. We're treating this as back to normal. It's interesting, Dave working on my travel plans, flying into Spain. But you can't just get on a plane, you need to jump through certain things because of COVID. But it looks as of today, they're not even requiring masks onsite. That doesn't seem to be a requirement. Just the honor system that you are vaccinated or recovered and we'll see how that goes, but we're excited to be there. We'll have a big booth and about eight of us, we'll have a lot of people there.  And where can people find Intuiface online?  Geoff Bessin: Dave, thank you for asking, Intuiface.com. They can also just contact us. You are listening to Jeff Besson. You can just email me bessin@intuiface.com. The product can be tried for free, Dave. No credit card required. People can poke at it and see if what we're saying is true.  All right, thank you. Geoff Bessin: Dave. It's a pleasure. Thanks for having me.

#US - Unique & Shared Experiences

With spring strongly here we are starting to think out of the nest to focus on stories of personal growth, new beginnings and establishing independence. So today we will have five tales for you from storytellers who are going through changes. Join #Us as we explore coming into one's self and discovering all that you can be. Subscribe to our Email List:: https://www.firstpersonarts.org/signup Support #US:  https://www.firstpersonarts.org/donate First Person Arts Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/firstpersonarts Amazon Charity: https://tinyurl.com/Amazon-Charity-FPA First Person Arts Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FirstPersonPhilly/ First Person Arts Twitter: https://twitter.com/FirstPersonArts Subscribe to First Person Arts YouTube: https://tinyurl.com/SubscribetoFPA ABOUT UNIQUE & SHARED EXPERIENCES PODCAST Twice a month #US – Unique and Shared Experiences features stories from 20 years of archives curated around common themes. We believe that everyone has a story to tell and that sharing our stories connects us with each other and the world.  

The Other Stories | Sci-Fi, Horror, Thriller, WTF Stories

Two For JoyRobert Blythe, 'The Man Who Can Explode Birds With His Mind' is back with renewed dreams of making a difference in the world. But how does one make an impression as a supervillain if no one ever notices you?Written and narrated by Alexandra ElroyEdited by Duncan Muggleton (http://soundcloud.com/duncanmuggleton)With music by Duncan Muggleton (http://soundcloud.com/duncanmuggleton)And Thom Robson (https://www.thomrobsonmusic.com/)The episode illustration was provided by Luke Spooner of Carrion House (https://carrionhouse.com/)A quick thanks to our community managers, Joshua Boucher and Jasmine ArchAnd Carolyn O'Brien for helping with our submission reading.And to Ben Errington for the content campaigns, dungeons, trolls caves, elf woods, and teifling towns he takes us to in his ongoing game of Social Media Dungeons & Dragons.Alexandra is a bilingual voice actress and writer who lives in the Netherlands. She loves everything to do with stories, especially creative and playful horror. Her favourite voices to do are witches, goblins and crazy computers. When she is not voicing, writing or mummy-ing (which is all the time, really) she directs plays that she adapted from classic novels such as Pride and Prejudice, Death on the Nile and One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest.Would you like to have an episode of The Other Stories dedicated to you or someone you love... or maybe to a cause... or just to dedicate an episode to your favourite type of sandwich, then get in touch over at TheOtherStories.net/contact and let us know!You can help support the show over at Patreon.com/HawkandCleaverYou can join our Bookclub, Movieclub, and writing exercises over at Facebook.com/groups/hawkandcleaverT-shirts, mugs, posters, and comic books are available at www.gumroad.com/hawkandcleaverGet help with your short stories and your podcasts by heading to TheOtherStories.Net/servicesThe Other Stories is a production of the story studio, Hawk & Cleaver, and is brought to you with a Creative Commons – Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives license. Don't change it. Don't sell it. But by all means… share the hell out of it. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nick Luck Daily Podcast
The Saturday Edition - Ep. 36

Nick Luck Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 21:18


In this episode of the Saturday Edition of the Nick Luck Daily podcast, Charlotte Greenway recaps on. some of industry members' points of view on the BHA's latest proposal to combat small field sizes. This weekend is the Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs in the US and Michelle Yu provides a rundown of the field, picking out the main contenders. Then we hear from Bhupat Seemar who's brought Summer is Tomorrow over from the UAE for the race and long time, successful, US owner Mike Repole who has a runner in both the Oaks and the Derby with Nest and Mo Donegal. Over in Ireland, PaddyTwomey is looking to test the credentials of his Epsom Derby candidate, French Claim, who runs at Leopardstown on Sunday and discusses his chance.

Come and See
Put your head in the Lion's Jaw and Kick the Hornets' Nest!

Come and See

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 9:52


Composer of the Week
Vaughan Williams Today 1/4

Composer of the Week

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 81:50


This month, Donald Macleod takes a fresh look at Ralph Vaughan Williams, one of the UK's most significant music figures, as part of Radio 3's 'Vaughan Williams Today' season, marking the 150th anniversary of his birth. Ralph Vaughan Williams is one of the UK's most significant musical figures. This month, Donald Macleod takes a fresh look at this much loved composer as part of Radio 3's 'Vaughan Williams Today' season, marking the 150th anniversary of his birth Donald will be telling Vaughan Williams' life story and exploring his music in fascinating detail over the course of four weeks and twenty programmes. Interleaved with Donald's in-depth narrative accounts, some of our leading authorities on Vaughan Williams will be joining him to share new perspectives. They'll be unpacking the overlooked and less well known aspects of a composer whose body of work and diverse interests have made such an enduring imprint on British cultural life. The first week of this landmark series will focus on Vaughan Williams' formative years, and his earliest works. It could be said that Vaughan Williams was pre-destined to be a leading figure in the musical life of Great Britain. He was born in 1872 with, in his own words, "a small silver spoon in his mouth" and his mother was part of the Wedgwood and Darwin dynasties. Charles Darwin was Vaughan Williams' great uncle. Raised, after his father's early death, in the matriarchal family home Leith Hill Place in Surrey, young Ralph was encouraged in the pursuit of knowledge from an early age. The values he was exposed to growing up are reflected in his social awareness later on. He wrote music for every kind of setting, from the concert hall to the village hall. We'll follow his development from his very first attempt at writing music, Robin's Nest, to the assurance of his London Symphony. Music Featured: The Lark Ascending (excerpt) A vision of aeroplanes (excerpt) The Robin's Nest Quintet in D major - I: Allegro moderato Bucolic Suite - II. Andante; IV. Finale Songs of Travel - 3. The Roadside Fire; 4. Youth and Love In the Fen Country Songs of Travel - 1. The vagabond Heroic elegy & Triumphal Epilogue - I: Andante sostenuto Folk Songs from the Eastern Counties - No 2; No 13; No 15 Norfolk Rhapsody No 1 in E minor Five mystical songs - The Call Toward the Unknown Region The Water Mill The last invocation A Sea Symphony - III: The Waves; I: A song for all Seas (excerpt) The Garden of Proserpine (excerpt) Five mystical songs - Love bade me welcome The Wasps - Overture On Wenlock Edge - I: On Wenlock Edge; III: Is my team ploughing? The sky above the roof L'amour de Moy Quant li louseignolz jolis String Quartet No 1 in G minor - I: Allegro moderato Fantasia on a theme by Thomas Tallis - I: Largo sostenuto Phantasy Quintet - IV: Burlesca, alla moderato A London Symphony - Scherzo Linden Lea Serenade in A minor - IV: Romance Harnham Down On Wenlock Edge - Oh, when I was in love with you; Bredon Hill A Sea Symphony - II. On the Beach at Night Alone Presented by Donald Macleod Producer Johannah Smith For full track listings, including artist and recording details, and to listen to the pieces featured in full (for 30 days after broadcast) head to the series page https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0016rjd And you can delve into the A-Z of all the composers we've featured on Composer of the Week here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/3cjHdZlXwL7W41XGB77X3S0/composers-a-to-z

Trap One: A Doctor Who Podcast

Thank you for downloading the Trap One Podcast.  On this episode Pete (@Prof_Quiteamess), Simon (@Si_Hart) and Mark (@QuarkMcMalus) delve into The Hornet's Nest to celebrate the story's release on vinyl. Order the vinyl here or the entirety of the Nest Cottage Chronicles from Audible here. Paul Magr's blog on writing the story is here.

Lovecrow Ink Nest Podcast
Lovecrow Ink Nest: An invitation to a Safe Space

Lovecrow Ink Nest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 10:58


As an inclusive artist, creating a safe space for all of our guests is important. We created this message discussing our core values in inclusivity and accessibility for people who identify in  marginalized communities : Black, Indigenous, Transgender, Female, Laintx, Queer,  people of color and with special needs. We hope to continue working with you and meeting new friends along our journey by  creating a healthy relationship of mutual love and respect for one another.  

Plant Girl Magic
4. Chef Lisa Brooks Pt. 1: How She Became a Chef, Inside Our Relationship, and the “It” Factor She Looks For In a Chef

Plant Girl Magic

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 66:09


Y'all know I talk about my mentor Chef Lisa Brooks all the time, but today is extra special because she is wine-ing down with me on the podcast! In this two part series (we talked for two and a half hours y'all), Chef Lisa is sharing all about her background, her opinions on culinary schools, her first impressions of me, and so much more. I hope you guys enjoy and laugh along with us in this episode. Stay tuned for part 2! Connect with Chef Lisa Brooks! TikTok Instagram Website In this episode: How Chef Lisa became a Chef and the signs that led her there Why she would never work in a restaurant Why she chose to go to culinary school at CPCC instead of Johnson & Wales All the ways she explored entrepreneurship while she was growing up How Food Lion recruited her as a chef How I pursued her for years until she finally agreed to be my mentor The moment I blew Chef Lisa's mind with my vegan cooking All the stories from my own journey becoming a Chef that Chef Lisa witnessed and mentored me through Lessons Chef Lisa has learned as a personal chef from her own mentors What she expects from her mentees and her approach to mentorship The lessons she's learned from me on appearance, professionalism, and vegan cooking What Chef Lisa considers the “it” factor in a fellow chef Welcome to Plant Girl Magic! I'm Chef Joya, a celebrity vegan chef known for making the vegan versions of your favorite soul food and afro-caribbean dishes so good they rival the originals. On this podcast, I'm sharing the stories behind the magic, from my own vegan journey and celebrity stories, to topics I care deeply about like food injustice, family, and life as an influencer. If you have a topic you want me to cover on the podcast, please send me a DM on Instagram @cookingwithjoya. The Plant Girl Magic theme music is produced by my brother, Y'oMusic. Connect with Chef Joya! Instagram TikTok YouTube Facebook Website Chef Joya's Nest

Decision Vision
Decision Vision Episode 167: Should I Apply for Grants? – An Interview with Jill Wood, Phoenix Nest, Inc.

Decision Vision

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022


Decision Vision Episode 167: Should I Apply for Grants? – An Interview with Jill Wood, Phoenix Nest, Inc. Jill Wood, Co-Founder and CEO of Phoenix Nest, Inc., and Co-Founder of Jonah’s Just Begun- Foundation to Cure Sanfilippo, Inc., gave an overview of the process of applying for grants. She and her husband started the foundation […] The post

Business RadioX ® Network
Decision Vision Episode 167: Should I Apply for Grants? – An Interview with Jill Wood, Phoenix Nest, Inc.

Business RadioX ® Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022


Decision Vision Episode 167: Should I Apply for Grants? – An Interview with Jill Wood, Phoenix Nest, Inc. Jill Wood, Co-Founder and CEO of Phoenix Nest, Inc., and Co-Founder of Jonah’s Just Begun- Foundation to Cure Sanfilippo, Inc., gave an overview of the process of applying for grants. She and her husband started the foundation […]

In The Money Players' Podcast
Nick Luck Daily Ep 477 - You say Derby, I say Derby...

In The Money Players' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 35:14


Nick is joined by Racing Post writer Jonathan Harding to discuss the news and events from around the racing world today. Nick is in Louisville for the Kentucky Derby and catches up at some length with high profile owner Mike Repole, whose Nest and Mo Donegal will carry his hopes in the Kentucky Oaks and Derby respectively. At home, Jonathan reflects on a notable strike back at Chester for Aidan O'Brien and Ryan Moore in the two key Classic trials, while trainer Paddy Twomey joins the show to discuss the claims of his Epsom hopeful French Claim in this weekend's Derby Trial at Leopardstown. Jonathan casts his eye over the rumbling fixtures debate, and Nick brings you the latest instalment from his visit to Watership Down, this time featuring the veterinary work of Felipe (Phil) de Oliveira.

Nick Luck Daily Podcast
Ep 477 - You say Derby, I say Derby...

Nick Luck Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 35:13


Nick is joined by Racing Post writer Jonathan Harding to discuss the news and events from around the racing world today. Nick is in Louisville for the Kentucky Derby and catches up at some length with high profile owner Mike Repole, whose Nest and Mo Donegal will carry his hopes in the Kentucky Oaks and Derby respectively. At home, Jonathan reflects on a notable strike back at Chester for Aidan O'Brien and Ryan Moore in the two key Classic trials, while trainer Paddy Twomey joins the show to discuss the claims of his Epsom hopeful French Claim in this weekend's Derby Trial at Leopardstown. Jonathan casts his eye over the rumbling fixtures debate, and Nick brings you the latest instalment from his visit to Watership Down, this time featuring the veterinary work of Felipe (Phil) de Oliveira.

The Karen Kenney Show
Let's Talk About Drinking [REPLAY]

The Karen Kenney Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 68:09


In today's episode of The Karen Kenney Show, we revisit a wicked honest episode that got a lot of feedback when I first released it! I heard from so many people who said they loved the show, that it really resonated and that it got them thinking and talking with their friends and family about their own personal drinking and our greater culture of drinking. I also heard from some folks that shared that the episode touched a nerve and I even got a few messages from people that after reading the title - admitted that they were afraid to listen to it and were purposefully choosing not to at that time. On this show, we talk about some of the reasons why people might drink, what the reactions and social consequences can be when you make a conscious choice to stop and how letting it go can allow us to step more fully into the true nature of ourselves. This isn't an episode full of judgement. It's simply a down-to-earth, look at my own origin story with alcohol, my thoughts about drinking now that I'm an adult and hopefully a fresh perspective that someone will find helpful, hopeful or supportive. KK's Takeaways: First Time I Drank (6:06) Stay Safe Ladies (11:47) Awakening To My True Nature (14:30) Other People Take It Personally (17:31) My Family's History Of Drinking (21:16) The Reasons People Often Drink (23:11) If Your Life Is "Making You" Unhappy (26:18) What Do I Do If Everyone Drinks But Me?(36:40) Step Into What's True For You (45:16) Healing Internally (51:50) Karen Kenney is a certified https://www.karenkenney.com/spiritual-mentoring (Spiritual Mentor), writer, author, speaker, and the host of https://www.karenkenney.com/podcast (The Karen Kenney Show Podcast). She's also the founder of https://www.karenkenney.com/nest (THE NEST) - an online spiritual membership & community. She's been a student & guide of A Course in Miracles for close to three decades, a certified yoga teacher for 20+ years and is a longtime practitioner of Passage Meditation. She's also a Gateless Writing Instructor, workshop facilitator and transformational retreat leader. KK grew up in Lawrence & Boston, MA, and graduated from Boston University with a degree in Communications. She's known for her storytelling, her sense of humor and her “down-to-earth”, no BS approach to Spirituality. She helps people to rewrite their old stories, shift their perception from fear to Love, and deepen their connection to Self, Source & Spirit. Using her signature process - Your Story to Your Glory™ - people learn how to transform themselves and their lives from the inside out, so they can feel empowered, play a proactive part in their own healing, and experience more fun, flow, and freedom! A sought-after speaker, spiritual teacher, and thought leader for podcasts, shows, live events, group retreats and entrepreneurial mastermind programs, Karen has been invited to speak & teach on various platforms, stages & retreat centers across the country, including the renowned https://www.eomega.org/workshops/teachers/karen-kenney (Omega Institute for Holistic Studies). You can learn more & connect with KK at:http://www.karenkenney.com/ ( www.karenkenney.com) Thank you so much for listening! If you're digging the show, I'd be wicked grateful if you would go to Apple Podcasts, hit Follow and then leave a star rating & review. If something I shared from my heart today somehow landed in yours, I'd love to hear about it. So please tag me on Facebook or Instagram and let me know what your favorite part was or what you found most helpful. If you can think of someone that could benefit from hearing this episode, please share it with them & help me to spread the good word and the Love. xo 

The James Altucher Show
845 - How to build with the inventor of the iPhone, Tony Fadell!

The James Altucher Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 60:39


Quoting Tony Fadell: 'The best products are painkillers. Why? Because people need them. People, some people buy vitamins because they think they're going to help they are as they might be placebos. Other people buy painkillers, when you have back pain, when you have a headache, you buy that to get rid of that pain. And that's the best kind of product is when this when the individuals that you're trying to the audience you're trying to target, they have the pain, and you have a real answer for that pain.'In this episode of The James Altucher Show! I was joined by the one and only, Tony Fadell, an American engineer, innovator, designer, entrepreneur, coach, active investor, author, inventor of the iPod, iPhone, and founder and former CEO of Nest Labs, to talk about his new book, Build: An Unorthodox Guide to Making Things Worth Making, and also the history of iPod, and iPhone!Of course, when you have someone with his credential, who has worked with Steve Jobs and invented the iPod and iPhone, we have to talk about the origin of both of the devices, and how it is working for Steve! Also, the origin of the Nest thermostat and Nest Labs!We also talked about what made a good product, and a good idea? His thought on AR, VR versus Metaverse, and his commitment to Futureshape, where he mentors and invest in engineer or scientist working on foundational technology to make the future a reality!Visit Notepd.com to read more idea lists, or sign up and create your own idea list!My new book Skip The Line is out! Make sure you get a copy wherever you get your new book!Join You Should Run For President 2.0 Facebook Group, and we discuss why should run for president.I write about all my podcasts! Check out the full post and learn what I learned at jamesaltucher.com/podcast.Thanks so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The James Altucher Show” and rate and review wherever you get your podcasts:Apple PodcastsStitcheriHeart RadioSpotify Follow me on Social Media:YouTubeTwitterFacebook

The Mike Francesa Podcast
Ultimate Kentucky Derby Preview with Mike Francesa and Brad Thomas

The Mike Francesa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 62:44


It's Kentucky Derby time, and Mike Francesa welcomes Brad Thomas from to preview the run for the roses. The biggest horse racing weekend of the year is covered right here.00:00 Kentucky Oaks preview: Nest is the horse to beat1:43 Brad picks Nostalgic to win6:17 High Oak update7:33 Bob Baffert is at the Derby14:43 Messier's chances to win17:35 Brad picks Zandon as the horse to beat22:26 Epicenter candidate for a fade25:45 Mo Donegal may have some space to operate28:22 Happy Jack breakdown29:15 Smile Happy's pedigree31:31 Crowd Pride comes in from Japan as a wildcard34:52 Charge It has limited experience37:42 Tiz the Bomb will struggle in the dirt38:13 Pioneer of Medina with finishing problems38:44 Simplification not on Brad's list40:44 Barber Road had consistency, but unlikely to win40:57 White Abarrio likely too far on the outside42:40 Cyberknife belongs in the top tier, but green44:50 Too many questions with Classic Causeway46:35 Tawney Port grinds it out, but not fast enough47:29 Zozos has had plenty of rest but starts way outside48:54 Ethereal Road give D. Wayne Lukas another Derby starter52:07 Brad lays out his key Kentucky Derby picks54:23 What horse would be Brad's keeper?Subscribe to The Mike Francesa Podcast so you don't miss a single episode. Follow Mike Francesca & BetRivers Network on Twitter:

The Greatest Moments in the History of Forever
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

The Greatest Moments in the History of Forever

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 126:49


A criminal feigns insanity and is admitted to a mental institution where he rebels against the oppressive nurse in charge of the ward while breathing life into the anxious and downtrodden patients. Directed by Milos Forman. Screenplay by Lawrence Hauben and Bo Goldman. Based on the novel by Ken Kesey. Starring Jack Nicolson, Louise Fletcher, Will Sampson, Brad Dourif, Sydney Lassick and Danny DeVito. FOLLOW US ON LETTERBOXD - Zach1983 & MattCrosby Thank you so much for listening! Please follow the show on Twitter: @GreatestPod Subscribe on Apple Podcasts / Podbean We also discuss Pam & Tommy (Streaming on Hulu)

Loose Parts Nature Play
Nest Building Time

Loose Parts Nature Play

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 20:31


Book--Loose Parts Learning in K-3 Classrooms: https://www.gryphonhouse.com/books/details/loose-parts-learning-in-k-3-classrooms Loose Parts Play Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/LoosePartsPlay/ Loose Parts Play Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/LoosePartsPlay/   Inside Outside Michiana Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/InsideOutsideMichiana/   Loose Parts Nature Play Website: http://insideoutsidemichiana.blogspot.com

Best to the Nest with Margery & Elizabeth
EP. 298 Best to the Nest: Busy Days

Best to the Nest with Margery & Elizabeth

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022


We're both playing catch-up in our busy lives, so join us in the conversation and have a couple of laughs. Take a look at these cool things from Italy: Madova Gloves Pastry Shop Chic Nonna Di Vito Mollica Best to the Nest is our podcast all about creating strong, comfortable, beautiful nests that prepare us to fly.

The Impossible Network
Michael Plitkins - Redefining The Human Experience With Immersive Sound

The Impossible Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 62:56


This week's guest is Michael Plitkins, co-founder and Co-Der of Spatial Inc - the Immersive Audio start-up that redefines the human experience by creating virtual soundscapes where you work, where you play, and where you stay. In this interview, Michael takes us on a serendipitous journey through his life; a life defined by his willingness to embrace challenges, the courage to confront uncertainty, and trust in his ferocious independence. We discuss the trajectory of his fascinating career in Software Engineering, his appreciation for, and experience in design, how that opened the doors to his first role as an engineer, working across some groundbreaking technologies in VR and voice space, at iconic companies from Netscape to Nest. At 27 min Michael discusses the genesis of his idea for creating Spatial when he discovered no immersive audio solution existed to deliver the experience he sought. Micheal describes how he and his team are breaking down traditional audio barriers, taking audio to a new level, and allowing a community of creators to use Spatial tools to unleash their creative soundscapes as part of their designs, Michael and his team are poised to reimagine immersive audio that will change how we experience community spaces like retail, hospitals, entertainment spaces and even the office. Thanks to past guest Walter Werzowa for the recommendationNow on with the showHis early years and expanding world view from living in the UK and traveling Europe in his youth. The influence of his father and mother The serendipitous impact of discovering the Apple2 computerHaving the confidence to carve his own path without the traditional education trajectoryEarly career path Discovering the need to build immersive audio to scratch his own itch. The commercial applications of SpatialHis quick-fire answers Social LinksSpatial IncInstagramTwitter Linkedin Links in the showIBM Paper SoftwareApple IINetscape Tony FadellSilicon GraphicsTell-Me Networks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
How big companies kill ideas — and how to fight back, with Tony Fadell

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 77:29


Tony Fadell was instrumental in the development of the iPod and iPhone at Apple and then co-founded Nest Labs, which kicked off the consumer smart home market with its smart thermostat in 2011. Tony sold Nest to Google for $3.2 billion in 2014 and eventually left Google. He now runs an investment company called Future Shape.  Links: Inside the Nest: iPod creator Tony Fadell wants to reinvent the thermostat General Magic - Trailer Inside Facebook's metaverse for work Silicon Graphics Google is reorganizing and Sundar Pichai will become new CEO Fire drill: can Tony Fadell and Nest build a better smoke detector? Google purchases Nest for $3.2 billion Twitter accepts buyout, giving Elon Musk total control of the company Nest is rejoining Google to better compete with Amazon and Apple Apple Music Event 2005 - Motorola Rokr E1 / iTunes Phone Activision Blizzard hit with another sexual harassment lawsuit Nest buying video-monitoring startup Dropcam for $555 million What matters about Matter, the new smart home standard ZIGBEE ON MARS! Directory: Steve Jobs, CEO of Apple Andy Grove, former CEO of Intel Pat Gelsinger, current CEO of Intel Sundar Pichai, current CEO of Alphabet Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla, SpaceX, and The Boring Company Jeff Williams, COO of Apple Matt Rogers, Nest co-founder Jeff Robbin, VP of consumer applications at Apple Steve Hoteling, former CEO gesture recognition company Finger Works Jon Rubinstein, senior VP of the iPod division at Apple Steve Sakomen, hardware engineer and executive at Apple  Avie Tavanian, chief software technology officer at Apple Scott Forstall, senior VP of iOS software, Apple Jony Ive, chief design officer, Apple Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/22817673 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Beasts Of Burden
Ep 72: Hunter Johnson on Nest Predators

Beasts Of Burden

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 106:31


In this episode, we have our awesome guest Hunter Johnson of Arkansas! One topic that is often discussed amongst turkey hunters is: predators. Many fingers point to these furbearers as the culprit for our low turkey numbers. But is it? Hunter and I explore this along with our habitat tools to improve turkey habitat also at the same time advocating for trapping. Trapping is necessary to manage the predators at the end of the day.You can reach Hunter Johnson personally on Facebook or if you would like to learn more:Hunters: Breaking the Ceiling https://www.facebook.com/groups/613577862568335Turkey Hunters: Reversing the Decline https://www.facebook.com/groups/477669256900330Southern Habitat Managers: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1297985527013375

The 2AM Podcast
EP 148: Don't Do This To A Wasp Nest

The 2AM Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 17:46


Miguel's wasp nest disaster & thoughts on narcissism.    FOLLOW THE 2AM PODCAST: VISIT OUR WEBSITE  FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM  SUBSCRIBE TO OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL GRAB SOME MERCH

Arete Coach: The Art & Science of Executive Coaching
AC 1072 Shahrzad Sherry Nooravi PsyD MCC "Bit by Bit the Bird Builds Her Nest"

Arete Coach: The Art & Science of Executive Coaching

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 62:13


This is episode 1072 of the Arete Coach Podcast with host Severin Sorensen and guest coach Dr. Shahrzad Sherry Nooravi, who is an executive coach, organizational psychologist, speaker, author, CEO and Founder of Strategy Meets Performance, and an ICF Master Certified Coach (MCC). Today she works from San Diego, California, and helps business leaders through her organization Strategy Meets Performance. In our interview, Shahrzad talks about the importance of creating intentional culture, something she calls building the nest. We explore her coaching journey and talk about the nuances of executive coaching today. Shahrzad has been coaching through her organization and has served as adjunct faculty for the Center for Creative Leadership since 2010. In 2021 Shahrzad was the Vice-Chair for the Organization Development Network and President of the San Diego Chapter of the International Coaching Federation. Not only does Shahrzad have her MCC and doctorate in organizational development she has also received multiple awards such as 2019 Woman to Watch from the California Women's Leadership Association and 2015 Circulate San Diego's Citizen of the Year. Furthermore, she is also a highly successful author, speaker, group coach, and workshop leader covering topics such as culture, teamwork, and resilience. Her upcoming book, “A Powerful Culture Starts with You” breaks down culture and leadership in a unique and interesting manner with case studies and tips for leaders.  Discover more on these topics are at AreteCoach.io. The Arete Coach Podcast seeks to explore the art and science of executive coaching. You can find out more about this podcast at aretecoach.io. This episode was produced on January 20, 2022. Copyright © 2022 by Arete Coach™ LLC. All rights reserved.

WAN DEEP SESSION
WAN DEEP SESSION #563 (Deni Blaq Galactica Show Live @ The Nest Prague ) [PROGRESSIVE TECHNO / PSY TECHNO]

WAN DEEP SESSION

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 124:11


Brand new episode!Enjoy and subscribe for more!!!Donate us on PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/iamquantom Follow our social media:instagram.com/techartofficialinstagram.com/wanderlustrecfacebook.com/wanderlustrecsoundcloud.com/wanderlustrecFollow our Spotify Playlist:https://open.spotify.com/playlist/4i4M6A9QvdIAgOStjjWQPrTAG #wandeepsession on IGFollow our group on Telegram for more music:https://t.me/wanderlustrecordsListen WAN DEEP SESSION Live on Infinity Radio every Saturday 7PM-9PMhttps://infinityradioireland.comIf you want to have a guestmix in our session, just send us link with 1,5h - 2h of your mix (WAV) including tracklist.Email: wandeepsession@outlook.com© Wanderlust Records Ltd. 2017-2022 All Rights Reserved

On Boards Podcast
39. Gabe Kleinman - The most valuable companies of our time will be the ones solving humanity's biggest problems

On Boards Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 37:00


In a very short time - six, seven years - we've gone from impact investing being referred to as "invest for less" to “companies responsibly harnessing technology to solve big problems will outperform.”  In this episode we discuss how ESG has helped to drive that shift and the impact it is having on investing and board governance.   Thanks for listening! We love our listeners! Drop us a line or give us guest suggestions here.   Links   Board education & certification: https://www.pfisterstrategy.com/exceptionalboarddirector   Book on Board Architecture: https://www.pfisterstrategy.com/books   Gabe Bio: https://obvious.com/team/gabe-kleinman     Quotes   Ev Williams on why he founded Obvious Ventures: "I want to fund the companies that I wish existed in the world."   Obvious exists to back purpose-driven founders reimagining trillion dollar sectors. We are a multi-specialty firm investing in the fundamental building blocks of life and society: food, transportation, housing, healthcare, and more, investing in companies that are completely reimagining each of those sectors for the better.   For the first number of years at Obvious Ventures, we did not talk about impact. We actually banned the "I" word because the industry of “impact investing,” as it was originally constructed, was not a returns-focused industry. It was an industry wishing to realize some returns alongside some sort of social or environmental impact. There was a general belief that one would have to sacrifice profits in order to get that impact return, so to speak.   We founded Obvious Ventures on the simple belief that the most valuable companies of our time will be the ones solving humanity's biggest problems." For earlier-stage venture, board observers are common, and I think that's due to the nature of the stage of the company and what they need to do in order to survive, because for early-stage venture-backed companies the fatality rate is high – they want as much good advice and help as they can get.   A colleague of mine has a saying, "Startups don't die of starvation. They die of indigestion." And so helping them figure out what to focus on and how to get there really helps, and from a CEO standpoint, the board is an extension of your team.   Board meeting agenda So many boards get bogged down in the actual board room with these graphs and data and charts and everyone's squinting and it's like going through a boring presentation for 80% of the meeting. We recommend that CEOs really anchor their meetings in OKRs, (known as Objectives and Key Results), walking through a literal scorecard of how we are doing.   Red, not going so well, yellow, we're doing okay, and green, things are going really well.   If you're spending 80% of your board meeting with presentations, you're wasting your time. The board meeting is not the time to educate the board. That is the board's homework. They should come to the meeting, having done their homework and be prepared to do exactly what you just said, address the issues that the CEO and/or whatever, the management team is really grappling with to get the most value out of the people that are in the room.   Boring presentations at a meeting can be a telltale sign. Most early-stage startup and venture-backed boards are hands-on problem-solving boards.  The nature of the meeting tells you a lot of what's going on with early-stage boards.   Objectives and Key Results, and it's a framework popularized by John Doerr, and before him, Andy Grove at Intel, can be an effective way of running organizations from small to large, and especially an effective dashboarding mechanism for board meetings.     Big Ideas/Thoughts   What is a B Corp What it means to become a certified B Corp is you have to score above a certain threshold on an assessment that an organization called B Lab has created which assesses what are functionally environmental, social, and governance practices of the company.  I think it's a great tool for any company of any size to take just as a reflective tool to understand your operation and how you're doing.     Refreshing your board A company is a different company at a Series B stage or series C stage with $50 million in annualized revenue, then when it had a $100,000 ARR and it was just getting started with three board members. So often it makes sense that a CEO may need a different set of directors with a different kind of experience at a different stage, while still maintaining some continuity and understanding of the roots and the original purpose of the organization.     Impact Investing vs Investing in purpose-driven companies We believe that the biggest challenges that our world is facing, oftentimes highlighted by activists and social entrepreneurs were, in fact, big market opportunities and that companies solving those problems would realize the greatest returns   If you look at both consumer sentiment as well as companies that are trying to attract the best employees, the best employees want to work at companies that are having some sort of an impact, and the easiest way for us to measure that impact is through revenue generated and services rendered. It's that simple.   For example, if you look at Proterra, every time they sell an electric bus, they're taking a diesel bus off the road.  Every time Diamond Foundry sells an engagement ring or creates a semiconductor wafer chip that is lab grown, it's hopefully taking a diamond mine, which is carbon-intensive with horrible labor practices, out of business.   It's everywhere now, and everybody is waking up to the reality of these problems that we have to solve. It's important to note that we need the public sector. There's no question about that. Without a healthy public sector, none of these can be solved, and same with social activists who often highlight these areas for us, but we need the private sector to be a driver of innovation and delivering those solutions through the market. We are believers in capitalism. We think we need to change the definition and the practices of capitalism, but that's kind of happening on its own. Everyone is waking up to these new realities and the role of the private sector in helping solve them.   Beyond Meat as a great example of the shift. There were plenty of plant-based options before Beyond Meat, Morningstar Burgers and Quorn, and they were all in the novelty food section of the supermarket. The epic shift that Beyond Meat pioneered was you don't have to be a vegetarian to love a plant-based product.  We are not creating something that is for vegetarians only …we are competing with Angus, and we are going to take them on. One of the big defining moves that Ethan Brown pioneered at Beyond Meat was getting Beyond Meat placed in the meat case alongside Angus options so that everyday people could choose these things. What it really boiled down to was creating a super product that competed with the "original," and you see this playing out across a host of industries, not just in plant-based protein. Tesla makes the safest, fastest car – which also happens to be the best for the reducing carbon. Nest makes the most beautiful, money-saving thermostat ­– which also happens to be best for efficient energy use. And so on.

BirdNote
Cactus Wren Nest Orientation

BirdNote

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 1:37


Cactus Wrens, which may nest several times between March and September, carefully orient their nests in tune with the season. These bulky twig structures have a side entrance that curves toward the inner chamber. When building a nest for the hot months, the wren faces the opening to receive the afternoon breeze. By contrast, a Cactus Wren building a nest in early March orients the entrance away from the cold winds of that season, keeping the chicks snug and warm. Learn more at BirdNote.org.

Bleeding Green Nation: for Philadelphia Eagles fans
Above the Nest with Raichele #50: First-round trends + why the Eagles can make some noise now

Bleeding Green Nation: for Philadelphia Eagles fans

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 9:06


Whew! What a crazy first night!  Raichele Privette recaps the Eagles first-round moves. She explains what Jordan Davis bring to the table and why A.J. Brown immediately makes the Eagles WR room better. She also previews what to know ahead of night two. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Protecting Your NEST with Dr. Tony Hampton
Stop Dialysis before it starts with Teresa Rodriguez, RDN, IFNCP, CNSC, LDN, CLT: Episode 96

Protecting Your NEST with Dr. Tony Hampton

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 75:48


Welcome to Protecting Your Nest with Dr. Tony Hampton. Teresa Rodriguez is an Advanced Practice Registered Dietitian with training as a specialist in renal nutrition, nutrition support, mitochondrial health, ketogenic diet, and identifying adverse food reactions with an emphasis on food sensitivities as part of an Integrative and Functional Nutrition. In this discussion, Dr. Tony and Teresa talk about: (00:04:14) What is an Advanced Practice Registered Dietician? (00:07:07) Teresa's experience utilizing the ketogenic diet as a dietician (00:08:50) What is unique about Teresa's approach to working with patients in her practice (and why genetic testing is important) (00:15:32) Teresa's book, The Keto Solution for Kidney Disease (00:20:22) Studies on kidney disease and diet (00:34:54) How mold can negatively effect your kidney health as well as your over-all health (00:40:51) Protein and kidney health (00:47:34) The different approaches to treating kidney disease depending on which stage the kidney disease is in (00:55:04) Factors contributing to kidney stones (01:00:15) The benefits of a ketogenic diet for halting the progression of kidney disease (01:06:24) Teresa's NEST and ROPE goals Thank you for listening to Protecting Your Nest. For additional resources and information, please see the links below.    Links:   Teresa Rodriguez: Curious Mind RD Book   Dr. Tony Hampton: Linktree Instagram Account LinkedIn Account Ritmos Negros Podcast

Literally! With Rob Lowe
Michael Douglas: Taking the Makeup Off

Literally! With Rob Lowe

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 40:00


Welcome to episode 100! Today Rob Lowe sits down with Hollywood legend Michael Douglas to talk all things acting. In this episode you'll experience the hurdles it took to create One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, what makes a good producer and a good actor, Michael's unique interaction with Debra Winger, and the intricacies of awards ceremonies. All of this and a whole lot more—on today's celebration of an episode! Got a question for Rob? Call our voicemail at (323) 570-4551. Yours could get featured on the show!