Podcasts about Dalai Lama

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Tibetan Buddhist spiritual teacher

  • 2,616PODCASTS
  • 5,103EPISODES
  • 54mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 23, 2022LATEST
Dalai Lama

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Best podcasts about Dalai Lama

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Latest podcast episodes about Dalai Lama

WDR Lebenszeichen
Erinnerung an Tich Nhat Hanh

WDR Lebenszeichen

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 29:46


Er war eine Ikone des Buddhismus auch im Westen: Der Zen-Lehrer und spirituelle Meister für einen "engagierten Buddhismus" ist gestorben. Millionen Menschen hat er mit seinem Einsatz für den Frieden berührt. Neben dem Dalai Lama galt Thich Nhat Hanh als einer der wichtigsten Vertreter des Buddhismus.

Toast Hawaii
Düzen Tekkal

Toast Hawaii

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 55:05


Sinnlichkeit, Lebensfreude, Gastfreundschaft. Die 3 Begriffe reiten ja eigentlich wie die heiligen 3 Könige um das Thema Essen herum, aber wenn diese Begriffe eine geeignete Adressatin suchten, dann wären sie bei Düzen Tekkal genau richtig. Mit 10 Geschwistern wuchs die preisgekrönte Filmemacherin, Buchautorin und Kriegsberichterstatterin auf. 10. Plus Eltern. Plus weitere Familienangehörige. Plus Freunde, also es macht Spaß, sich vorzustellen, wer sich da so alles um den riesengroßen Esstisch tummelte und was da passierte. Und während es natürlich Menschen gibt, die das Essen lieben, sich aber vorm Kochen scheuen, so war das Zubereiten der Gerichte und die Küche als Rückzugsort unseres heutigen Gastes enorm wichtigtr, um Kraft zu tanken und zu der besonderen Person zu werden, die sie heute ist. Sinnlich, lebensfroh und gastfreundlich. Vor einigen Monaten wurde der 43jährigen für ihr mutiges Engagement das Bundesverdienstkreuz verliehen. Da wundert es nicht, dass noch vor Ablauf der 1. Minute der Dalai Lama ins Spiel kommt, aber hören Sie selbst. *** WERBUNG Toast Hawaii wird unterstützt von dmBio, die Bio-Lebensmittelmarke von dm-drogerie markt. Ganz nach dem Motto „Natürlich lecker erleben“ bietet dmBio mit mehr als 550 Produkten eine vielfältige Auswahl – von leckeren Snacks für zwischendurch bis hin zu original italienischen Tomatensaucen. Haben auch Sie eine dmBio-Geschichte, die im Podcast erzählt werden soll? Dann schreiben Sie uns gerne unter toasthawaii@studio-bummens.de ÖKO-Kontrollstelle: DE-ÖKO-007

The Stress Mastery Podcast: Living Right with Bill Cortright
#1265 “The Book of Joy” by Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu: “FORGIVENESS: Freeing Ourselves from the Past”

The Stress Mastery Podcast: Living Right with Bill Cortright

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 28:13


In today's book study, “The Book of Joy” by Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu are in the section Days 4 and 5-The Eight Pillars of Joy: “FORGIVENESS: Freeing Ourselves from the Past.” This section continues the eight pillars of joy and the Dali Lama and Archbishop Tutu discuss Pillar #5 the first pillar of the Heart. This is a powerful section on healing our past wounds. Forgiveness is a super power that disengages the Ego's programs of Resentment and Regret thus healing us on level to allow spirit to shine. ________________________________________________________  Join The Stress Mastery Community today for FREE! Click here to register HERE! Love the show? Tweet me a shoutout at: @Billcortright Want to sponsor episodes of The Stress Mastery Podcast?  Email Bill at : Bill@livingrightwithbillcortright.com  Mentioned in this show: Join the private Facebook Group: The Stress Mastery Podcast Subscription/SocialLinks: Subscribe on iTunes Subscribe to the The Stress Mastery Mailing List Watch on Youtube www.livingrightwithbillcortright.com Instagram: @livingrightwithbillcortright Facebook at Bill Cortright STAY INSPIRED!

A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment
What Is A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment?

A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 18:58


Two years ago, we created A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment to share the rich tradition of Tibetan Buddhist analytical meditation in a form that requires no belief beyond what science currently accepts. The first 40 episodes of the podcast gradually go through all of these topics, in order, beginning with appreciating the gift of our life and our place in the universe, and gradually moving up to cultivating boundless compassion for all beings and understanding the ultimate nature of our inner and outer realities. Over the next year, interspersed with new interviews, we will be re-releasing updated versions of these topics every few weeks, alternating an introduction to each topic on Tuesday with a meditation on Friday. Here's the first one, What Is A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment.Episode 1: What Is A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment? Introducing A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment, bringing the inner science of Buddhist meditation to twenty-first century people hungry for happy, meaningful lives. We take a secular approach to meditation that requires no belief beyond our current understanding of science and psychology, based on powerful Buddhist mind training techniques that use imagination, intelligence, and emotions to probe our inner and outer realities, and expand our compassion.Support the show (https://www.skepticspath.org/support/)

The Rich Roll Podcast
Doug Abrams On Why Hope Is The Antidote For Apathy

The Rich Roll Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 126:34


As we grapple with a global pandemic, experiential climate change, mass species extinction, and many other dire calamities—it can feel like the world has lost its moral center. But every solution begins with hope—the antidote to what ails us.Famed primatologist, climate activist, and global icon Jane Goodall has devoted her life to better understanding our natural world and preserving its majesty. As one can expect, the 87-year-old has some thoughts about our enduring climate crisis—thoughts that don't revolve around cynicism, anger or pessimism—but instead are all about hope. A hope that is fierce. A hope underscored by action, empathy, and optimism.How can someone who has studied the climate crisis for the better part of her life maintain such a positive disposition in the face of humanity's self-destructive trajectory? What does hope even mean? And why is it desperately incumbent upon all of us to cultivate hope as a strategy to best evolve as humans and a global community?Today's guest Douglas Abrams wanted answers to these questions. Needed answers. So he sought out Jane and spent countless curious hours with her, culminating in the Book of Hope, a beautiful and intimate look into the heart and mind of a woman who has truly revolutionized how we view the world around us.Returning for his second appearance on the show, Douglas is a literary agent, editor, author, and former Stanford classmate.He initially joined the podcast back in February 2017 (RRP 274) to discuss the first in his Global Icon series of books, The Book of Joy—an instant New York Times bestseller that beautifully synthesizes a series of conversations between Douglas, The Dalai Lama and Bishop Desmond Tutu on the nature of human happiness and suffering.A continuation of our former conversation, today, we pivot from joy to focus on hope. Hope as an antidote to helplessness. Hope as our greatest strength. And hope as the foundation upon which all solutions emerge.It's also a conversation about the importance of empathy. Meeting resistance with patience. Obstinate grace. And what it means to completely devote yourself to what's right.But mostly, this is a discussion about what we can all learn from Jane Goodall's example. Why it's incumbent upon all of us to shoulder an urgent but hopeful responsibility for the future of our planet. And how to best lead by example.To read more, click here. You can also watch it all go down on YouTube. And as always, the podcast streams wild and free on Apple Podcasts and Spotify.Douglas is an impressive intellect and a charming, curious conversation partner. I always leave time spent with him better than before. My hope is that this exchange will impact you similarly.Peace + Plants, See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Why Do People Resist Veganism? - Melanie Joy, PhD

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 11:53


Why Do People Resist Veganism? -  Melanie Joy, PhD Melanie Joy, Ph.D., Ed.M. •           https://www.melaniejoy.org/•           Book - Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows: An Introduction to Carnism Dr. Melanie Joy is a Harvard-educated psychologist, celebrated speaker, and the author of six books, including the award-winning Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows; Beyond Beliefs: A Guide to Improving Relationships and Communication for Vegans, Vegetarians, and Meat Eaters; Powerarchy: Understanding the Psychology of Oppression for Social Transformation; and Getting Relationships Right. Dr. Joy is the eighth recipient of the Ahimsa Award – previously given to the Dalai Lama and Nelson Mandela – for her work on global nonviolence. Her work has been featured in major media outlets around the world, including the BBC, ABC Australia, NPR, and the New York Times, and she has given talks and trainings in nearly 50 countries. Dr. Joy is also the founding president ofhttp://www.carnism.org/. You can learn more about her work at http://carnism.org/. #MelanieJoy #ClimateChange #Diet #Pandemics #Nutrition #TheRealTruthAboutHealth CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealthLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    Check out our Podcasts Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83JGoogle:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:  https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:   https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internalDailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims.  

Your Anxiety Toolkit
Ep. 217 The Benefits of Meditation for Anxiety & OCD

Your Anxiety Toolkit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 40:39


SUMMARY:  Today we have Windsor Flynn talking about how she realized the benefits of meditation for anxiety and OCD in her recovery. Winsdor brought her lived experience and training to the conversation and addressed how meditation has helped her in many ways, not just with her OCD and mental health. In This Episode: The benefits of meditation for general anxiety The benefits of meditation for OCD The roadblocks to practicing meditation How Mindfulness and mediation help with daily stress (especially through COVID-19) Links To Things I Talk About: Instagram: @windsormeditates Instagram: @Windsor.Flynn Website: www.windsorflynn.com (Windsor is certified to teach the 1 Giant Mind 3 Day Learn Meditation course). ERP School: https://www.cbtschool.com/erp-school-lp Episode Sponsor: This episode of Your Anxiety Toolkit is brought to you by CBTschool.com.  CBTschool.com is a psychoeducation platform that provides courses and other online resources for people with anxiety, OCD, and Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors.  Go to cbtschool.com to learn more. Spread the love! Everyone needs tools for anxiety... If you like Your Anxiety Toolkit Podcast, visit YOUR ANXIETY TOOLKIT PODCAST to subscribe free and you'll never miss an episode. And if you really like Your Anxiety Toolkit, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (maybe even two). EPISODE TRANSCRIPTION This is Your Anxiety Toolkit - Episode 217. You guys, 217. That's a lot of episodes. I'm very excited about that. Today, we have with us the amazing Windsor Flynn. I cannot tell you how incredibly by inspired I am with Windsor. She is very cool and has so much wisdom and so much kindness to share. Today, we have her on to talk about having anxiety and learning the importance of meditation. Now, Windsor speaks specifically about having OCD and how much it has helped her to take up a meditation practice. She goes over the couple of main key points, which is number one, anyone can meditate. And that meditation can be user-friendly for people, even with OCD. And she said, “Especially for people with OCD.” And she actually gives us the amazing gift of a guided meditation at the end, that just helps you bring your attention to the present and learn to drop down into your compassion and your body. And then the third point she makes is that meditation can be integrated into your life, even if you feel like you don't have time, or even if it's really uncomfortable. And she shares some amazing experiences and examples of where she really struggled and how she got through those difficulties. So, I'm going to quickly first do the “I did a hard thing” and then I'm going to let you guys get right into the amazing conversation with Windsor Flynn. So, today's “I did a hard thing” is from Anonymous, and they said: “I wear a dress that has been sitting in my closet for months. I was always scared to show my skin since breaking out in hives over my social anxiety. I felt proud for the first time in a long time.” This is so cool. You guys, I love this so much. They're really talking about showing up imperfect and all, or letting people judge them and going and doing what you want to do anyway. And that is what this podcast is about. It's about living the life that you want, not the life that anxiety wants you to have. And often, anxiety will keep your life very small if you only listen to it and only follow its rules. And so, anonymous is doing this work, walking the walk, not just talking the talk. So, yes, I'm so, so in love with this. Now you guys, you can go over to my private practice website, which is where the podcast lives. It's Kimberley Quinlan - L for License, M for Marriage, F for Family, and T for Therapist – I had to think there – .com. So, KimberleyQuinlan-lmft.com. And then you can click on the podcast and right there is a link for you to submit your “I did a hard thing” and you can be featured on the show. So, go do that, but not right away. First, I want you to listen to this amazing, amazing episode. Kimberley: Welcome. I am so excited for this episode. I have a reason for being so excited, which I'll share with you in a second, but first, I want to introduce to you Windsor Flynn. She is incredible. I have watched you grow over the last what? A year or two years since I've known you. It is so wonderful to have you on, so thank you for coming. Windsor: Yeah. Thank you for inviting me. This is so cool because I've spent a lot of time listening to your podcast and, I don't know, just hoping to be on Monday, but I didn't know for what. So, this is really cool for me. Kimberley: Yeah, this is so cool. So, you're coming on to talk about meditation. And the reason that this is so exciting for me is that is actually what this podcast was originally for – was to bring mindfulness and meditation practice to people who have anxiety. And I did a lot of meditations at the beginning and then I lost my way. So, I feel like you coming here is full circle. We're going back to the roots of the show to talk about mindfulness and meditation. Do you want to share a little bit about your story with mental health and why you landed on this as being your passion project? Windsor: Yeah, sure. So, I started-- I guess my mental health story goes way back, but I'll just start at the beginning when I first came to my OCD diagnosis. I had been experiencing anxiety. Looking back, I will say it was pretty debilitating, but I was sort of just powering through it. I was a new mom. I didn't have a lot of mom friends, the first in my group to have kids. My parents are across the ocean in Hawaii. I'm in California, in San Francisco with my boyfriend who is shocked at being a dad. So, I'm very anxious, but I'm doing all the things. And I had started experiencing intrusive thoughts, which I didn't know were intrusive thoughts. I was just really worried that I was going to become a headline for like moms that murder. I hate moms that kill because I had heard of this story. I'm sure so many people who grew up at the same time as me were really familiar with the Andrea Yates story. I don't need to go full into detail, but she had some mental health issues and she ended up killing her kids. It's a very, very sad story, but I had attached to that because I was just so, so scared that that would happen to me. And I don't know why I was nervous that this would happen to me. But ever since I was little, I just always thought that anything drastic, it would happen to me. I would be there for the end of the world. I would be there to witness a mass murder, or I would be a victim of a serial killer. All these things, I just thought it had to be me. I don't know why. So, of course when I have a baby, I'm thinking, “Oh no, this horrible thing, it's bound to happen to me. I need to pay attention.” So, that's when the hypervigilance started, all of these things that I now have language for, but I wasn't quite sure how to explain, and I also didn't want to explain it to anyone because it sounds unhinged. So, I was doing this alone. I was trying to keep myself very busy. I was doing all the classic compulsory activities that happen when you're trying to avoid intrusive thoughts and avoid this massive discomfort in fear. And eventually, we moved out of the city. So, not only was I mothering by myself-- not really by myself. I had a partner, but he was working a lot just with his schedule. So, he was sleeping most of the day and gone all night. So then we moved across the bay to Alameda and then I just didn't even have friends anymore. So, I was all alone. So, I was thinking, “Wow, if there's ever going to be a time that I'm going to just completely go off, it'll be now.” And then it just snowballed. It spiraled into this thing where I couldn't not be scared and I didn't know what was going to happen. I was convinced that I was going to kill my son for no other reason. Then I just had a feeling that something bad was going to happen. So, I looked up postpartum mood disorders because somehow, I knew those existed. And I was hoping that this had something to do with it. I still had hope that there was an explanation. And I found something that said Postpartum OCD, and anxiety. And of course, I hit every single track mark. It wasn't mild symptoms. I was just, yup. Check, check, check, check, check. And so, I felt a little okay. Not really, right? And I finally saw someone who ended up being-- she said she was a postpartum specialist, which was great. I signed up with her. We talked. She told me I had OCD. It was cool. But she didn't give me any tools. She was doing the root cause stuff, which is probably really helpful in other circumstances, not necessarily for OCD. But she reassured me enough that I was cool with my OCD. I was like, “Well, I'm not going to kill anyone. That's fine. I can go home. I can continue being a mom as long as you're telling me I'm not a murderer.” Just like, “No, you're not a murderer.” I was like, “Great, well, we're done here, I guess.” And I got pregnant again. And of course, I was so scared. I was like, “That's going to happen again. I'm going to have postpartum OCD.” So, I couldn't pause my whole pregnancy, but it was in the name of preparedness. So, I didn't know that I was making my symptoms worse and worse and worse until I had the baby. This time I'm not scared I'm going to kill anyone. I'm just scared that now I think she's the devil, which I did not know how to recognize it. So, finally, I'm experiencing a whole different subset of OCD symptoms. I didn't know, but I just thought, well, it was OCD the first time. I'm just going to check. And luckily, I landed on my therapist. I still see-- even though this was four years ago, I still see her every two weeks. I love her. She's the best. She's given me all the tools I needed to manage my mental health, got me to a place where not only was I totally understanding the disorder, but I felt really comfortable sharing and sharing in a way that I thought would be helpful to other people. So, that's when I started advocating for maternal mental health and OCD, and that's how we know each other, through the internet, social media space. And I guess that was a mouthful, but that was how I landed onto the advocacy part. And eventually, I switched to meditation because I felt like this was a tangible way that I could offer a service that I know to be helpful for the management of mental health. And I know how much resistance there is towards starting this meditation practice because I too went through a number of years where I absolutely said no to this idea of meditation. But once I started, I realized, wow, I don't know why I didn't do this sooner. There's really something to it. And it's very teachable. And I know from firsthand experience how beneficial it is. Kimberley: I love that. I actually don't think I've heard your entire story. So, thank you for sharing that with me and everybody. I didn't realize there were two waves of OCD for you and two different subtypes, which I think is common, for a lot of people. Windsor: Yeah. Kimberley: I love that. So, I think what you're saying, and can you correct me if I'm wrong? So, the first wave was reassurance, what you used to get you through. And then the second you used ERP? Windsor: Yes. Kimberley: Okay, great. And then from there, the third layer of recovery or however you want to say it, was it meditation, or were there other things you did to get to the meditation place? Windsor: Well, I was doing ERP and that really helped with my OCD management. I was able to recognize whenever I had a new obsession, and I feel like I could recognize anyone's new obsession. At this point, I was like, ‘Oh, that's this, that's this. It's tied into this.” So, I had a really great understanding, and that was cool. But I still have two kids, we're still in a pandemic, I still have communication issues with my partner – all these normal things that ERP doesn't necessarily help with. So, it was really just about finding that balance between working on myself and stress management and really getting to be that calm, chill person that I've always wanted to be. Even when I was doing the best with my OCD, I was still not so relaxed because I had a lot of attachments to how I wanted people to perceive me, how my children were behaving, not necessarily in a controlling way, but just really feeling a lot of responsibility over everything. And so, the meditation was just this next step that I was hoping would get me there, because I was feeling a lot of stress, not even related to my OCD, just in general. And I wanted to be able to find something that would help me get through that stress so that I could start really figuring out what it is I wanted to do, just even for fun again, instead of just only feeling this overwhelmed. Kimberley: Yeah. No, I really resonate with that. All I can say for me is, while I had a different story, I had an eating disorder, I was trying to do meditation during that, but the thoughts and everything was just too big for it. And it was hard for me to access actual meditation without it just being an opportunity to ruminate, sitting there, just cycling. So, the main thing I really want to ask you, if you're willing to share, is let's say specifically someone with OCD, what were some of the struggles that you had with meditation? Because I know so many people with OCD are really resistant to it because the thoughts get louder when you sit still and so forth. So, what were some of the things that you had to work through to be able to sit on a cushion? Windsor: Yeah. That's such a great question because I feel like, had I not figured out that I had OCD and then done all this work with ERP to really learn how to acclimate myself to the presence of intrusive thoughts, I don't know that I would've been successful in meditation. Actually, I know that I wasn't because I had tried it before, and it was too hard. So, I really-- even with ERP, once I started the meditation journey, the first few weeks were pretty challenging for me because as someone with OCD, every time I close my eyes and I'm not occupied, or my brain is not occupied, it's like prime time. This is OCD's favorite. It's like the time to shine. It's like, “Okay, here I am. What can we throw out to you today?” And so, knowing that this was a possibility, even when I signed up to learn meditation, I was like, “Okay, I'm going to do this. I'm going to try, I'm going to give college a try.” Then my OCD was like, “No.” You close your eyes, something could happen, like you could have a breakdown or you could make all these realizations that you are a psycho killer. And then you'll just definitely kill everyone. Thank God you tried meditation. Now your true self can come out. And I was like, “Okay, I'm going to just do it anyways. I'm just going to meditate because I have to see, not even in a compulsory way, I have to see if this is true. But I can't-- knowing now what OCD does, I couldn't-- it was almost I took it as a personal challenge. Kimberley: Like an exposure, right? It was like an exposure, like, “Okay, fine. I'm going to-- let's see.” Windsor: I signed up to learn meditation as a true exposure because now I had this fear that if I come to all these realizations, it won't be cool. It will be devastating for everyone around me. So, I was like, “Well, I'm going to try. I'm going to try to meditate.” And do you know what? I cried and panicked the first time. I had to turn off my camera because I did not want the teacher to see. Kimberley: So you did it live. Windsor: I did it live. It was so hard. It was like a total exposure because this was in front of-- I think there were 25 people in the course and everyone was closing their eyes, I'm assuming. But 20 minutes is a long time to meditate. So, I know people were going to be opening their eyes. So, I was live having this fear that I was going to turn into a psycho killer on the camera. So, I was crying because it was hard. But you know what? I'm so glad I did because also ERP showed me that crying is fine. We can cry when we do hard things. I was doing the hard thing and I was proud of myself. I even shared afterwards. We were like, “Who wants to share?” And I was like, “Me.” I cried and I had a panic attack. Kimberley: See. That is so badass in my mind. That is so cool that you did that. You rode that wave. Windsor: Yeah. And it was great because if I didn't do that or purposely put myself into the situation to cry and do this hard thing, I wouldn't have been able to get to the good part of meditation, which I love. I like to talk about the good part of meditation. But having OCD makes starting the hardest part. Kimberley: Yeah. What is the good part of meditation for you? Because I think that no one wants to do hard things unless they know there's some kind of reward at the end. Everyone's going to be different, but for you, what is the why? Why would you do such a thing? Windsor: Well, because I learned this thing, right? That was so valuable. Someone told me, we don't gauge the benefits of meditation for how we feel when our eyes are closed. We're more interested in what happens while our eyes are open. How is it impacting? And I noticed almost right away that when tensions were high, when I usually would be the first to participate-- because I'm really affected by the way other people's moods are. I feel responsible or I have to change it. I became dysregulated really easily. I noticed almost right away that when other people were feeling their feelings around me, I was able to observe them instead of participate in that, which was really cool. And it was just so much nicer to be able to be supportive instead of become one of those people who also needed support in that moment. And I also noticed right away that I had a higher tolerance for loud noises and just disruptions, because I'm pretty sensitive to lots of different noises at once. It gets me pretty anxious and agitated. So, having kids at home all day isn't ideal for that. And so, the meditation really helped me a lot with that. I was able to recover more quickly from periods of dysregulation. Maybe I would become dysregulated, but I could calm down quicker. And so, I really loved that. And I noticed that as before where I would be like, I need wine at 4:30 or whatever time it was. Once I started meditating for a few weeks, then wine just became something that tasted good that I liked in the afternoons. I didn't need it. Sometimes I would be like, “Wow, we're having dinner. Oh my God, kids, I didn't even have wine.” And they were like, “Wow, you're right.” And so, I would pour myself a glass just because I like it. Kimberley: Right. Not because you needed it to get through the afternoon. Windsor: Yeah. And so, I really liked all those changes. And it just is really restful, which I wasn't expecting. The practice itself, the one that I practice, it's twice a day. And I find that doing those two meditations really gives me more energy because I'm not a coffee person. So, yeah, I just feel like what started as a thing that I wanted to feel more rested and less stress, it has actually become a tool that I can use to help maintain a busier lifestyle, which as much as I don't love for everyone, I can't avoid it. Anyway. Kimberley: That is so cool. I mean, how amazing that this practice came to you. So, you are talking about this specific meditation practice that you use and the benefits. Do you want to share a little about what specifically you use? I'm sure some people here have heard from me of self-compassion meditations and mindfulness meditations, but do you want to share specifically what practices you are interested in practicing? Windsor: Yeah. So, the practice that I find the most success and enjoyment out of is a silent meditation, which actually was the most intimidating for me, but I love it. It's the one giant mind being technique. It's called a being technique because, I guess the focus of the meditation is to connect with your being, which I guess if you say it without sounding too woo-hoo or anything like that, we're just connecting to your true self apart from all the thoughts and the ideas and all the conditioning we have. Just getting back to you, which is something that I really wanted, especially after having two kids and being confused in the state of life that's not really developed yet. So, I love that part. And since I didn't have to focus on anything like someone else's voice, or trying to follow a guided meditation, sometimes I feel that takes more energy because I still have to pay attention to something. A silent meditation allowed me to really find that rest and allowed my brain to just slow down. Kimberley: Yeah. I too. I mean, I love guided meditations for people who are starting off and need some instructions. But I find the silent meditation once I got the hang of it, I could practice it in a minute between clients. I could just sit for-- I could quickly go into that and then come out. Or if I'm presenting and I'm listening to someone, I could just drop down into that. So, I really love the idea of this as well because it's something you can practice in small pieces.  Not so formally, but drop into just connecting down out of your head into your body kind of thing. Okay, so the biggest question I'm guessing people have is, are you “successful” with your meditations daily? What does it look like day-to-day? Are there ups and downs? How is it for you? Windsor: Yeah. This is something that comes up a lot when people ask, because we know that, yes, all meditation is helpful. But we also know that to get the most benefit out of meditation, it's best to have a regular practice. And this could mean meditating once a day, or with this particular technique, meditating twice a day. And it sounds a lot. And I would love to say I meditate twice a day every day, no matter what. But I have OCD, so I allow myself to be a little bit more flexible. I don't really love rigidity when it comes to things like that because I have a tendency to really grab onto them. So, I do allow myself to skip it sometimes, either for reasons like I forget, or the day just gets ahead of me. As important as meditation is, there's a lot of things that trumpet, like do my kids need something? Do I have to pick someone up? Is everyone being fed? There's all these things that are also really important. So, I do try to meditate twice a day. Most days I do. Sometimes I don't. But that's okay because I did what I had to do to keep everything going. Kimberley: What about during your meditation? Windsor: What, excuse me? Kimberley: What about during your meditation? Is that an up and a down process? Do you have “good days” and “bad days” with it or is it pretty consistent for you now? Windsor: Well, I don't like to talk about the meditations as being good or bad. Some are really gratifying and some are less gratifying, because even the less gratifying meditations are really good for you. You're still going to benefit from them, even though it wasn't necessarily easy or didn't feel good. But that's just like a lot of things. Meditation can be categorized as something like that, like maybe brushing your teeth or exercising. Maybe you don't love it all the time, but you do it because it's good for your body and it helps you reach certain goals. And sometimes it's really hard for me to get to a good juicy place, and that's okay. I've just started to not expect a certain experience when I go into the meditation. And that makes everything a lot easier because then I'm not letting myself down or I'm not feeling disappointed or I'm not crushing a goal. I don't go into the meditation feeling like I'm going to feel so relaxed and cool. I just say, “Oh, I'm going to close my eyes and we'll just see what happens during this session.” Kimberley: And that's why I love what you're saying because it's so in line with recovery, like dropping the expectations, dropping just the good feelings, dropping goals, having these big goals all the time. I think that's-- sometimes I have found, what happens in your meditation is like a metaphor for life, right? Like, okay, today is a busy brain day. There's going to be days like that. And I think that it's a great way to just practice the tools in a small setting that you would be practicing in the day anyway. Windsor: Exactly. That's why I love it for people with OCD too because let's say you commit to doing it 20 minutes a day or 20 minutes twice a day. During that 20 minutes, you know that any thoughts can come up, any feelings can come up, and you're just going to let them be there. And this is excellent practice for when you're going about your daily life and you have no control ever over what comes into your mind or what happens. But since you've been practicing this in your meditations, those responses to accept and let go become more automatic. So, not only are you having great meditation experiences or anything, but in your life, you can use those same tools. It's not just adding another thing. It all works together. The meditation is so helpful in every aspect. Kimberley: Right. It's like we go to the gym to strengthen our muscles and we meditate to strengthen our brain muscles, right? Windsor: Yeah. Kimberley: Yeah. I love that. So, one thing I didn't ask you ahead of time, but I'm wondering, would you be interested in leading us through a couple of minute meditation to get us experiencing that? Windsor: Yeah. And you know what? I was thinking of like, maybe I should think of something to say in case she asks it, but I don't think she will. So, yeah, we can just do a short-- what I do sometimes when I don't do the whole 20 minutes is I just do a short mini one, like a minute or two. Kimberley: Would you lead us? Windsor: Yeah. Okay. So, for everyone listening and for Kimberley, I just want to show you a little bit about what it looks like to connect to your being and to practice a silent meditation, just for a short little grounding experience in the middle of a busy day or before a meeting, anytime you need to. So, what I like to do before I meditate is to just get into a comfortable spot. You don't necessarily have to be on a fancy cushion. You just have to have your lower back supported. And go ahead and close your eyes. And what I like to do before I start any meditation is take a few deep belly breaths. So, we'll just breathe into our noses right now. Feel your belly. Feel your chest... And release through the mouth. One more deep breath into the nose... into your belly... and release. And one more deep breath into the nose. Feel your belly... and release. So, now you just want to let your breath settle into its own natural rhythm. This isn't a breathing meditation. We're not going to focus on our breath. And you can scan your body for any tension that you might be holding. A commonplace is in your neck and your shoulders. Make sure you drop your shoulders, can wiggle your jaw a little bit, and just let all of that tension go. So, when we're meditating, we don't want to put a focus on any thoughts that might come into our mind. But when they do come in, we just want to acknowledge them and recognize that this is a normal part of meditation. We never want to resist any thoughts or feelings that we might have. These are all important. And just continue following your natural breath. And has any thoughts come into your mind, just remember that we don't have to engage with them. It's okay to just witness them and let them pass through you. Maybe you might notice a sound outside or a body sensation. That's okay. Just be a witness to that too. Now you can take another deep breath into the nose... Into your belly... and breathe out. And you can start to bring your awareness back to your body and see how it feels to be where you are. You can start to bring your awareness back into the space. And slowly, when you're ready, you can open your eyes. Kimberley: Oh, what a treat. Windsor: And that's a little meditation, but I was really feeling it for a second. Kimberley: Yeah. I just kept smiling because it was such a treat. What a treat that I get to have my own little meditation instructor in the middle of a podcast. It's my favorite. What a gift. Thank you so much. Windsor: You're welcome. Kimberley: Yeah. Thank you. I think I love-- I just want to highlight a couple of things you said, which is, for those who have anxiety, meditation is not the absence of thoughts and feelings, right? You highlighted that and that was so helpful, just to acknowledge that thoughts and feelings will happen, sensations will happen, but we just become an observer to them, which I think again, not only helps us with meditation, but it helps us with response prevention, during our exposures. It helps us during panic. Such a great tool. So, I'm so grateful for you sharing that. Windsor: Cool. Well, thanks for letting me. I love to talk about it when I have the chance. Kimberley: Yeah. Okay. So, I want to ask one final question, which is, what do you really want people to know? If there's something we've missed today or if you want to drive home the main point, what is your main message that you're wanting people to take away from today's podcast? Windsor: I guess what I really want people to know about meditation is that you don't have to be a certain type of person to do this. You don't need to be a specific personality type or have certain interests to make meditation work for you. You can just be yourself and come as you are and treat this practice as a gift that you're giving yourself, that you deserve to take part in because it offers such deep rest and relaxation. That meditation can be a part of a modern, busy lifestyle. You don't have to be common Zen all the time to do it. I think that meditation is for everybody. Kimberley: I love that. I always remember, I think I could be killing this here, but the Dalai Lama says, and this always gets me laughing because he always says, if you don't have time for meditation, you are the one who needs to meditate the most. Windsor: Yeah. I love that one. Kimberley: I killed the way that he said it, but for me, so often I'm like, “Oh, I don't have time. Oh, I didn't get time today.” And he really keeps nagging me in my mind in terms of knowing the more busy you are, the more you may want to prioritize this. Of course, like you said, that happens and priorities happen. But for me, that was the main message I had to keep reminding myself when it came to meditation. So, I loved that. Windsor: Yeah. Kimberley: Well, thank you so much. This is just delightful. Really it is. It has brought such joy to me today because like I said, it feels full circle to be coming back and talking more about meditation and doing more of that here. Where can people get a hold of you and hear about your work? Windsor: So, I have my Instagram, @windsor.flynn, and that's my OCD one. I talk a little bit about meditation on there, but I know that not everyone is necessarily ready for that. So, I do have my other Instagram, @windsormeditates. And that's when I focus a little bit more on the meditation. And if you're interested in taking any of my group courses or private meditation sessions, you can just go to my website, windsorflynn.com. All very easy, just search my name on the internet, and then you'll find some links for those. Kimberley: And we'll have all the links in the show notes as well. So, if people are listening on, they should be able to connect to that. So, amazing. I'm so-- pardon? Windsor: I was just going to say thank you so much for having me. I'm a big fan of yours and I love the work that you're doing and I feel so honored that I get to be on your podcast. Kimberley: No, I feel likewise. I love what you're doing. There's so many things I wish I could focus on. And I love when somebody like you will come along and they focus on that one thing. It just makes me really happy because I just love when people are finding little areas, particularly in the OCD and mental health space where it's like, we need these sources. So, I'm so happy that you're doing that work. Thank you. Windsor: Cool. Thank you so much. Kimberley: My pleasure. And like I said, go follow Windsor. She's amazing, and I'm just honored to have you here. Windsor: Thank you. ----- Okay. So, before we finish up, thank you so much for being here and staying till the end. Before we finish, I want to share a review of the week. This one is from Cynthia Saffel and she said: “I'm so excited to share these podcasts with my clients.” She gave it a five-star review and said, “I first was introduced to Kimberley's clear and compassionate teaching style when I took the ERP school course for therapists.” For those of you who don't know, we have a CEU approved course called ERP School, where you can learn how to treat OCD using ERP. And she went on to say, “In the past 3 weeks since taking the course I recommended both the course and podcasts to my clients.” Thank you so much, Cynthia, for your review. And for everyone who leaves a review, it is the best gift you can give me in return for these free resources. So, if you have the time, please do go over and leave a review and have a wonderful day. It is a beautiful day to do hard things. Have a wonderful day, everybody.

The Stress Mastery Podcast: Living Right with Bill Cortright
#1260 “The Book of Joy” by Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu: “Acceptance: The Only Place Where Change Can Begin”

The Stress Mastery Podcast: Living Right with Bill Cortright

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 19:30


In today's book study, “The Book of Joy” by Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu are in the section Days 4 and 5-The Eight Pillars of Joy: “Acceptance: The Only Place Where Change Can Begin” This section continues the eight pillars of joy and the Dali Lama and Archbishop Tutu discuss Pillar #4 the last pillar of the Mind. This is a powerful section on acceptance and how this brings Joy to our lives regardless of the circumstances we are in. This section is Stress Mastery. ________________________________________________________  Join The Stress Mastery Community today for FREE! Click here to register HERE! Love the show? Tweet me a shoutout at: @Billcortright Want to sponsor episodes of The Stress Mastery Podcast?  Email Bill at : Bill@livingrightwithbillcortright.com  Mentioned in this show: Join the private Facebook Group: The Stress Mastery Podcast Subscription/SocialLinks: Subscribe on iTunes Subscribe to the The Stress Mastery Mailing List Watch on Youtube www.livingrightwithbillcortright.com Instagram: @livingrightwithbillcortright Facebook at Bill Cortright STAY INSPIRED!

Compassion In Action
The journey of compassion with Dr. James Doty

Compassion In Action

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 49:48


James R. Doty, M.D. is the founder and director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education at Stanford University of which His Holiness the Dalai Lama is the founding benefactor. Dr. Doty works with a variety of scientists from a number of disciplines examining the neural bases for compassion and altruism. He is also a professor in the Department of Neurosurgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.

Inspire Nation Show with Michael Sandler
One Simple Practice In FOUR Simple Steps For YOUR Transformative Journey! Kamal Ravikant

Inspire Nation Show with Michael Sandler

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 67:13


If you've ever wanted to welcome in magic into your life and feel better about your life, then do we have the love yourself like your life depends on it show for you.   Today I'll be talking with Kamal Ravikant, self-published phenom, poet, entrepreneur, and investor, and one of my all-time favorite guests I've had on the show (he was also the first). He's also the author of one of the most beautiful, brilliant, and important reads out there today, “Love Yourself Like Your Life Depends on It”   That is just what I want to talk with him about today, about one simple practice and four simple steps that can completely transform your life. Plus we'll talk about living like you've died, why being depressed is a good day, CocaCola signs and market street, two last leaves and an open heart, and what in the world rubber snakes and Jesus have to do with anything.   Kamal Ravikant meditated with Tibetan monks in the Dalai Lama's monastery, served in the US Army infantry, and a bestselling author, on the one simple practice and four simple steps that can completely transform your life.   Key Points Discussed:  What in the world happened to you two months ago and what was going through your mind? (03:55) How has the Satori experience changed you? (08:09) What works for the inside practically and how it changed Kamal's mindset (15:24) What was the original bursting of the artery that sent you down this whole path of loving yourself? (20:15) Loving ourselves with the same intensity we would use to pull ourselves up if we were hanging off a cliff with our fingers (23:45) The power of weaving in “Thank You” into everything we put into ourselves (28:45) Going into flow by embracing ourselves and the importance of committing to loving ourselves (32:54) Setting people up for success by having them listen to the same piece of music every time they're meditating (42:31) What does light have to do with anything? (49:34) The need for an internal change before anything else changes (52:12) How the “Love Yourself Like Your Life Depends on It” book will help people (57:27) How important is giving love? (59:41) How much would our world change if we got this concept? (1:04:21)   To find out more visit: https://www.amazon.com/Love-Yourself-Like-Your-Depends-ebook/dp/B0086BX8UE - Love Yourself Like Your Life Depends on It https://amzn.to/3qULECz - Order Michael Sandler's new book, "AWE, the Automatic Writing Experience" www.automaticwriting.com  ……. Follow Michael and Jessica's exciting journey and get even more great tools, tips, and behind-the-scenes access. Go to https://www.patreon.com/inspirenation   For free meditations, weekly tips, stories, and similar shows visit: https://inspirenationshow.com/   We've got NEW Merch! - https://teespring.com/stores/inspire-nation-store   Follow Inspire Nation, and the lives of Michael and Jessica, on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/InspireNationLive/   Find us on TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@inspirenationshow   

The Stress Mastery Podcast: Living Right with Bill Cortright
#1255 “The Book of Joy” by Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu: “Humor: Laughter, Joking Is Much Better”

The Stress Mastery Podcast: Living Right with Bill Cortright

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 19:09


In today's book study, “The Book of Joy” by Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu are in the section Days 4 and 5-The Eight Pillars of Joy: “Humor: Laughter, Joking Is Much Better” This section continues the eight pillars of joy and the Dali Lama and Archbishop Tutu discuss Pillar #3 and how they use humor to bring people together even during a tragic event. This is a great chapter that can help one open their Hearts to others and themselves. ________________________________________________________  Join The Stress Mastery Community today for FREE! Click here to register HERE! Love the show? Tweet me a shoutout at: @Billcortright Want to sponsor episodes of The Stress Mastery Podcast?  Email Bill at : Bill@livingrightwithbillcortright.com  Mentioned in this show: Join the private Facebook Group: The Stress Mastery Podcast Subscription/SocialLinks: Subscribe on iTunes Subscribe to the The Stress Mastery Mailing List Watch on Youtube www.livingrightwithbillcortright.com Instagram: @livingrightwithbillcortright Facebook at Bill Cortright STAY INSPIRED!

INpowered Mind-INpowered Health - the keys to heart aligned living, with host Jayne Marquis

In this episode, Jayne has a conversation with Lisa Tahir, author of "The Chiron Effect". Endorsed by his holiness the 14th Dalai Lama. Chiron is a little-known planet that in astrology is known to illuminate that which is hidden. Find out how to find your needed place of healing, and why illuminating and healing our own core wounds help us become empowered. Using astrology as a diagnostic tool, Lisa Tahir reveals how to use the astrological placement of the minor planet Chiron in your birth chart to identify the core wounds and unconscious patterns that block your capacity to have self-empathy and to forgive. Coining the phrase “Chiron effect” to describe the magnetic pull that individuals have around specific areas of vulnerability, she explains how, like a raw nerve, the placement of Chiron describes what parts of our lives we might edit or hide for fear of being rejected as well as the areas of sensitivity where we are triggered. A fascinating conversation with Lisa. Join us and spiral up! #JayneMarquis #empowerment #TheChironEffect #mindbody #heal to find Lisa and "The Chiron Effect" - www.nolatherapy.com For more INpowering episodes, linktree connects to my website, and many platforms where Inpowered is published - My Linktree: https://linktr.ee/INpoweredhealth This podcast is for information purposes only and represents the views and opinions of the speakers. The information presented is not meant to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease. We recommend you seek the advice of a licensed healthcare practitioner before beginning any natural, complimentary, or conventional treatment.

On Being with Krista Tippett
Remembering Desmond Tutu

On Being with Krista Tippett

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 50:49


The remarkable Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town and Nobel Laureate died in the closing days of 2021. He helped galvanize South Africa's improbably peaceful transition from apartheid to democracy. He was a leader in the religious drama that transfigured South African Christianity. And he continued to engage conflict well into his retirement, in his own country and in the global Anglican communion. Krista explored all of these things with him in this warm, soaring 2010 conversation — and how Desmond Tutu's understanding of God and humanity unfolded through the history he helped to shape.Desmond Tutu was an Anglican Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town, South Africa and recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He wrote numerous books for adults and children — including The Rainbow People of God, No Future Without Forgiveness, Made for Goodness and, together with his good friend the Dalai Lama, The Book of Joy.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.This show originally aired in April, 2010.

On Being with Krista Tippett
[Unedited] Desmond Tutu with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 75:28


The remarkable Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town and Nobel Laureate died in the closing days of 2021. He helped galvanize South Africa's improbably peaceful transition from apartheid to democracy. He was a leader in the religious drama that transfigured South African Christianity. And he continued to engage conflict well into his retirement, in his own country and in the global Anglican communion. Krista explored all of these things with him in this warm, soaring 2010 conversation — and how Desmond Tutu's understanding of God and humanity unfolded through the history he helped to shape.Desmond Tutu was an Anglican Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town, South Africa and recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He wrote numerous books for adults and children — including The Rainbow People of God, No Future Without Forgiveness, Made for Goodness and, together with his good friend the Dalai Lama, The Book of Joy.This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Remembering Desmond Tutu." Find the transcript for that show at onbeing.org.This show originally aired in April, 2010.

Backbone Radio with Matt Dunn
Backbone Radio with Matt Dunn - January 2, 2022 - HR 3

Backbone Radio with Matt Dunn

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 38:41


Mass Formation Psychosis. The world has gone barking mad. How did it happen? Our conversation about mass psychosis theory, as popularized by Dr. Robert Malone and Dr. Mattias Desmet. A fragmented society, hypnotized by our devices. A nervous Ruling Class spreading fear in their efforts to control. The madness of crowds and the role of the PSYOP. The crushing of dissent. Good conscience maltreatment of "the other." The pathway to Global Totalitarianism. Notes from Aldous Huxley, George Orwell, Hannah Arendt and the Dalai Lama. How to promote healing from destructive emotions? How to disallow the spread of our sick society? The paradoxes of Christian readiness. Plus, Steve Cortes on Democrat fears rising into 2022. Julie Kelly exposing the phony FBI plot around Gov. Gretchen Whitmer. Precursor to January 6th? RIP Betty White, John Madden and Harry Reid. With Listener Calls. Happy New Year to Backbone Country. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Finding Harmony Podcast
Rebirth, Restart, and the New Year with Guy Donahaye

Finding Harmony Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 130:23


Happy New Year, Thundercats! (That's the name Russell's come up with for “the Finding Harmony fanclub.” Shout out to Valerie Swift for setting this up! hint hint…. lol!) To start your year, here's wonderful interview, with the one person who made Russell the most nervous to talk to! Yet, like all things, the experience of actually sitting down with Guy Donahaye was an absolute delight. Guy Donahaye was Russell's first Mysore style Ashtanga teacher in NYC, his mentor, and the last man certified by Sri. K. Pattabhi Jois — and possibly the first Certified teacher to publicly reject him as “Guruji.” Guy has a very natural and shy reticence about him. It's one of his strongest characteristics and is something his students would all immediately ascribe to him. So we were absolutely thrilled to have him join us and talk so much! He was loving, humble and engaged with our conversation in a sincere way, with the intention of cultivating a deeper understanding around why we do the things we do, what's the true purpose for practicing yoga, and how this might be approached in different ways. We believe that he very much appreciated our work and we are honored to add his voice and point of view to our collection of esteemed perspectives from practitioners and teachers all over the world. With Guy, we spoke about regret a great deal, and whether regret and learning are both possible. For example, can you regret getting into a bad marriage and subsequently a divorce, if you, as a person, learned so much from the experience? Isn't this what the Dalai Lama teaches us when he says that China's treatment of Tibet is and was his greatest teacher? Still, Guy seems to regret his treatment of Russell in his Mysore room 20 years ago. Whereas Russell was deeply grateful for his experience, and regrets ever leaving him. So here we are. Now. Where we are. And really, what regrets can we truly carry when we look deeply into the turbulent stillness of our hearts with kindness, humour, and compassion? All our love to you, with the dawning of new days, in 2022! Thunder, Thunder, Thundercats Ho! Fire up your sword of Omens! LEARN MORE ABOUT GUY - FACEBOOK I INSTAGRAM LEARN MORE ABOUT THE FINDING HARMONY INSIDE CIRCLE! - https://www.harmonyslater-programs.com/ BE THE FIRST TO KNOW! SIGN UP - https://www.harmonyslater.com/ The Finding Harmony Podcast is hosted, edited and produced by Harmony Slater and co-hosted by Russell Case. A big heart of thanks to our friends, family, and students from around the world, who've generously supported this podcast through your comments, sharing, and financial donations. If you've enjoyed today's podcast, please consider supporting our future episodes by making a donation. Every little bit goes a long way and we are immensely grateful for any and all of your support: Make a donation Don't forget to subscribe and leave a review! ❤ Give us a 5★ rating! Music by Nick Evans - Listen to the entire album on Spotify - Click Here.

Ritual Recipes
RR56 - Hope and the Parliament of the World's Religions

Ritual Recipes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 16:47


After 2 challenging years, I found hope attending the virtual conference of the Parliament of the World's Religions. Its 1893 conference is considered the beginning of the interfaith movement. The Oct 2021 conference offered 583 programs, panel discussions, religious ceremonies and spiritual observations. Presenters included Christians, Jews, Muslims, Buddhists, Jains, Bahhais, Sikhs, Hindus, Pagans, Native Americans, Indiginous people and more. The Dalai Lama spoke to the gathering, as did the Pope. Also sharing their wisdom were an Inuit shaman, a Curandera Esperitu, an African elder, and a Lakota grandmother -- and more.  Links: Episode 9 of Ritual Recipes about Spirit Spoons and a Ritual for Soup to Heal the World https://parliamentofreligions.org/home  

The Stress Mastery Podcast: Living Right with Bill Cortright
#1250 “The Book of Joy” by Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu: “Humility: I Tried to Look Humble and Modest”

The Stress Mastery Podcast: Living Right with Bill Cortright

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 30:09


We continue the book study with sadness in our hearts for the passing of the Archbishop on 12-26-21. In today's book study, “The Book of Joy” by Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu are in the section Days 4 and 5-The Eight Pillars of Joy: “Humility: I Tried to Look Humble and Modest.” This section continues the eight pillars of joy and the Dali Lama and Archbishop Tutu share their unique perspectives on Humility which is Pillar number two. They share their unique ways of how they see their status and how they view fame and separateness. ________________________________________________________  Join The Stress Mastery Community today for FREE! Click here to register HERE! Love the show? Tweet me a shoutout at: @Billcortright Want to sponsor episodes of The Stress Mastery Podcast?  Email Bill at : Bill@livingrightwithbillcortright.com  Mentioned in this show: Join the private Facebook Group: The Stress Mastery Podcast Subscription/SocialLinks: Subscribe on iTunes Subscribe to the The Stress Mastery Mailing List Watch on Youtube www.livingrightwithbillcortright.com Instagram: @livingrightwithbillcortright Facebook at Bill Cortright STAY INSPIRED!

Aspire with Osha: art, nature, humanity
Why We Love Dogs and Make Cows Cry

Aspire with Osha: art, nature, humanity

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 48:03


Osha & Dr. Melanie Joy engage in a fascinating discussion of the psychology of carnism & explore how we are influenced to treat some beings with dignity while oppressing others.  Dr. Joy, founder of Beyond Carnism, has received the prestigious Ahimsa Award - previously given to the Dalai Lama & Nelson Mandela - for her work on global non-violence.  Dr. Melanie Joy is a Harvard educated psychologist, international speaker & author of 5 books, including Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs and Wear Cows, (just  released in its 10th Anniversary Edition) and the award winning books:  Beyond Beliefs;  Powerarchy; and  Getting Relationships Right . "If slaughterhouses had glass walls, everyone would be vegetarian. " - Sir Paul McCartney How do we justify cruelty? Dr. Joy explores the deep psychological and societal ideologies that allow us to perpetuate cruelty to others that we classify as not deserving of dignity or compassion. "The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated." - Mahatma GandhiWe take a look at the roots of  racism, sexism and violence against others - and how this is related to our climate crisis and - the future for humanity.In her book, Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows, Dr. Joy investigates factory farming, exposing how cruelly the animals are treated, the hazards that meatpacking workers face, and the environmental impact of raising more than 10 billion animals for food each year. Provocative ans challenging, this book will change the way you think about food forever.We discuss how even those who eat meat can become allies and advocates for preventing cruelty to animals. Learn more at carnism.org; Melanie Joy

Finanzas Orgánicas
Ep 91 | Cómo echar las finanzas pa' lante en el 2022 con Maickel Melamed

Finanzas Orgánicas

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 63:00


En la búsqueda de un mejor estatus o estilo de vida pueden aparecer diferentes obstáculos que nos hacen perder la motivación, como la pandemia, la crisis económica, los problemas personales o financieros. Sin embargo, el cierre de un año, tan complejo para algunos, como lo fue el 2021 y la expectativa del nuevo año 2022 nos puede ayudar a recargar el espíritu de energía para seguir construyendo el futuro financiero que deseamos. Este episodio de Despierta Tus Finanzas Podcast, conversamos con Maickel Melamed (@maickelmelamed) acerca de cómo echar “pa' lante” cuando estamos desanimados, cómo conectar con la claridad, cuál es la mentalidad ganadora, cómo ganar confianza en tí mismo, quién es el infante interno (exageración, comparación y descalificación) y de qué manera desarrollar la resiliencia. Recomendaciones: Libro: The Book of Joy de 14th Dalai Lama, Desmond Tutu, y Douglas Carlton Abrams (Versión en español: El libro de la alegría) Programa: Pa' lante de Maickel Melamed _________ ¿Te gustó el episodio? Déjame un rating ★★★★★ y review al podcast. Así juntos construimos una comunidad de inteligencia financiera más fuerte. _________ ¡Evolucionamos! Ahora somos Despierta Tus Finanzas podcast. Escucha nuestros episodios anteriores bajo el nombre de Finanzas Orgánicas. Descarga GRATIS nuestro e-book "Retos y Caminos hacia el Bienestar Financiero" Si buscas mejorar tu gestión de dinero, únete a nosotros en el programa Despierta Tus Finanzas™ Únete a nuestra comunidad en Instagram: @juliofinance | @fintelhub Visita la web de Fintelhub

LOA Uncorked
Episode 59: Lisa Tahir - Beautiful, Talented Soul & Author of The Chiron Effect: Healing Our Core Wounds through Astrology, Empathy, and Self Forgiveness

LOA Uncorked

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 50:44


In this powerful episode of LOA Uncorked, we enjoy a brilliant conversation with Lisa Tahir, Psychoastrology®, author, healer, and beautiful soul.  If you don't believe us, just ask His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama who endorsed Lisa's book The Chiron Effect: Healing Our Core Wounds through Astrology, Empathy, and Self-Forgiveness. This is a conversation that reveals so much about Lisa's depth of talent, brilliance, vulnerability, and heart.  It also brings out important vulnerability and core wounds that Holli and Jeanna carry as well.  These are the kinds of conversations that can transform us all - and the LOA gals were transformed by, and in awe of, Lisa.  We know you will enjoy this incredible episode and have the opportunity to consider ever present LOA practices and/or cliques and how they can be reframed with more context, power, and impact. PS Baby is a Leo!

Awakening the World to Oneness from Humanity's Team
Manifesting Oneness Through Compassionate Sound

Awakening the World to Oneness from Humanity's Team

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 61:57


In this podcast, ‘Manifesting Oneness Through Compassionate Sound' Jonathan and Andi Goldman, along with their Global Oneness Summit panel guests Lama Ngawang Tashi Bapu and Chloë Goodchild, explore: Sound and compassion, and how this combination of frequency plus intention can manifest the outcome of Oneness. The how's and why's of using sound in order to facilitate, enhance and empower compassion. How sound and compassion can be used to create positive shifts in our consciousness. Jonathan Goldman is a bestselling author, international authority on sound healing, founder of the Sound Healers Association, and a pioneer in the field of harmonics.  Andi Goldman is a holistic psychotherapist, sound healer, award-winning author, director of the Healing Sound Seminars, and co-director of the Sound Healers Association.  Geshe Ngawang Tashi Bapu, better known as Lama Tashi has been Principal Chant Master of the Dalai Lama's Drepung Loseling Monastery and served as Director of the Central Institute of Himalayan Culture Studies in India.  Chloë Goodchild is a singing philosopher, vocal artist, sound visionary and founder of The Naked Voice, a pioneering training programme to explore the human voice as a catalyst for self-discovery, authentic expression, loving presence and transformation.  Tune in to Manifesting Oneness Through Compassionate Sound to hear Lama Tashi, Chloë, Andi, and Jonathan speak about compassion, Oneness, and healing through sound.  ***Note: this is a special rebroadcast and any websites, links, programs, or events mentioned may no longer be active (or dates may have been changed). Thank you!*** Explore Humanity's Team and the timeless truth that We Are All One.  To see the entire collection of Global Oneness Summits, as well as hundreds of other programs devoted to conscious living, please visit Humanity Stream+, our top-of-the-line and economical streaming service that helps you to be in control of your own conscious journey. Learn more about the Humanity's Team free education programs.

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
More Animals Killed In One Week Than The Total Number Of People Killed In All Wars Throughout History - Melanie Joy, PhD

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 6:07


More Animals Killed In One Week Than The Total Number Of People Killed In All Wars Throughout History -  Melanie Joy, PhD Melanie Joy, Ph.D., Ed.M. •           https://www.melaniejoy.org/•           Book - Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows: An Introduction to Carnism Dr. Melanie Joy is a Harvard-educated psychologist, celebrated speaker, and the author of six books, including the award-winning Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows; Beyond Beliefs: A Guide to Improving Relationships and Communication for Vegans, Vegetarians, and Meat Eaters; Powerarchy: Understanding the Psychology of Oppression for Social Transformation; and Getting Relationships Right. Dr. Joy is the eighth recipient of the Ahimsa Award – previously given to the Dalai Lama and Nelson Mandela – for her work on global nonviolence. Her work has been featured in major media outlets around the world, including the BBC, ABC Australia, NPR, and the New York Times, and she has given talks and trainings in nearly 50 countries. Dr. Joy is also the founding president ofhttp://www.carnism.org/. You can learn more about her work at http://carnism.org/. #MelanieJoy #ClimateChange #Diet #Pandemics #Nutrition #TheRealTruthAboutHealth CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealthLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    Check out our Podcasts  Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83JGoogle:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:  https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:   https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internalDailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ 

Anxiety Bites
Befriend Your Beast

Anxiety Bites

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 49:55


Jen talks to best-selling author and philanthropist Sarah Wilson about her memoir about anxiety, 'First, We Make the Beast Beautiful.' Sarah tells Jen that even the Dalai Lama told her he can't stop the chatter in his head, Charles Darwin had panic attacks, and how being playful, experimental, and curious in approaching our anxiety work is key. To get Sarah's latest book 'This One Wild and Precious Life' about hope and a path forward in a fractured world during climate change go to her website - where you'll also find info on all of her best-selling books, her blog, information on her speaking engagements and more at: https://www.sarahwilson.com For more information on Jen Kirkman, the host of Anxiety Bites, please go here: https://jenkirkman.bio.link Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Back2Basics: Reconnecting to the essence of YOU
E135: Lisa Tahir - Allowing Life to Happen

Back2Basics: Reconnecting to the essence of YOU

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 32:46


Lisa Tahir, LCSW is certified in EMDR level I, Reiki level II, and as a Thought Coach through the Institute for Transformational Thinking. She has private practice office locations in both Los Angeles, CA and New Orleans, LA. Lisa is passionately committed to helping people heal and become emotionally, spiritually, mentally, and physically healthy. The Chiron Effect - Healing Our Core Wounds through Astrology, Empathy, and Self-Forgiveness (Inner Traditions Publisher, November 2020) The Chiron Effect is a guide to using astrology as a diagnostic tool to identify one of 12 core wounds, and heal them utilizing a prescription of psychology, spirituality, and taking personal responsibility. Lisa reveals how to transform your wounds, also experienced as areas of vulnerability that you may edit or hide from others from fear of being rejected or judged, and unconscious patterns that block self-empathy and forgiveness, and prevent you from living your most true and authentic life. Lisa is also the host of the weekly podcast All Things Therapy which she began in 2016, and releases weekly episodes every Thursday. Dedicated to Changing Consciousness One Conversation at a Time, Lisa's show promotes personal growth and transformation, advancing the conversation on emotional, psychological, physical, and spiritual development. Among her guests in over 245 episodes are Marianne Williamson, John Gray, Ph.D, David Kessler, Katherine Woodward Thomas, Alan Weiss, Judith Orloff, M.D., Ora Nadrich, and many others. Website: https://www.nolatherapy.com All things Therapy Podcast: All Things Therapy on Apple Podcasts 

the artisan podcast
ep25 | the artisan podcast | keith roberts | creator of the oak journal

the artisan podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 35:38


Check out our episode with Keith Roberts, Entrepreneur | Author & Keynote Speaker | Creator of the Oak Journal.   We chat about creativity, mentorship, entrepreneurship and so much more/----more---- Katty: I'm so excited to interview a good friend, Keith Roberts, an incredible creative and the creator of The Oak Journal, for this session of the Artisan Podcast. Hello, Keith, welcome. Keith: It's an honor to be here, thanks for having me. Katty: I'd love to start the conversation, Keith about you as a creative and how you got your start and then we'll make that move into where you are today with The Oak Journal. Keith: Great. So my start, I actually went to Brooks Institute of Photography in Santa Barbara, California, where I got a degree in Industrial Scientific Photography with a minor in Undersea Photography, so really applicable to the real world….sarcasm there!   I think one of the many gifts that I took away that was a life changer for me with Brooks was the level of presentation and professionalism that was required. It was easy to get into Brooks Institute of Photography, it was incredibly hard to graduate. There were 58 students in my class and 12 graduated. If you got to C you failed, you had to retake the class. A second C you were expelled.  So they were really about making exceptional artists and not about just making money, which I really appreciate, and being somebody that's owned an agency for 25 years and seeing what a lot of the schools turn out now that are based on profit versus not, really instilling what the students need to have a successful career as a creative. That was enormous for me. The other thing that I took away from that was, you know, a very special relationship with the founder of the school, Ernest Brooks. I minored in Undersea Photography and I got to spend several months living on a boat diving every day with a gentleman who has, you know, an exhibit in the Smithsonian Institute for his underwater photography. We had Jean-Michel Cousteau, Jacques Cousteau's son, dove with us for several expeditions. So the taste for once-in-a-lifetime experiences, I got at a very early age. Katty: Oh my gosh I got goosebumps. That's incredible to have that opportunity at such a young age, that just opened up the whole world for you to be able to look at everything through their eyes too. Keith: Yeah, and I would say it also set an expectation that I did not want to have an ordinary life. I remember to this day at my grandmother's trailer in rural Indiana she had a poster of the poem, The Road Less Traveled. And I always remember that last verse “Two roads diverged in a road and I took the road less traveled by and that has made all the difference” and that was an early opportunity to see when everybody else is sitting in a classroom or working on being an engineer, which was the safe job in the 90s you know, and my dad was an engineer, and that was the safe route to go..what was possible if you really followed your passion. Katty: Beautiful. And I know that, unfortunately, Ernest Brooks passed away recently. And you wrote a beautiful tribute about him. Can you talk a little bit about mentorship and just kind of what that meant for you to be under the tutelage of this incredible person? Keith: Absolutely, and thank you for giving me the opportunity to continue to honor Ernie. He was one of the many mentors that I've continued to work with. It was a gift and I think, realizing as a Buddhist, I believe that there is no such thing as a coincidence, but when the student is ready to teach her presents itself and I think there are so many lost opportunities when people don't realize that there's this synchronicity happening all around them.  And so, with Ernie Brooks, I remember something specifically said that the boat we lived on was “Just Love.” and he said, “The time we spend upon just love is not deducted from our lives.” And it still chokes me up to this day, and I think that's why he lived to be as long as he did is because he spent so much time on that gorgeous boat.  But mentorship is essential and it's not something that ends with the first. Ernie sent me on a path, but at Brooks, I met Lapsom, who was somebody that worked with the Dalai Lama, and he put me on a path from being a devout atheist to finding Buddhism and changing the entire path of my life. Even though Lapsom was very briefly, in my life. And then there was a gentleman, Dave Larsen. I assisted a couple photographers Vic Huber and Bob Carey, those were also mentors that helped me continue to push what I wanted to be as a professional, but when I broke out and started working as a photographer, stock photography was really decimating the market and a lot of established photographers were closing and so I spent a year as a starving artist, and then had to get a real job. And that's how I got into doing design, where I met my next mentor, a gentleman named Dave Larsen. He saw me as a designer that, head down when things weren't going to get accomplished by my peers, I would jump in and make sure that we hit our deadlines, and he was the one that actually gave me the opportunity to move to Denver, he promoted me within that organization that was acquired by Equifax. And then the next step was EO and the mentors like Warren Rustand and having those people that continue to inspire you to tears. Katty: Well said. EO for the audience is the Entrepreneurs Organization, a network of about 16,000 members entrepreneurs across the globe, and that's how Keith and I know each other. We're both members of EO, and have a lot of people, a lot of mentors in common. Warren Rustand is the gentleman that Keith just talked about. So, obviously, the influence of all of these incredible people has created an indelible impact on you, one that you carry with you still today. When and who kind of lit that spark of entrepreneurship for you?  Keith: That's a really good question. I don't know. Actually, I do. I remember in seventh grade. The funny thing is it wasn't really inspirational, it was my accounting teacher or some class that I had and I remember he explained a definition of an entrepreneur, and it was horrible. It was somebody that was going to have many failures before they have a success, probably have, you know, one or multiple bankruptcies. I mean he really described an entrepreneur as an atrocious choice to make in your life, and I remember sitting in that class and being like, “Huh, I think that's me”. Going against the grain, not following the rules, and facing insurmountable odds with optimism. So it was sort of an adverse inspiration. Katty: I love that. I absolutely love that. You can see this on my wall, it says “dwell in possibilities.” It's my absolute favorite quote, and that's what entrepreneurship is all about. There is a possibility out there so let's go and do it. Katty: I love that. At what point in your career after you were working and obviously studying photography, making the move to design and working for Dave Larsen. At what point did you say okay now I'm ready to start my own agency? Keith: It was actually serendipity, so I had been doing some stuff as Zenman, as a freelancer, while I was working at Equifax, which is where I worked for Dave Larsen. And then they had moved me from California to Denver when the merger happened. Like with most acquisitions they within six months realize the redundancies that they'd acquired and they'd also moved us out here. So, I always had the goal that before I was 30 I wanted to be my own boss, to have my own business, to be an entrepreneur. And I actually was given a freeroll, I had a six-month runway, it was pre-September 11, the economy was great. Based on my management level, I had a half-year runway. I looked at that opportunity like once in a lifetime, I'm never going to be given this gift again. I took my severance package I tore up my resume, never to be edited or used again, and formed Zenman as official business. Katty: It's one thing though to go from being a solopreneur, and to running and creating one. Having employees, having that responsibility for other people, beyond just yourself. When did you make that transition? Keith: That was a couple of years later. So for the first three years, it was just me, it was called Zenman because I was the Buddhist creative guy I was the Zenman. But then as we started adding employees and scaling, you're absolutely right, two things happened; my stress level increased exponentially and my personal income decreased catastrophically. And it probably took five years to get back to where I was after adding that overhead and that did not alleviate the peaks and valleys that came with a service-based industry.  We weren't doing a lot of recurring revenue at the time, so each month it was eat what you kill, and it was feast or famine, many times. And I would even say past that, so that was eight years into the business. It was another five years before I joined EO, that I really learned how to be an entrepreneur. The first decade was stubbornness, willingness to work 100 plus hours a week, which led to, you know, illness and all sorts of issues. But it was actually learning how to run a business, learning how to be a leader, even learning what EBITA meant, which I didn't know the first 10 years. These things are essential, but we don't know them all right out of the bat. We weren't taught those and you know photography school or, you know, wherever we go.  Katty: I think you bring up a really good point, in terms of kind of what, what has been taught currently in art schools. For artists and creatives, as a whole really putting their practice and their expertise in the various programs that they use, you know, whether it be Adobe Creative Cloud or Figma or whatever it may be, but not to forget the business side of them because so many of them are solopreneurs and are running their own freelance business; to really have a good understanding of what the accounting side of it needs to be. Either to outsource it to an accountant and or do it themselves, whichever they want, but to really look at that business as a business. I think it's really important to be able to have that full-scale picture of it. Keith: It's a really good point Katty because I learned the presentation skills and that's one of the things I learned at Brooks was a well-put-together portfolio that's perfectly mounted and everything is top-notch is going to get more jobs and better photography with a sloppy presentation. The one thing we didn't learn was the business part of running a studio, photography business, freelance business.  So for the first 15 years of my company or longer. I saw the business's checking account like Monopoly money, it wasn't real money to me until it came to me. I mean millions of dollars were wasted by not having that clarity and understanding and business education, which is essential. And I think you know the tables have turned, and now the most secure opportunity is to be your own boss to be an entrepreneur versus trusting your career into some other company hitching your wagon to that star and hoping that they not only are successful but that they continue to value your contribution and reciprocate that with job security. Katty: Very very true and very well said thank you for that. Now you've recently transitioned out of your business. Is that correct? Am I saying that correctly?  Keith: No, that's correct. Yes, I sold Zenman to a SaaS company called Mblue in Latin America. It has been an amazing transition. I was really nervous. I know so many people sell their business and they lose their identity. They make a bunch of money and then they become miserable. I feel very very fortunate that it's been a serendipitous partnership that maintains a legacy in the business and I'm helping them grow and accomplish their goals. I think the mindset of win-win, it wasn't I'm tapping out the last day, it's that I'm committed to it and that the people on the other side have the trust and respect to let us continue to run our practice as we do. Katty: Fantastic. And obviously, I know this from having known you the past few years, you've embarked on this passion that is now your sole focus in your business, which is an incredibly beautiful journal that you've created for others to use, and I can see the experience for having put a great presentation together that you learned so many years ago, really manifests itself in the Oak Journal, it's absolutely beautiful. Can you talk about what that spark was and why did you decide to go into this business? Keith: Yes, it is a combination of two things, it is my Ikigai but I didn't know it when I started down that journey. Ikigai is a Japanese term that means life's purpose. But one of the things that I really wanted to do was stop trading my time for money. I realized when I had kids that time was the one finite resource we had. As an agency owner and a top paid creative, I make a lot of money per hour and it's still not a good exchange. So, my goal was to come up with a product-based business that would fulfill my needs of financial independence without trading my time for money, and in finding the right product that's how I came up with the Oak Journal. I wanted something that I could use my knowledge to create and do a better job than anybody that was currently doing this with the skills I built over the two decades of running Zenman. So being able to design something-- I've designed many many books over the years, but being able to take the life experience, skills, you know even Warren Rustand's 10 10 10 and weave that into a paint by numbers roadmap that anybody can use to live their best life has been transformational and it really made me want, with intention, transition out of the Zenman which was 100% my identity, it's my nickname, it's what people call me, to helping others and being a bodhisattva. Katty: Fantastic. So, as a practice as a mindfulness practice and gratitude practice. Is that something that you were doing anyway before you put the journal together? Keith: Yes, I've been meditating for 20 plus years and about 10 years ago I started practicing Transcendental Meditation, and it has had as big of an impact on me as the Entrepreneurs Organization has. Meditation is a superpower. If somebody doesn't think that they have enough time in their day to meditate, you need meditation, more than anyone, and you will find if you start a simple practice, it gives you time in the day because you're more productive, you're more clear, you're more creative, you're more focused. I wish people would look at meditation like a free pill that would give them superpowers like that movie with Bradley Cooper, Limitless, you know, it's not quite that but it's pretty amazing how much, just having a 10-minute meditation can change your day. Katty: I love that. Can you talk about that and creativity and where you see the through-line between the two because we talked about being quiet for a few minutes, that's what we're talking about here. Keith: Yeah I mean that's a really good question Katty thanks for asking. I mean the most amazing ideas if you look at, you know songwriters or inventors they happen in the shower or while they're driving down the highway and the reason that is they're not thinking about other thoughts, they're not thinking about their problems, their mortgage their issues with their partner, they're just washing their hair and at peace with their mind, their mind itself and so we're able to come up with those really, really creative ideas. So I am intentional with creating those moments from meditation, to start my day to even having core hours where I turn off all devices not just my email, my phone is in airplane mode there's no you know Twitter open. I don't do that ever anyways, but you know there's all distractions are turned off so you can focus on writing your book, working on that creative project, or whatever it is that needs to be accomplished. You can really get into those that state of theta brainwaves with intention. Willie Nelson actually does it by just driving his truck; he writes his best songs when he's driving down the highway. So once he figured that out when he wants to be creative, gets in his truck and he starts driving. So there are all different ways you can get into that state. Katty: Yeah it's interesting because creativity doesn't necessarily happen nine to five staring at a screen. It happens when you're out in nature and happens when you're just, you allow your mind to get creative. To go inward I think it's just so important to be able to do that. Keith: 100% I agree. Katty: I've done meditation for years. I only can do it if it's a guided meditation. I have not gotten to a place where I can do it on my own. But even in the guided practice, I find that so impactful and so helpful to be able to do that. Keith: Yeah, I agree. Try TM it's just a mantra I think that one will--And there's nothing wrong with guided meditations. I still do those as well and I practice those with my boys, but I have struggled with contemplated meditations that weren't guided until I found TM. Katty: Okay, I will look into it. There's also a couple of other friends who embark upon TM. You're the third person I'm hearing this from, so I think maybe the universe is talking. So you've started your boys on meditation? Keith: Yes, now we make that part of their day. In fact, when they were very very young, we had them in three different preschools before we found a school called Morningstar that was a yoga and meditation-based preschool. So the boys started every day with yoga, they did guided meditations. It was a very Eastern hippy Boulder-esque type of preschool, but it really resonated with our boys. Now, they don't embrace it with the same joy that I do, but they understand the value of it. It's almost like a joke in our house that we'll all talk about the benefits of meditation and be like “I know Dad, you talk about this dad, I know that you wrote an article about this, dad.” So I'm hoping one day, they'll listen with the same attentiveness that somebody to keynote does. Katty: Fantastic. I know that the Oak Journal you just came out with a new version of it, can you talk a little bit about the differences between this and what you were doing? In addition to the different sizes, but what's that creative process for you, because clearly you're still a very creative person and you've just channeled that creativity into this. Keith: Yeah, I love making things. So the main changes that we made, the biggest one is we move production to the US, and now it is being produced with environmentally friendly materials. The factory that we were using in China, didn't have the same standards and so that was the biggest one to us to have something that was made with our core value of environmentally friendly alignment, and also, it helped with just production delays and shipping and everything we're dealing with right now around the world.  The other piece is, each week has a positive psychology exercise, and we had people that have been doing it for over a year and so they were repeating the same, let's create our bucket list every nine weeks and so they were getting diminishing returns. So the next version is to 2.0, we're going to make four versions total so that you can have 48 different positive psychology exercises. I'm sorry, 54 different exercises that you would do in a year in two weeks, and then you could repeat it. We're also working on two other products. One is called the Sequoia, so that's your 10-year journal you set your BHAG and your moonshot. And then you're incrementally working towards that. With the series of 120 Oak Journals and then our passion project right now is the Acorn. So this is for children, and this is actually something that we're intending just to give away. We'll definitely print it and have them for sale. But anybody that wants an Acorn Journal anywhere on the planet will have a free. Katty: How beautiful and I love all the tree references and all the nature references. Keith: Thank you. Going back to our roots, beautiful. And thank you for connecting me to your resources for my journal too. You've been so gracious, I have to say that Keith, talking about mentorship, early on. You've just been so gracious with sharing your knowledge and all the trials and tribulations of bringing this journal to market and sharing that with me and with others who are interested in that. So definitely a mentor, so thank you for that. Keith: Thank you very much Katty, I appreciate it. I truly believe all ships rise with the tide. And, the more we can help each other, it just benefits everyone. And I know more people having your book and your journal is going to help them. I think one of the things I'm blessed with here in Colorado is the creative community was very symbiotic. We do compete with people but at the same time, my competitors would reach out to me and say hey there's jobs out of our league, this is more in your wheelhouse, could you take it. I think when you have that mindset of collaboration, then it's reciprocated. Katty: And it's beautifully said because so many freelancers are so siloed and the importance of community can't be overemphasized, to be part of that community, whether it's Creative Mornings or AIGA or whatever it may be, but to find a community of other creatives to be able to collaborate with is so critical. Keith: Yeah, you said it perfectly, not being on an island, not being in a silo. You know just leaning on somebody, I mean, EO was great during COVID. I don't know how many people in our chapter wouldn't have gotten their PPP, if it hadn't been for other members that say hey I have this connection at a community branch we can help you, don't worry about going through the big bank you've had for 20 years, you need to call Mary at Mbank and she'll submit your proposal at three in the morning to get you taken care of. Mentorship, and also the peers that you just have, in a connected, trusting, and vulnerable way when people don't have their guards up when they're honest with what's going on. It's amazing how we come to each other's aid. When we just raise our hand and say hey I need help.  Katty: Yeah, very very true. It's been an interesting year for sure. And we're still in it, by all means, it's not a done deal. What would you say is one of the biggest lessons that you've learned for yourself during this pandemic year and a half? Keith: The importance of community and connection. You know I've seen other people that don't have the network, that really struggled that sort of went inside and dealt with everything personally, versus just like we mentioned having that community that you can reach out to. I mean one of the blessings of EO is that it's a global community. So, I took it as an opportunity because I could go have a coffee with a friend in Denver every day, to have a zoom call with a friend in Melbourne or you know just other ways to connect with people around the planet. I actually feel like, for me, it broadened my global connections, even though I wasn't able to travel and I am chomping at the bit to go travel to meet these friends. Katty: Yeah I agree 100% We did that on the family side. And I don't know if I told you this when we saw each other last week, but since March 20th we started a family zoom, and we've had one every single Sunday since then. So March 20th of 2020, and my family is all over the world, nobody lives here in Los Angeles, so to be able to have this very intentional focused one-hour zoom call with one another. This is with grandparents and grandkids and aunts and uncles and the brothers and the sisters, that I think the max point we had 18 people on our zoom. And it still happens today, every Sunday at 10am. It's the Douraghy family zoom call, and it's similar to a forum exercise. So everything starts with an icebreaker: everybody talks about a win, everyone does a one-word open, and it's been transformational because we're actually learning things about each other that we wouldn't otherwise because we're not asking these very intentional questions of each other when we're physically together. So it's been phenomenal in terms of how close we've become as a family. Keith: That is really cool, that's such a cool gift. I think it's also a perspective, right? I mean you could look at it that “hey I haven't been able to be in the same room with these people.” But the flip side of that coin is you just created a tradition that hopefully will go on for generations. And we were blessed to have the technology to be able to do that, I mean even 10 years ago it would have been a different world we were in and I think so much more challenging to face this isolation. Katty: Oh, I agree 100% 100% agree, and look, the future of work has changed. And without the technology that we have today wouldn't have been possible to continue. Katty: What is getting you excited and inspired these days? Keith: You know what gets me excited is actually, I think, something that's really messed up right now. And that's the changes that I think are inevitable with social media. You know what's coming out about algorithms intentionally presenting inflammatory content. I'm actually excited that there will be action taken to hold these people accountable. It's going to turn the world on its head as far as advertising, e-commerce. But that's already happening with iOS changes and privacy, which is not a bad thing. Personally, I am quite happy having the exact product that I want presented to me in a way that makes it easy to purchase it. But I am excited about the change that's going to help remove the wedge that's dividing this country apart because the truth of the matter is on 95% of the issues were exactly the same. And I think there are some toxic influences that are exasperating our divide, and I am for the first time in years, optimistic that we're going to start taking that wedge out and coming back together. Keith: Whatever we can do to make that happen. Katty: Yes. And one final question for you, something to leave behind for our audience, especially those who are embarking on their creative career, and/or because of COVID have had to pivot their freelance business or if they've lost their jobs. What are some lessons learned that you want to leave them with in terms of determination to just continue, continue the task? Keith: Two tools that I will leave one; I'm a big fan of Dr. Joe Dispenza, and he has a tool on manifesting what you want. So if you're struggling right now, maybe you lost your job during COVID or your business failed or something. Set your intentions with a tool he created where you take a piece of paper out, you write emotions on one side and intentions on the other. So if your goal is a new job, what is the intention? I get to travel three months out of the year and see the world. I'm making enough money that I'm financially independent. What are all the intentions that you have? And then on the other side under the emotions, what are the feelings that you have? Actually, try to feel those emotions so you can manifest it. And that is a great tool. I love that tool but it is the first step.  The second step is doing the work. The thing that I hate about the book The Secret is it's all about having the right mindset and everything's just gonna appear in your life. The mindset is critical. It's essential, but it's the first step, you've got to make continuous daily progress, you can't just wish upon a star, that you're going to have your dream job. What did you do today to actually accomplish that goal? What incremental progress, even if it was just five new connections on LinkedIn that you sent out. What was the incremental progress you made today towards living your best life? Katty: Beautiful. Thank you, Keith, thank you for joining us here. Where can people find you and where can they find that your beautiful journal? Keith: Oakjournal.com you can connect with me on social. Look for Zenman, you will find me or anything Oak Journal related, you will definitely find me and you can direct message me, you can even email me at keith@oakjournal.com if you have any questions. Katty: Thank you. Before I let you go, I forgot to ask this, you also do a lot of sessions where you teach people how to journal and meditate and so forth. Correct? Keith: Absolutely. Yep. I do it, I literally just got off one right before we started. I was doing one for EO Cape Town, but I also do them for individual forums, for companies and I have a masterclass that's a six-week class people can do, it's an Oak masterclass. Keith: oakmasterclass.com or Oak Journal. They all are pretty good at all the SEO interlinking web thing having owned an agency. So if you get to one of my properties you can find everything that you need and will guide you through that journey.  The master class is a six-week intensive that we work on in small groups and then individually. And it's a requirement I do a little bit of coaching but I'm really really particular with working with people that have the growth mindset that you know are going to be a good fit. So everybody has to do the masterclass first to make sure we're both on the same path. Katty: Got it.  I'll put all the links in the show notes so that everybody knows how to find you and where to find you.   Thank you for listening to the artisan podcast, brought to you by Artisan Creative.  

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S30E1 - Best of 2021 - Assessing a Teams' Mental Health Needs to Provide Support and Avoid Burnout, Leah Weiss, Ph.

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 31:11


In this "Best of 2021" HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonathanhwestover/) talks with Leah Weiss, Ph.D. about assessing a teams' mental health needs to provide support and avoid burnout (Originally Aired September 9th 2021). See the video here: https://youtu.be/Zzcr5QzuPw0. Leah Weiss, Ph.D., MSW (https://www.linkedin.com/in/leahweissphd) is a researcher, lecturer, consultant, author and co-founder of Skylyte. Dr. Weiss is best known for her teaching at Stanford's Graduate School of Business and groundbreaking work with Stanford's Compassion Cultivation Program (conceived by the Dalai Lama). Dr. Weiss has taught and spoken at Harvard, Stanford, Princeton, Smith, TED and 75 companies from Goldman Sachs to Intuit. She co-founded Skylyte in 2019 with partner Ines Gramegna to provide corporate leadership and build resilience using AI technology and other data-driven solutions. With Skylyte she has counseled such clients as Stanford Health, Mayo Clinic, Genentech, Google, European Commission, and NASA. Skylyte has attracted over $1 million in pre-seed funding and is venture-backed. An expert in workplace anxiety, burnout, resilience, and the role of leadership in addressing mental health, Dr. Weiss holds a PhD from Boston College, and bachelor's degree from Stanford University. She lives in Portland, Oregon, and has three young children. Like this episode?! Please leave a review. Check out Dr. Westover's new book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/bluerthanindigo. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/leadershipalchemy. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/hci-magazine. Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/performance_management_podcasts/ Ranked #6 Workplace Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/workplace_podcasts/ Ranked #7 HR Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/hr_podcasts/ Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/talent_management_podcasts/ Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/personal_development_podcasts/ Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/leadership_podcasts/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hcipodcast/support

The Stuart Watkins Podcast
#140 Lama Surya Das

The Stuart Watkins Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 88:47


Join Lama Surya Das and Jo Tastula in this beautiful Dharma conversation.Lama Surya Das is one of the foremost Western Buddhist meditation teachers and scholars, one of the main interpreters of Tibetan Buddhism in the West, and a leading spokesperson for the emerging American Buddhism. The Dalai Lama affectionately calls him “The Western Lama.”Surya has spent over forty-five years studying Zen, vipassana, yoga, and Tibetan Buddhism with the great masters of Asia, including the Dalai Lama's own teachers, and has twice completed the traditional three-year meditation cloistered retreat at his teacher's Tibetan monastery. He is an authorized lama and lineage holder in the Nyingmapa School of Tibetan Buddhism, and a close personal disciple of the leading grand lamas of that tradition. He is the founder of the Dzogchen Center and Foundation in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and its branch centers around the country. Over the years, Surya has brought many Tibetan lamas to this country to teach and start centers and retreats. As founder of the Western Buddhist Teachers Network with the Dalai Lama, he regularly helps organize its international Buddhist Teachers Conferences. He is also active in interfaith dialogue and charitable projects in the Third World. In recent years, Lama Surya has turned his efforts and focus towards youth and contemplative education initiatives, what he calls “True higher education and wisdom for life training.”Lama Surya Das is a sought after speaker and lecturer, teaching and conducting meditation retreats and workshops around the world. He is a published author, translator, chant master (see Chants to Awaken the Buddhist Heart CD, with Stephen Halpern), and a regular blog contributor at The Huffington Post and Elephant Journal, as well as his own AskTheLama.com blog where he shares his thoughts and answers questions from the public.Much gratitude to the sponsors of Yoga Heart Mind!ww.solemechanics.com.au 15% off with promo code WATKINS6162 https://www.themilkcleanse.comPromo code STUARTWATKINS for 10% offhttps://sacredtaste.comPromo code STUARTWATKINS for 10% offhttps://blessitbee.com.au/r?id=af1ac8Promo code STUART for 10% offSupport the show (https://stuartwatkins.org/podcast/)

The Stress Mastery Podcast: Living Right with Bill Cortright
#1245 “The Book of Joy” by Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu: “Perspective: There Are Many Different Angles”

The Stress Mastery Podcast: Living Right with Bill Cortright

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 24:01


In today's book study, “The Book of Joy” by Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu are in the section Days 4 and 5-The Eight Pillars of Joy: “Perspective: There Are Many Different Angles” This section begins the eight pillars of joy and the Dali Lama and Archbishop Tutu share their unique perspectives on how by changing the way we see things we change our state of being. This is a wonderful section on how to create a wider and larger perspective of any event thus seeing it through the eyes of God. ________________________________________________________  Join The Stress Mastery Community today for FREE! Click here to register HERE! Love the show? Tweet me a shoutout at: @Billcortright Want to sponsor episodes of The Stress Mastery Podcast?  Email Bill at : Bill@livingrightwithbillcortright.com  Mentioned in this show: Join the private Facebook Group: The Stress Mastery Podcast Subscription/SocialLinks: Subscribe on iTunes Subscribe to the The Stress Mastery Mailing List Watch on Youtube www.livingrightwithbillcortright.com Instagram: @livingrightwithbillcortright Facebook at Bill Cortright STAY INSPIRED!

Zen Commuter
1755: Lion's Roar Week - Compassion by the Dalai Lama

Zen Commuter

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 21:36


Today's article focuses on developing compassion, and what compassion truly is.  It is told by a man who knows it well...the Dalai Lama

Cyrus Says
Vikas Khanna | Chef, Restauranteur, Author & Judge on MasterChef India

Cyrus Says

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 58:10


Cyrus is joined by Vikas Khanna, Celebrity Chef, Restauranteur, Author, Cookbook Writer and Judge on MasterChef India, to talk about his amazing journey and career. They talk about how Punjabi families feed everyone with love and affection, Vikas' new book 'Barkat', what it's about and how he wrote it in the pandemic. They also talk about Cyrus and Vikas being born during the 1971 war, the stories of partition that Vikas would hear about when he was younger, and tons more. They also discuss some of the amazing places Vikas has worked at as a chef, working at The Leela, going to and falling in love with Bhutan, meeting the Dalai Lama in Tibet, and why the 'Michelin Star' rating is so highly sought after. Vikas also talks about working with Gordon Ramsay and Gordon being extremely complimentary towards Vikas, and tons more. Tune in for a wonderful episode.Follow Vikas: https://twitter.com/TheVikasKhanna and https://www.instagram.com/vikaskhannagroupSubscribe to our new YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmY4iMGgEa49b7-NH94p1BQAlso, subscribe to Cyrus' YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/channel/UCHAb9jLYk0TwkWsCxom4q8AYou can follow Antariksh on Instagram @antariksht: https://instagram.com/antarikshtDo send in AMA questions for Cyrus by tweeting them to @cyrussaysin or e-mailing them at whatcyrussays@gmail.comDon't forget to follow Cyrus Broacha on Instagram @BoredBroacha (https://www.instagram.com/boredbroacha)In case you're late to the party and want to catch up on previous episodes of Cyrus Says you can do so at: www.ivmpodcasts.com/cyrussaysYou can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcasts App on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios

A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment
Robert Thurman on Enlightenment, Time, Skepticism, and Science [rebroadcast]

A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 65:01


Dr. Robert Thurman touches on some of his most profound points in this special interview rebroadcast: from the nature of time, to what is enlightenment, to why there's no evidence for “nothing.” He talked about what a psychonaut is and the importance of skepticism in Buddhism and in science. Please enjoy this wonderful conversation with one of the world's greatest minds.The New York times calls Dr. Robert Thurman “the leading American expert on Tibetan Buddhism.” Professor Thurman is an intimate student of His Holiness the Dalai Lama and was one of the first Westerners to become an ordained Tibetan monk in India in 1962, before returning to the United States to relinquish his monk's robes and become the Buddhist scholar and author that he's known as today.[Episode 50] Ten Questions for Dr. Robert Thurman (Part 1)[Episode 51] Ten Questions for Dr. Robert Thurman (Part 2)Support the show (https://www.skepticspath.org/support/)

Daily Fire with John Lee Dumas
Dalai Lama shares some DAILY FIRE

Daily Fire with John Lee Dumas

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 1:21


Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions. - Dalai Lama Check out John Lee Dumas' award winning Podcast Entrepreneurs on Fire on your favorite podcast directory. For world class free courses and resources to help you on your Entrepreneurial journey visit EOFire.com

Working In
Encore: The Science of Manifestation with Dr. James Doty

Working In

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 11:46


Dr. James Doty wants you to conjure the life of your dreams. The Stanford University neurosurgeon, author, and mate of the Dalai Lama, the Pope, and Desmond Tutu (despite being an Athiest) knows a thing or two about manifestation! On today's encore episode of the Braincare Podcast, Dr. James Doty explains the incredible results of manifesting your intention with all of your senses. Plus, he explains how seemingly serendipitous moments of good fortune are linked to our self-actualisation practices. We talk about: How can you manifest your intentions with all of your senses? Manifestation and the subconscious mind Extraordinary connections: why you should never take people for granted Neuroplasticity and manifestation Mind over matter: how to change your fate What one thing do all spiritual leaders have in common?

The Stress Mastery Podcast: Living Right with Bill Cortright
#1240 “The Book of Joy” by Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu: “Meditation: Now I'll Tell You a Secret Thing”

The Stress Mastery Podcast: Living Right with Bill Cortright

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 30:43


In today's book study, “The Book of Joy” by Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu we are now ending the section Days 2 and 3-The Obstacles of Joy: “Meditation: Now I'll Tell You a Secret Thing.” This section the Dali Lama and Archbishop Tutu share their unique spiritual practices with each other. Dali Lama leads a meditation while the Archbishop takes him through the Christian practice of receiving the Eucharist. This is an amazing exchange of love. ________________________________________________________  Join The Stress Mastery Community today for FREE! Click here to register HERE! Love the show? Tweet me a shoutout at: @Billcortright Want to sponsor episodes of The Stress Mastery Podcast?  Email Bill at : Bill@livingrightwithbillcortright.com  Mentioned in this show: Join the private Facebook Group: The Stress Mastery Podcast Subscription/SocialLinks: Subscribe on iTunes Subscribe to the The Stress Mastery Mailing List Watch on Youtube www.livingrightwithbillcortright.com Instagram: @livingrightwithbillcortright Facebook at Bill Cortright STAY INSPIRED!

All Things Therapy
Meditation for Clarity & Self-Awareness

All Things Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 15:19


Host Lisa Tahir is live from Las Vegas, discussing how meditation brings inner clarity & self-awareness. She introduces her in-person monthly New Moon Meditations beginning in January of 2022. The energy of the New Moon amplifies the manifestation of new beginnings in relationships, finances, health, and other areas of life important to you. Book sessions with her at www.nolatherapy.com   * Betterhelp.com sponsors this podcast and offers you 10% off your first month of online therapy to try them out at www.betterhelp.com/att

Leading with Genuine Care
Nipun Mehta | Move Slowly and Care Deeply

Leading with Genuine Care

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 80:43


  “How do we hold transactions in their place, while also honoring the much larger spectrum of the human experience?” — Nipun Mehta   You've probably heard of paying it forward: Responding to an act of kindness someone shows you by helping another person. To Nipun Mehta, it's not just a nice idea, it's a way of living and leading that can change all our lives for the better.   Nipun is a former Silicon Valley computer scientist who traded Big Tech for big ideas. He founded ServiceSpace, a support network for projects that nurture kindness and compassion. The idea is to build a community of people who do things for each other not in exchange for money or other material rewards, but with the aim of creating an ecosystem based on kindness.   It's an ambitious project, but Nipun isn't in a rush. As with everything in life, he'd rather go slow and build systems that work than follow the stereotypical Silicon Valley motto "move fast and break things."   You may be aware of Nipun from his various TED Talks. He's also been praised for his ideas about spreading compassion by no less than Barack Obama and the Dalai Lama. In 2019, he received the Goi Peace Award — having turned it down multiple times previously.   In this episode of Leading With Genuine Care, Nipun explains how we're already all engaging in indirect reciprocity, why he never takes shortcuts in relationships or life, and what a bold trek across India taught him about the connection between uncertainty and compassion.   You'll also learn: How to escape our narrow reciprocity feedback loops The collective power of paying it forward How his mom and dad's “sandbox” approach to parenting shaped Nipun's outlook Why he's proud to be someone who cares a lot How a walking pilgrimage through India forever changed his perspective on compassion How a plumber moved Nipun to tears Why ServiceSpace doesn't have a plan Where to find the best apples in the world (and why this is important)   Connect with Nipun Mehta Facebookfacebook.com/servicespace/    Twitter twitter.com/servicespace    Website servicespace.org/    Learn More From Nipun Mehta Find out more about Nipun   Visit his website here: http://nipun.servicespace.org/about/    Watch Nipun Mehta's TED Talks   Leading with the gifts of emergence: https://www.ted.com/talks/nipun_mehta_laddership_leading_with_the_gifts_of_emergence   Can we create social change without money? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BoV23TJe4UM    What does it take to create a giver culture? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lP17YsBrVkQ    Get Rob's Weekly Newsletter Never miss an inspiring conversation about compassionate, positive leadership on the Leading with Genuine Care podcast plus other great articles and insights. Click below, and you'll also get a download of his favorite mindful resources.   https://www.donothingbook.com/resource-guide    Follow Rob Dube on Social Media  LinkedIn:  linkedin.com/in/robdube    Facebook:  facebook.com/rob.dube.1    Twitter:  twitter.com/robddube    Rob Dube's Website donothingbook.com  

Ordinary People Doing Extraordinary Things
How to Swerve & Change Direction Quickly to Create Breakthroughs

Ordinary People Doing Extraordinary Things

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 36:27


In episode 632, I chat with Kevin Cullen. Have you ever read something that fundamentally changed the way you looked at your life, your business, your situation, and those around you? Has someone ever said something to you that opened your eyes to a whole new possibility? Kevin Cullen is the President of Leadera Consulting Group and in this chat will share the different conversations that have taken place over the course of several decades and have fundamentally changed the quality of his life. Through his journey, Cullen has had the unique opportunity to spend time with some amazing people—Mother Teresa, His Holiness the Dalai Lama, gurus, philosophers, business leaders, celebrities, teachers, and leading-edge thinkers. Listen as we chat about concepts and thought provoking questions to help you create more breakthroughs in your life. Kevin has over thirty years of experience providing business consulting, training, and development to individuals and Fortune 500 companies.

10% Happier with Dan Harris
404: What Is Nirvana? | Robert Thurman

10% Happier with Dan Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 39:52


If you want to make change in a world filled with all sorts of horrors and obstacles, does it help or hurt to stay cheerful while you go about your business? Robert Thurman argues passionately in favor of cheerfulness, although he will admit to still being miserable in his own way. This is an expansive conversation that covers everything from: what is nirvana to the Buddhist Four Noble Truths to why the Buddha was a scientist. Robert Thurman is a legend. As a young Harvard student, he got into an accident and lost the use of one of his eyes. He dropped out and went on a spiritual quest that brought him to India, where he became the first Westerner to be ordained as a monk by the Dalai Lama, with whom he remains close friends. Thurman later disrobed, got married, and had a bunch of kids, including the movie star Uma Thurman. He also became an academic. He was a Professor of Indo-Tibetan Buddhist Studies at Columbia University until December 2020 and is the President of the Tibet House U.S., a non-profit in New York City dedicated to the preservation and promotion of Tibetan civilization. He and his wife, Nena, also run an affiliated center, called the Menla Retreat, which is north of New York City. Bob just turned 80, but he is very busy. He has a new book called Wisdom is Bliss: Four Friendly Fun Facts That Can Change Your Life. He also writes a regular newsletter for Substack and hosts The Bob Thurman Podcast.This is a wide-ranging interview with a fast-moving mind that talks about: bliss-void-indivisible, why we feel unsafe when we're happy, and why Robert was happy to lose his eye. Robert also offers his frank reflections on the promise and limits of the dharma from someone who has been practicing and studying for sixty years. If you don't understand every reference, try to let it wash over you because the net effect is pleasantly head-spinning. Check out the Dalai Lama's talk – “The Ultimate Source of Happiness,” which is free for everyone in the Ten Percent Happier app.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Phoenix Helix: Maximizing autoimmune health through the paleo diet and lifestyle
Episode 189: Best Of – Meditation for Fidgety Skeptics with Jeff Warren

Phoenix Helix: Maximizing autoimmune health through the paleo diet and lifestyle

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 73:36


In support of my own autoimmune health, I'm taking a sabbatical for the month of December and releasing two of my favorite episodes from the archives that you might have missed. Today's episode is one of the most popular of all time. If you think you can't meditate, this podcast is for you! Do you picture meditators sitting quietly with completely empty minds - something you could never do? Let me tell you a secret: those people don't exist. Even the Dalai Lama has thoughts while he meditates. The mind is designed to think just like the heart is designed to beat. Meditation isn't about stopping thoughts; it's learning how to notice and detach from them. There are also many different ways to meditate, including moving meditations, or cultivating mindful moments in everyday life. My guest is Jeff Warren, who is known as the “MacGyver of Meditation”. He excels at fixing people's meditation problems. In this episode, we talk about common meditation obstacles for people with autoimmune disease, and how to overcome them.

The Stress Mastery Podcast: Living Right with Bill Cortright
#1235 “The Book of Joy” by Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu: “Illness and Fear of Death” I Prefer to Go to Hell

The Stress Mastery Podcast: Living Right with Bill Cortright

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 25:58


In today's book study, “The Book of Joy” by Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu we are in the section Days 2 and 3-The Obstacles of Joy: “Illness and Fear of Death” I Prefer to Go to Hell. This section the Dali Lama and Archbishop Tutu dive deep into the fear we carry within about death. In this section they go deep into the dealing with life and understanding of using death for us to live a more joyful life now. ________________________________________________________  Join The Stress Mastery Community today for FREE! Click here to register HERE! Love the show? Tweet me a shoutout at: @Billcortright Want to sponsor episodes of The Stress Mastery Podcast?  Email Bill at : Bill@livingrightwithbillcortright.com  Mentioned in this show: Join the private Facebook Group: The Stress Mastery Podcast Subscription/SocialLinks: Subscribe on iTunes Subscribe to the The Stress Mastery Mailing List Watch on Youtube www.livingrightwithbillcortright.com Instagram: @livingrightwithbillcortright Facebook at Bill Cortright STAY INSPIRED!

No Labels, No Limits podcast
214 - Healing Our Core Wounds with Lisa Tahir

No Labels, No Limits podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 42:57


The No Labels, No Limits podcast welcomes yet another talented, female leader, Lisa Tahir. Lisa is a licensed therapist, the podcast host of All Things Therapy, and author (endorsed by His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama) for her book, "The Chiron Effect: Healing Our Core Wounds through Astrology, Empathy, and Self-Forgiveness."Today's interview delves deeper into the realm of psychology, EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing), Reiki, and Psychoastrology. Lisa is the FOUNDER OF PSYCHOASTROLOGY® and also established “The Yes Foundation, INC. Nonprofit where she teaches children and adults with disabilities to blow and cast glass art utilizing her ADA compliant and US patented workbench, “The CHAIR-iot.”She is truly on a path of inspiration, as is aiming to "help peo[le know they can change their patterns and their lives."Listen in as Lisa shares her journey from spirituality, emotional and physical wounds, through to exploring the concept of Chiron.Learn more and connect with Lisa here:http://www.facebook.com/nolatherapy/http://www.twitter.com/TahirLCSWhttps://www.youtube.com/nolatherapyhttps://www.instagram.com/nolatherapy/https://www.linkedin.com/in/lisatahirwww.nolatherapy.com Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman
Rapid Response: How GoFundMe has facilitated $15 billion in giving, w/CEO Tim Cadogan

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 34:26


From the start of the pandemic, GoFundMe has served as a consistent global outlet for help. Since its inception, the for-profit crowdsourcing platform has facilitated $15 billion in giving through more than 200 million donations. It's also attracted big names to the platform, including Taylor Swift, the Dalai Lama, and will.i.am. The key to the company's success? According to CEO Tim Cadogan: "You need great people who are really ambitious in service of the mission.” Cadogan argues that the difference between GoFundMe and other businesses is that GoFundMe is about “people helping each other,” as opposed to commercial transactions. Asking for help, he says, unlocks more possibilities than people realize – a lesson for GoFundMe users, and for businesses overall.Read a transcript of this episode: https://mastersofscale.comSubscribe to the Masters of Scale weekly newsletter: http://eepurl.com/dlirtXSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Masters of Scale: Rapid Response
How GoFundMe has facilitated $15 billion in giving, w/CEO Tim Cadogan

Masters of Scale: Rapid Response

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 34:26


From the start of the pandemic, GoFundMe has served as a consistent global outlet for help. Since its inception, the for-profit crowdsourcing platform has facilitated $15 billion in giving through more than 200 million donations. It's also attracted big names to the platform, including Taylor Swift, the Dalai Lama, and will_i_am. The key to the company's success? According to CEO Tim Cadogan: "You need great people who are really ambitious in service of the mission.” Cadogan argues that the difference between GoFundMe and other businesses is that GoFundMe is about “people helping each other,” as opposed to commercial transactions. Asking for help, he says, unlocks more possibilities than people realize – a lesson for GoFundMe users, and for businesses overall.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Buddha at the Gas Pump
626. Nipun Mehta

Buddha at the Gas Pump

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 114:31


Nipun Mehta is the founder of ServiceSpace, a global community at the intersection of technology, volunteerism, and the gift economy. Most recently, ServiceSpace's pandemic response has showcased the unique beauty of its global ecosystem. Nipun has catalyzed a global social movement of community builders grounded in their localities and rooted in practices for cultivating love, nonviolence, selfless service, and compassion. The ecosystem has reached millions, attracted thousands of volunteers, and mushroomed into numerous community-based service projects as well as inspiring content portals. ServiceSpace harnesses the collective power of networks and our deeper interconnectedness to create a distributed social movement founded on small, local individual acts of kindness, generosity, and service that ignite shifts in individual and collective consciousness. Nipun was honored as an "unsung hero of compassion" by the Dalai Lama, not long before former U.S. President Obama appointed him to a council for addressing poverty and inequality in the US. Yet the core of what strikes anyone who meets him is the way his life is an attempt to bring smiles in the world and silence in his heart: "I want to live simply, love purely, and give fearlessly. That's me." In his mid-twenties, Nipun quit his job to become a "full-time volunteer". One of his most formative experiences was a walking pilgrimage across India, with his wife of six months, whose profound lessons also became the subject of his widely-read address at UPenn commencement. Over the last twenty years, he has addressed thousands of gatherings around the world, speaking next to wide-ranging leaders from Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak to author Elizabeth Gilbert to civil rights legend John Lewis. Germany's OOOM magazine named Nipun one of the Top 100 Most Inspiring People of 2020. See links to these ServiceSpace websites at the bottom of their website.         And for some of Nipun's talks and articles, visit his personal website. Discussion of this interview in the BatGap Community Facebook Group. Interview recorded December 4, 2021. Video and audio below. Audio also available as a Podcast.

New Dimensions
Waking up to “Real” Reality as Taught by the Buddha - Robert Thurman, Ph.D. - ND3739

New Dimensions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 57:20


Buddhism is not a religion but is an engagement with “real” reality. The entire Buddhist tradition is built on a philosophical scientific foundation. The Buddha was more a scientist than a religious teacher. Here we explore how we can tap into “real” reality by removing the veils of ignorance and make our life count with evolutionary skill. Robert Thurman, Ph.D. is the retired professor of Indo-Tibetan Buddhist studies at Columbia University as well as cofounder and president of Tibet House, which is dedicated to the service of His Holiness the Dalai Lama and the people of Tibet. He's been a close friend of the Dalai Lama for over 50 years and is a passionate activist for the rights of the Tibetan people. He is a skilled translator of Buddhist texts and an inspiring writer of many popular Buddhist books, including Man of Peace: The Illustrated Life Story of the Dalai Lama of Tibet (graphic novel co-creator) (Tibet House 2016) , Love Your Enemies: How to Break the Anger Habit & Be a Whole Lot Happier (co-author Sharon Salzberg) (Hay House 2013) and Wisdom Is Bliss: Four Friendly Fun Facts That Can Change Your Life. (Hay House 2021).Interview Date: 8/20/2021   Tags: Robert Thurman, Nirvana, Tarthang Tulku Rinpoche, The Four Nobel Truths, The Eightfold Path, Max Planck, consciousness, authority, noble, speech, empathy, Buddhism, Personal Transformation, Spirituality, meditation

Active Allyship...it's more than a #hashtag!
EP #74: The Book of Hope: A Survival Guide for Trying Times with Douglas Abrams

Active Allyship...it's more than a #hashtag!"

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 14:50


Lisa is solo today.  Her guest is Douglas Abrams who talks about the book he did with Jane Goodall, The Book of Hope: A Survival Guide for Trying Times.Doug Abrams is a multiple New York Times-bestselling author as well as an editor, literary agent, and film producer who is committed to helping catalyze the next evolutionary stage of our global culture. He co-wrote "The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing World" with the Dalai Lama and Desmond Tutu and "The Book of Hope: A Survival Guide for Trying Times" with Jane Goodall. He has coauthored many bestselling non-fiction books and has has written two novels, "The Lost Diary of Don Juan" and "Eye of the Whale", which together have been translated into over thirty languages.  Doug is the Founder and President of Idea Architects, a creative book and media company helping visionaries to create a wiser, healthier, and more just world.  As a literary agent and editor, he has also worked with Bryan Stevenson on his #1 New York Times bestseller "Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption" and Stephen Hawking on his last book, the globalbestseller "Brief Answers to the Big Questions."  He has had the privilege of working with many great thought leaders, visionary scientists, and humanitarians including Nobel Laureates Nelson Mandela, Jody Williams, and Elizabeth Blackburn.  Doug has also worked with Desmond Tutu as his coauthor, editor, and literary agent for almost two decades.  Dialogue is key to Doug's work, and he believes that genius is a collaborative process. His goal is to bring people together in a cultural conversation through books and media that transform lives and ultimately the world.  Books and films he has developed have been credited with convincing then-President Bill Clinton to stop the genocide in Kosovo (THE BRIDGE BETRAYED), for launching the modern anti-slavery movement (DISPOSSIBLE PEOPLE), and for helping to expand a mass incarceration reform movement (JUST MERCY, a book and film starring Michael B. Jordan and Jamie Foxx). Throughout all of his wide-ranging projects, Doug aspires to help build a prism through which life-changing conversations and experiences can be created and nourished.  He has had the privilege of interviewing global heroes and icons including Jimmy Carter, Bono, Carlos Santana, Richard Branson, and many others.   He was also on the founding team of JustGive.org, a philanthropy website that has pioneered new forms of giving and been responsible for giving over half a billion dollars to charity. He lives with his wife, Rachel, an integrative family physician, author, and lifelong conversation partner. He has three grown children, Jesse, Kayla, and Eliana.Book description: **THE INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER**In a world that seems so troubled, how do we hold on to hope?Looking at the headlines—the worsening climate crisis, a global pandemic, loss of biodiversity, political upheaval—it can be hard to feel optimistic. And yet hope has never been more desperately needed.In this urgent book, Jane Goodall, the world's most famous living naturalist, and Douglas Abrams, the internationally bestselling co-author of The Book of Joy, explore through intimate and thought-provoking dialogue one of the most sought after and least understood elements of human nature: hope. In The Book of Hope, Jane focuses on her "Four Reasons for Hope": The Amazing Human Intellect, The Resilience of Nature, The Power of Young People, and The Indomitable Human Spirit.Drawing on decades of work that has helped expand our understanding of what it means to be human and what we all need to do to help build a better world, The Book of Hope touches on vital questions, including: How do we stay hopeful when everything seems hopeless? How do we cultivate hope in our ch

Daily Fire with John Lee Dumas
Dalai Lama shares some DAILY FIRE

Daily Fire with John Lee Dumas

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 1:18


Happiness is not something readymade. It comes from your own actions – Dalai Lama Check out John Lee Dumas' award winning Podcast Entrepreneurs on Fire on your favorite podcast directory. For world class free courses and resources to help you on your Entrepreneurial journey visit EOFire.com

Wabi Sabi - The Perfectly Imperfect Podcast with Candice Kumai

launch a meaningful business that makes more $$$  Here's How I did it in my early 20's:2007 20172020These are the three years  I chose to launch various production companies what is your offering? how good are you at your craft?read: starts with why where do you need help to hireread: the e myth what kind of boss do you want to become?-listen to my finance guide on this podcast ask yourself what can I offer the world that we need more of?- as the Dalai Lama says we don't need any more "successful" people we need healers  - healing, light, empathy, compassion, love- and you can be and do both - making money your goal might be painful - choose to do your best work -learn to scale -be patient  - it takes time for one to grow a REAL business that grows-stand out from others& overall be in no hurry to be a billionaire, focus rather, on being a damn good person x ck 

The Vinyl Guide
Ep315: Eraldo Bernocchi - SIMM, Sigillum S, Somma & more

The Vinyl Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 49:49


Eraldo Bernocchi discusses his career of creation & composition, production, vinyl and physical form media, rare records as well as his new SIMM album "Too Late To Dream". Topics include: SIMM & his creative cycles "Too Late To Dream" approach & vocals Collaborating with others His love of punk rock in his youth Finding records in Italy Early career releases, 1st vinyl project Sigillum S Developing limited numbers of products The collectable records of his career Playing for the Dalai Lama w Somma Touring the new record Purchase "Too Late To Dream" at Ohm Resistance Records. Extended interview here: www.Patreon.com/VinylGuide Listen on Apple: https://apple.co/2Y6ORU0 Listen on Spotify: https://spoti.fi/36qhlc8 Follow our Podcast: https://linktr.ee/vinylguide Facebook: www.Facebook.com/VinylGuide Instagram: www.Instagram.com/VinylGuide Support our show: www.Patreon.com/VinylGuide If you like records, just starting a collection or are an uber-nerd with a house-full of vinyl, this is the podcast for you. Nate Goyer is The Vinyl Guide and discusses all things music and record-related