Podcasts about Nepal

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Country in South Asia

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  • May 16, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Nepal

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Latest podcast episodes about Nepal

The Kevin Jackson Show
Ep. 22-192 - Boosted Revenue

The Kevin Jackson Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 38:40


In this episode, Russia's oil and gas revenues hit record highs despite Biden's sanctions. Twitters permanent ban policy and actual percentage of bot or spam accounts.

The Wisdom Podcast
Shaila Catherine: Beyond Distraction (#138)

The Wisdom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 77:33


This episode of the Wisdom Podcast features Shaila Catherine, who has been practicing meditation since 1980, with more than eight years of accumulated silent retreat experience. She has taught insight meditation since 1996 in the U.S. and internationally, dedicating several years to studying with masters in India, Nepal, and Thailand. She is the founder of Bodhi Courses—an […] The post Shaila Catherine: Beyond Distraction (#138) appeared first on The Wisdom Experience.

BCPL Unstacked
Author Talk 24: Unwind with Amy McCulloch

BCPL Unstacked

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 61:40


Unstacked with Sarah (Bay County Public Library) and Stephen (Huntsville-Madison County Public Library). Join us for an interview with best-selling author, Amy McCulloch. We'll discuss her adult debut thriller, Breathless, set in Mt Manaslu in Nepal. Amy's personal experience mountaineering adds to the authenticity of the thriller. Amy climbed Mt Manaslu in 2019 and is the youngest Canadian woman to reach the summit. Unwind with Amy as she shares her writing process, love of adventure, Chocolate Buttons, libraries, and more. For more information about Amy McCulloch, visit her website at https://amymcculloch.net/. "The Story behind Breathless" video can be found here: https://youtu.be/chZUd9rk5NI. Stay safe and read my friend. It's good for you! #AmyMcCulloch #Libraries #NWRLS #HMCPL #WritingProcess #Mysteries #MtManaslu #Breathless #Summit #Mountaineering #Antarctica #ProjectPossible

The Desi VC: Indian Venture Capital | Angel Investors | Startups | VC

Varun Alagh is the CEO and co-founder of D2C unicorn, MamaEarth, a personal care brand that specializes in baby and toddler products. Varun is a master marketer having worked for the world's most valuable brands Coca-Cola as well as its Diets and Lights portfolio for India and South West Asia (Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka). Before this role, he worked with Diageo and managed World's No.1 spirits brand Smirnoff for India. Prior to his stint with Unilever he was in sales for 3 years managing an 800 crore in more than 20 categories spread across home care, personal care & foods.In this episode, we will cover:1. How do you build purpose driven brands in India 3:502. Building a voice over time 14:543. As an entrepreneur, how does one find purpose? 24:404. How do investors react to purpose 29:415. What does it mean to be a unicorn startup today? 31:536. What excites Varun about Indian consumers and what does he still not understand about them 34:30

Cuke Audio Podcast
With Guest David Padwa

Cuke Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 41:52


David Padwa helped us to obtain Tassajara. You'll hear some about his many roads herein like his venture out in the Be Here Now trip to Nepal and India and about his upcoming new book , Tetralemma. Check it out at tetralemma.org.

Behind The Shield
Matt Dawson - Episode 614

Behind The Shield

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 115:03


Matt Dawson is a finance manager, explorer and the man behind Dawson's Peak. We discuss the career that ended his football journey, the world of finance, the pursuit of happiness, enlightenment in Nepal, overcoming grief, Project Seven for Soldiers and so much more.

UCA News Podcast
Observations: Social science research can replace no-longer-effective answers to no-longer existing problems

UCA News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 7:27


The Catholic Church in Asia operates in ignorance. We don't really know ourselves or the world in which we are called to proclaim the Good News. There is a realm of research to which we must turn, the social sciences. They can tell us not only about the world outside the Church, but about ourselves as well.  Professional research in sociology and psychology would enable us to escape the trap of no-longer-effective answers to no-longer-existing problems.  Father William Grimm, who lives in Japan,  shares some thoughts on this.Produced by Binu AlexFor news in and about the Church in Asia, visit www.ucanews.com

The Tuddle Daily Podcast
Episode 646: Tuddle Daily Podcast 628 “Grammy Winner”

The Tuddle Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 78:40


Tuddle Daily Podcast 05122022My interview with Grammy winning classical pianist Angelin Chang“America's 1st woman GRAMMY-Award Winning Classical Pianist”MusicMusic InterviewsMusic TuitionEducationSelf-ImprovementAbout MeCritically acclaimed for her musical poetry and technical brilliance, Angelin Chang is America's first woman classical pianist to win the GRAMMY® Award (Best Instrumental Soloist with orchestra). Recognized in the Women of Hopkins honoring female trailblazers from Johns Hopkins University, Dr. Angelin Chang is Professor of Music and Law at Cleveland State University. As a leader in the music industry, she has been selected into Nashville's prestigious Leadership Music. Through specialized performance-related injury prevention and alleviation techniques, Dr. Chang helps pianists develop virtuosity while liberating them from fatigue, pain and injury, and has published on the subject for the European Piano Teachers Association International Conference. She brings immediate and lasting results for high-level performing musicians to enjoy technical freedom with artistic expression.Angelin Chang has performed worldwide on major concert stages to stadiums from New York to Nepal before royalty and the UN Secretary-General for UN75, World AIDS Day, and the United Nations Women's Organization. She performs worldwide at venues such as Carnegie Hall (New York), Kimmel Center (Philadelphia), Severance Hall (Cleveland), Radio France, Worldwide Afro Network, South African Broadcasting Corporation, and with members of The Cleveland Orchestra and The Philadelphia Orchestra. As the first Artist-in-Residence at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., she developed and launched the Arts for Everyone initiative. Dr. Angelin Chang presents piano seminars and masterclasses at such institutions as the Cleveland Institute of Music, Manhattan School of Music, University of North Texas, Temple University and Curtis Institute of Music (Philadelphia). She provides online programs to professionals in piano mastery for music-playing career longevity. www.angelinchang.com

UCA News Podcast
UCA News Weekly Summary, May 13, 2022

UCA News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 12:42


Listen to news from and about the Church in Asia in a capsule around 10 minutes.The arrest of Hong Kong's Cardinal Joseph Zen has sparked global outrage about communist China's iron-fisted grip on freedoms and rights in the former British colony. This story and more in this week's podcast.Filed by UCA News reporters, compiled by Rock Ronald Rozario, edited by Peter Hill, presented by John Laurenson, background score by Andre Louis and produced by Binu Alex for ucanews.comFor news in and about the Church in Asia, visit www.ucanews.comTo contribute please visit www.ucanews.com/donateTwitter Handle: twitter.com/ucanews

Roll With The Punches
Angels In Disguise | Helen Zahos - 347

Roll With The Punches

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 47:34


When the proverbial hits the fan anywhere in the world Helen Zahos is quite possibly going to be there in a heartbeat, halo firmly in place. If you ask me, Helen is an angel in disguise. An Emergency Nurse, Humanitarian, Paramedic and incredibly resilient woman, Helen has volunteered in disaster areas around the world and has cared for some of the world's most vulnerable people. Helen has volunteered in Iraq in IDP Camps, in Nepal after the earthquake and Philippines after the Typhoon, as well as assisting during the Syrian refugee crisis on the border of Greece. We talk about how nothing ever came easy for Helen, how hard she worked to be able to do the work she loves. The ups and downs of the personal sacrifice and emotional investment and how Helen has and continues to manage herself in the middle of it all. Another podcast bestie, you can be sure of that! EPISODE SPONSOR | SCOPE (AUST) LTD Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/scopeaust/ LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/company/scope-aust/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/scopeaust Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/scopeaust/ HELEN ZAHOS Website: www.helenzahos.com TIFFANEE COOK Linktree:  https://linktr.ee/rollwiththepunches/ Website: www.rollwiththepunches.com.au LinkedIn:  www.linkedin.com/in/tiffaneecook/ Facebook:  www.facebook.com/rollwiththepunchespodcast/ Instagram:  www.instagram.com/rollwiththepunches_podcast/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/tiffaneeandco   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Money Matters with Wes Moss
Identifying Your Philanthropic Pursuits and Giving Back with Maggie Doyne

Money Matters with Wes Moss

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 52:49


Wes is joined by Maggie Doyne, philanthropist, author, Founder of BlinkNow, and 2015's CNN Hero of the Year Award recipient, to address discovering your philanthropic pursuits and how you can give back. Maggie talks about finding herself in Nepal at a young age, how she felt the urge to make a change in the country based on an eye-opening experience, and her motivation for building a children's home, women's center, and school there. She provides updates about raising numerous children in Nepal and their success stories, along with why she believes there is something to be done everywhere in every community. The episode concludes with Maggie revealing tips for finding what gives you purpose and formulating ways to give back based on the change you want to see in the world. She also unveils details from her recent book, “Between the Mountain and the Sky,” her nonprofit BlinkNow, and how listeners can show support. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sushant Pradhan Podcast
Episode 50: Sabal Shaha, Managing Director of Garud Securities | Sushant Pradhan Podcast

Sushant Pradhan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 79:57


Mr. Sabal Shaha is the Managing Director of Garud Securities; the largest private security company in Nepal. In this Podcast, Mr. Sabal Shaha shares his knowledge and experiences on starting a company, motivating people, managing a large group, recruiting manpower, growth, opportunities, etc. Mr. Sabal Shaha's Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sabal.shaha Mr. Sabal Shah's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sabal-shaha-01031a175/?originalSubdomain=np Garud Securities: https://www.garudsecurities.com.np/

Missing Witches
WF Ana Tajder: Mother Wisdom and Mother Wounds

Missing Witches

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 47:09


https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/thank-you-mama/id1502312840 Full Transcript: Risa: [00:00:00] Welcome. Welcome friends. Welcome. Children, mums, parents, magical beings... welcome a wall of fog and returning birds. You'll hear the honk soaring overhead, and the stomps of the three-year old upstairs as we begin to sort of circle in, call in our feelings for a missing Witches first let's talk about mothers. We'll say from the beginning, what a complicated question. And we have the right person to open this up with us. For so many of us, this idea of just purely celebrating mama culture is really hard. There's so much mother trauma in so many of our communities [00:01:00] and so many families where that idea needs to be queered and needs to be multipled. And today I am carrying the heavy weight on my chest of having read the leaked opinion from the United States Supreme court that will force motherhood, forced pregnancy on women's bodies that will remove the protection of Roe vs. Wade. And I'm just really, reeling with the sorrow of what that will mean today. And it all just feels complicated and connected, by the time this episode comes out, we'll know more, but that's where my feeling is. And I have to be honest about it. Thanks for being here, thanks to the coven for being here and for all of you portalling in and out and being in this circle wherever you are in time, by the time the sound hits you. We'll just hold this sorrow together and also this light. [00:02:00] And we'll turn to the complicated question of things we can learn from our mothers, whether they mean to teach it to us or not. You can hear the sweet laugh of Ana she's the award-winning journalist, who is the host of the Thank You Mama podcast. She has interviewed so many people from all over the world about what their mothers taught them. And really you dig into both sides of this question. What did they mean to teach you? What do you wish they could have taught you? What were the tacit lessons? What is this knowledge that's sort of on the edges of all this rationalized knowledge. What are moms passing down hand by hand? You you've gotten so many windows into that. So thank you so much for being here with us today. Ana: Thank you for having me. I'm so excited [00:03:00] to be here with. Today and talk about this and share my learnings and insights and thoughts about this. It's a fascinating topic and I've been dealing with it for two years at this stage, and it's just opening more and more angles. You know, the deeper I go into it, the more dimensions of being open to me and I'm, I feel very blessed that it's a beautiful world to discover and a beautiful topic to be dealing with. Risa: Yeah, it is. Do you wanna tell us how you started and then maybe what are some of the dimensions that are opening now that you're surprised about? Ana: It started very organically. It did not start as a podcast. It started a few weeks after I lost my mom and my mom and I were extremely, extremely close. Her parents had died when she was very young. So she basically lonely had me. She turned me. I mean to her family. And [00:04:00] we had a very beautiful relationship. She was by far not a perfect mother. She was a strange mother, but the one I loved so much. She had two parallel careers. She was an award-winning acclaimed and admire movie actress and parallel to that. She finished the academy of arts and was a visual artist equally, a claimed and awarded. And. What's amazing about my mom being my mom is that she, in a way she's an idol to me, but I meet more and more young women in creation nowadays. So tell me she was there. She is there idle as well. So it's, it's a very. Beautiful situation of having a mom. Who's your idol, both career wise and, you know, towards the outside, towards what she represented in the society, as well [00:05:00] as how she raised me and the relationship she had with me. So when she died of cancer, very surprisingly, oh, it was a big shock for me. And a few weeks afterwards, I had a panic attack. I had this panic fear that I was going to forget everything she told me and that through that I was going to forget everything. She. Who she is that I'm going to lose her if I forget what she told me. So I sat down and started writing down everything I could remember. She told me, and then that turned into everything she taught me and everything she showed me and that turned, started turning into a book about her life, through her lessons. And then the magic started happening in that I was telling my friends what I'm working on. And you could see their reactions, how obvious and deep and important [00:06:00] this topic is to all of us. What have we learned from our mothers, but we never really articulated or put it in a form or give it a deeper thought. And that inspired me to start a podcast. because for me, the important thing was to interview women from all over the world. I really, and this is why a podcast was such a great medium to do this because I can just use Skype and interview women. I had women from 50 different countries. I had women from Nepal and Tanzania and Kenya and Trinidad and Iran, and you know, all over the world. And it was important to me to not only go geographically globally, but also to interview women from very different backgrounds and different religions and different socio economic status and not only successful professionally [00:07:00] successful women, but stay at home moms, women who are farmers to really get a feeling for what is it that our mothers around the world teach us. And then little by little, and this is one of the dimensions that opened up. A question popped up to me. I still quite early on in my interviews was what, what was something important that your mom did not teach you? What, what did you miss in, in what she showed you taught to you? And this turned out to be one of the equally important question as what your mom taught you. But then another dimension that was really important to me because I had such a close relationship to my mom and I grew up in this beautiful mother-daughter bubble. Was that. Not all women have relationships like that. They're mothers. And somehow the universe shoved my head into a [00:08:00] series of interviews just recently with women who had very let's call them complex relationships with their mothers. And I started reading literature on mothers who don't love, or, you know, complicated mother daughter relationships to prepare myself for these interviews because it was a completely foreign world to me. And I've learned that this is just as important as those women who come on my show, who just, you know, bursts with love with their mothers is women who had very tough relationship and still have lessons to share that they learn from, from that, that, that that's beautiful. Risa: It gives me a sense of ease in a way around the subject to know that those stories are included to, you know, those stories are, as you say, they're, they're pushing their way in the universe is pushing their way into you [00:09:00] being. Like, this is complicated shit, you know? Ana: Well, I started reading the books about mother wounds and, you know, the, the inherited trauma and they just opened, it opened again, it opened the whole world to me, a new world that I didn't know, but also it opened my eyes towards some of the trauma that goes around in my family that we never dealt with it actually, or, you know, it gets mentioned, but never really dealt with. Risa: Can you tell us more about this childhood on an island in Croatia, you told me that children told you you were a witch when you were growing up and your mother sounds like she had. A real magic, like a real, she made a magic bubble for you and it wasn't always perfect, but.. Ana: So I, I did not grow up on the island. I grew up basically in [00:10:00] Zagreb in the capital of Croatia, but my mom's family comes from a very tiny island. South of Croatia. It's so tiny there during the winter, there are 120 people living in it. It doesn't have any hotels. It doesn't have any cars. So it's really, when you watch a Disney movie, Luca, I think was the last Disney movie with this beautiful Mediterranean island. That's our island. You know where everybody's family, no cars, no tourists, just this wild. Beautiful. Mediterranean island. And so just as my mother did, I would spend my whole summers there. So come end of school, you know, immediately the next day we went to the, to the island and I would spend two and a half, three months on the island every year. We. All of us in our family feel extremely, extremely, deeply connected to the island. We really feel like it's in our blood, in our veins and the [00:11:00] island. I know I'm boasting and I sound like a person in love, but people who arrive to the island do say that it has very, very deep energies and it's very special. we Have an old house, which my great grandmother bought. And that's another beautiful story about my island. Please tell me to shut up if I'm too long with my story. Oh no, no, no. A theme of our podcast is please expand. So please take us on this journey. So in early. 20th century. So just, I would say just around first world war. The, that was back then, Austro-Hungarian monarchy that the island belong to went through its crisis. As did the whole world. There was no food. There was, there were, there was a depression and the men on the island decided to go and look for [00:12:00] other places to work and go look for money so they can send money back home to the island to support their wives and children. So they left. Once the men left the women decided to dress themselves in black and they took over everything, everything they took over the farming, they went fishing, they raised their children, they took, took over whatever work there was. These women. Dressed in black on this Mediterranean island took over and I have a beautiful postcard, always on my desk of these women. And you can see how burned by the sun and hard work they are. They, they, they look like men actually. This life toughened them up a lot. And it was famous for being this island of these women dressed in black and they would go rowing the boat. They would go fishing. And this picture stays very clearly in my head from hearing about it and seeing [00:13:00] the old photographs of these women in these big black dresses, rowing their boats, you know, and fishing. So it's, it's a very magical, and female, like this place, that's just bursting with this women, females and female energy. Quite recently, I heard stories I read that the inhabitants of the island original inhabitants were considered witches. They were in, I think there were shamans. Uh, they brought the. Whatever religion or shamanism, I think from Bosnia Herzegovina when they came towards the island centuries earlier and they never forgot it. So there are stories of raising dead back to life. Apparently in front of each house door, we have bones of our ancestors buried. I dunno, I haven't yet looked into it. Who is buried and what's buried in front [00:14:00] of our house, but. There are all these stories of this. And there are also stories of people being able to fly on the island. So there is a old fishermen who is now, now, already dead, but he, I think he was also like 1940s, 1950s, where he self taught himself to paint and he started painting all these amazing paintings off the magic on the island. So his paintings are full of this people flying around the island and, doing some strange rituals. And. I didn't know this. When somebody told me once one older gentlemen on the island once looked at me I was saying something and he said, oh, you're a witch just like your great grandmother. And I said, I got a little offended because I thought he meant I was, you know, we in west of this idea [00:15:00] of witches as being old evil women. And I was like, why, why is he telling me that, you know, and only once I heard this background story about what, they meant what he meant you know, I, I realized I received a compliment. Risa: Yes, you did. Ana: So that's the story. That's the story of the island. Risa: That's so powerful. I had to stop to write down. They dressed themselves in black and took over everything. Ana: How amazing is that? So pure and I'm so glad there are photographs of this women, you know, it's not just a legend. It's it's it'sreal. Risa: Yes. And now that you know, it's a compliment, do you feel connected? Do you feel like your, your writing your interviews are sort of drawing, weaving that web of power [00:16:00] between women's knowledge powerful femme knowledge? Ana: I do. And you know, it's interesting that my mom, my mom was a feminist and very outspoken and she was always an activist. She was always fighting for the weaker ones in a society back then in 1970s, way before Hollywood stars, she created a charity organization for hungry children in Africa. And she donated. Well, every award she would win she would donate and collect money and buy food and medication and fly to get over these things to Sudan and to different countries, to make sure that they reach the, the, the ones who need, they reached children and don't end up in the wrong hands. And equally, she was always very loud and raised me to be very aware of this... female energy and how special we are. Dare I say, you know, and how powerful we are. But, [00:17:00] but I'm very embarrassed to say that only through this hundred something interviews I made in last two years, this really entered my body. I don't know how to say it in different way. I really feel with every cell of my body. How. Interconnected we are. And, and what I've learned through these interviews is how there is a common narrative in women's lives, no matter where they are and what, what circumstances they live in and grew up in, you know, a woman who grows up on a farm in Turkey and a woman who grows up in a, Middle-class family in Switzerland there are always these common narratives in women's lives, and that feels extremely connecting. And that made me aware of what a sisterhood we have and how interconnected we are. And it [00:18:00] kind of was beautiful for me to learn through my podcast that I lost my mom, but I gained... billions of mothers around the world. You know, this podcast because it was really such a beautiful gift to me and listening to all this lessons and women's lives and how, how universal the lessons are, what women are teaching their children , really, really, really brought home how, how powerful and how connected we are. And it made me very, very sad that we are not aware of it. You know, even me when my mom who tried to teach me this and show it to me, it took a while for me to learn it. And I wish we, all of us would be more aware of it. Risa: Yeah, it feels pretty intentional sometimes eh? Layers and layers and layers of intention that separated us from each other, separated us from that sense of power. Ana: I just wanted to say that from the sense of power I interviewed a [00:19:00] lady a few weeks ago, who wrote a book called "We are the daughters of the witches you didn't burn" and reading her book was just so eyeopening to me. It really hit me very strongly, how unaware we are, how buried this, this feeling of our power. It was just as you say, systematically, buried through century, not century millennium, you know, and I'm glad that we are slowly waking up to it. It's going to be magical, we'll save the planet. Risa: Oh I love your optimism Ana! I need this today. I mean, I feel that in our work too, and it's so powerful to connect with your web and your circle and the sense of mounting knowledge. Cause I do believe this is how we cast a circle of protection for trans women for non-binary people for gender expansive people that it is in [00:20:00] owning our own power our own divinity, our own, power as women, as something deeply connected to the earth and to the reproductive power in the, Earth, fertility, whatever that fertility is for you. Ana: I just wanted to say this female energy that's nurturing How should I say, it's, it's nurturing and cherishing and taking care of things. We've been too long in this male energy of using rational brains and building things and constructing. My mom was always telling Ana don't construct life. It's a very male thing to do. This conscious constructing. And, I really think. We really need more of this intuition and this nurturing, caring energy, which I want to call female, you know, Risa: can you talk about [00:21:00] when the nurturing breaks down in the interviews that you've had, where for whatever reason, a mother wasn't capable of that? Can you talk about what lessons you've been hearing from that side of the experience? Ana: The most important lesson I heard from all of that is that to two things. One is there is a magical moment that happens. My guests tell me when the Mom admits to her daughter that she made mistakes and that she didn't do certain things right. And when she tells her daughter, but this has to be honest, of course, that, you know, I'm, I'm sorry. I'm sorry if I made mistakes, I'm sorry. I did make mistakes. I'm sorry that sometimes I hurt you. I come from this place. I couldn't do better at the moment. You know, just to knowledge I did my best and I'm sorry [00:22:00] that it wasn't enough or it was wrong. I loved you. And did what I could and I heard in a few interviews, how that creates a very magical moment when a door open. A door to forgiveness opens and new energies released in that relationship. And, and you know, some of my interviews were in tears telling me about this, how, how much that matters. The other thing I learned is that it's connected, you know, it's connected, I've learned that we have to look back and see where the person comes from. You know, what her trauma was or why she wasn't able to give the love that we deserve or the support for it. and this is where forgiveness come comes in again. I learned that growth comes from this [00:23:00] forgiveness, that caring I had, you know, I had a few guests who didn't speak to their mothers for decades. One of my guests told me she hugged for mum for the first time in her life when she was 69, but it's never too late. You know this moment of connecting and forgiving at the end. Right. Open open some beautiful energies, no matter what happened. Risa: Yeah. I mean, I will say, I think if you've been, um, you don't have to forgive everybody. Ana: You don't. No, no, no, no, no, you don't need to forgive, but you have to come where I think you have to see where they come from. Risa: Yeah. That can be a great gift yourself. Ana: Yeah, exactly. Because as one of my guests said, being angry is like drinking, poison and waiting for the other person to die. And then in a way, is that, is it because what we [00:24:00] need to do is learn how to. Release what, whatever the negative thing was from our moms, was it their trauma or the way they treated us as you say, it doesn't have to be forgiving, but it has to be recognizing and maybe through seeing where it comes from, just releasing it, you know, I've, I've, it's funny. I went through this with my dad and partially with my mom, but when my mom passed away, my dad, I don't know what happened to him. He suddenly turned in. It felt like he turned into my enemy. He, he just, instead of being there for me, then I was an only child and don't have any other family. And he was the only person that was out there that still, I feel like he should have been supporting me through this. He suddenly turned into this person like a stranger who was against me. And I didn't speak to him for, I mean, after all the courts and [00:25:00] lawyers and most awful experiences, I didn't speak to him for a year. But then, then I decided for myself that. That's not what I want. You know I know what he did to me. I recognize it. It's there. The pain won't disappear. The, the feeling of betrayal won't disappear, but I do not want to be a person who doesn't speak to her father I want my son to have his grandfather and I've learned for myself and I'm very proud for that to compartmentalize, or what is the word in English, you know, to just put this feeling into its own place and say, this is give it a ribbon and say, this is what it is, but I still want to have a father in my life and a grandfather in my son's life. And, and it was a huge learning experience to create boundaries and self-defense and know how close to let certain people to you, you know, [00:26:00] where to just raise the wall and be like, this is how far you are in my life. You're my dad, but this is how far you can come. Risa: Yes. Raise that wall. And you point to such, a poignant and painful thing. And I'm so sorry that happened to you, that those layers of complex trauma around your mother's death that's fucking sucks. Ana: Oh, man. It really, it was, it was it really sucked that, that part, it was hard enough dealing with losing her and losing her so quickly. But then dealing with that, I felt like I really felt like somebody tore the skin of my body and I was lying wounded without skin on the floor. And he came and started punching me with his feet. This is how I felt like I was really like, you're supposed to give me a hand and protect me and not in this worst month. But anyway, Yeah. Risa: And you point to you, point to something [00:27:00] that I think is so core to this is that the, the mother trauma, is twisted and tied up in the father wound too. Right? It's all this shit that patriarchy did to women it did to men too did it to them, to. It's a violence that it took from them too, that it made them. You know, suffer also and put that suffering on their, on their children. Ana: Yeah, yeah, absolutely. Yeah, Risa: yeah. Yeah. I didn't mean to diminish what you said, because I've had very powerful experiences in the same way of like choosing a forgiveness that was for me and wasn't for that. Exactly. Yeah. Um, but I also, yeah, I wanted to say it out loud because I do know there's people in our coven, people who listen to people in the world, close friends of mine for whom the mother trauma you know, it's at the level of abuse. [00:28:00] It's at the level of such pain that it's like Ana: but I think what I'm trying to say, spit that poison out. You might find that poison in your body, in your being and the pain and spit it out in whatever shape or form you find it useful, like you decide or works for you, but maybe more than forgiveness. It's. Spit it out, throw it like, whoa, get rid of it. Yes. Risa: Yes. And like you said, put that, put that wall that maybe it's a container, you know, for me there was some container magic involved or there was, you know, there was some freezer magic involved. There was some burying of things with seeds that, you know, there was also some like drawing out of like, what do I choose to keep from that experience Ana: Burning for me, burning burning helps a lot. Fire helps a lot for that kind of cleansing. Yes. Risa: Yes you are [00:29:00] a Witch. Ana: Discovering little by little day by day. Risa: Yeah. All of us, all of us are discovering. Can you tell us, take us down like memory lane, maybe, uh, take us on a memory journey of some of the moments in your interviews that were the most profound for you. Ana: Well, I already mentioned that lady who just, she said, I couldn't be in the same root word. My mom, since I was born, you know? Wow. There was some bad energy there. They never, they just never got along. And then she told me how. COVID happen. And her mom was in her eighties and she was 69 and suddenly they were kind of in a similar situation of being the high risk group and very [00:30:00] nervous about, you know, what is going to happen if they're going to die from this. And they started zooming everyday. Just to check on each other and see how the other one is doing. And they shared this fear. And little by little day by day, they started talking more and more and they found a way to each other. It was amazing listening to this story. And then when everything was over and they had a group reunion, this is where that hug happened, where for the first time in their lives, they hugged. And listening to that, I, I cried. I also had, just my last interview is a book author who in her twenties remembered that she was sexually abused by her mother's father and her mother would not have any of it. Instead of supporting her her mother got very angry that, [00:31:00] you know, she's doing this to the family and to her father and... this is one of these interviews where I listened to this, both having my mom as my mom and being a mother, just my, my brain, this information can't land anywhere in my brain that a mother wouldn't support her daughter in that. The good thing is Laura started writing about, she went through therapy and started writing about it and wrote a book about it. And this book reached millions. She sold millions of copies and reached millions and millions of women who were in the similar situation and help them, you know, she started doing workshops and obviously she helped other people with same experiences. But her modern, never, no matter what happened from mother, never accepted that this was the truth. And in spite of that, Laura took care of her when she was old and dying and she was there and [00:32:00] they somehow, they somehow found each other, you know, that was deeply touching. And then on the inspiration, very positive side, I, this might be my favorite interview and I keep talking about it all the time. I interviewed a doctor in molecular biology whose mom grew up in Turkey, on a farm in Turkey. And she as a girl was not allowed to go to school or get any kind of education and so she was completely illiterate and she had three daughters, which in Turkey, on a farm is not considered a big achievement, maybe even a burden. This Mom. Somehow managed to gently and lovingly support these three daughters and gently push them. And this is the beautiful thing. Listening to my guest, explain how gentle, these pushes and supports were from this [00:33:00] mom, to the extent where she would ask neighbors to help the girls with a homework, because she wasn't able to, she was illiterate. Two of the girls now have PhDs. One is a lawyer in the UK. My guest, as I mentioned, has a PhD in molecular biology and that was just an amazing story. That was the, the, the beautiful, positive. This is exactly that nurturing, loving, supporting energy that I think the world's needs right now. Risa: Oh! Yes. What a world changing power. Ana: You know, it was so funny when I was, I have a corporate history. I did an MBA and spend many, many, many, too many years in corporate life. I was an international marketing, . Uh, professional. Strategies for different markets. And [00:34:00] anyway, my company invited two Scandinavian futurists is talking about future of business and management. And it was a very big symposium taking place in a, in a beautiful, Theater here in Vienna and this tool dude's dressed in black and shaved heads with their glasses. And they were telling us about the future of business and you know, this whole blah. And then they throw a question in the audience and they said that they asked us, what do we think the managers of the future would be like? And I got up and said, mothers. And I think that was the moment where it was clear to me by the silence from the audience and the dudes on the stage. It was clear to me that I need to resign. This is not a world for me. You know, bed moment was so clear to me that. This is [00:35:00] completely wrong and it needs to change it just as a, as I said, mothers, you know, it was clear to me that. That's what needs to happen. Risa: Yep. And you're, I mean, I think all the research backs you up, right? I was just reading research about, the most effective new hires in police departments the ones that have the best success rate at solving cases at resolving situations without violence. Uh, building community connections. They are mothers. They are women who are later in their career. They have like raised some kids, and now they're doing this out of a commitment to their community. Policing is pretty fucked as an institution, but when, when people are trying to get it right, they are trying to hire, you know, generally like black women, who've already raised kids. And that's the thing that's making the biggest impact in communities. Is it enough to save the institution of policing? I, you know, I don't [00:36:00] know, but I think you're right that we need. Mother energy and intelligence. Ana: Nurturing and nurturing and connecting. Somebody who unifies and connects. Risa: Yeah. I will, um, open it up. If anybody who is here wants to say hi, ask a question, just share a response. It's so nice to have you here in person. So feel free to just go ahead and unmute. Coven 1: Is it okay if I just sort of respond a little bit? Risa: Of course. Coven 1: I'm Zoe and I am a Witch from Western Australia, currently working on a mine site driving dump trucks. I've had to delve deep into a lot of psychological and spiritual healing that went back many generations on both sides of my family. Like Anna [00:37:00] was saying coming to a place of understanding and forgiveness. Is something that's definitely come in time. Like for me you know, I'm 31 and it's been a journey to get to there. I think as witches, we are self appointed to break, those traumatic cycles we are often the black sheep of the family. It's a solitude, lone Wolf kind of practice. And we do a lot of healing for a lot of other people. And that comes from that divine, feminine energy that we're talking about. And it's yeah, just to do with healing, all of the trauma that has come before. All of the other women and the men. And, I think I'm in a good place with my mum now, but we can't live under the same roof. [00:38:00] Risa: Same.. Coven 1: Thanks for letting me chime in. Risa: that's what's special about, being in the coven and, and for us being able to have you here is there's, it's a prism you know, as you say, this practice or this identity can be so solitary. So. It's a relief to get, to hear each other's voices and hear my own thinking drawn out and reflected. And yeah, it's a, it's a support. So thank you for being here. Coven 1: Thank you so much for having me Risa: CAS. How are you doing with all this? There's a lot. There's a lot of stuff in here, especially as a mom. Coven 2: This was such an emotional topic for me. Been sitting here like. Tears in my eyes because, well, first of all, Ana, thank you so much for this conversation I'm a stay at [00:39:00] home mom and I hold a lot of privilege with that under capitalism. I also questioned my worth. However as I'm sitting here and we're talking about what didn't we learn from our mothers and honoring that generational trauma and with everything that's happened this morning, I'm just holding space for the work that I do. For my family, with my own family, I've ended up becoming my mother's mother and my grandmother's mother. And as my husband is learning how to hold emotions. I'm holding space to mother him and I mother, my children. I feel really powerful in my tears right now. Would it be alright if I speak my [00:40:00] great great-grandmother and my grandmother and their names Risa: right now. Yes. Thank you. Coven 2: Elizabeth. Rose.. Linda Tammy. Cassandra.. Risa: I hope in this litany of names, you also hear reflected listener the names of the women, the DNA lines, the deep timelines that connect us to each other, these complicated, painful memories. Especially on today when we're reminded again, of all the people who don't get to make this choice and all the people who've brought us here and made infinite choices along the way, and all the people hoping desperately to get us safely to tomorrow. Ana: thank you to Zoe and thank you to [00:41:00] Cassandra. I am, I am in tears and I'm very deeply touched because they were so touched with our conversation. Um, I have something I would like to share with Cassandra. It just lights went off in my head when I heard her talk, one of the most important things I've learned from this hundred something interviews again from mothers everywhere and every shape and form and every situation and every circumstance. When I ask women, what do you wish your mom had taught you? One of the three things that always comes up is self care. And I know it became more of a very cliche word, but hearing Cassandra mothering, her children and her husband and herself, I just want to throw it out there. Cassandra, please mother yourself as well, [00:42:00] because you, you, you have to, you have to mother yourself so that you can mother all of these other people around you. And I know where you come from. I feel like I have two children, although officially I have only one I'm I'm mothering them both and, and it's beautiful. and awarding, but it can be depleting as well. And yes, healthy boundaries as well. Just be there for yourself as well. Not only for everybody else. Risa: So in that spirit, can I ask you Ana. Would you draw on all of these voices that you've heard and maybe as a, as a closing moment for us here today. Can you speak in a collective mother voice, or maybe it's your own mother voice and offer us listeners a little piece of [00:43:00] motherly wisdom, a little piece of that nurturing that we can carry with us in our hearts this week and this year, and going forward, that's a big question, but I feel like you can do it. you're a witch from an island of women who dressed in black and took care of things, Ana: I can definitely, I can improvise and I want to connect to what I just said to Cassandra, which is. Just love yourself, you know, love yourself and love this life. It's one life that we have and it's short and it's beautiful. And it's so magical. The fact that we. Can be here on this planet and look at this beautiful full blue sky or your beautiful foggy forests and put our feet in the grass and feel the ground and breathing and hear the birds, twitter in our ears. It's magical. And we should just appreciate it. And. Feel how amazing we are. This is, this is I think the most important thing I've learned from the mothers around the world is [00:44:00] how powerful, how unique, how amazing in our uniqueness, how strong we are and how connected we are. And. We should just celebrate it. We should share this love and kindness with everybody around us and stay strong because tough times come and challenges come, but we can do that. We're strong enough and just pass on all this joy and love. And I think that's, that's what I feel I want to share. Risa: Thank you for that. I will replay that when I need to hear it. And thank you for being here. Ana, it's so nice to get, to spend time with you. I love the way you think it was such a pleasure to get to talk to you on your podcasts about Amy's and my moms. And so nice to get a little glimpse of your [00:45:00] magical mom. I feel really lucky to have this conversation with you. So thank you. Ana: Thank you so much for having me and thank you to Zoe and Cassandra for joining us. Risa: Thank you to the coven who's here and the coven we make in the dark between our ears. We love you so much. You know, you have Canadian aunties up here whenever you need us. And I think a Croatian aunty, I'm going to include Ana in this great circle of protection we make for you. If you need to get the fuck out of America or whatever, we love you guys blessed fucking be.

Podcasts @ ORF
Modi in Europe; Ukraine in Focus; Economic Crisis in South Asia

Podcasts @ ORF

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 21:52


In this episode of “The Ideas Factory”, Naghma Sahar, Senior Fellow at ORF, and Harsh V. Pant, Director of Studies and Head of Strategic Studies Programme at ORF, analyse - Prime Minister Narendra Modi's visit to Europe; with the centre of power strategically shifting to the Indo-Pacific; India and the European Union are trying to work out a new arrangement, to accommodate the new geopolitical reality. China's rising presence in the Indo- Pacific and South China Sea region with Russia challenging Europe on its very doorsteps, it becomes extremely crucial for the European Union to declare its ambitions much more openly. Engagement of India with Germany has been evolving, with the focus on green and sustainable partnerships, and the professional mobility agreement. The big crisis going on in neighbouring Sri Lanka is a big cause of worry for India. We are seeing a cascading effect, with countries like Nepal, and Pakistan facing enormous political and economic challenges.

Live Inspired Podcast with John O'Leary
Change the World in the Blink of an Eye with Maggie Doyne (ep. 462)

Live Inspired Podcast with John O'Leary

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 47:54


Maggie Doyne's mission is to create a world where children are safe, educated and loved.   At age nineteen, Maggie used $5,000 of her babysitting money to co-found BlinkNow Foundation which helped to build the Kopila Valley Children's Home and School, a safe place for orphaned children in war-torn Nepal.   Since 2010, Maggie + her team have served 500 of the region's most impoverished children and worked to deepen and grow the organization's impact through grassroots community development efforts.   Today, as you hear from a humanitarian, activist, CNN Hero of the Year and Forbes "Top 30 under 30" Social Entrepreneur, you'll learn just how tremendous + unlikely her work has been. Plus, Maggie shares specific and practical ways to take action for a cause that's meaningful to you.   Learn more about the Live Inspired Podcast at JohnOLearyInspires.com

Pushing Limits Podcast
Live With James On Everest (Part 5)

Pushing Limits Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 18:31


In this episode we catch up with James once again out in Nepal as he heads on his next rotation up Mt Everest! Hear all about his last rotation and how he is recovering! The mountain is getting a little less crwded now and many teams are using this upcoming weather window for their summit pushes! Be sure to follow along on Instagram too! 

OceanFM Ireland
Castleconnor man prepares to conquer Mount Everest in coming days

OceanFM Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 6:28


Jonathan Ruane from Castleconnor is days away from becoming the first Co Sligo man ever to reach the summit of Mount Everest. He's in Nepal, preparing for the final ascent, which he hopes to achieve by next Monday - his partner, Grace O'Flanagan, has just returned from the base camp in Nepal

Nepal Now
Nepal bites into ambitious school meals programme

Nepal Now

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 10:56


That is the sound of hundreds of students at Tilingatar High School in Tokha Municipality lining up for their midday meal of rice and veggies. This still unfinished concrete school of 1,100 students on the urban edge of the Kathmandu Valley is one among tens of thousands of government schools country wide that serve hot meals to their students. In two more years the midday meal programme (known here as diya khaja) will feed children in all 77 districts, after the remaining 6 districts transition from meals provided by the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP). This is no small feat, nor cheap. From 2017 to 2020 the diya khaja budget almost quadrupled (from $20 million to nearly $70 million). After teachers' salaries, this is the largest education expense in Nepal. In March I travelled to the Far West region and visited five schools in both the hills and the Tarai plains. Unanimously I found that officials and parents liked the government's school feeding. It made students excited about going to class and provided some of them with their most healthy meal of the day.I'm not saying there are no challenges: some schools and the municipal governments that transfer the money to them to run the programme — budgeted by the central government — say that providing 15 rupees per child per meal just isn't enough, when they also have to pay for cooks, utensils and transportation. And media reports appear regularly about low quality food in a certain school or of officials substituting processed food for the nutrition-based menu created by the ministry of education and WFP. Surprisingly, neither the government nor the UN agency has analysed the impact of school feeding on child nutrition in Nepal, a country where malnutrition remains a major health problem. That said, schools and municipalities are forging ahead with diya khaja. In the fertile outskirts of Kailali district — with the help of the WFP — schools are contracting local women farmers to provide rice, lentils, milk, yogurt and almost every other ingredient needed for their menus fresh from their fields. And here in Tokha, the municipality has itself expanded school feeding beyond grade 5, the last year of the government programme, to grade 10. ResourcesArticle and video on school feeding in NepalArticle on school meals in Nepal and CanadaWorld Food Programme global report, with Nepal case studyNepal Now social linksFacebookInstagramTwitterLinkedInThanks as always to Nikunja Nepal for advice and inspiration.Music: amaretto needs ice ... by urmymuse (c) copyright 2018 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial  (3.0) license. http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/urmymuse/57996 Ft: Apoxode

InAsia
Nepal Elections: Why Can't the Mayor Be a Woman?

InAsia

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 10:25


Fourteen thousand women won political office in Nepal's first local elections in 2017. With the 2022 elections now just days away, our guest, Sumina Karki, asks why so few women ran at the top of the ticket. 

Ken and Deb Mornings
My Yes is on the Table: A Conversation with Jennifer Hand

Ken and Deb Mornings

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 8:41


Have you ever been afraid to say “yes” to God? What are some ways to move from that fear stop to the faith step? Jennifer Hand came to a crossroads in her life as a missionary in Nepal, grappling with what she thought was a lifelong call. In this study, Jennifer looks to the wilderness journey of the Israelites to challenge each of us to live knowing that God desires us to have our “yes” on the table, being always ready for His assignments. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Indian Edit
Ep. 68: A tale of two start-ups with Ishu Dhakras founder of Ne Nepal and Marketing Manager Burma Burma!

The Indian Edit

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 73:56


An absolute delight to speak with a young Nepali entrepreneur working on TWO start-ups! Join me in this chat with Ishu Dhakras, co-founder of lifestyle brand Ne Nepal and marketing manager of restaurant group Burma Burma! Ishu grew up in Nepal, was educated in the US, and is now based between Bombay and Kathmandu. Loved hearing how she tried many start-up ideas before landing on the winning one with jewellery and home goods handmade in Nepal. Hear how she and co-founder Tulja Kedia wanted to offer Nepali customers a handmade alternative to the glut of cheap products made in China, while creating fair employment for Nepali ceramic and metal working artisans.Listen here or at www.theindianedit.com and please take a second to rate us wherever you're listening so the voices of these inspiring women can be heard all over the world!SHOWNOTES FOR EPISODE 68:Find Ishu at the Ne Nepal website and on instagramTry restaurants Burma Burma or order from their pantryBOOKS and MORE:Three Cups of Tea: One Man's Mission to Promote Peace . . . One School at a Time by Greg MortsensenPregnant King by Devdutt PattanaikThe Nutmeg's Curse: Parables for a Planet in Crisis by Amitav GhoshThe Glass Palace by Amitav GhoshIn an Antique Land by Amitav GhoshMy chat with Jennifer Jewell on the Cultivating Place podcast:Cultivating Place: The Indian Edit, with Nitasha Manchanda Questions? Comments? Get in touch @theindianeditpodcast on Instagram !Special thanks to Varun Dhabe and the team @ Boon Castle / Flying Carpet Productions for audio post-production engineering!

Himal Southasian Podcast Channel
Escalating crisis in Sri Lanka, local elections in Nepal, Film Southasia 2022, and more.

Himal Southasian Podcast Channel

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 33:30


In this episode, we look at growing protests in Sri Lanka, their political implications, as well as the no-confidence motion against Imran Khan in Pakistan. In Around Southasia in 5 minutes, we talk about the termination of citizenship for high-profile dissidents by Myanmar's military regime, the tragic resurgence of communal violence in India, Nepal's upcoming local government elections, and more. Plus in our culture section Bookmarked, we discuss the 25th edition of Film Southasia held in Lalitpur, Nepal, plus our monthly recommendations for reading and watching.

Tuesday People
Episode 128 - How to Change the World with Philanthropist Maggie Doyne

Tuesday People

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 37:10


At the age of nineteen, this week's Tuesday People guest, Maggie Doyne, used her babysitting money to build a home for orphaned children in war-torn Nepal. In 2010, she and her team opened a school for five hundred of the region's most impoverished children. Her grassroots community development efforts continue through her BlinkNow Foundation, as her impact on this region of the world continues to grow. Please join us for this inspiring conversation with the woman named CNN Hero of the Year, whose work has been championed by the Dalai Lama, and has changed the lives of hundreds in this beautiful corner of the world. You can learn more about Maggie, the BlinkNow Foundation, the Kopila Valley Children's Home and School, and Maggie's new book, "Between the Mountain and the Sky: A Mother's Story of Love, Loss, Healing, and Hope" by visiting her website at www.maggie-doyne.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tough Girl Podcast
Shikha Tripathi - Outdoor Writer and Adventurer who has participated in expeditions in the Himalayas.

Tough Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 40:39


Shikha is a writer based in Uttarakhand, India. Specialising in stories woven around nature and the outdoors, sustainable living, and those with a cultural insight from the remote mountains of India, Nepal and Bhutan.    Her travel stories appear in a wide variety of publications such as the National Geographic Traveller, Travel + Leisure, Conde Nast Traveller, Lonely Planet, and more.    Her environmental and social interest stories have appeared in newspapers such as The Hindu, The New Indian Express, and on platforms such as Nature InFocus and RoundGlass Sustain.    Born and brought up in the mountains, she is a qualified mountaineer who has participated in expeditions in the Himalayas. Her mountaineering stories have appeared in The Outdoor Journal and online on the Red Bull forum.    Shikha is the recipient of a Commonwealth Writers fellowship for her stories on Himalayan ecology, and has also authored an award-winning children's book on Northeast India's first female Everester, Tine Mena, for a literacy NGO, Pratham.    Most recently, she authored a series of Lonely Planet pocket guide books on Nepal.   New episodes of the Tough Girl Podcast go live every Tuesday at 7am UK time - Make sure to subscribe so you don't miss out.    To support the tough girl mission to increase the amount of female role models in the media -  visit www.patreon.com/toughgirlpodcast.      Show Notes Who is Shikha Growing up in the mountains in India Her love of exploration Deciding to become a professional writer Being curious about the world Quitting her job to backpack across the Indian Continent in 2008 Her love of writing and not wanting to be confined to an office cubicle Being drawn to the mountains and wanting to spend more time there Her year of self discovery Her childhood and early years Going into higher education Making the decision to quit her job and go on a gap year Planning her year out and travelling on a shoe string budget Wanting to get off the regular tourist circuit Heading to the North East of India Spending time in Nepal and Bhutan Building her career as a freelance writer Travelling solo in remote places Advice and tips for solo travel Why planning a little ahead can make things a lot easier Advice for travel writing Why you need to find your niche Finding your writing voice Telling the same story but in a different way Learning mountaineering skills  Encouraging more women to gain skills in the outdoors Challenging times in the mountains Walking on unmarked trails  Being underprepared on the mountains and the lessons learned Dealing with challenging situations and her process for handling it Staying positive and having a back up plan How to connect with Shikha  Putting together her website Writing her award-winning children's book on Northeast India's first female Everester, Tine Mena. Wanting to inspire young girls Advice for women and girls to spend more time in the mountains Future dreams and goals      Social Media   Instagram: @shikha_trip   

The Ferment Podcast - Conversations About Worship And Transformation

Please enjoy this special repost of Jay Pathak's conversation with David Ruis on the We Are Vineyard podcast. David shares some things he's been learning about the story of God through his own story of adoption, the work of music in his life, and some stories of his early encounters with the Holy Spirit and his process of reconciling them with his Baptist upbringing. David also shares his heart in seeking the Lord to hear what He wants to do during any gathering or time of worship and his practice of coming with expectation that the Lord is with us.  David and Anita Ruis have lead, encourage, and empowered the Vineyard in Canada as the National Directors since 2014. David is a well-respected worship leader and songwriter (You're Worthy Of My Praise, Every Move I Make, and much more). His most recent album, When Justice Shines, was released through ION Records. David has also authored two books: The Worship God Is Seeking and The Justice God Is Seeking. As a team David and Anita are also known to be effective church planters and seasoned pastors having established churches in Canada and the US. David has also been instrumental in seeing Vineyard communities established in Nepal and India. Much of the Ruises' focus has been in indigenous settings, working with people experiencing poverty and subsequent marginalization. They also have significant experience facilitating leadership development and on the creative side David is known for fostering originality in song-writing and the arts in various cultural settings. A burning passion for the Ruises is both practical and theological integration of creative worship in church community, and deep life engagement with issues of poverty and social injustice. The Ruises currently reside in Kelowna, BC. In their down time they love to be creative and hang with their grandkids. Show Notes: We Are Vineyard Podcast https://vineyardusa.org/podcast/ David's church- Kelowna Vineyard https://www.kelownavineyard.com/ The Worship God is Seeking by David Ruis https://amzn.to/3w1PDAT The Justice God is Seeking by David Ruis https://amzn.to/3y8uZSd Miracle Work by Jordan Seng Vineyard USA's recommended reading for May https://amzn.to/3y3mtE6

The DeshBhakt With Akash Banerjee
Rahul Gandhi: Modi's Biggest Weapon? | 15 Reasons WHY | Akash Banerjee

The DeshBhakt With Akash Banerjee

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 20:53


Rahul Gandhi was in the news this week - again - this time because he was spotted in a Pub in Nepal. The Opposition had a field day - claiming that Rahul was there with the Chinese Ambassador. While none of that was true - what is sadly true is that Rahul continues to be the gift for the Govt and instead of counterbalancing the Govt - he's helping with the rise of an authoritarian government. Here's 14 reasons why Rahul is Modi's best and biggest weapon to stay in power. The Congress IT cell can bring in the fireworks now! *********************************

Pangolin: The Conservation Podcast
46. Guardians of the Red Panda (with Sonam Tashi Lama)

Pangolin: The Conservation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 44:40


This week Jack is joined by Sonam Tashi Lama, the Red Panda Network's Program Coordinator! Sonam is here to discuss what the organisation is doing within Nepal to help safeguard this incredible species. This includes conversations about their research into Red Panda migration and the threat of dogs. The duo also chat about how the Red Panda Network is helping to empower local communities in the fight to save the Red Panda through their education work and Forest Guardian Programs. Finally, they celebrate the fact that Sonam won a 2022 Whitley Award for his fantastic work! It is also worth noting that this is the second of our Red Panda themed episodes! Last time, Jack was joined by Terrance Fleming to discuss what a Red Panda is, its relationship with the Giant Panda, and how the Red Panda Network works globally to protect the species. Make sure and check that out once you're done here! Useful Links: Follow us on Twitter, Facebook & Instagram @PangolinPodcast ! Follow The Red Panda Network on Facebook, Twitter & Instagram: @RedPandaNetwork Check out The Red Panda Network Website to learn more: https://redpandanetwork.org/ Music Credits: "Cambodian Odyssey" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com), Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ At The Shore by Kevin MacLeod, Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3389-at-the-shore License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Monkoto by Kevin MacLeod, Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4072-monkoto License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ AngloZulu by Kevin MacLeod, Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3372-anglozulu License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Savannah (Sketch) by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/4323-savannah-sketch- License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license

The Podcast on alanarnette.com
Everest 2022: Weekend Update May 8 - Ropes to the Summit!

The Podcast on alanarnette.com

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 18:56


It was a busy week in the Himalayas with summits on multiple 8000ers, including Everest. On the Nepal side of the mountain, Kami Rita Sherpa led the rope team to the summit and at the same time extended his summit record to 26. Sadly, there were two more deaths of the season, one on Kangchenchunga and another on Everest. Still, thus far 2022 is a low-drama season. With the good weather emerging, the summit trolls will now allow everyone to make their attempts. Big Picture 2022 is turning out to be an unusual season but in a good way. On Thursday, I did a podcast with three world-class meteorologists, Michael Fagen of Everest Weather, Chris Tomer of Tomer Weather Solutions, and Marc De Keyser of Weather4expeditions , about what we are seeing and can expect these last few weeks of the season. They all agreed that it is warmer than usual, drier than usual, and with less wind than usual. The culprit is the Jet Stream is not sitting on top of Everest like it usually does. They even suggested that we may see another year like in 2018 when we had 11 consecutive days of low winds that allowed a record year for Everest summits with 802 summits on both sides. The Nepal side saw a total of 562 summits made up of 266 foreigners (aka members) and 296 High Altitude Workers (aka Sherpas). We won't see anything like that number of summits in 2022, perhaps around 400, including support. A wild card was a potential typhoon brewing in the Bay of Bengal but now it appears that "ASANI" will track away from making landfall. Again, there are currently NO typhoon warnings issued by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Climb On! Alan Memories are Everything

One More Thing Before You Go
Over The Teacup-That Thing About Mother's Day 2022

One More Thing Before You Go

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 12:35


In this episode it's finally here Mother's Day 2022 today's May 8th it's a Sunday and we're so happy that she joined us. Mother's Day, is celebrated as a holiday in honor of mothers in countries throughout the world. In its modern form the holiday originated in the United States, where it is observed on the second Sunday in May. Many other countries also celebrate the holiday on this date, while some mark the observance at other times of the year. Mothers are special because without them none of us would be here! Throughout history there is historical documentation in one form or another of celebrating moms. In fact there are some very unique forms of this celebration that can be traced back to the ancient Greeks and Romans, who held festivals in honor of the Great Mother of the Gods Rhea also called Cybele, of the ancient Oriental and Greco-Roman deity, known by a variety of local names; the name Cybele or Cybebe predominates in Greek and Roman literature from about the 5th century BC onward. Her full official Roman name was Mater Deum Magna Idaea (Great Idaean Mother of the Gods). The clearest modern precedent for Mother's Day is the early Christian festival known as “Mothering Sunday.” Once a major tradition in the United Kingdom and parts of Europe, this celebration fell on the fourth Sunday in Lent and was originally seen as a time when the faithful would return to their “mother church”—the main church in the vicinity of their home—for a special service. . During the Middle Ages the custom developed of allowing those who had moved away to visit their home parishes and their mothers on Laetare Sunday, the fourth Sunday of Lent. This became Mothering Sunday in Britain, where it continued into modern times, although it has largely been replaced by Mother's Day. Mother's Day is celebrated on Sunday, May 8, 2022. The history channel May 8,2022 https://www.history.com/topics/holidays/mothers-day The American embodiment of Mother's Day was created by Anna Jarvis in 1908 I just a deeply personal day for and visiting with your mother which became an official U.S. holiday in 1914. Unfortunately with the commercialization by florist retailers in card companies in other industries that work to promote the holiday, Jarvis would later condemn the holiday Jarvis felt that the day that she created to appreciate your mother and maybe help her around the house with other things or sit and talk and have a cup of tea, was ruined due to that commercialization and spent the later part of her life trying to remove it from the calendar. While dates and celebrations vary, Mother's Day traditionally is celebrated in the United states in North America, South America, United Kingdom, Thailand, Mexico, Spain, Nepal, Ethiopia and many more. https://beforeyougopodcast.com This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Podcorn - https://podcorn.com/privacy

History of a Haunting
131: Mount Everest Death Zone

History of a Haunting

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 64:08


**Content Warning** This video contains material that may be harmful or traumatizing to some audiences. VIEWER DISCRETION IS ADVISED** This week we go... a little more grim than normal and talk about the Mount Everest Death Zone. The highest peak in the world is the ultimate adventure experience that many are willing to, and have, risk their lives to summit. Also known as an open air graveyard, numerous bodies line the hike of this beast. So it's not all that shocking to hear it's also haunted by lost spirits, and those who are trying to help their counterparts do what they died trying. We also discover, to no one's surprise, that Carrie wants no part of any kind of hike ever, and that Laura isn't opposed to the tiny mountains of Nepal.

It Takes Grit
How To Stay Strong While Feeling Weak with Rebecca Louise

It Takes Grit

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 14:49


Coming to you from Namche Bazaar in Nepal after my first rotation to acclimatize! I have learnt and gained so many lessons so far on my journey to Everest and I still am only halfway with the biggest challenge ahead, the summit of Mount Everest!  In this weeks episode of It Takes Grit we are climbing straight into staying strong while you feel weak by pushing yourself, giving yourself a break, taking the next 10 steps. Getting ready to head back to basecamp and these 5 tips have helped me personally and will help so many of you when you feel like giving up!We Cover:Everything EverestRemember your CONFIDENCEPain is temporaryCreate your focusThe 5 Day Break Free Challenge is officially OPEN! What are you waiting for?! Sign Up Now!Message me as I attempt to reach the SUMMIT of Mount Everest! Your messages are so encouraging and I love reading all of them!LIVE Tracking of my expedition to the top of Mount Everest! Follow Along NOW! Join our Monthly Challenge & Newsletter to get the most recent updates and new podcastsCheck out the Inner Transformation ProgramFollow the ItTakesGritPodcast on Instagram!If this podcast has helped you in ANYWAY, please share with at least one person and leave a REVIEW, it makes a huge difference to the podcast and I want to hear from you :-)Get the It Takes Grit book with a ton of BONUS features !

The DotCom Magazine Entrepreneur Spotlight
Elliot Justin, MD, FACEP, Chief Executive Officer, FirmTech, A DotCom Magazine Interview

The DotCom Magazine Entrepreneur Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 37:27


About Elliot Justin and FirmTech: Dr. Elliot Justin is an Emergency Medicine specialist and health care technology consultant in urology, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. As an entrepreneur, he has originated and advised several health service, telemed and tech startups. His interest in regenerative medicine and his passion for regular playful lovemaking and its health benefits have inspired FirmTech, his latest venture promoting sexual wellness. Keenly interested in keeping men firm and fit for a lifetime of lovemaking, Justin began exploring aphrodisiacs in medical school in 1975. (Bad news, none of them work). More recently he researched neuro-modulation therapy for sexual dysfunction. Part of the study involved testing a pacemaker-like implant to help achieve erections in rams (and himself). Nicknamed “Project O,” the experiment ultimately failed, although it refuted published claims by urologists. His wife has nicknamed him “The Louis Pasteur of Human Sexuality” for his bold research and self-experimentation. Undeterred and focused on “sexcess,” Dr. Justin and his FirmTech team have developed a transformative tool to help men optimize personal “erectile fitness,” and to inspire better cardiovascular health. Since 1988, Dr. Justin has founded and exited three Emergency Medicine service companies, and established Swift MD, a telemedicine company. He's also a lead investor in KORE, a company that transforms agricultural and industrial waste into natural gas. Dr. Justin concentrated on Slavic studies at Harvard University (1971-'75) and medicine at Boston University (1975-'79). His studies instilled skepticism toward the conceits and prognoses of experts, antipathy to authoritarians and true believers, and kindled a passion for liberty and objectivity. Above all he believes the inability to admit error and uncertainty are the roots of friction and failure. In 2014 he established Pegasus Liberty Foundation to fund research on the prevalence of slavery and efforts to rescue and rehabilitate slaves in India, Nepal and Burma. He also has served on the advisory board of the Freedom Fund. Passionate about history, economics and pre-20th century literature and art, Dr. Justin wrote the novel “The Chastity of Honor,” about the country's first war against jihadis during the Jefferson presidency. Happily married for 33 years and the father of three adult children, Dr. Justin and his painter wife live in Montana with two energetic mares. He is a passionate trail rider who sometimes imagines, to his wife's chagrin, that he's a centaur. We use smart sextech to measure hardness, orgasmic power, and the number of erections during sleep in order to help men optimize their personal Erectile Fitness and enjoy better sex and health.

The Emerging Cricket Podcast
Why no Women's IPL!? Nepal v Zim A, UAE v HK, KKR in USA + news around the world!

The Emerging Cricket Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 45:16


India, are you watching? After the Women's T20 Challenge is announced again and with FairBreak in full swing, Bes, Tim and Nick discuss the absence of a Women's IPL. Elsewhere, Nepal take on Zimbabwe A, KKR make waves in the USA and UAE knock over the HK in a women's T20 series!

Pulled By The Root - Amplifying Adoption Issues

This week we are joined by Sandra Moon, a Maltese adopted person from regional NSW in Australia. She is a journalist and writer currently working on her memoir regarding her experiences of adoption and reunion with universal themes of the innate desire for familial connection and belonging. Sandra was in a children's home and therefore classified as a Forgotten Australian, she is also the child of a Forgotten Australian who was in foster care placements and children's homes. Sandra is a mother and has had several experiences of motherhood, most of them non traditional. She has been a legal guardian of a child in Nepal, fostered three children and has a daughter she birthed. Currently Sandras family consists a teen and a tween and a cat named Gretel. In this episode, Sandra speaks to the reality of what it is to challenged with the issues surrounding adoption, sexual orientation and identity. She shares her diverse experiences from a deep heart felt place. Our conversation enforces the power of sharing, connection and action oriented healing. 

The Jaipur Dialogues
Rahul Gandhi in Nepal - अभी तो पार्टी शुरू हुई है Sanjay Dixit

The Jaipur Dialogues

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 13:19


World is very unfair to Rahul Gandhi Bhaiya. First he is accused of not attending to party affairs, and when he start taking interest in party, they accuse him of levity. Sanjay Dixit looks at this irony sympathetically.

Mongabay Newscast
Wonder on wings: the fierce nature and enduring beauty of birds

Mongabay Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 47:40


It's a really busy time of year for birds all over the world as they migrate and prepare for a new breeding season, so on this episode we discuss the amazing fierceness and beauty of birds, why they deserve your interest and attention, plus some recent research and avian conservation trends in Nepal. We welcome back the incomparable and award-winning author Sy Montgomery, whose most recent books are all about our avian friends: The Hawk's Way: Encounters With Fierce Beauty, which is now in stores, and also 2021's The Hummingbird's Gift: Wonder, Beauty, and Renewal On Wings. In her signature & wonder-rich way, Montgomery shares some of the truly amazing things learned from personal experiences with falconry and hummingbird rehabilitation, and discusses why we find birds so fascinating. Host Mike G. also speaks with Mongabay staff writer Abhaya Joshi about the birdlife in his country of Nepal, a new bird-counting app that's sparking newfound interest there, and some of the most recent conservation actions being taken in the country to protect birds. Hear Sy Montgomery's previous appearance on this show here (or search for episode #37 in your podcast app): “Podcast: Exploring the minds and inner lives of animals” Further reading about Nepal's birdlife by Abhaya Joshi: “Bird-counting app kindles interest in Nepal's rich avian life” “Nepal's first bird sanctuary takes flight, raising hope for conservation” “Study: Farmland birds in Nepal, India in dire need of conservation action” Episode artwork: Fiery-throated hummingbird at Paraiso del Quetzal, Costa Rica, by Joseph C Boone via Wikimedia Commons. If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage, news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay. Please share your thoughts and ideas! submissions@mongabay.com.

Better Than Human
Red Pandas: The One, True Panda and a Plant-Eating Carnivore

Better Than Human

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 62:35


The red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is a cat-sized mammal native to the Himalayas and China. Despite being protected in all countries it has ranges in, the red pandas' populations continue to decline. Red pandas are the original pandas; they were 'discovered' by Europeans first and their discovery gave rise to the name panda, and giant pandas were later named after them. However, we now know that red pandas and giant pandas are not related. So which species is the "true" panda? Depends on who you ask. But, since the word Panda actually means bamboo eater, are they not both true pandas? There are two subspecies of Red Pandas: the Chinese red panda and the Himalayan red panda.  There are fewer than 10,000 Red Pandas left in the wild, and with its populations scattered in small pockets it could easily be wiped out. Red pandas are mostly-vegetarian carnivores, which seems counterintuitive. However, the carnivore classification doesn't necessarily coincide with an animal's dietary preference. So while a majority of their red panda diet is bamboo, which they luckily digest slightly better than the Giant Panda, they are still classified as carnivores because of their evolutionary history.  The red panda diet isn't the only trait they share with giant pandas. Both animals also independently evolved a pseudo-thumb, which they both use to help them eat bamboo. Red Pandas evolved these false thumbs before they started eating bamboo, though, and this false thumb might be why Red Pandas started eating bamboo in the first place. Listen now to find out more about the red panda and why it was once described as 'the most beautiful animal.' In The Good The Bad The NewsPixar's newest movie 'Turning Red' is considered a controversial movie by some, all for stupid reason. Yes, there was 13 year old girl cringe, but that's not what the controversy is about. Cat One-eyed Joe (Dexter) has returned home after a 5 year journey that included a luxury stay at a prison and being spoiled on an oil rig. Also, dog breed has little effect on dog behavior. 

Sushant Pradhan Podcast
Episode 47: Sanjay Adhikari | Sushant Pradhan Podcast

Sushant Pradhan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 176:22


Mr. Sanjay Adhikari is a Professor, Lawyer, and a Public Interest Litigator for Natural and Cultural Heritage. In this podcast, he talks about the cons of Nijgadh International Airport, Stolen Arts, and the architecture of Nepal. He also shares his experiences on getting back Stolen Arts to Nepal and much more. Mr. Sanjay Adhikari's Twitter: https://twitter.com/sanjaypil Mr. Sanjay Adhikari's Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/adhikarisanjay62

Coffee with the Docs
Ashley Wray on the Basics of Meditation

Coffee with the Docs

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 44:50


We had the pleasure of interviewing Ashley Wray, founder of Mala Collective for this weeks episode. Ashley has an amazing way of making meditation simple and accessible to all. If you are wondering what the 'buzz' is about meditation and how to get started, this episode is calling! More about Mala Collective: Ashley Wray is the founder and CEO of Mala Collective. The company works with artisans in Asia (from Bali to India to Nepal) to create products supporting a mindfulness and meditation practice.   Merging both authentic practices and beautiful pieces, Mala Collective wants to inspire you to live your mindfulness practice at home and throughout the day. Ashley designs the pieces, such as mala beads, crystal kits, and meditation cushions, by merging tradition and modern-day aesthetic.   Since starting Mala Collective in 2011, Ashley has taught meditation across North America, taken meditation trainings from LA to NY to India and Bali, and has worked to make meditation and mindfulness more accessible and fun.   Mala Collective has worked with brand partners from Lululemon to Anthropologie. And has been featured in YGQ, British Vogue, Yoga Journal, Goop, Well + Good, and Poosh.   Partners: Want to check out mala collectives products + programs? Use code COFFEE20 and receive 20% off!

What the Fundraising
49. Exploring Ethical, Community-Based Changemaking While the World Watches with Maggie Doyne

What the Fundraising

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 52:29


What does it look like to use our power and privilege for good? In some cases it involves us speaking out, in others it involves us getting quiet and listening. How do you know what to do when? Maggie Doyne and I explore all of this and more in this week's episode of What the Fundraising. Maggie has been hailed as CNN Hero of the Year and criticized for perpetuating the white savior narrative, and she has something to say about both. As many people know, at 19 years old, Maggie set off on a gap year that ultimately led her to Co-Found BlinkNow and personally adopt almost 60 Nepalese children. Her story is complicated, inspiring, nuanced, beautiful, and painful. And through her new book, "Between the Mountain and Sky: A Mother's Story of Love, Loss, Healing, and Hope" Maggie lets us walk with her through so many of the ups and downs of her journey. In this episode, Maggie and I untangle some of the duality that Maggie and BlinkNow experienced when the media would cover Maggie's inspiring story. For example, opportunities and funding for the nonprofit were realized because Maggie was from a suburban town in New Jersey, while at the same time the media narrative about the organization would often leave out the most important part - that the organization was primarily driven by local leadership and solutions from inside the local community. While Maggie was attempting to partner with the local community in the most humble and ethical way, the media clickbait stories about her work caused harm and, as she reflects back, that is something she wishes she had corrected and spoken up more about at the moment.  Maggie talks about her commitment to using her whiteness as an ally, to elevate the voices and the stories around her and not be the center of the story. And in this conversation, we explore the learning journey that has led to her stepping back in this way. We often approach conversations like this in binary ways - good/bad, right/wrong, ethical/unethical but what this conversation creates is an opening for more curiosity, wonder, learning, and listening.  We talk about how the nonprofit sector as a whole can do better, starting with a commitment to learning from one another. We also discuss the power of vulnerability as a teacher and storytelling as a tool; why it's important to deploy an inside-out approach that honors the people who know best, the ones on the ground. If you'd like to support BlinkNow's work in Nepal, please consider getting involved with one of their many amazing donor opportunities. You can also visit your favorite independent bookstore or click here to purchase a copy of "Between the Mountain and Sky: A Mother's Story of Love, Loss, Healing, and Hope." Many thanks to our sponsor, Learn Grant Writing, an online learning experience that makes grant writing approachable and fun. If you want to learn more about how to align your fundraising and grant writing practices - watch a FREE fireside chat with me and the Meredith → learngrantwriting.com/mallory  

City Cast Chicago
From Naperville to Nepal: Lucy Westlake is Climbing Mount Everest

City Cast Chicago

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 15:21


Lucy Westlake isn't walking at graduation this spring with her class at Naperville North High School. That's because the 18 year old is preparing to be the youngest American woman to summit Mount Everest. She graduated early last fall, and she previously broke the world record for youngest female to climb to the highest points in all 50 states. She's also climbed the highest points on four of the seven continents. Westlake called City Cast producer Simone Alicea from a Mount Everest base camp. Lucy's GoFundMe Follow us on Twitter: @CityCastChicago Sign up for our newsletter: chicago.citycast.fm Call or Text Us: (773) 780-0246 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Overheard at National Geographic
Going Undercover to Save Manta Rays

Overheard at National Geographic

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 39:48


After wildlife filmmaker Malaika Vaz stumbled upon manta ray poaching near her home in India, she disguised herself as a fish trader to find out who was behind the plot—a dicey proposition as she pursues traffickers in India, China, and Nepal. Want more? Check out Malaika and Nitye's production company, Untamed Planet. There, you can see films about big cats, pandemics, and, of course, manta ray trafficking. Also explore:  Curious how these animals stole Malaika's heart? Take a look at Nat Geo Wild's The Social Lives of Manta Rays. For subscribers: Believe it or not, manta rays have their own distinct social circles. Learn more in our article about manta ray friendships. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices