The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics

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Consumers are weird. They don't do what they say they will do and don't act how we think they "should." Enter Melina Palmer, a sales conversion expert with a personal mission to make your business more effective and brain friendly. In this podcast, Melina will take the complex concepts of behavioral economics (the study and science of why people buy - or not) and provide simple, actionable tips you can apply right away in your business. Whether you're a small business or thriving corporation, Melina's tips can help your business increase sales and get more customers.

Melina Palmer


    • May 20, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekly NEW EPISODES
    • 42m AVG DURATION
    • 205 EPISODES

    Listeners of The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics that love the show mention: melina, behavioral economics, practical examples, mariel, consumer, interesting information, psychology, marketer, choices, marketing, principles, business owner, fail, implement, explains, fluff, concepts, apply, skip, action.



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    Latest episodes from The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics

    205. Encouraging Kids' Brain Development Through Music, with Emily Cadiz of Finnegan the Dragon

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 48:11

    Today I am very excited to introduce you to Emily Cadiz, founder, and CEO of Finnegan the Dragon. What is Finnegan the Dragon, you ask? Of course, Emily will tell you all about that during our conversation, but here is the short, teaser version. Finnegan the Dragon is a new company I've had the honor of being an advisor for. This is an organization that is all about improving brain development and language learning for kids using inclusive music.  When I was given the opportunity to be part of the advisory team for this company, I knew it was something I had to do. There are so many amazing things on the horizon for Finnegan the Dragon and I am so excited to finally be able to share what Emily and her team are up to so you can learn all about it! Emily will be sharing about all the great work they are doing, exciting milestones coming up (including your opportunity to be a beta tester for the upcoming game launch), and how to get their free Ebook that came out this week. Listen in!  Show Notes: [00:44] Today I am very excited to introduce you to Emily Cadiz, founder, and CEO of Finnegan the Dragon. [03:40] Emily shares about herself and how she got connected to Melina.  [05:12] She has always been a service provider, teacher, musician, and public servant before starting her own business.  [06:48] She suffered a traumatic brain injury in the classroom, which turned her world upside down.  [07:37] During her recovery she found herself going back to music. She started studying how her own brain was recovering through sound and music.  [09:01] In her research she stumbled upon inclusive music which is how we use music to strengthen the brain multiple times throughout our lives to either cope, acquire, or realign ourselves with language.  [10:29] Going to traditional therapy never helped Emily because it was a reminder to her that she was disabled. Medical interventions can sometimes serve as a consistent reminder that you're different and that your access point to the world is not the same as everyone else. This was a spark for creating something new with Finnegan the Dragon.  [11:51] If we make this work part of the entire curriculum from a very young age everyone can benefit so you don't have to make anyone feel different.  [12:31] Developmentally speaking, stages happen at different rates for different children. Finnegan the Dragon wants to make things accessible for everyone.  [14:23] The process of making her brain tired and then letting it repair was the process that music had — it helped her to “sweat” her brain.  [16:35] Melina shares her experience taking college music classes during high school.  [19:43] There are 1.5 billion people that speak tonal-based languages.  [20:56] We can see in a lot of countries where tonal-based languages are dominant or even with people that are studying tonal-based languages, their brains are cognitively able to do things that other brains aren't.  [21:36] The standards for developmental milestones have gone down. We have 33-34% of kindergarteners needing special education interventions coming into the 2022-2023 school year.  [23:53] If your child is spending more than 30 minutes a day in front of a screen per day with passive engagement their chances of having ADHD or a mood disorder are increased by 50%.  [25:37] Passive screen time is the root cause of a lot of this.  [26:54] Passive screen time is silent participation with the screen. Using your finger doesn't fully activate your brain for learning either.  [28:02] There needs to be sound, noise, singing, motion, and movement going on for little ones to really understand how their world works.  [30:23] We know it is unreasonable to expect zero screen time (or even less than 30 minutes) so Finnegan the Dragon is an optimized game and accompanying classroom curriculum.  [33:10] Little kids have trouble with r's at that age, we shouldn't correct them. We can often encourage inappropriate sounds that are very hard to correct down the road.  [35:55] Tone is equally important at this age to all of your academic subjects. Tone and language develop at the same rate. If we ignore tone we are not strengthening the brain as much as we should or need to be.  [38:20] Music (at home and in schools) are so important for development in all areas of life.    [39:41] Meet Finnegan and learn his story in their free ebook, Finnegan the Singing Dragon. He uses music to help him overcome some things he is facing. Get your free ebook.  [41:38] It is so important to help our generation of little learners be able to have a fighting chance and help all the children be on a level playing field. Will you support them and Finnegan? [42:35] The Finnegan beta game will be coming out in the fall. Sign up for the newsletter to be first to know when it's available. [44:24] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [47:00] If you enjoy the experience I've provided here for you, will you share about it? That could mean leaving a rating/review or sharing the episode with a friend (or 10!) Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    204. Evolutionary Ideas with Sam Tatam, Ogilvy's Global Head of Behavioural Science

    Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 46:16

    Today I am so excited to introduce you to Sam Tatam to talk about his fantastic new book Evolutionary Ideas. I got my first peek at this book so many months ago and I have been eagerly awaiting the moment when I can finally share it with everyone. I'm delighted that that day is finally here!  Sam Tatam is the Global Head of Behavioural Science at Ogilvy. He has a passion for understanding human behavior, and his experience comes from a mix of organizational/industrial psychology and advertising strategy. Sam has led behavior change projects across virtually every category and continent. Today, he leads a global team of talented psychologists and behavioral economists to develop interventions and shape the communications of some of the world's most influential brands and organizations. You're in for a treat! I truly loved Evolutionary Ideas and think you will too! Show Notes: [00:42] Today I am so excited to introduce you to Sam Tatam to talk about his fantastic new book Evolutionary Ideas. [03:27] Sam shares his background and how he got into behavioral science. He is an organizational psychologist by training.  [05:47] Virtual doesn't have to be worse. Nudgestock looked at what they had available and reframed the idea of what this event could be (without being anchored to what they had done before).  [06:38] He shares their internal conversations about how they approached Nudgestock differently to make that transition (and have amazing results!) in 2020. [07:45] They decided if they were going to do it digitally they wanted to do it big (transitioning from the “Woodstock” of behavioral science to the “Live Aid”).  [09:27] They “followed the sun” and presented through LinkedIn live (with over 128,000 attendees!).  [11:32] Look at challenges that come your way like opportunities.  [12:21] Sam's new book is called Evolutionary Ideas.  [13:21] The beginnings of his book actually started in 2014 when he did a keynote in Sidney.    [15:03] Six years later a video about biomimicry continued to spark his interest.  [17:13] We are not distinct.  [19:10] It helps us to be more open and see psychological solutions in a slightly different way.  [20:49] Language is so immensely powerful. It helps us to see things in the world and categorically differentiates between concepts.   [21:53] Once you have a language for something, you see it more frequently and easily, and you can apply it more systematically.   [23:27] Context and individual differences still play a role.  [26:10] We don't always need to be revolutionary. It is not true that big problems need big solutions. (Innovation Myth #1 in the book!) [26:58] Small ideas can have big impacts. We have a series of shared problems that we face. We have also adapted to have shared solutions.  [29:31] Innovation is the revolution of the contradiction.  [31:05] If you understand what connects us (across species and other developments) then you can borrow from each other and learn together.  [33:36] There is a rich and vast resource of inspiration in the world around us.  [35:12] The brain makes decisions the same way regardless.  [36:58] If you can reframe in more human terms, solutions are all around us to help us solve our problems. You are probably not as unique in facing your challenges as you think you are.  [38:38] Questions can be really helpful for us to have a bit more of a checklist approach to creativity.  [41:50] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [42:37] Take comfort in knowing that any problem you have has already been solved before. [45:09] If you enjoy the experience I've provided here for you, will you share about it? That could mean leaving a rating/review or sharing the episode with a friend (or 10!) Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    203. Brainy Health Benefits of Nature, with Dr. Jay Maddock

    Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 25:05

    While I was recently in College Station visiting the Human Behavior Lab, I had the joy of meeting Dr. Maddock when he came by to chat with us for a bit. I hadn't met him before, but in learning about his work and research it was clear that we had to do an interview. Thankfully, I had my equipment with me and he had some spare time to talk about some of the incredibly cool stuff he and his team are doing.  Dr. Maddock is a professor in the department of environmental and occupational health at the school of public health at Texas A&M University and is also the co-director of the Center for Health and Nature. He serves on the Brazos County Board of Health. Not to mention he is editor in chief of the Journal of Healthy Eating and Active Living. He has authored more than 130 scientific articles which have been cited more than 5000 times, plus his research has been featured on/in The Today Show, BBC, CNN, Eating Well, Prevention and Good Housekeeping and he has given lectures around the world. This isn't even all of his bio, but I wanted to let you know a little bit about this awesomeness before you hear about the cool stuff he is doing. Listen in to hear all about the connection between nature and our health. It is really amazing! Show Notes: [01:16] Dr. Maddock is a professor in the department of environmental and occupational health at the School of Public Health at Texas A&M University and is also the co-director of the Center for Health and Nature. [03:47] Jay shares about his background and what he does. [05:16] They are really looking at how natural environments change health. Spending time in nature really changes your health. [05:59] They are now trying to understand what is the perfect dose of nature and how they can use some of the models to get more people into nature. [07:46] Virtual reality lets us break the senses up. They can do a study experimenting with only one sense.  [08:40] They are trying to figure out the essential pieces of nature that we need for healthy benefits. [09:47] People like different types of nature.  [10:49] The more that we feel we are in the environment, the more effect it has on our physiology.  [11:29] There are so many questions we can answer in virtual reality that would be difficult to do in person.   [12:48] Making environments immersive and interesting is important for people. Being in real nature is always best for us, but since that isn't always possible, it will be great to have other options.  [14:49] How we can integrate nature into our surrounding and environment is important.  [15:55] They have been looking at the effect of travel and nature. So many times when we go on vacation we want to go to some beautiful natural spot, but we also have an effect on the environment.  [17:34] The ability to virtually tour places that are untouched would be really cool.  [18:11] The biggest thing with health and nature is it doesn't work without conservation.  [18:45] One of the other things they have been working on is looking at some of the behavioral theories that we use and how we adopt these to increase people's time in nature.  [21:27] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [23:53] If you enjoy the experience I've provided here for you, will you share about it? That could mean leaving a rating/review or sharing the episode with a friend (or 10!) Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    202. Checking in with Dr. Marco Palma

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 42:58

    Today's episode is an update on all the exciting stuff going on at the Human Behavior Laboratory at Texas A&M University. Last week I was able to spend two full days in the Human Behavior Lab (one of my favorite places in the world if I'm honest) and today's episode is featuring the director of the lab, Dr. Marco Palma.  This is actually his third time being on The Brainy Business podcast. (He might be the first one to do that…?) Since the first time he was on the show (way back in episode 33 when I visited the lab for the first time) we have done so much together, including creating the certificate in Applied Behavioral Economics. I am honored to teach so many amazing courses for that program which has led to relationships and conversations with wonderful people around the world. (Sneak peek! Some of those projects are going to be featured in the coming weeks, and I am very excited to showcase more of my own work in the podcast.) The lab has done tons of experiments since I was there in January 2019 for that first interview, and about 40 of them have been published in the last few years. Don't worry, we won't try to cover all of them today. Instead, Dr. Palma and I selected a choice few that really resonate and can be applicable for listeners like you. Show Notes: [00:52] I spent two full days last week in the Human Behavior Lab at Texas A&M University.  [01:33] Dr. Palma has been on the show before (this is actually his third time – I think he might be the first to do that).  [05:29] There have been many changes since the last time I featured the lab on the show: in terms of the infrastructure, they are hiring new people, and students have graduated and started their own labs.  [06:43] ] One of the fascinating parts about studying human behavior is that we are all, to a certain degree, experts.  [08:26] Marco's tips for choosing between a PhD, masters or a certificate program like the one we have at Texas A&M.  [10:04] It is an exciting time to be at Texas A&M because of all of the different dimensions of human behavior that are being studied from different angles.  [12:05] The lab has done tons of experiments since I (Melina) was there in January of 2019 and about 40 of them have been published. [13:05] Dr. Palma shares about their charitable donations experiment.   [14:20] In the paper they concentrate on matching 1-to-1 versus giving seed money with charitable donations. The matching scheme is supposed to motivate people to give because then their money can go further.  [17:04] The general idea is that matching funds are always a good idea because they encourage others to donate, but as Dr. Palma shows, there could be a negative behavioral message being shared underneath the surface that actually decreases donations in this type of approach.  [19:10] Being able to communicate that a percentage of your money goes directly to the charity goes a long way and is a way to differentiate yourself. You want to be able to stand out and be a high-quality charity.  [20:10] Next Dr. Palma shares about their calorie labeling experiment. In this paper, they are looking at the policies requiring large restaurant chains to display the calorie content of food on food menus. The intention of the policy was for people to realize the number of calories in food and act accordingly in trying to reduce calorie consumption. [22:57] Some studies have shown this works, some show that people don't change their consumption, and others show that they eat more calories when the numbers are shown on the menu. How can all three things be true at one time? Dr. Palma shares about their research and why relativity matters. [24:32] You're not going to change how you eat in response to the calories if you expect something to have a lot of calories because you didn't really learn anything new.   [25:43] It's dependent on the menu you see, your expectations, and realization of reality. In this context you can have scenarios where you increase calorie consumption, you make no changes in calorie consumption, and in which you actually have a reduction which is the intention of the law. [28:32] In another paper they were looking at decision-making under time pressure.  [29:49] Once you have a set (number of choices) we are very good at optimizing the thing that we like the most.  [31:04] However, generating a choice set is very difficult for us to do (businesses should focus on this!). If someone else constructs the choice set for us and gives us a choice among 3-5 options, we are actually pretty good at choosing something that we would probably like. We tend to choose things we value a lot.  [32:15] The less cost we have to invest in making a decision will lead to an increase in satisfaction. Not only is the business going to gain, but the customer is also going to be happier.  [33:00] Making decisions when you are hungry or emotional tends to change the way that we act.  [34:58] In another paper looks at how hunger might change our cognitive capacity.  [36:22] They found there was no difference in the cognitive performance of normal-weight individuals whether they had the option to order food or not. Obese individuals had a lower performance relative to the normal weight individuals so they were more affected by being hungry – unless they were able to pre-order their snack. Why?  [37:51] The obese individuals anticipated the food and the anticipation was enough to increase their cognitive capacity. (It essentially eliminated the negative impacts of feeling hungry.) [39:37] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [41:44] If you enjoy the experience I've provided here for you, will you share about it? That could mean leaving a rating/review or sharing the episode with a friend (or 10!) Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    201. Creating Content People Can't Help But Engage With featuring Katelyn Bourgoin

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 53:38

    Today I am very excited to introduce you to Katelyn Bourgoin. As you will hear during our conversation, I met Katelyn via Twitter where she has been kind enough to tag me many times when people ask for recommendations for people who are using psychology in marketing or for business as well as for podcast recommendations, books, or just for someone to follow. Katelyn also has a phenomenal newsletter that is so engaging — I just love how well she understands her audience. We will be talking about that a lot more during the conversation today.   Katelyn uses reciprocity so well by shining the light on others and it comes back in a really great way. Before any non-marketers tune out and say this episode is not for you, know that creating engaging content that people want to respond to matters for everyone whatever your industry, whoever you are communicating with, and whatever you want to achieve. People like to work with those they like. Framing your messages with the recipient in mind is never a bad idea. Katelyn is a marketer and market researcher so that is the lens of her statements throughout the episode, but I challenge you to consider all the ways this can be useful to you in your life and business. For anyone with a newsletter or striving to have one, and who has ever been mystified by Twitter and especially Twitter threads, get ready for some awesome tips and free resources.  Show Notes: [00:41] Today I am very excited to introduce you to Katelyn Bourgoin.  [02:13] Katelyn is a marketer and market researcher so that is the lens of her statements throughout the episode, but the tips are for everyone! [04:24] Katelyn shares about herself and how she found herself in the behavioral sciences.  [05:50] She ended up working with a bunch of companies and seeing the same problem over and over: they just didn't know who their best customers were or why they bought. That led her to launch the company she has today called Customer Camp. [08:18] When she decided that she wanted to help people overcome that problem she discovered an innovation framework known as Jobs to Be Done.  [09:56] Jobs to Be Done is really important for understanding the context of the customer situation and what would cause them to seek out and choose a new solution.  [11:44] Their company exists to help people build a better understanding of their buyers through educating them on why people buy, training, and products. [12:39] It was thinking beyond the research and what they do to what would be engaging for potential customers.  [14:54] Having a functionally better product is important but there are all these other factors that you also need to consider when you think about the job holistically.  [16:00] You have to not just look at the functionality of a product but you have to consider the social and emotional aspects too.  [18:45] In having these conversations about the buyers' journey, pulling out the details, and mapping them, that is what leads to being able to design better marketing.  [20:14] Talk to buyers who have bought to try and understand their buying journey — that's a step a lot of marketers are missing.  [23:00] The trigger technique is a good solution for pulling out the bits that you can make most actionable and share with your team to back up your strategy. (Freebie in the links below!) [25:47] When they designed the newsletter, they thought about what was the job of the newsletter. They wanted to create a newsletter to make people feel like it was food for their brains. [26:58] It has to be something really quick to consume and it has to be something where you walk away feeling like you have ideas for applying them to your own work. [29:55] People need to feel like they are getting something back to open and read a newsletter.  It can be inspiration, validation, or something to forward.  [32:02] They realized it was better to have consistency with their newsletter even in the subject line.  [34:44] Testing and seeing what works is very helpful.   [37:54] Choose the social media platform where you think you can be consistent.  [39:21] Make a big effort to follow the right people. She follows people who inspire her and she can learn from.  [40:57] Leverage the opportunity to highlight work that other people are doing. [42:54] Melina shares about one of Katelyn's Twitter threads. [44:32] When it comes to writing a thread, the first tweet is the most important one.  [47:34] Understanding your customers when it comes to figuring out demand is everything. Clarity of what works doesn't come from sitting around in a boardroom and thinking about it. It comes from actually engaging with customers. [49:05] If you want to market better, really be obsessed about understanding customers.  [50:28] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [52:31] If you enjoy the experience I've provided here for you, will you share about it? That could mean leaving a rating/review or sharing the episode with a friend (or 10! Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    200. A More Beautiful Question with Warren Berger

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 52:10

    Today I am very excited to introduce you to Warren Berger. If you know me at all, you probably know what a big deal this is for me. Warren wrote my very favorite book, A More Beautiful Question. I reference it all the time on the show when I am being interviewed, when I am teaching… I even referenced it in my own book. I love questions and a huge part of that infatuation came from Warren's book.  When the milestone of the 200th episode of The Brainy Business was on the horizon I decided to go out on a limb and asked Warren if he would be my guest for this special episode. He kindly agreed and here we are! Warren has a history as a journalist for the New York Times before writing or co-authoring ten books including A More Beautiful Question, The Book of Beautiful Questions, Beautiful Questions in the Classroom, and more. Today we are talking about questions (of course!) as well as design thinking and so much other goodness. You definitely don't want to miss this one! Thank you so much for 200 amazing episodes together! What do you want to hear more of in the next 200?  Show Notes: [00:45] Today I am very excited to introduce you to Warren Berger.  [01:44] Warren has a history as a journalist for The New York Times before writing or co-authoring ten books including A More Beautiful Question, The Book of Beautiful Questions, Beautiful Questions in the Classroom, and more. [03:35] Warren shares who he is and his background. He is a long-time journalist. [05:54] This idea of asking questions, trying to get to the right questions, and figuring out how to ask a good question is a really important concept that has been underappreciated and not talked about enough.  [07:20] Questioning is basic and comes naturally to us…but at the same time, it is very complex. There are so many ways you can get better at questioning and understand it better.  [09:16] Warren looks for whatever has been published and he also talks to people and interviews them about how they use questions. He has interviewed a hostage negotiator, FB agent, therapists, coaches, and more.  [11:31] It is very common to see books have a chapter on questioning, but it doesn't go that deep into it. There needs to be more. Warren advocates for Questionology departments in schools (sounds good to Melina!) [12:46] The more you learn about something, the more you realize there is to learn and that is certainly true with questioning. (Intrigued by this idea? Listen to episode 198 on the Dunning-Kruger effect to learn more about this!) [14:28] Warren has three books on questioning, A More Beautiful Question, The Book of Beautiful Questions, and Beautiful Questions in the Classroom. [15:27] There is this underappreciated tool called questioning. You know how to do it in a way, but there is so much more to it that you can learn. Questioning leads to innovations, changes, and breakthroughs.  [16:25] Everybody comes at questioning from a different angle.  [19:02] His third book on questioning was adapted for education and teachers.  [20:58] You have to model the behavior of being a curious questioner that doesn't have all the answers. Be a person that is wondering, growing, and learning. [23:27] You have to have a balance of confidence and humility to be a questioner. [24:39] The model for great leaders is to have that ability to learn consistently and be learning in front of the people you are leading.  [25:36] The smartest people are aware of how much they don't know. Being aware of your ignorance is an indication of how smart you are. (Dunning-Kruger effect again!) [27:28] We have to realize there is a lot we don't know and keep learning with our teams.  [29:48] Questioning involves getting comfortable with uncertainty.  [31:17] If you use why, what if, and how questions together they tend to go in a cycle that pushes you forward.  [33:27] Questioning has to be actionable and it has to be moving forward.  [35:07] The problem is that people want to rush to practical “How” questions. It is in our nature, but it is not enough. [36:53] You could give yourself a deadline when working through the questions or just trust your gut that you will know when you have spent enough time on that stage of questioning. Melina's tip – ask way more questions than you think you need to. [37:39] Sometimes the purpose of a question is to help you get to the next question. [38:48] The questioning muscle is a different muscle than your idea-generating muscle. When you use the questioning muscle you start to see things differently.  [41:11] Warren says design thinking is how a designer would go about approaching a problem, what can we learn from the way designers approach problems, and how we can apply that. [43:27] We can all use this mindset and process that designers use as we try to take on problems.  [44:18] If you want to create your own beautiful question and take ownership of it, consider framing it as: “How might I…?” Warren shares his beautiful question(!) [46:21] Forget the mission statement. What is your company's mission question? [48:33] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [50:28] If you enjoy the experience I've provided here for you, will you share about it? That could mean leaving a rating/review or sharing the episode with a friend (or 10!) Thank you for 200 episodes! What do you want to hear in the next 200? Share it with me on social media (links below). Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    199. Brainy Tips for Ethical Influence with Brian Ahearn

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 45:54

    Today I am so happy to have my friend (and a great friend of The Brainy Business) Brian Ahearn back on the show. Brian is a wealth of information and is the Chief Influence Officer at Influence People. It has been almost 100 weeks since Brian was on the show – which is kind of crazy to think about. He was here in episode 104 talking about how to ethically influence people and his first book, Influence PEOPLE. Now he is here talking about his third book, called The Influencer, which came out a couple of months ago. Today, Brian gives tips about Cialdini's 7 Principles of Persuasion, including some things to do as well as common pitfalls to avoid. He also talks about how he approached writing a business parable for this third book, and how that was different from a traditional business book. Lots of great insights await in this brainy episode! Show Notes: [00:41] Today I am so happy to have my friend Brian Ahearn back on the show.  [01:36] He is a Ted X presenter who has more than 30 years of experience in the insurance industry. [03:39] Brian shares his background and what he does in this world of behavioral sciences.  [05:33] Changing how people think or feel about something isn't usually enough–you need to get them to change their behavior.  [06:46] It is not about what we think and how we feel. It is about how they think and feel.   [09:16] Don't tell, ask. Also, say “Because…” and give a valid reason. That simple restructure is going to get you what you need far more often.  [11:46] The Principle of Liking was something he learned the importance of through Cialdini.  [12:37] It is not about us getting someone to like us, it is about us utilizing those same approaches to come to know and like them. [14:13] A lot of times, we don't know how thirsty we are until we take that first sip. (Giving compliments to people who don't get them often is like giving a thirsty person water, it makes a huge impact.) [16:32] Life is a lot happier when we are looking for the good in people and they are responding positively to us.  [17:41] Brian shares about his three books and how they differ from each other.  [19:09] His most recent book is called The Influencer: Secrets to Success and Happiness. [21:11] He shares that his approach for his most recent book is much like his approach to parenting.  [23:14] He shares how his first two books were different from his most recent book. [25:49] Authority is really important for speaking and training and a book helps create that authority.  [27:53] Brian summarizes Cialdini's 7 Principles of Persuasion: liking, reciprocity, unity, authority, social proof, consistency, and scarcity. [30:14] Liking Tip: Don't go into a situation trying to get people to like you.  Have the mindset that you want to come to like the people you are with. [32:32] Scarcity Tip: Instead of talking about all the positive reasons for doing business with you, talk about what people give up for not doing business with you.  [35:17] The value of ending with a question can have a huge impact. (reframing!) [37:06] All of life and sales is a long game. It is good to put the goodness out into the world and in some way it will come back to you.  [39:23] Brian shares the things he is excited about and what he is working on.  [42:17] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [43:45] Melina's top takeaways: Don't ask how you can get people to like you, instead find ways that you can like other people. When you genuinely like people and find things in common with them everything gets better.  [44:46] If you enjoy the experience I've provided here for you, will you share about it? That could mean leaving a rating/review or sharing the episode with a friend (or 10!) Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    198. Dunning-Kruger Effect: Behavioral Economics Foundations

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 27:26

    In today's episode, we are talking about one of my all-time favorite concepts, the Dunning-Kruger effect.  In its simplest form, the Dunning-Kruger effect essentially says that people who are unskilled will tend to overestimate their abilities and those who are very skilled experts will underestimate theirs. Someone who undersells their skills could be more qualified than that person who seems very confident. In this episode I explain what the Dunning-Kruger effect is, how understanding it can help you be more effective, how to leverage it in business, and some top tips for navigating this natural tendency of the brain. Show Notes: [00:41] In today's episode, we are talking about one of my all-time favorite concepts: the Dunning-Kruger effect. [03:48] To put the Dunning-Kruger effect into its simplest form, it would say essentially that people who are unskilled will tend to overestimate their abilities and those who are very skilled experts will underestimate theirs. [04:34] Think about a kid who graduates from high school and believes they know everything. [05:23] When someone graduates from high school, they are at a point that has come to be known as the “Peak of Mount Stupid.” At the peak of mount stupid, someone has lots of confidence, but it isn't built on much competence. They have no idea how much they don't know so they are blissfully unaware of their precarious position and how close they are to falling right off the cliff. When this kid gets to college and realizes they don't know nearly as much as they thought they did, they fall into the “Valley of Despair.” [07:21] This is an opportunity to look at the things you don't yet know and begin to research them. This gradual climb is called the “Slope of Enlightenment.” You slowly gain confidence as you grow your competence…though you might never get back up to the level of confidence you had way back at the peak of mount stupid. [08:14] If you take a moment now to reflect upon your own life, I am guessing you could pretty easily come up with at least half a dozen examples where the Dunning-Kruger effect reared its ugly overconfident head. [09:43] While you are an expert in one thing, you are way overconfident in something else, where you don't have any idea of the ocean of stuff you don't know. [11:29] How the effort heuristic relates.  [12:43] I can live in blissful unawareness of my inadequacies forever and never have it be an issue until I try the thing enough to realize that I should have been a little less confident. [13:56] Have some awareness and don't assume you know better than everyone else. [14:54] There is a flip to this as well. (It isn't all about mount stupid). Remember, there is a point where you become an expert and then grossly underestimate your own abilities. [16:11] You can't do this for everything, but on the things that matter it is worth doing a little Dunning-Kruger evaluation every so often to discover if you are underestimating or overestimating your confidence and competence at this point. [17:11] Look at your own moments where you have high confidence and low competence (or high competence with not enough confidence) to determine if you are showing up in the best way possible. Also, look at others to determine where they are on that Dunning-Kruger scale. [18:37] Another place where the Dunning-Kruger effect is really critical to keep in mind is when you look at coaching or giving advice to members of your team. [20:10] Giving them too many things to change while they are feeling the stress in the “valley” is going to make the problem worse, so you need to be selective on what advice to give them. [21:23] Know that when people have low competence in something, they are likely to be overconfident in their own abilities. Those who are very competent have a tendency to underestimate their own skill or ability. [22:02] There is an interesting point when there is an increase in knowledge where you realize all of what you don't know—that increased competence results in a drastic drop in confidence. [22:46] As you build knowledge, know that you will gradually underestimate your abilities, skills, and all the effort and training that went into what you now know and can do. Just because it is easy for you doesn't mean it isn't of value to someone else. Especially when someone is new, overshare information to help with where you both are on the Dunning-Kruger scale. [23:33] Don't take your spot on the Dunning-Kruger scale as a fixed point. The context is always changing, there are new discoveries and technologies and experts every day. [26:07] If you enjoy the experience I've provided here for you, will you share about it? That could mean leaving a rating/review or sharing the episode with a friend (or 10!) Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    197. You Have More Influence Than You Think with Vanessa Bohns

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 54:11

    Today I am very excited to introduce you to Dr. Vanessa Bohns, author of You Have More Influence Than You Think: How We Underestimate Our Power of Persuasion and Why It Matters. She got her Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Columbia University and her AB in Psychology from Brown University. Her research looks at social influence and the psychology of compliance and consent.  She has been published in Psychological Science, the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Organization Science, the Yale Law Journal, and more. She and her work have also been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, The Economist, Harvard Business Review, and NPR. She is an associate editor at the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, was previously editor of the social influence section of Social and Personality Psychology Compass, and sits on the editorial boards of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology and Social Cognition. In this episode, we talk about influence, building relationships, Vanessa's book, and so much more. If you have been loving all the conversations about influence this episode is a must-listen.  Show Notes: [00:43] Today I am very excited to introduce you to Dr. Vanessa Bohns, author of You Have More Influence Than You Think: How We Underestimate Our Power of Persuasion, and Why It Matters.   [03:32] Vanessa shares about herself and her background. She is an experimental social psychologist.  [05:04] She started on this journey of exploring influence in a different way than many other people have. They look at what their intuitions are to influence and how they match or don't match reality.  [06:39] In general, we get focused on one negative thing and we are so focused on that one thing that we don't pay attention to all of the other things that other people are paying attention to.  [07:07] Vanessa shares about the “weird shirt” study. [09:51] Good news! People are not paying attention to the things you hope they are not paying attention to and the things that you are really insecure about.  [10:17] The invisibility cloak illusion is the idea that we often feel like we walk through the world wrapped up in an invisibility cloak; you feel invisible to the world, but are not. People are noticing you and more than you tend to think. [11:44] People are actually paying attention to us as a whole, but they are not noticing the tiny embarrassing flaws that are the things we worry that people are noticing. In the end, we are having more influence than we think in a more positive way often than we think. [13:54] Influence works both ways. It is not just the person standing in front of the room, it is also the people they are speaking to that can have influence.  [15:26] The audience sitting there without saying a word can really shape the beliefs of that person at the front of the room.  [17:15] One thing that was difficult for a lot of people is doing presentations over a virtual format where you lose audience feedback.  [20:09] There is so much feedback you get from nonverbals that you take for granted. Vanessa wove in polls and chat questions to maintain engagement virtually. [21:51] She found that going around the room in Zoom and having everyone share what they think about a particular topic has really helped in her virtual presentations.  [23:18] Breakout rooms in online platforms are a great way to re-energize participants.  [26:16] We have lost so much of the interpersonal aspects of influence by moving to a virtual environment.  [28:39] People really just get the gist of what we say.  [30:07] In general, people only speak up about things that they really care about.  [31:57] The online chat feature is an outlet for people who feel less comfortable actually speaking aloud.  [33:28] So often when we do something we are so focused on how people are going to judge us for that thing instead of thinking about how that thing we said or did impact other people.  [35:05] Any time we are holding back and not asking for something, we may be missing opportunities.  [37:16] You want to be aware that every conversation and interaction is leaving an aftertaste, aftermath, or afterglow.  [38:58] We are too hard on ourselves when it comes to people judging us.  [39:43] It is so important for us to be mindful of the impacts our words and actions are having on other people.  [42:02] Shouting is born of underconfidence. We shout when we think nobody is listening.  [44:08] We don't see the ways we are impacting people all the time.  [45:58] If you can find ways to get out of your own head and reflect on the things that you're doing, you can be more accurate and aware of your influence.  [47:02] People like you more than you think they do.  [49:43] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [53:03] If you enjoy the experience I've provided here for you, will you share about it? That could mean leaving a rating/review or sharing the episode with a friend (or 10!) Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    196. Anthropology, Market Research & Behavioral Economics with Priscilla McKinney

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 53:07

    Today I am very excited to introduce you to Priscilla McKinney, CEO of Little Bird Marketing and host of the Ponderings from the Perch podcast. As you will hear in our conversation today, I love how thoughtful Priscilla and her team are about those brain associations and little play on word moments, like calling the podcast "Ponderings From the Perch" when the company is "Little Bird" Marketing, which is, of course, an extension of the benefits of word of mouth and the saying that "a little birdie" told you something. (Did you see how I extended that in the art for this episode…?) This builds upon Dan Gingiss' insights on creating remarkable experiences that people can't wait to share and his WISER framework. It is witty and engaging to have little easter eggs like this. It helps people feel like they know you and want to connect more. Priscilla and I talk about this, her background in anthropology, how that helps her bring the “human factor” back into brands, and so much more during our conversation today. You don't want to miss it! Show Notes: [00:41] Today I am very excited to introduce you to Priscilla McKinney, CEO of Little Bird Marketing and host of Ponderings from the Perch podcast.  [03:35] Priscilla shares about herself and her background. She studied cultural anthropology and is now a CEO of a digital marketing agency. [04:27] Every company should have a clear and effective marketing plan. Forget what everyone else is doing and think about what you need to do to drive revenue.  [06:51] Priscilla found herself in marketing after naturally doing it on the side.  [09:50] Quit marketing to everybody and think of who the most ideal person is. [10:51] Observe people in their natural habitat and understand what is convenient, natural, and helpful for them. What delights and engages them?  Once you understand this, start building a plan to attract those people.   [13:43] When your best and brightest clients start talking, listen and figure out what is frustrating to them.  [15:58] Too many people are not social on social media.  [18:46] That amplification of your thought leadership is where you can't help but see things a little differently.  [19:40] 92% of people who are engaged online want to deal with the person who is acknowledged or perceived as the thought leader in their industry.  [22:58] You have to be willing to be a little bit different than everybody else.  [25:43] Priscilla shares the background behind her business name and brand: Little Bird Marketing.  [26:52] Fidelity to your brand is something that really takes effort.  [28:27] Melina shares her favorite ad campaign of all time.  [30:25] Priscilla shares her favorite ad campaign of all time. [31:55] Fun is such an important part of engaging with other people.  [32:47] Priscilla shares examples of how she used personas in the past.  [35:26] Speaking to the real heart of the problem is the one thing in persona work that can overcome any other obstacle. (And what most brands get wrong.) [37:51] Pricing is not about the price. Oftentimes we haven't done a good enough job making them feel like they need this and you.  [39:40] Creating personas isn't enough–you need to use them. Keep them central to everything you do. [41:52] People are going to get to your 404 page but you don't want it to be a bad experience. (Check ours out for inspiration.) [43:45] Priscilla is going to be MCing Greenbook's IIEX North America in Austin this year.  [45:28] Melina is going to be speaking at IIEX North America in Austin and IIEX Europe in Amsterdam. Come join us! [48:31] Priscilla has lots of great resources to polish your marketing.  [49:45] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [52:00] If you enjoy the experience I've provided here for you, will you share about it? That could mean leaving a rating/review or sharing the episode with a friend (or 10!) Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    195. Saving Peru's Environment One Nudge At A Time with BE OEFA

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 48:50

    Today I am very excited to introduce you to Karina Montes and Mario Drago to discuss their work with BE OEFA in Peru. These are the first guests on the show from South  America, and I am so excited to start having a more international presence in the guests coming up this year. Thank you to Carlos Hoyos, a listener of the show and LinkedIn connection for the suggestion and introduction. If you or someone you know is doing some cool work in behavioral economics in a country that isn't yet well represented in the space, reach out to me on LinkedIn or through email. I would love to see if it is a fit to feature on the show just like Karina and Mario's work with BE OEFA.  OEFA is the environmental regulatory agency in Peru, sort of like the EPA here in the United States, and BE OEFA is a (now award-winning!) team Karina started a few years ago to help incorporate behavioral economics into their work with some amazing results, as you will hear about in today's show. Show Notes: [00:42] Today I am very excited to introduce you to Karina Montes and Mario Drago working with BE OEFA in Peru. These are the first guests on the show from South America.  [01:42] OEFA is the environmental regulatory agency in Peru. BE OEFA is a team Karina started a few years ago to help include behavioral economics into their work with some amazing results. [04:23] Karina shares about herself and her background. She is an economist at OEFA.  [04:51] Mario shares about himself and his background. He is an external consultant and lawyer.  [06:03] Karina shares the story of reforms that started in 2016.  [08:26] When people weren't doing what they “should” even though it was the law, they realized they needed to know more about the irrational part of the brain. [10:16] Mario's relationship with behavioral economics was kind of an accident.  [11:21] Mario's team was trying to investigate why the public policies were not working. They discovered all the rational measures and economic incentives were not working.  [14:08] Mario was the coach for Karina's team. Each group worked with one problem, analyzed the behavior of interest groups, set objectives, and assigned the nudges.  [16:27] Sometimes you have to think in another way to promote compliance.  [17:42] They identified five projects they thought could be solved with behavioral science.  [20:18] The five projects seemed very irrational because they thought that the way to solve the problem was easy.  [21:02] BE OEFA was created to be an experimental nudge unit. [23:42] They formed a group with people that were very motivated and already knew about the topic. Hundreds of people completed the test and 30 people were selected for the first group.  [25:01] Mario shares the process he went through to design the projects.  [26:09] The first step was to determine who they wanted to nudge. Then, after identifying the true problems they began the experiments, which lasted 3-12 months.  [29:05] They found something similar in every case. It is always best to understand the problem before investigating the best nudges to use. [30:54] The best nudges are incredibly simple (in hindsight) and obviously work, but they often take a long time to figure out in practice.  [32:17] So much time has to be spent on developing and thinking about who you are talking to, what they are doing, and what mindset they are in. [34:09] In the experiment about liability acknowledgment, the problem was that there was a very low rate of companies that acknowledged liability responsibility after the analysis process began.  [36:55] In the academic research you can find, a 3-4% increase is often a beautiful outcome. Their applied research had a much more significant impact – from 1.4% compliance to over 30%!  [37:49] You don't only have to provide the information. You have to make sure they understand it, internalize it and get part of their mental process in the right moment with the right incentive.  [39:28] Karina's tip: having lots of good data is key.  [42:12] It is important to be sure of the problem that needs to be solved.  [43:54] If you are interested in behavioral sciences, there is a lot of space to work in the public sector. If you want to have a career in behavioral economics you can also have public agencies as a client.  [45:28] You have to have information and data. [44:48] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [46:30] There is a whole community of people who love behavioral economics from around the world waiting to network and connect with you. It is great to have like-minded people to connect with. [47:41] If you enjoy the experience I've provided here for you, will you share about it? That could mean leaving a rating/review or sharing the episode with a friend (or 10!) Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    194. Functional Fixedness: When All You Have Is A Hammer, Everything Looks Like a Nail

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2022 26:23

    In today's episode, we are digging in on the concept of functional fixedness, or the “when all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail” problem. I rather enjoyed taking this analogy a bit to the extreme while sharing how this works; I hope you like it too. When there is an issue with functional fixedness, both sides are holding tightly to their own respective hammers. Like all the biases, heuristics, and concepts I share here on The Brainy Business, it is often easier to see these things in others than in ourselves, but I challenge you to look for your own hammer in each encounter. As you will learn in this episode, getting out of your own functionally fixed way – even about something simple – can have such a huge impact on your company overall. Listen in to find out how you can make small changes for a big impact.  Show Notes: [00:41] In today's episode, we are digging in on the concept of functional fixedness, or the “when all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail” problem. [02:27] When you first show up to tackle a new skill or concept, you are so excited for this new opportunity, you likely bring every mental tool you might need to help you learn. You're a sponge, ready for whatever life throws at you. [03:17] As you develop expertise, you start to declutter that mental toolbox. [04:30] When someone cuts you off on the freeway, they're instantly labeled a “jerk.” What about when you cut someone off? It feels completely different because of fundamental attribution error (and we do this all the time in business).  [06:09] It is important to know that you see “others” as different from you and will tend to judge them and their ideas more harshly, not giving them the benefit of the doubt that you might give to yourself and members of your team. [07:49] Isn't it possible that the one thing someone else is arguing is one of those 275,000 things your brain filtered out? Or that you are looking at just one of many possible correct alternatives that could work? [08:15] Functional fixedness or being set in your ways is another version of confirmation bias and the focusing illusion. [09:06] Everyone else doesn't have to be wrong in order for you to be right. [09:58] One of my favorite stories that I think is such a great example of overcoming functional fixedness, comes from Apollo 13. [12:31] Even when the stakes are high little things like this can be missed when you're too focused on your little area that you are working on. That can cause a big problem.  [14:23] It is easy to find the right answer to the wrong question. [15:18] Reframing the conversation so the team can look at things from different angles is so important [16:51] When you are too deep into a problem or have become an expert, you have this curse of knowledge that can keep you from seeing all the other opportunities that are just outside the norm. [17:26] Having a background knowledge of associations and how things work is important, but it is also important to understand that functional fixedness is a problem and it can keep you stuck sometimes in a way that will keep you from innovations or from solving the right problems. [19:35] When you are fixated on the myopic perspective of what you do or how you do things, everything looks like a nail when all you have is that hammer. You can be missing the bigger picture, which isn't necessarily a problem until sometimes, it is too late. [19:51] As you think about starting to apply this to your work, I don't recommend starting with something big like your company's mission. Have some warm-ups on less consequential projects first. [21:11] Properly wording the question is so critical for where you end up. [23:47] In general, when there is an issue with functional fixedness, both sides are holding onto their own respective hammers. Like all the biases, heuristics, and concepts I share here on The Brainy Business, it is easier to see these things in others than in ourselves, but I challenge you to look for your own hammer in each encounter. What are you fixated on that is keeping you closed off to the other person's perspective? [24:51] “I don't care what it was designed to do, I want to know what it can do”  - Gene Kranz, flight director for Apollo 13 [24:58] If you enjoy the experience I've provided here for you, will you share about it? That could mean leaving a rating/review or sharing the episode with a friend (or 10!) Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    193. How To Make Online Courses People Enjoy (And Complete) with Chris Rawlinson of 42 Courses

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 53:36

    Today I am very excited to introduce you to Chris Rawlinson, founder of 42 Courses, a company he started because he believes learning should be a fun interactive journey of discovery. It's not about being right or wrong because, in fact, sometimes the best way to learn is to be wrong. Learning is about interest and engagement and enjoyment. And much like a great holiday, it's often more about the journey itself. Chris took insights from a varied background to create online courses that people actually enjoy and complete. In an industry with standard completion rates of less than 10 percent, how does 42 Courses hover around 80 percent? They have incorporated behavioral science and psychology to help ensure a great experience that keeps people learning and coming back again and again? Listen in for tips to incorporate into your own courses. Show Notes: [00:42] Today I am very excited to introduce you to Chris Rawlinson, founder of 42 Courses, a company he started because he believes, "learning should be a fun interactive journey of discovery.” (Agreed!) [03:31] Chris shares about himself, his background, and how he found himself in this space.  [05:00] Why 42?  [07:01] Many of the courses are behavioral science-specific or have behavioral science in them. People need to upscale their creativity, problem-solving, and wellness.  [09:21] Having a limited number of courses at any time makes it so it is easier for people to make a choice and learn something.  [11:03] Chris shares about the framing experiment they did with their pricing.  [13:04] Disney Plus had a price increase and said that it is $1.99 per day instead of the overall price. Chris and Melina discuss the ups and downs of this approach. [15:43] With education you will value the course more if you pay more money. [18:35] For a lot of companies, the best thing they can do is increase their pricing.  [20:20] He started 42 Courses to make great learning that is really enjoyable for people.  [22:47] They have a team on the back end that is moderating all the responses instead of making that automated. (Wow!) [25:08] Their courses offer real-world feedback from real people. They tried to integrate as many things as they could that they learned from behavioral science into all of their courses.  [26:18] They have a much higher completion rate than most of their competitors.  The average completion rate for an e-learning course for around 7-9%.  [27:07] Right now their completion rate is 82%, but it fluctuates between 70-100%.  [29:19] They are rolling out an update so when you join it will show you where you are in your country. It is much more motivating than showing all the users. [31:10] Everyone learns differently.  [33:32] Whatever you are doing online, in particular, if you are doing continuous education, it needs to be short, stackable, and bit-sized.  [34:35] The only way we remember things is through stories.  [37:29] Splitting things up into little lessons which have a mixture of easy and hard stuff really works.  [40:32] Should you get progressively harder only or mix in some easy stuff? [41:52] In most education settings online you are missing the interactions with peers after the lecture, so they created and added opinion-based questions. [44:18] We do need community, but the community side of things needs to be at a certain breakpoint.  [46:56] There are ways to have those “water cooler” moments that can help get the value of what was happening and bring it into a virtual space.  [49:21] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [52:31] If you enjoy the experience I've provided here for you, will you share about it? That could mean leaving a rating/review or sharing the episode with a friend (or 10!) Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    192. AI, Blockchain, Machine Learning, & Behavioral Economics with Manuj Aggarwal

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2022 50:16

    As a lover of questions, I get asked a lot of things on all sorts of topics. One that comes up often is this idea about machine learning, AI, big data, data analytics, and how it combines with the behavioral sciences. Is there an overlap or are they competing? How can they work together?  Around the same time as I was prepping to be part of a debate at the Insights Association's CONVERGE conference on a similar topic, I had my conversation and interview with Manuj Aggarwal. He went from making $2/day to the boardrooms of Fortune 500 companies as a business mentor. He now has four patents, two published books, and more than 180K students across the globe. He has worked with multiple businesses including Microsoft, Pearson, IBM, and many others. He even developed an AI-based system to help students avoid dropping out of degree programs that were praised and mentioned by Barack Obama and Bill Gates. He is the host of the Bootstrapping Your Dreams podcast, where I was honored to be a guest recently and I am delighted to have him with me here on the show to talk about the value of AI and how it can overlap with behavioral science. Listen in as we discuss all about combining AI with behavioral science. You don't want to miss the many great insights!  Show Notes: [00:08] I'm delighted to introduce you to Manuj Aggarwal to discuss the opportunity of combining AI with behavioral science. [01:07] In December 2021 I (Melina) had the honor of being part of a debate put on at the Insights Association's CONVERGE conference where my team was arguing that "When it comes to capturing consumer insights, AI is never going to work." [03:59] Manuj shares about himself and the work that he does. [06:42] We are all experts in something and we are always trying to improve ourselves.  [07:17] Technology moves at a very rapid pace.  [10:18] Blockchain can decentralize and negotiate that trust between us as a technology; we don't need the bank or any third party. Instead, we can put our promise on a blockchain, and when that promise is fulfilled the technology is going to complete that transaction.  [11:35] Manuj shares two of his favorite projects. The first project was a mining project they did with UPS. [13:27] In the second project they applied behavioral science and AI with universities to keep students from dropping out of their degree programs after the first year. The system they created was talked about and supported by Barack Obama and Bill Gates. (Awesome!) [15:47] It is about understanding what people are thinking and what the reference point is that they have in their mind to get that concept.  [16:20] We need to find out the objective and work backward.  [18:38] Monitoring the data and enhancing the models in real-time lets things get even more accurate.  [20:10] Instead of focusing on the problem you think exists, they start by asking, “What are the results you are looking for?' [21:15] Figure out what the result is that you are looking for and then work backward on the root cause.  [23:50] There are so many common problems that people are having. Scaling happens gradually.  [25:46] There has never been a greater time than this to create a globally scalable company or solution.     [26:34] At the fundamental level when we break open AI it is actually a network of networks.  [28:33] You have to clean the data and you have to continuously do many experiments to fine-tune your data.  [30:09] You don't have to become an AI expert to apply it.  [32:12] As a business owner or individual, you need to look for repeated patterns in real life and that is where AI can be really helpful to optimize a business.  [33:03] Not sure where to start? Look at some repeated patterns where something happens consecutively three times.  [35:41] 95% of our decisions are made by our subconscious mind.  [36:44] Mediation allows you to connect with other human beings at a much more meaningful level.  [38:08] Mediation is really about unplugging and doing something that you would do any day of the week for the sake of having fun.  [41:34] The script needs to be flipped around. First, we need to feel fulfilled and happy and clear off all these negative emotions which then leads to amazing opportunities. (Melina calls this “calming the elephant” often) [43:46] It is all about having conversations, building connections, and relationships.  [45:08] Nobody cares how much you know until they know how much you care.  [46:17] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [49:05] If you enjoy the experience I've provided here for you, will you share about it? That could mean leaving a rating/review or sharing the episode with a friend (or 10!) Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    191. Using Semiotics in Retail with Rachel Lawes

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 11, 2022 42:52

    Were you a fan of The DaVinci Code? I loved that book, and quickly read everything by Dan Brown, which led to a fascination with the world of signs and symbols. I never really thought about how that aligns with my love of brain associations and behavioral economics, but they are very much rooted in the same fascinating topic.  When I was introduced to Rachel Lawes, by recent guest Elina Halonen, and I got to check out her first book Using Semiotics in Marketing and then an early read of this new book Using Semiotics in Retail, I was hooked and knew I had to share it with you all here on the show. Rachel is here to talk about the ins and outs of semiotics, and some fun stories about how they impact us all the time even when we might not realize it. I really love everything to do with semiotics and I think you will too.  One of my favorite insights from our conversation is, “Where there is choice, there is meaning.” Take a moment to ruminate on that, and let's start the show. Show Notes: [00:47] Sometimes things come up that get me beyond fascinated and this is one of those episodes. It is because of the entire field of semiotics. Signs, symbols, and brain associations and how they impact businesses and buying decisions, it is truly fascinating.  [03:15] Rachel shares about herself and her background, and how she got into the field of semiotics. As a social psychologist, she is all about relationships and how people communicate with each other. [04:24] Semiotics starts out from the view that people in conversation with each other actively and cooperatively build and construct versions of reality.   [06:24] Semiotics is the study of how people interpret and make sense of signs.  [08:15] Rachel shares about the Game Stop stock market saga.   [10:47] Millions of people bought shares in Game Stop with the result that by January of 2021 it was one of the most high-ranking businesses in the world in terms of its shares.  [13:07] Game Stop is a great story about business and how people create meaning amongst themselves.  [16:01] People were very quick to use the tools of language to create a sense of group identity.  [19:01] It simply changed the rules of the game because the stock market was not designed that way.  [21:05] Rachel shares the story from her book about a jam business gone terribly wrong.  [23:41] She went to the jam business and took photos to find out what was keeping people away. [24:03] An essential question in semiotics is “Where have I seen this before?”  [25:13] She shares her findings when she visited the jam business. (Listen for a laugh!) [28:07] When you hear it all explained, it sounds classy, but when you get the comparison you can see the flaws.   [28:57] Trust your instincts. If there is something making you uncomfortable, you need to take that seriously until you find out what that is.  [30:12] “Where have I seen this before?” is one of Rachel's favorite questions because it is one that her clients can start to use right away. It is also user-friendly for people just beginning semiotics.  [30:45] Where there is choice, there is meaning.  [31:19] She shares an example of Donald Trump's hair.  [33:50] Rachel shares the hilarious videos of Jeff Bezos and Leonardo DiCaprio. [36:56] No matter how much money you have, money will never trump good looks. [40:32] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [41:42] If you enjoy the experience I've provided here for you, will you share about it? That could mean leaving a rating/review or sharing the episode with a friend (or 10!) Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    190. The Voltage Effect with John List

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 4, 2022 48:26

    Today I am very excited to introduce you to Dr. John List, former chief economist at Uber, current chief economist at Lyft, professor at the University of Chicago, co-author of the wildly popular book, The Why Axis: Hidden Motives and the Undiscovered Economics of Everyday Life, who is here talking about his newest book, which just came out a couple of days ago, titled The Voltage Effect: How to Make Good Ideas Great and Great Ideas Scale. In this episode, we talk about ideas that can scale, possible hurdles you may face when scaling, and how to overcome those obstacles. John shares about his brand new book and the five vital signs to vett your own ideas as you are growing to determine if they will scale, and what to do for those that might not be ready to scale yet. Listen in to learn all about making those good ideas great and your great ideas scale! Show Notes: [00:42] Today I am very excited to introduce you to Dr. John List. Former Chief Economist at Uber, current Chief Economist at Lyft, and professor at the University of Chicago.  [02:38] John shares about himself and his background in behavioral economics.  [03:18] He quit on his dream to be a professional golfer to pursue his new dream in economics.  [05:29] After learning he would take the lessons in many cases from the classroom and use them in the real world.   [07:19] He hasn't been to all the baseball stadiums yet, but nearly all of them.  [08:42] John shares the moment he started becoming more interested in scaling when he started a preschool and created his own curriculum. [10:59] Turning a mountain into a molehill.  [12:23] We very rarely say, “Are we doing something that is scalable?” and “What do we need to do differently in our original research if we find the program works to make it scale?”  [14:12] A constant thread in all of his walks of life is that you can only make big changes at scale.  [16:58] There are five important vital signs that any idea has to have a chance to scale.  [17:49] Just because your idea doesn't check all five boxes doesn't mean you shouldn't still go for it.   [20:01] Vital Sign 1: Make sure your idea actually has voltage before you try to scale it.  [21:14] Vital Sign 2: know your audience.  [24:41] His group developed a new product called Uber Apologies. Apologies really only work for new users.  [27:09] Vital Sign 3: Understand your situation. [29:05] Look at all of the constraints and flaws at scale and bring that back to the original research. With those constraints in place, do we have an idea that can still work? [30:18] Vital Sign 4: the spillover effect.  [32:06] His team rolled out tipping at Uber in the summer of 2017.  [34:35] Vital Sign 5: understand whether your idea has economies of scale or diseconomies of scale. Anything that has made it big has great economies of scale.  [37:28] The context or the properties of the situation are super important.  [38:02] Poke and prod and figure out where the weaknesses are. What are the nonnegotiables and if those aren't available at scale then you have to change your idea and refine.  [40:53] We have a finite number of days we get to live on this earth and we only have so many ways to change it and make it better. Why not give yourself your best shot? [42:38] The second half of the book is using storytelling and standard ways to think economically to make better decisions in your life.  [45:09] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [47:16] If you enjoy the experience I've provided here for you, will you share about it? That could mean leaving a rating/review or sharing the episode with a friend (or 10!) Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    189. Influence Is Your Superpower with Yale's Dr. Zoe Chance

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2022 43:19

    Today I am very excited to introduce you to Dr. Zoe Chance. She got her Ph.D. in marketing at Harvard and has taught at Yale's School of Management for over 10 years. She has done a TEDx on how to make behavior addictive, and has been featured on NBC News, CNN, The Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Forbes, Washington Post, Fast Company and so many more amazing places. She is here today to discuss her fantastically awesome new book, Influence Is Your Superpower, which officially comes out on February 1, 2022. I had the honor of reading this book early and let me tell you, you want this book. Hit pause, go place your order and come on back to listen to the conversation. Listen in as we talk about how you can actually have fun in your work and break the rules a little. We also talk about Zoe's “No” challenge and her magic question. So much goodness… you don't want to miss it!  Show Notes: [00:43] Today I am very excited to introduce you to Dr. Zoe Chance. She got her Ph.D. in marketing at Harvard and has taught at Yale's School of Management for over 10 years. [03:02] Zoe shares about herself and how she got into the world of behavioral science. She teaches at Yale's School of Management and the book that she wrote is based on the course she teaches (the most popular in the business school!).  [05:57] Rejection doesn't kill you. If you are not getting rejected it means you are playing small.  [07:27] “No” is so hard for people to say and it is so hard for people to hear.  [08:24] When we are comfortable saying no we are helping other people be more comfortable saying no.  [09:36] “‘No.' is a complete sentence. ‘No, thank you.' is a polite complete sentence.” [11:32] Why it is empowering to just say, “No, thank you.” [12:10] She has her students do a 24-hour “No” challenge where for 24 hours they say no to everything and everyone. The results are always surprising. [14:18] Nobody is going to dislike you for asking for something or rejecting a request if you do it in a warm way.  [16:49] If you have shorter chapters between your longer ones rather than a smaller number of long chapters, the book feels easier to read so you get more momentum going through.  [17:37] We're setting people's expectations and influencing their experiences by the names and frames that we give.  [19:55] In her book, Zoe wanted her readers to know that they don't have to do things the way everyone else is doing them and you can question all the norms and rules and do the thing that feels good and is fun to you.  [20:26] Zoe shares about her visit to the Harry Potter Studios outside of London and the impact it had on her. Melina chimes in with her experience as well! [23:06] If you ever have a chance to do the London Harry Potter Studio tour Zoe and Melina both highly recommend it.  [24:17] Zoe shares about the psychological illusionist Derren Brown.  [26:28] In The Invisible Gorilla, you are focusing on one thing which is asking your brain to ignore everything else.  [27:27] Magicians are masters at directing attention and framing what we pay attention to.  [29:54] The Apocalypse, is Derren (and Zoe's) favorite show of his. He persuades the friends and family of a selfish loser to have him believe the end of the world is happening and there is a zombie apocalypse. He steps up as a hero.  [31:31] People want to say yes to you.  [33:45] The magic question is “What would it take?” [34:36] When the other person tells you what it would take, they're implicitly committing to supporting that outcome if you follow the road map.  [36:32] Zoe's book, Influence Is Your Superpower is a personal journey of transformation to becoming someone that people want to say yes to.  [38:22] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [39:03] When you are having fun people can sense it and it makes them more likely to be attracted to what you're doing. [40:04] I challenge you to take Zoe's “No” Challenge – say no to everything for the next 24 hours (after you buy her book of course-ha!).  [42:06] If you enjoy the experience I've provided here for you, will you share about it? That could mean leaving a rating/review or sharing the episode with a friend (or 10!) Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    188. Behavioral Blueprint, including COM-B and MOVE models with Elina Halonen

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 57:27

    Today I am very excited to introduce you to Elina Halonen, a behavioral insights strategist who has worked in the space for 15 years and co-founded a London-based insights consultancy working with global brands on branding, communications, and product/service development projects. She has expertise in behavioural analysis & design, consumer insights & market research, Cultural understanding, desk research & trends, branding & marketing strategy, and more.  Today on the show we talk a little about the COM-B and MOVE models, as well as Elina pre-committing to us all that she is going to write a book, called the Behavioural Blueprint! COM-B is for: Capability, Opportunity, Motivation, and Behavior. MOVE is for: Meanings, Observations, Viewpoints, and Experiences. We dive into what these models mean, a couple of examples, and so many other great topics. Show Notes: [00:40] Today I am very excited to introduce you to Elina Halonen, a behavioral insights strategist who has worked in the space for 15 years and co-founded a London-based insights consultancy working with global companies on branding, communications, and product/service development projects. [03:13] Elina and Melina have been connected on LinkedIn for years and officially meeting for the first time for this interview!  [03:53] Elina shares about herself and her background.  [05:15] For the last couple of years she has worked as an independent consultant and has worked with various research agencies.  [08:02] Tips for starting a business in an emerging market? Find a niche where you can raise awareness for what you do. Some areas are easier than others. Find a way to educate the market. [09:52] You will need a lot of creativity to promote yourself and what you do.  [12:07] If you pick what you are going to do, you have to be all-in on that thing for at least a year to give it a chance to be successful.  [14:55] Elina's first degrees were in marketing and it was always about consumer behavior.  [16:42] All of business is a long game.  [17:22] Give information generously. Make sure you add value to people. [20:31] She works with market research agencies and brings her behavioral science expertise.  [22:19] There are different ways of talking about behavioral science depending on what it is you are doing. It is not one size fits all.   [23:01] When they do a project, they think about the target behavior, what is the business objective, and what behaviors do they want to influence or change.  [25:04] Elina shares her commitment to writing her book, Behavioral Blueprint. Hold her accountable on Twitter. (handles below) [27:51] Melina shares her tips for writing a book, including to break it down and just get started.  [28:39] Break it down into chapters and look at what content you already have that fits that information and start segmenting it in.  [31:34] Bringing cultural psychology into behavioral change is becoming increasingly important.  [33:45] She has an intuitive process of looking at things in a certain way that is her Behavioral Blueprint.  [35:02] Start by looking at the situation and accessing what you are up against. [35:44] She is a big fan of the COM-B model: Capability, Opportunity, Motivation, and Behavior. [36:46] There is a huge amount of context that applied behavioral science often ignores.  [39:11] When she is analyzing or trying to organize things she likes to make it logical.  [41:54] Solving the wrong problem is very common and very human. Not spending enough time identifying the problem is the biggest mistake Melina sees companies make.  [43:37] Elina shares her blog post that she wrote about Netflix solving the wrong problem.  [45:10] Everything you do has an opportunity cost. We need to be sure we are solving the right problem first. It is the foundation of everything we do.  [48:03] We need to understand someone's logic empathically, putting ourselves in their shoes before we try to change their behavior.  [50:53] There are just some ways of spending money that is socially acceptable and some that aren't.  [51:15] Never assume you understand why someone does something because you don't.  [53:45] It's not about you, it's about the audience. Could it help someone else? [54:35] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [56:19] If you enjoy the experience I've provided here for you, will you share about it? That could mean leaving a rating/review or sharing the episode with a friend (or 10!) Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    187. Motivation and Incentives at Work with Kurt Nelson

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 46:00

    Today I am very excited to introduce you to Dr. Kurt Nelson, one of the cohosts of Behavioral Grooves as well as the president and founder of The Lantern Group.  In our conversation today we dig into motivation and incentivizing people at work and how to align that with your company strategy. We discuss how simple, seemingly “obvious” things can cause miscommunications so easily, like the word “grooves” in Behavioral Grooves. Tim and Kurt had many conversations about the name and agreed to it and were doing their first interview when they realized they had totally different ideas of that context - ha! Listen in to hear the full story. Kurt also shares his top podcasting tips and advice for anyone thinking about starting their own show. He shares so many great insights in our conversation, you definitely want to make sure to listen in.  Show Notes: [00:41] Today I am very excited to introduce you to Dr. Kurt Nelson, one of the cohosts of Behavioral Grooves as well as the president and founder of The Lantern Group. [02:17] Recently, Tim and Kurt did a session in the BE Thoughtful Revolution - watch the replay. [03:26] Kurt shares about himself and his background. He is a behavioral scientist and he has been working in the field for 20+ years.  [05:04] Discussion on the music piece of Behavioral Grooves (and an interesting miscommunication that can teach you about business).  [07:43] There are over 260 episodes of the Behavioral Grooves podcast.    [09:34] Melina believes that Abbey Road by The Beatles is the greatest album ever.  [12:25] Sometimes we get constrained by our own knowledge. The idea of not knowing allows you to be more expansive in your thoughts about what could be. [13:40] People get limited not only by their expertise, but also by their history. [15:33] The interesting piece about business and the world is that it is constantly evolving, shifting, and changing. What worked last year might not work this year. The context changes by company and year.   [17:31] Co-hosts work on a podcast if you have a clear understanding and respect for each other. You also need to have an understanding of who is doing different roles.  [18:59] Consistency is key!  [20:18] As a host you have to bring a unique perspective to the story they are telling and ask them the right questions.  [22:04] A lot of the work Kurt does focuses on applying a behavioral science lens inside of organizations and trying to help the company understand the drivers of an employee's behavior and the motivation behind that behavior. They usually start with a behavioral audit.  [24:06] A big gap is almost always communication. You can have the best incentive plan, total rewards, and structure in place, but if people don't understand it or buy into it, you are missing a big opportunity. [26:27] Kurt shares two of his corporate projects. They looked at the current programs they had in place and what behaviors they were driving.  [28:26] Companies want the behaviors the incentive plans and rewards programs are driving to align with the company strategy.  [29:03] The pandemic has been a real game-changer for many organizations.  [30:14] You need to treat your employees as humans. Understand what you can do as a manager to allow that human-centeredness of your employees to really be there and that you are bringing in the elements of listening, care, empathy, and concern.  [32:19] Understanding incentives becomes even more important when people are working remotely.  [32:39] The incentives need to match the audience you are currently trying to appeal to.   [34:43] That alignment with your incentives and your audience might mean you might have to exclude a certain group of people. [35:47] Get the philosophy aligned with where you want to go before you even start to think about the specifics of how your rewards, incentives, and communication all go into play.  [36:50] In business we often think we are on the same page, but there are so many different perspectives that didn't even come into your brain.  [39:03] There is a real value of bringing someone in that isn't a part of the organization to do some of this work.  [41:47] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [42:22] Join my free community, the BE Thoughtful Revolution. Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    186. Get It Done: Surprising Lessons from the Science of Motivation with Ayelet Fishbach

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 53:31

    Today I am very excited to introduce you to Dr. Ayelet Fishbach. She is the Jeffrey Breakenridge Keller Professor of Behavioral Science and Marketing at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, and the past president of the Society for the Study of Motivation and the International Social Cognition Network (ISCON). She is an expert on motivation and decision making and the author of the brand new book, which just released this week called Get it Done: Surprising Lessons from the Science of Motivation.   Of course, Ayelet's insights are valuable all year round, but it is very much intentional to have this as the first episode of the year. This really is the time of year where people are thinking about goals and motivation. Your New Year's resolutions are still hopefully intact, and you can increase your chances of meeting and exceeding them with these insights from Ayelet. Regardless of when you listen, it's always a good opportunity to set and achieve a new goal. After all, tomorrow is the first day of the rest of your life.

    185. How to Create Remarkable Experiences with Dan Gingiss

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 49:43

    Today I am beyond delighted to introduce you to my friend Dan Gingiss to talk about how to create remarkable experiences that your customers can't wait to share. Dan is an international keynote speaker and coach who believes that a remarkable customer experience is your best sales and marketing strategy.  His 20-year professional career included leadership positions at McDonald's, Discover, and Humana. He is the author of two books, including The Experience Maker which we will discuss today, and is the host of two shows, the Experience This! podcast and The Experience Maker LinkedIn live show.  While Dan's insights are valuable at any time, it is very much intentional to have this as the last episode of the year. This is a time many reflect on the year that has just ended and think about what they will be doing next. If your plan doesn't already include an improved customer experience and having a business that people can't wait to share about, it should. Listen to today's episode as you consider your customer experience and look to improve it in the new year.  Show Notes: [00:39] Today I am beyond delighted to introduce you to my friend Dan Gingiss to talk about how to create remarkable experiences that your customers can't wait to share. [03:36] Dan shares his experience speaking at Social Media Marketing World for the first time.   [04:30] Dan shares his background of 20 plus years in corporate America.  [05:04] We all know that word of mouth is the holy grail of marketing. It is much better when someone is saying nice things about us than if we are saying nice things about ourselves.  [05:29] A remarkable customer experience is your best marketing strategy.  [08:34] We have so much data on our customers that we don't use and we forget to come back to.  [11:03] Experience can happen anywhere. It is about knowing when to provide the right experience when your customers need it most or don't expect it.  [13:47] There are so many little things that we can do. Some people may advocate to only focus on one side, but Dan (and Melina!) suggest you both get rid of pain points and create positive moments.  [14:26] If we keep focusing on the little things, they absolutely add up to something amazing.  [15:48] We have got to empower all of our employees to truly believe they are in the customer experience business.  [16:56] Become a customer of your own business.  [18:49] Remove pain points and create peaks in your customer journey.  [20:08] If your customer is frustrated with your company, they are going to be more open to a TV commercial or social media ad for your competitor.  [22:16] The WISER Methodology teaches you how to create the kinds of experiences that people want to talk about. You have to be intentional about the experience to make it so someone wants to share it.  [22:55] W stands for witty, I is immersive, S is sharable, E is extraordinary and R is responsive.  [25:18] Millennials and Gen Z in particular want a relationship with the brands they spend their hard-earned money with. In order to have a relationship, you have to have human interaction.  [26:48] We don't have to delight in the same way every time.   [28:57] There is a part of every business where either you do it the same way as everybody else or the same way it has always been done and you can turn it into something that can be an experience when people least expect it.  [30:43] Whenever you can play to peoples' kids or pets, you are going to hit them in the heart.  [32:36] There are lots of opportunities, but we just have to seize them and look for chances when people don't expect it.  [35:07] With gift-giving, make sure you are giving a gift you would like to receive (i.e. don't slap a giant logo on your “gift”).  [37:00] Shareable is the end goal and it has to be strategic and intentional.  [39:27] There are so many opportunities where we can kick it up a little notch and do something unique—it is a great way to stand out. You don't have to spend more, just spend differently.  [40:39] Look for ways to make work more fun and enjoyable.  [42:37] Every communication is an opportunity.  [45:36] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [48:28] If you enjoy the experience I've provided here for you, will you share about it? That could mean leaving a rating/review or sharing the episode with a friend (or 10!) Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    184. Best of The Brainy Business in 2021

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 52:34

    So much happened in 2021 at The Brainy Business and in the Palmer household, it has been fun to reflect on it for this episode. Here are a few highlights:  In January, I started teaching a new class at Texas A&M University through the certificate in Applied Behavioral Economics via the Human Behavior Lab.   In March, we rolled out the new website and on May 1st, I launched my free global community of behavioral economics enthusiasts with (currently) over 500 members.  My first book, What Your Customer Wants and Can't Tell You come out on May 11, 2021, and I got to be part of some amazing events this past year sharing about it and other parts of my work.  And, while I didn't talk about it much publicly, I had a baby in 2021! The Brainy Baby, Mr. Hudson Grey Palmer, was born on August 9th and is a fantastic addition to our family.  Join me as we take a look back at all the excitement and top content of 2021. I hope you will enjoy this walkthrough of last year as much as I did.  Show Notes: [00:06] Today's episode is showcasing the best content from The Brainy Business in 2021. [02:12] My very first book, What Your Customer Wants and Can't Tell You came out on May 11, 2021! [03:49] Melina had a baby in 2021! The Brainy Baby, Mr. Hudson Grey Palmer was born on August 9th. Look how cute he is. :) [07:51] Top Countries Downloading The Brainy Business: The US is first, followed by UK, Canada, Australia, India, Germany, Brazil, Mexico, the Netherlands and Spain.  [09:02] Top Ten States: Coming in at number 10 Pennsylvania then New Jersey at number 9, Virginia at number 8, Illinois at number 7, Ohio at 6, Florida as number 5, New York at number 4, Washington at 3, Texas at 2, and California still with the top most downloads of 2021. [10:32] Of the 470,000 total downloads of the show so far, 250,001 have come from the US. That means nearly half of our downloads are international, which is so cool. [12:53] Of those more than 175,000 downloads of the show in 2021, and now with 184 episodes of content to choose from, we get our top 10 episodes of the year, starting with episode 136 on Temptation Bundling. [14:20] Next we have episode 165, when Matej Sucha of Mindworx and insideBE came onto the show discussing research they have done and the case studies of insideBE, which launched in 2021 as well. [15:32] At the number 8 spot we have episode 158 with Matthew Confer letting you know the three things everyone needs to do before you decide. [16:12] Next, at number 7 we have episode 160, an interview with Matt Johnson, coauthor of Blindsight. [17:20] At number 6, we have the only foundations episode to make the top 10 this year, and it was a relatively new one which is pretty cool. This is episode 171 on The Paradox of Choice. [18:33] Our top 5 kicks off with episode 164, an interview with Amy Bucher about her fantastic book Engaged, and so much more about her work in applying behavioral economics. [19:32] At number 4, is episode 140, an interview with Benny Cheung where we talked about some research he did at Dectech that was also featured in chapter 28 of my book, which showcases the importance of testing. [20:55] At number 3 we have episode 159, a behavioral economics analysis of Amazon and coming in at number 2 is episode 144, a behavioral economics analysis of Disney. [22:22] Our top most downloaded episode of 2021, which was episode 157, my interview with Robert Cialdini on his new and expanded edition of Influence, which includes a whole new 7th principle of persuasion. [23:27] One of my main tips is to play the long game and form great relationships so pitching is easier. [26:33] There has never been a month of the podcast where every episode didn't get at least 1 download. [27:24] Let's dig into that top 10 of all time list starting with number 10, which was episode 111, Avoiding everyday work disasters, with Gleb Tsipursky. [28:24] Next is episode 62 on Game Theory and the 8th most downloaded episode of all time, is number 102 on Confirmation Bias. [31:00] The 7th most downloaded is episode 83, How to organize your brain with behavioral economics followed by episode 61 on Color Theory.  [33:37] The episodes with the fifth and third most downloads are both analyses of companies again, like I already talked about for the top downloads of 2021. However, these are different profiles, including number 86 with a behavioral economics analysis of Peloton, and episode 73 with a behavioral economics analysis of Starbucks.  [34:57] In that number 4 spot we have episode 5, The Truth About Pricing. [35:37] Number two is episode 2, The Top 5 Wording Mistakes Businesses Make. [36:37] The most downloaded episode of all time is the very first one, Unlocking the Secrets of the Brain. [39:55] The final top 10 list are the most read articles from my Inc Magazine column in 2021. For the full list, check out the blog post linked here with the summary of all three top content areas! [42:50] The 7th most read article is called, “Dread going to work every day? The culprit may be hanging in your office.” [43:16] The 6th most read article on Inc is the first one I wrote for them. It is called, “1 Simple Brain Trick That Can Help You Overcome Self-Doubt Forever.” [44:57] The fourth most read article is on one of my very favorite things. It's called, “Forget brainstorming. Try questionstorming.” [45:38] The third most read article is, “Feeling unproductive? This brain bias could be to blame.” [46:07] In our still Zoom-filled virtual world, it isn't surprising that the second most read article this year was, “Why you hate seeing your face in video meetings.” [47:02] “Don't ask ‘What are you thankful for?' Try this instead” is my most read article of 2021. [48:22] What's ahead for The Brainy Business in 2022? [51:22] Thank you again for making 2021 such an amazing year and for listening, subscribing, sharing, rating, and reviewing The Brainy Business podcast. I appreciate you all, and can't wait to see what 2022 has in store. Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! Get the Books Mentioned on (or related to) this Episode:   The Paradox of Choice, by Barry Schwartz Never Go With Your Gut, by Gleb Tsipursky Influence (New and Expanded), by Robert Cialdini Engaged, by Amy Bucher Blindsight, by Matt Johnson and Prince Ghuman Top recommended next episode: The Best of The Brainy Business in 2020 (ep 133) Already heard that one? Try these:  The Best Content from the Brainy Business in 2019 (ep 82) Dr. Robert Cialdini and the (Now!) 7 Principles of Persuasion (ep 157) Behavioral economics of Disney (ep 144) Behavioral economics of Amazon (ep 159) Unlocking the Secrets of the Brain (ep 1) The Top 5 Wording Mistakes Businesses Make (ep 2) Starbucks (ep 73) Other Important Links:  Best of 2021 Blog Post  Best of 2020 Blog Post Best of 2019 Blog Post Don't Ask “What Are You Thankful For?” Try This Instead (Inc.com) Why You Hate Seeing Your Face In Video Meetings (Inc.com) Feeling Unproductive? This Brain Bias Could Be To Blame (Inc.com) Texas A&M Certificate in Applied Behavioral Economics The Brainy Business Shop Check out Melina's award-winning book, What Your Customer Wants and Can't Tell You on Amazon, Bookshop, Barnes & Noble, Book Depository, and Booktopia

    183. The Power of Fast-Choice & Implicit Testing with CloudArmy's Keith Ewart

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 49:06

    Today rounds out this miniseries of companies providing testing opportunities for businesses with a conversation about fast-choice and implicit testing with CloudArmy's Dr. Keith Ewart.  During our conversation today, Keith starts by telling us all about testing and project work he did during his 24 years at Proctor and Gamble – the positives and the pitfalls – and the work he now does as VP of Insights at CloudArmy.  He will share about some of the issues in testing at large organizations, including being stuck executing projects that you know won't work well because the testing took too long to come back and being too far down the track to implement something new. (So frustrating!) That's why the super quick and incredibly effective fast-choice and implicit testing that CloudArmy does is such a great solution, which he will also give insight on. Listen now to learn all about it (and best next steps for starting your own project). Show Notes: [00:42] I am so excited to introduce you to Dr. Keith Ewart, partner and VP of insights at CloudArmy. [03:35] Keith shares about where he lives and his background.  [05:04] He actually started off in microbiology. After working in microbiology for about a year and a half he saw the wonderful world of insights and requested a move.  [06:38] A key part of his life at Proctor and Gamble was in packaging and developing better packaging solutions.  [07:47] The importance of understanding the packaging impact in the zero moment of truth all the way to the purchase in store.  [09:18] They were encouraged to think about multi-sensory signals.  [10:36] The third moment of truth is asking if that whole experience was so good that you want to tell your friends about it. It is important to have testimonials and brand advocates.  [12:46] The third moment of truth is not talked about in many companies.  [13:57] We want to drive the habits and at the same time we uncover what those barriers are. If we can uncover those barriers, we can put solutions in place.  [14:51] One of the biggest barriers to innovation is speed.  [16:05] Keith is a massive fan of fast cycle learning, rapid prototyping, bringing ideas to life very early on, and getting the voice of the consumer in the room as quickly as possible.  [18:15] What you really want is an individual's true response and ideally more than one or two focus groups.  [20:01] You can start to think about concepts, positioning, and using imagery to convey those brand positioning or benefits you want to get across.   [22:40] CloudArmy is a software company and programmers who have a background in the whole field.  [24:19] The beauty of a true implicit methodology is that consumers don't even realize that they are being evaluated.  It is based solely on reaction times.  [26:28] They are using implicit tests for packaging, messaging, advertising, and across the board.  They are getting a true unconscious response to a set of stimulus.  [28:31] If you want to design your own test, it is not a problem.  The key thing is what is the objective of the client and what is the best tool to understand and utilize.  [31:03] Context is key. Defining what you are really trying to get at and what success looks like. Make sure your problem statement is defined and can be measured. Take the data and translate it to actionable insights.  [33:15] Keep things simple. People's brains are tired and they can't cope with so much information.  [34:00] How many people can truly say they know what their brand stands for? What does the consumer really think is the most important component of their brand? [36:27] Everyone should spend more time understanding the problem.    [38:20] The more constraints you put in place the longer time it will take. It is often beneficial to keep the sample broad.  [41:14] When you get everyone in the room together all trying to create and you get the toolkits around to help evaluate these things, you can make decisions quickly [44:21] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [47:24] Shop at The Brainy Business shop for that perfect brainy gear. Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    182. Using Biosensors to Unpack Human Behavior, with iMotions' Jessica Wilson

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 54:11

    How often does your business run tests?  Testing is so important. You don't need to do fancy stuff every time and there are so many types of testing. If you don't take the time to test, you can't know what is working and there is a good chance you are wasting time on stuff that isn't going to help you reach your goals.  Today, I am so excited to introduce you to Dr. Jessica Wilson, technical director at iMotions who got her Ph.D. in neuroscience from Northwestern University. As you will hear in the episode, she and I have been working together on a project for quite some time now and I am very excited to have results to share with you now. This episode will talk about that study we did together for The Brainy Business as well as some of the other awesome work iMotions is doing. Show Notes: [00:40] Today, I am so excited to introduce you to Dr. Jessica Wilson, technical director at iMotions who got her Ph.D. in neuroscience from Northwestern University. [03:31] Jessica shares more about who she is and what she does. Her background is in research and neuroscience.  [03:58] iMotions is a software company that provides a platform that can integrate and synchronize different neuroscience tools.  [05:28] There are so many different applications; iMotions does product testing, ads testing, sensory work, and more.  [08:23] The most basic setup includes eye-tracking, facial expression analysis, and skin conductance. Those three work really well together and they are also very easy to get started with.  [10:23] These tools are really helpful in certain ways, but at the end of the day the research question is king and it will help dictate what tools you use.  [12:10] Jessica shares details about video testing and applying test results.  [14:54] The data to help you make the best design decisions at the time when it counts.  [15:16] Jessica shares a study using video testing from the University of South Florida.  [16:52] The common theme in all these methods is that the most effective projects have a distinct research question and distinct variables.  [19:01] For the first phase of The Brainy Business website project, we looked at where people naturally gravitated to on the website. For the second phase of the study we adopted more of a task-based approach.  [20:47] Melina was doing a redesign of the website so she did a study with iMotions that she talked about in her book. They did two tests.  [23:21] The first thing they had people do was just a free one-minute navigation. They wanted to see if there were things they attended to more than others, if things got ignored, or if they were scattered all over the place with their attention. Just looking at the one-minute navigation both sites did pretty well.  [24:23] The differences started to happen when the task components were introduced.  [26:23] There were two tasks for the study, each with its own scenario.  [28:39] One of the best things about running a test like this is that you are really forced to narrow it down to one thing.  [31:03] The best research looks at one or two things.  [33:21] With the old website there was a 12% success rate of actually clicking on the pricing course and the success rate went up to 70% with the new website design. [35:38] For the corporate page, it was found that it was giving too much information, reducing the effectiveness. [36:48] Melina was able to use insights from the two tests to help with the full redesign and integrate it into other areas of the site as well.  [38:51] You don't have to use the whole testimonial. It can be much more impactful if you call out the little highlights that can get buried in a paragraph.  [39:48] In the second test, the difference between the two prototypes was how they framed the testimonials.  [41:30] People will start at the very top of web pages and you will see a lot of aggregation from the left to the right on the top and on the left side going down and slowly fading over time as people start skipping past things.  [43:23] Across most of the different measures of eye-tracking it looked like less was more in this case. Just taking the highlights from the testimonials goes a long way in being able to direct attention to the area and people will spend more time looking there. [45:40] Melina will be including pictures and other information about the test on the Apply It page.  [46:38] Once the pandemic hit, people weren't collecting data anymore because you can't bring people into a physical lab space. They started looking at online data collection and remote options. [48:03] You get research unrestricted by the bounds of geography. There are now more possibilities than ever for how we can collect this data.  [50:07] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [52:37] Shop at The Brainy Business shop for that perfect brainy gear. Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    181. The Power of Metaphors for Brands with Olson Zaltman's Malcolm and Hannibal Brooks

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 47:21

    You are familiar with metaphors...you likely learned about them in elementary school. But do you know how important they are in your business?  Well, it turns out that metaphors are way more important in understanding the mind of your consumer than you could have possibly imagined. There are two associates from the firm Olson Zaltman here today to share the power of metaphors and how they use them in their Zaltman Metaphor Elicitation Technique (ZMET) process. The ZMET was created by Dr. Gerald Zaltman at the Harvard Business School in the 1990s and is still incredibly relevant for brands today.  During the conversation, Malcolm and Hannibal Brooks will share how they have used the ZMET for brands like Harvard, Tropicana, a funeral company, and more. Plus, insights into the 16 deep metaphors they work with at Olson Zaltman and why they matter for all companies who want to appeal to their customers (i.e. everyone!).  Show Notes: [00:06] In today's episode we are digging deep into the power of metaphors with two associates of Olson Zaltman. [02:53] Malcolm and Hannibal share about themselves, their background, and how as twins they ended up in the same field and working together.  [03:44] They both graduated with degrees in food science and went to a master's program focused on marketing, management, and consumer psychology.  [05:57] At Olson Zaltman, they do research that is focused on understanding the unconscious through metaphor. Their process is focused on using imagery and verbal metaphors to understand emotions.  [06:40] We think in images, not in words; metaphors are our way of describing the world.  [09:28] Metaphors really affect the way we perceive the world around us.  [11:04] Part of what makes these metaphors universal is that a lot of them originate in the experiences we have in life that exist before we can even verbalize.  [12:25] There are 16 deep metaphors that define our experience.  [14:48] Different groups of consumers might have different metaphors or understandings of a product or service.  [15:24] For women, clothing is a form of self-expression and freedom.  For men, clothing is often about a form of control.  [18:12] They share examples of the types of business problems they are solving. [19:42] With ZMET they want to understand with your particular consumers, are they getting something out of your product and your brand? [22:44] Prior to the ZMET process the business only needs to know the problem that they are having.  [25:08] The ZMET process can help answer a lot of questions for businesses.  [25:57] They share their findings from a case study with Harvard. [28:17] Helping to trigger the unity piece can be very valuable (as was the case for Harvard). They have found that there are core principles that they stumble upon time and time again.  [31:12] Deep 1-on-1 guided conversations help them unpack what is the best way for the business to move forward.  [33:20] You want to understand your brand's core assets and what fits with the mindset people have around it.  [36:19] One of their most fun cases to talk about is the research they did for the Funeral Service Foundation. They found that people would look at their funeral almost as a performance. People don't want to be remembered in a way that is sad. They want to be remembered for who they were, with a celebration.  [38:57] Their recommendations included creating this online experience that is more fun, including the most fun things about the person and how they want to be remembered. It gets people thinking and talking about their death while they are still alive by making it less scary.  [41:33] Their real work is understanding stories and connecting with people.   [42:23] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [44:28] Shop at The Brainy Business shop for that perfect brainy gift. Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

    180. Unboxing Videos: Why Do They Work?

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 22:14

    If you're a human person with any access to the internet, you are likely familiar with unboxing videos. Maybe you like and watch them yourself, maybe your kids love to watch other people open up boxes of toys, or maybe you avoid them at all costs. Whatever camp you are in, at one point or another, you probably thought something like, “Why do so many people watch these?” or “Why do these work?” Today's episode is dedicated to talking through the brain science of what is going on behind the scenes of an unboxing video. In this episode I talk about why they work, what to keep in mind if you ever decide to make your own, and some insights on the various types of “unboxings” out there (anything with a reveal pretty much counts). We will dig in on mirror neurons, anticipation/dopamine, priming, the senses, and more!  Listen now to get the scoop on unboxing videos.  Show Notes: [00:06] Ever wondered why unboxing videos are a thing? That's what we're focusing on in today's episode. [03:19] There are countless ways to do these unboxing or reveal videos. [04:01] In this episode, I am going to talk about four main things that are happening with unboxing videos, or that you should keep in mind when you create these yourself. We are going to talk about mirror neurons, dopamine created by anticipation, priming, the senses, and more. [04:35] Mirror neurons are the key to empathy and our ability to learn from observing others instead of only by doing things ourselves. [06:20] Mirror neurons greatly impact our lives every day. They have done some amazing things for all of humanity, the first of which is our ability to learn by observation and the second is our ability to empathize. [07:31] In an unboxing video, when someone else is opening the box, it is like we are doing it ourselves. We are able to live vicariously through that experience. Because of the dopamine release, it is very exciting for our brains even if we can't have and will never have the item that is being opened or revealed. [08:50] Dopamine is tied to anticipation, and so when there is a moment where you aren't sure what is going to happen -- where you are waiting for that reveal and don't know what is coming out of the box -- you are getting a kick of dopamine. [10:24] Once you know what is in the box (or how the movie ends), the joy for your brain is over. It is about savoring the anticipation that the brain loves. [10:50] Our brains love that uncertainty and expectation. [11:38] If you want someone to be excited about the unboxing process, you should prime them for that excitement. [13:07] Your excitement breeds more excitement in the viewer. [13:43] If you have too much of a lull, people might get bored and leave. You can play the B-side for a while, but you need to mix in some hits here and there to keep it interesting. [14:15] When you create an unboxing video, it is important to try and incorporate all five of the senses whenever you can to help get those mirror neurons firing. [16:31] Descriptive priming words that evoke the senses are critical when doing any video, and in an unboxing, they can get people excited. [17:54] The internet is full of unboxing videos for a reason, find some and take notes. Be sure to watch good ones, sure, but also find and watch some bad ones. What did they do wrong? When did your attention wane? How can you apply that to your future videos? [18:43] If you have never done an unboxing or reveal video before, what could you do one of? Plan in advance how you might incorporate all our main aspects from this episode: mirror neurons, anticipation, priming, and all five senses...and hit record! [20:33] As it is the holidays, it is a perfect time to pick up some Brainy Gear for you or a friend at The Brainy Business shop.  Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! Get the Books Mentioned on (or related to) this Episode: What Your Customer Wants and Can't Tell You, by Melina Palmer The Experience Maker, by Dan Gingiss The Hype Handbook, by Michael Schein The Life-Saving Skill of Story, by Michelle Auerbach Marketing Mess to Brand Success, by Scott Miller Top recommended next episode: Mirror Neurons (episode 31) Already heard that one? Try these:  Priming (episode 18) Get Your D.O.S.E. of Brain Chemicals (episode 123) Sense of Smell (episode 25) Sense of Taste (episode 26) Sense of Touch (episode 28) Sense of Hearing (episode 27) Sense of Sight (episode 24) Familiarity Bias (episode 149) Surprise and Delight (episode 60) Scarcity (episode 14) Novelty and Stories (episode 54) Herding (episode 19) Other Important Links:  The Neurons That Shaped Civilization The Mind's Mirror Shopping, Dopamine, and Anticipation Check out Melina's award-winning book, What Your Customer Wants and Can't Tell You on Amazon, Bookshop, Barnes & Noble, Book Depository, and Booktopia

    179. Sludge: What It Is and How to Reduce It, a Behavioral Economics Foundations Episode

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 29:21

    The internationally acclaimed book, Nudge, has shaped a lot of the field of behavioral economics. It has also spurred a whole other area which one of its co-authors, Cass Sunstein, has written a new book about, called Sludge: What Stops Us From Getting Things Done and What To Do About It, which released in fall 2021.  Sludge is everywhere in our lives. So what is it and how do we reduce it? This episode of The Brainy Business podcast is dedicated to all things sludge to help you identify and reduce it in your business. In this episode you will learn about: what sludge is and isn't; a customer facing example of sludge; a back-office example of sludge; how to quantify sludge; and how to get others on your team on board with finding and removing sludge. No matter your size or industry, I guarantee sludge is a problem in your business. Find it, remove it, and enjoy the benefits. Listen to learn more about sludge... Show Notes: [00:06] Today's behavioral economics foundations episode is all about sludge. [02:23] Context and the way choices are presented make a huge difference in what we find to be most appealing. When the choices are presented in a different order we might choose something else entirely. [03:32] When you use a tactic to influence choice, we call that a nudge. [05:45] “Sludge is built into the human condition, and we need to start to remove it, piece by piece.” [07:02] “Sludge hurts all of us, but if you are sick, old, disabled, or poor, or if you don't have a lot of education, sludge is a curse.” [08:07] Sludge is everywhere in our lives. Melina shares examples of sludge.  [10:34] “If sludge is understood to consist of frictions that separate people from what they want to get, the concept is not entirely mysterious.” [11:16] Much sludge involves confusing administrative burdens requiring people to obtain information, to figure out whom to call, to find out exactly what they're supposed to do. [13:01] Sometimes it is good for people to be confronted with a little sludge to prove they qualify for a benefit or that they care enough to earn whatever is presented, or that they are a good fit for a position. [13:30] In this episode I'm going to give you a back-office example, a customer-facing example, and some ways to think about quantifying the problem of sludge so you can know its real impact [13:50] When it comes to customer-facing examples, I like to start with the “buy now” button from Amazon. [15:12] In the buying process, questions like “Are you sure?” or extra fields or steps can act as partitions. Each new partition is a point where someone will evaluate if this is worth it or if they should bail completely or plan to “come back later.” Unfortunately, later often never comes. [17:09] Removing the sludge so you only ask what is absolutely necessary can help a lot more people get over that first hurdle. Focus on each micro moment as it exists and what is absolutely necessary.  [18:23] You can turn the sludge up or down as needed, but again I want to stress that most companies have way too much sludge in the way of people doing business with you. [19:41] My main piece of advice: find the least amount of items you need to get someone to move forward in this singular situation. [20:21] Melina shares back office examples including expense reports, checking tools in and out, and signing off on a change. [21:55] Melina shares her experience when she first started at the credit union and changes required a physical form to be completed by hand. (So sludgy!) [24:15] In the back office, when you trust your employees, you can reduce the sludge and things get done faster, for a lot less money than if you don't have trust. Work on trust and get rid of that sludge. [24:47] Because people get stuck in the status quo, they often don't feel like they can give up sludge. [25:11] Sunstein gives an example of quantifying sludge with TSA Precheck and shares how quickly the value can add up. [26:40] When you take a minute to quantify the lost sales or the minutes wasted by key staff members, the initiatives that couldn't be completed because of wasted time, or anything else. It can add up incredibly quickly. [27:21] Sludge is a huge problem in your business, I promise, no matter your size or industry. Find it, remove it, and enjoy the benefits. Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! Get the Books Mentioned on (or related to) this Episode: Sludge, by Cass Sunstein Nudge, by Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein Friction, by Roger Dooley The Speed of Trust, by Stephen M.R. Covey The Paradox of Choice, by Barry Schwartz Top recommended next episode: Friction, an interview with Roger Dooley (episode 72) Already heard that one? Try these:  Introduction to NUDGES and Choice Architecture (episode 35) iNcentives: the “N” in NUDGES (episode 36) Understanding Mapping: the “U” in NUDGES (episode 37) Defaults: the “D” in NUDGES (episode 38) Give Feedback: the “G” in NUDGES (episode 40) Expect Error: the “E” in NUDGES (episode 39) Structure Complex Choices: the “S” in NUDGES (episode 41) Amazon: a Behavioral Economics Analysis (episode 159) The Speed of Trust, with Stephen M.R. Covey (episode 148) Partitioning (episode 58) Paradox of Choice (episode 171) Status Quo Bias (episode 142) Change Management (episode 7) Framing (episode 16) Interview with Dr. Robert Cialdini (episode 157) Check out Melina's award-winning book, What Your Customer Wants and Can't Tell You on Amazon, Bookshop, Barnes & Noble, Book Depository, and Booktopia