Podcasts about future of work

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Best podcasts about future of work

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Latest podcast episodes about future of work

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S36E7 - Adaptability Quotient - The New Superpower, with DanRam

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 40:37


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover talks with DanRam about Adaptability Quotient (AQ), the new superpower. See the video here: https://youtu.be/mQ6pc4lpjns. DanRam (https://www.linkedin.com/in/iamdanram/) travels the globe as an Event MC & Speaker at over 100 events a year. Hosting changemakers like President Barack Obama, billionaire founders Sir Richard Branson and Reid Hoffman, F1 champion Nico Rosberg, Grammy-winning artists and celebrities, he works on 4 continents from college campuses to parliaments to in-house corporate innovation days for Fortune 500 companies to the biggest tech conferences in the world. His passion is to inspire people with his motto 'Start Now Start Simple' in building a future we all want to live in. Please leave a review wherever you listen to your podcasts! Get 3 months of GUSTO free when you run your first payroll, at Gusto.com/hci Check out the HCI Academy: Courses, Micro-Credentials, and Certificates to Upskill and Reskill for the Future of Work! Check out the LinkedIn Alchemizing Human Capital Newsletter. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Future Leader. Check out Dr. Westover's book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine. Ranked #5 Workplace Podcast Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast Ranked #7 HR Podcast Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts Each HCI Podcast episode (Program, ID No. 592296) has been approved for 0.50 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR™, aPHRi™, PHR®, PHRca®, SPHR®, GPHR®, PHRi™ and SPHRi™ recertification through HR Certification Institute® (HRCI®). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Life on Planet Earth
ROLLING STONES EXCLUSIVE: Best-selling author, JEFFREY ROBINSON, recalls his jaw-dropping escapades outside London with RON WOOD as the author was writing the rock legend's autobiography.

Life on Planet Earth

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 27:05


JEFFREY ROBINSON is the bestselling author of 30 books, and a popular speaker on the international after-dinner circuit. Born in Long Beach, NY (1945), he began selling freelance articles and stories to small magazines before his 15th birthday. Later, while attending Temple University in Philadelphia (BA-1967), he wrote for television and radio, was a staff writer at KYW-TV3 (1965), scripted a popular local children's show and was on the writing staff of "The Mike Douglas Show" (1966), a nationally televised daily talk show. After serving as a press and public relations officer in the United States Air Force (1967-1971), he took up residence in the south of France where he spent the next 12 years vagabonding around the world, writing articles and short stories for leading North American and British periodicals. In 1982, now earning his living as an established freelance journalist and short story writer, he moved to London England to write books. His money laundering tour de force, The Laundrymen (1993) was a headline-maker in 14 countries, establishing him as a recognized expert on organized crime, dirty money, fraud and money laundering. Actively maintaining that reputation through books, television programs and speaking engagements around the world, the British Bankers' Association has labeled him, "the world's most important financial crime author." In addition to books on dirty money, he has published investigative non-fiction, major biographies and novels. Source: jeffreyrobinson.com PLUS: Our weekly Future Shock 2.0 segment with IRA S. Wolfe about business and workforce trends caused by the convergence of people, business and technology. IRA is an author, workforce trends expert and Top 5 Global Thought Leader on the Future of Work and HR. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-aidan-byrne0/support

Team Performance - Winning Ways for Uncertain Times
The Definition of Success is Changing, Are You Ready?

Team Performance - Winning Ways for Uncertain Times

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 54:55


When it comes to the future of work, there is a big gap between the expectations of leaders and those they lead. According to a shocking study released by McKinsey, 75% of employees saw hybrid as permanent with adaptations. However, 75% of leadership believed the exact opposite. Do you think business operations will go back to "normal" or will they fundamentally change? Is your leadership focused on the "ceremonial" or the "significant?" Join Christian Napier and Spencer Horn as they discuss this timely topic.

The Tech Humanist Show
Does the Future of Work Mean More Agency for Workers?

The Tech Humanist Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 33:07


This week, we look at a few of the macro trends shaping both the labor market today and the future of work — such as the Great Resignation and collective bargaining — and examine how tech-driven business has both brought them about and potentially given workers more freedom and leverage. We also consider what all of that means for you if you're the one tasked with managing workers or leading a workplace forward, as well as what these trends might mean overall for humanity. Guests this week include Giselle Mota, Christopher Mims, Dr. Rumman Chowdhury, Dorothea Baur, John C. Havens, and Vanessa Mason. The Tech Humanist Show is a multi-media-format program exploring how data and technology shape the human experience. Hosted by Kate O'Neill. To watch full interviews with past and future guests, or for updates on what Kate O'Neill is doing next, subscribe to The Tech Humanist Show hosted by Kate O'Neill channel on YouTube. Full Transcript: Kate: The global workforce is experiencing an unprecedented level of change. The Great Resignation may look like a direct result of the COVID Pandemic, but the drivers behind this large-scale trend come from deep-rooted and centuries-old issues in employer-employee dynamics that have been amplified by evolving technology. So in this episode, we're exploring the lessons we've learned from the technologization — the impact of technology on work, as well as how the changing work landscape is pushing people to crave and demand more agency over our work and our lives. I recently had the opportunity to speak with Giselle Mota, Principal Consultant on the Future of Work at ADP, who offered some insight into the emotional human factor behind these changes. Giselle: “I think it's more about us realizing that work is not all that we are. Some people have left their very high-paying roles because they had stress about it, or because they need to be at home caregiving, or now they have issues with their own healthcare or mental health that came up, and they're prioritizing self over this idea of ‘I live to work I live to work I live to work,' right? The value system of humanity globally has shifted a lot, and people have been reassessing, ‘how do I want to spend my time?' ‘How do I want to live my life?' Work should not be driving all of that, our lives should be driving work experience. The ability to think about choosing when you're gonna work, ability to work from different places, how long is my work week, can I come in and out of my shifts throughout the day, can I work on projects, can I destructure and break down what work is and work at it my way? I think that's what we've been seeing.” Kate: Before we can fully understand why this is happening, we have to look at where we are and how we got here. Trends like the Great Resignation follow many years of jobs being automated or shipped overseas. Fewer people are needed to fill the remaining roles, so demand for workers in certain markets is disappearing, while in other markets, the supply of workers for a given job is so high that people aren't paid a living wage. With the rise of the ‘gig economy,' it's becoming less clear what level of education is needed to attain a well-paying job that will still be around in 5 years. Not that this is an entirely new phenomenon. Since at least the dawn of the industrial era, automation caused certain jobs to go out of favor while other jobs sprang up to fill the void. In the 21st century, with the advent of the Internet, algorithms, and ‘big data,' this cycle has been significantly accelerated. More jobs have been “optimized” by technology to prioritize maximum efficiency over human well-being, which is part of what's causing—as I talked about in our last episode—a global mental health crisis. And while the overview sounds bad, there is good news. As long as we can stay open-minded to change, we can work together to design solutions that work for everyone. And if we can do that, the future of work has the potential to be much brighter than the realities of today. To get there, we have to ask ourselves, what assumptions were made in the past to create the modern work environment, and which of those no longer serve us? Rahaf: “If we're gonna move to a more humane productivity mindset, we have to have some uncomfortable conversations about the role of work in our lives, the link between our identity and our jobs and our self-worth, our need for validation with social media and professional recognition, our egos…” Kate: That's Rahaf Harfoush, a Strategist, Digital Anthropologist, and Best-Selling Author who focuses on the intersections between emerging technology, innovation, and digital culture. You may have heard the extended version of this quote in our last episode, but her insight into how questioning our assumptions about work is playing into the changing work landscape felt equally relevant here. Rahaf: “We really have to talk about, ‘growing up, what did your parents teach you about work ethic?' how is that related to how you see yourself? Who are the people that you admire? You can start testing your relationship with work, and you start to see that we have built a relationship with work psychologically where we feel like if we don't work hard enough, we're not deserving. We don't ever stop and say, ‘does this belief actually allow me to produce my best possible work, or is it just pushing me to a point where I'm exhausted and burnt out?” Kate: Outside of our own personal assumptions about our relationship with work, there's also the relationship businesses and technology have with us as consumers, and how their assumptions about what we want are equally problematic. John: “I've read a lot of media, where there's a lot of assumptions that I would call, if not arrogant, certainly dismissive, if not wildly rude… You'll read an article that's like, ‘This machine does X, it shovels! Because no one wants to shovel for a living'!” Kate: That's John C. Havens, Executive Director of the IEEE Global Initiative on Ethics of Autonomous and Intelligent Systems. Here he's talking about the current belief held by a lot of the people creating modern technologies that everything can be automated, no matter the cost. John: “We've all done jobs that, elements of it you really don't like and wish could be automated, but usually that's because you do the job long enough to realize, this part of my job I wish could be automated. I've done a lot of, y'know, camp counseling jobs for the summer where I was outside, y'know I was doing physical labor… it was awesome! That said, you know, I was like, ‘this is great for what it was, I kind of don't want to do this for my whole life.' Yeah, a lot of people would not be like, ‘give me 40 years of shoveling!' But the other thing there that I really get upset about when I read some of those articles is what if, whatever the job is, insert job X, is how someone makes their living? Then it's not just a value judgment of the nature of the labor itself, but is saying, from the economic side of it, it's justified to automate anything that can be automated, because someone can make money from it outside of what that person does to make money for them and their family. We have to have a discussion about, y'know, which jobs might go away. Why is that not brought up? It's because there's the assumption, at all times, that the main indicator of success is exponential growth. And a lot of my work is to say, I don't think that's true.” In many ways, our society has failed to question the assumption ‘if something can be automated, automate it.' But as the great Ian Malcolm said in Jurassic Park, “your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think if they should.” While automation of jobs is frequently thought of in a manufacturing context, more and more we're seeing automating creep into other areas as well, like decision-making and workplace management. The same factories where machines are replacing physical human labor have now been optimized to replace human thought labor and managers as well. Christopher Mims, tech columnist at the Wall Street Journal and author of Arriving Today, on how everything gets from the factory to our front door, calls this phenomenon “Bezosism.” Christopher: “Bezosism, it's like the modern-day version of Taylorism or Fordism… the bottom line is, this is how you optimize the repetitive work that people do. This isn't just Amazon, Amazon is just the tip of the sphere. Amazon is the best at doing this, but every other company that can is trying to do the same thing: make workers more productive by managing them with software and algorithms, kind of whatever the consequence is. Emily Gindelsberger talks about how, whether it's an Amazon warehouse, or any fast-food restaurant you can name, or a call center… all of these places are now managed by algorithm, and the workers are monitored by software. Instead of a boss telling them to work faster, it's the software cracking the whip and being like, ‘you're not working fast enough, you need to pick packages faster' in this Amazon warehouse, or ‘you need to flip burgers faster' if you work at a McDonald's. But this is becoming the dominant way that work is organized if you don't have a college degree, if you're an hourly worker. You know, the whole phenomenon of the gig economy, the rise of part-time work, subcontracting, the so-called ‘fissured workplace'—all of that is, as one person put it, do you work above the API, like, are you a knowledge worker who's creating these systems? Or do you work below the API, where, what's organizing your work and your life—it's a piece of software! I mean, it's designed by humans, but your boss is an algorithm. And that is becoming, other than wealth and income inequality, one of the defining characteristics of, almost a neo-feudalism, ‘cause it's like, ‘hey! we've figured out how to organize labor at scale, and extract the most from people and make them work as efficiently as possible… we'll just let the software do it!'” Kate: The acceleration of this style of management is a big part of the driver pushing people to question our assumptions about work and begin to demand more agency. If you've been following my work for a while, you've heard me say, “the economy is people”, and that means we can't talk about the future of work without talking about the future of the worker. The idea that people, especially those doing what is considered ‘unskilled' labor, have little agency over how they work isn't new. AI may have exacerbated the issue, but the problem goes back as far as labor itself. Labor unions arose in the early 19th century in an attempt to level the playing field and allow workers to express their needs and concerns, but as we've seen with the recent Starbucks and Amazon unionization stories, the battle for human rights and agency in the workplace is far from decided. And it isn't just factories and assembly lines—it's happening in every industry. In the tech industry, there's a subset of people known as “Ghost Workers,” a term created by anthropologist Mary L. Gray and computer scientist Siddharth Suri to describe the usually underpaid and unseen workers doing contract work or content moderation. They frequently work alone, don't interact with one another, and often aren't even aware who they're working for, so the idea of collective bargaining feels farther out of reach. Dorothea Baur, a leading expert & advisor in Europe on ethics, responsibility, and sustainability across industries such as finance, technology, and beyond, explains some of the human rights issues at play in this phenomenon. Dorothea: “If you look at heavily industrialized contexts or like, heavy manufacturing, or like, textile industry, the rights we talk about first are like the human rights of labor, health and safety, etc. But I mean, trade unions have come out of fashion awhile ago, a lot of companies don't really like to talk about trade unions anymore. So when we switch to AI you think, ‘oh, we're in the service industry, it's not labor intensive,' but the human factor is still there. Certainly not blue collar employees, at least not within the own operations of tech companies, and also maybe not as many white collar employees, in relation to their turnover as in other contexts, but there's a lot of people linked to tech companies or to AI, often invisible. We have those Ghost Workers, gig economy, or people doing low-payed work of tagging pictures to train algo—uh, data sets, etc., so there is a labor issue, a classical one, that's really a straightforward human rights case there.” Kate: Algorithms have worked their way into the systems that manage most of our industries, from factory workers to police to judges. It's more than just “work faster,” too. These algorithms are making decisions as important as where and how many police should be deployed, as well as whether bail should be set, and at what amount. The logical (but not necessarily inevitable) extreme of this way of thinking is that all decisions will be relegated to algorithms and machines. But if people with the ability to make decisions continue to give these types of decisions to machines, we continue to lose sight of the human in the equation. What little decision making power the workers had before is being taken away and given to AI; little by little, human agency is being stripped away. The question then becomes, what if an algorithm tells a worker to do something they think is wrong? Will they have the freedom to question the algorithm, or is the output absolute? Dr. Rumman Chowdhury, Director of the Machine Learning Ethics, Transparency, and Accountability team at Twitter, elaborates. Rumman: “So if we're talking about, for example, a recommendation system to help judges decide if certain prisoners should get bail or not get bail, what's really interesting is not just how this affects the prisoner, but also the role of the judge in sort of the structure of the judicial system, and whether or not they feel the need to be subject to the output of this model, whether they have the agency to say, ‘I disagree with this.' A judge is a position of high social standing, they're considered to be highly educated… if there's an algorithm and it's telling them something that they think is wrong, they may be in a better position to say, ‘I disagree, I'm not going to do this,' versus somebody who is let's say an employee, like a warehouse employee, at Amazon, or somebody who works in retail at a store where your job is not necessarily considered to be high prestige, and you may feel like your job is replaceable, or worse, you may get in trouble if you're not agreeing with the output of this model. So, thinking about this system that surrounds these models that could actually be a sort of identically structured model, but because of the individual's place in society, they can or cannot take action on it.” Kate: The jury — if you'll pardon the expression — is still out on these questions, but we do know that in the past, worker agency was a key element in the success of our early systems. In fact, in the early days of creating the assembly line, human agency was fundamental to the success of those systems. Christopher Mims again. Christopher: “The Toyota production system was developed in a context of extreme worker agency, of complete loyalty between employer and employee, lifelong employment in Japan, and workers who had the ability to stop the assembly line the instant they noticed that something was not working, and were consulted on all changes to the way that they work. Honestly, most companies in the US cannot imagine functioning in this way, and they find it incredibly threatening to imagine their hourly workers operating this way, and that's why they all—even ‘employee-friendly' Starbucks—uses all these union busting measures, and Amazon loves them… because they just think, ‘oh, god, the worst thing in the world would be if our ‘lazy' employees have some say over how they work. It's nonsense, right? There's an entire continent called Europe where worker counsels dictate how innovations are incorporated. You know, that's how these things work in Germany, but we have just so destroyed the ability of workers to organize, to have any agency… Frankly, it is just disrespectful, it's this idea that all this labor is “unskilled,” that what you learn in this jobs has no real value… I think companies, they're just in this short term quarter-to-quarter mentality, and they're not thinking like, ‘how are we building a legacy? How do we retain employees, and how do we make productivity compatible with their thriving and happiness?' They all give lip service to this, but if you push as hard as Starbucks for instance against a labor union, honestly you're just lying.” Kate: Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, Unions were an imperfect but necessary solution to ensuring workers had access to rights, freedoms, and safety in certain workplaces. According to a 2020 report from the Economic Policy Institute, Unionized workers earn on average 11.2% more in wages than nonunionized peers, and Black and Hispanic workers get an even larger boost from unionization. However, it looks like the changing nature of work is changing unionization as well. Unlike the Great Depression, which expanded the reach of labor unions, the Great Recession may have ushered in a period of de-unionization in the public sector. From the 1970s to today, the percentage of U.S. workers in a union has fallen from 25 to just 11.7 percent. In a piece of good news for Amazon employees in New York, they successfully voted for a union in their workplace on April 4th of this year, marking the first victory in a years-long battle for Amazon employee rights and agency. Looking forward, it's hard to say whether unions will be the best solution to worker woes. As more jobs become automated and fewer humans are needed in the workplace, there may be a time when there are only a few employees in a given department, which makes it harder to organize and empower collective bargaining. At the same time, being the only person working in your department may in fact give you more power to influence decisions in your workplace, as Christopher Mims explains. Christopher: “If you reduce the number of humans that work in a facility, it's like a tautology—the ones that remain are more important! Because in the old days, you could hire thousands of longshoreman to unload a ship, if one of them didn't show up, like, who cares? But if you're talking about a professional, today, longshoreman who's making in excess of 6 figures, has these incredibly specialized skills, knows how to operate a crane that can lift an 80,000 lb. shipping container off of a building-size ship, and safely put it on the back of a truck without killing anybody—that person doesn't show up to work, you just lost, y'know, a tenth of your productivity for that whole terminal that day. This is also an example of this tension between, like, it's great that these are good-paying blue-collar jobs, there aren't that many left in America, however, their negotiating power is also why the automation of ports has really been slowed. So that is a real genuine tension that has to be resolved.” Kate: So far in this episode, we've talked a lot about factory workers and the types of jobs that frequently unionize, but the future of work encompasses everyone on the work ladder. In the past, all of the problems regarding lack of worker agency has applied to ‘white collar' jobs as well. The modern office workplace evolved in tandem with factories, and the assumptions about how work should be organized are just as present there. Vanessa: “Our work environments, with who was involved with it and how they were constructed, is something that has been done over a long period of time. And the people who have been involved in that who are not White men, who are not sort of property owners, who are not otherwise wealthy, is a really short timeline.” Kate: That's Vanessa Mason, research director for the Institute for the Future's Vantage Partnership. Here she's explaining how workplace culture evolved from a factory mindset—and mostly by the mindset of a particular subgroup of people. Offices may feel like very different places from factories, but when you look at the big picture, the organizational structures are guided by many of the same ideas. Vanessa: “I think that a lot of organizations and offices are fundamentally sort of command and control, kind of top-down hierarchies, unfortunately. You know, the sort of, ‘the manager does this! Accountability only goes one direction! There's a low level of autonomy depending on what level you are in the chart!' All of those treat humans like widgets. I think that we have to keep in mind that history and that experience, like I still bring that experience into the workplace—basically, I'm in a workplace that was not designed for me, it's not meant for me to succeed, it's not meant for me to even feel as socially safe and as comfortable. There's a lot of research about psychological safety in teams. Like, our teams are not meant to be psychologically safe, they're set up to basically be office factories for us to sort of churn out whatever it is that we're doing in an increasingly efficient manner, productivity is off the charts, and then you receive a paycheck for said efforts. And it's only right now (especially in the pandemic) that people are sort of realizing that organizational culture 1) is created, and 2) that there's an organizational that people didn't realize that they were kind of unintentionally creating. And then 3) if you want your organizational culture to be something other than what it is, you need to collectively decide, and then implement that culture. All of those steps require a sort of precondition of vulnerability and curiosity which people are really frightened to do, and they're trying to escape the sort of harder longer work of negotiating for that to occur.” Kate: And that's what's needed from our managers and leaders as we navigate to a brighter future of work: vulnerability and curiosity. The vulnerability to admit that things could be better, and the curiosity to explore new ways of structuring work to allow more room for agency and decision-making to bring out the best in everyone. If the idea of a union sounds scary or expensive, perhaps there are other ways to allow employees the have more agency over how they work. A world in flux means there's still room to test new solutions. Lately, one of the changes business leaders have tried to make to their organizations is to bring in more diversity of workers. Women, people of color, neurodivergent minds, and people with disabilities have all been given more opportunities than they have in the past, but as Giselle Mota explains, just bringing those people into the workplace isn't enough. Giselle: “I read a study recently that was talking about, even though a lot of diverse people have been hired and promoted into leadership roles, they're leaving anyway. They don't stick around an organization. Why is that? Because no matter what the pay was, no matter what the opportunity was, some of them are realizing, this was maybe just an effort to check off a box, but the culture doesn't exist here where I truly belong, where I'm truly heard, where I want to bring something to the forefront and something's really being done about it. And again it has nothing to do with technology or innovation, we have to go back to very human, basic elements. Create that culture first, let people see that they have a voice, that what they say matters, it helps influence the direction of the company, and then from there you can do all these neat things.” Kate: If you're managing a workplace that has functioned one way for a long time, it may not be intuitive to change it to a model that is more worker agency-driven. How can you change something you may not even be aware exists? Vanessa Mason has a few tips for employers on what they can do to help bring about a new workplace culture. Vanessa: “And so what you can do, is really fundamentally listening! So, more spaces at all hands for employees to share what their experience has been, more experience to share what it is like to try to get to know co-workers. You know, anything that really just surfaces people's opinions and experiences and allows themselves to be heard—by everyone, I would say, also, too. Not just have one team do that and then the senior leadership just isn't involved in that at all. The second thing is to have some kind of spaces for shared imagination. Like all the sort of popular team retreats that are out there, but you certainly could do this asynchronously, at an event, as part of a celebration. Celebrating things like, y'know, someone has had a child, someone's gotten married, someone's bought a house—all of those things are sort of core to recognizing the pace and experience of being human in this world that aren't just about work and productivity. And then some way of communicating how you're going to act upon what you're hearing and what people are imagining, too. There's a bias towards inaction in most organizations, so that's something that certainly senior leadership should talk about: ‘How do we think about making changes, knowing that we're going to surface some changes from this process?' Being transparent, being accountable… all of those sort of pieces that go along with good change management.” Kate: A 2021 paper in the Journal of Management echoes these ideas, stating that communication between employers and their workers need to be authentic, ongoing, and two-directional, meaning that on top of listening to employee concerns, managers also needed to effectively communicate their understanding of those concerns as well as what they intended to do about them. A professional services firm analyzing a company's internal messaging metadata was able to predict highly successful managers by finding people who communicated often, responded quickly, and were action-oriented. Of course another thing many workplaces have been trying, especially in the wake of the COVID pandemic, is allowing employees to work remotely. Giselle Mota again. Giselle: “I think all we're seeing is we're just reimagining work, the worker, and workplace. Now that the pandemic happened, we learned from like Zoom, ‘wait a minute, I can actually work remotely, and still learn and produce and be productive, on a video!' But now, we can add layers of experience to it, and if you so choose to, you can now work in a virtual environment… people are flattening out the playing field. Companies that used to be die-hard ‘you have to work here in our office, you have to be here located right next door to our vicinity,' now they've opened it up and they're getting talent from across the pond, across the globe, from wherever! And it's creating new opportunities for people to get into new roles.” Kate: Although COVID and Zoom accelerated a lot of things, the idea of people working from home instead of the office isn't actually a new one. AT&T experimented with employees working from home back in 1994, exploring how far an organization could transform the workplace by moving the work to the worker instead of the other way around. Ultimately, they freed up around $550M in cash flow by eliminating no longer needed office space. AT&T also reported increases in worker productivity, ability to retain talent, and the ability to avoid sanctions like zoning rules while also meeting Clear Air Act requirements. As remote work on a massive scale is a relatively new phenomenon, the research is still ongoing as to how this will affect long-term work processes and human happiness. It is notable that working remotely is far less likely to be an option the farther you drop down the income ladder. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, only 9.2% of workers in the bottom quartile of wage-earners have the ability to work remotely. The availability also varies depending on the job you're doing, with education, healthcare, hospitality, agriculture, retail, and transportation among the least-able to work remotely, and finance and knowledge workers among the most-able. Because we aren't entirely sure whether remote work is the best long-term solution, it's worth looking at other ways to attract high-value workers—and keep them around. One idea? Invest in career planning. Technology is making it easier than ever for employers to work with their employees to plan for a future within the company. AI has made it possible to forecast roles that the company will need in the future, so rather than scramble to fill that role when the time comes, employers can work with a current or prospective employee to help prepare them for the job. In my conversation with Giselle Mota, she explored this idea further. Giselle: “A lot of companies are now able to start applying analytics and forecast and plan, ‘okay, if this is a role for the future, maybe it doesn't exist today, and maybe this person doesn't yet have all the qualifications for this other role. But, they expressed to us an interest in this area, they expressed certain qualifications that they do have today, and now AI can help, and data can help to match and help a human, you know, talent acquisition person, career developer, or manager, to help guide that user to say, ‘this is where you are today, this is where you want to be, so let's map out a career plan to help you get to where you should be'.” Kate: She went on to explain that employers don't need to think about jobs so rigidly, and rather than looking for one perfect person to fill a role, you can spread the tasks around to help prepare for the future. Giselle: “I was talking to someone the other day who was saying, ‘y'know, we have trouble finding diverse leadership within our organization and bringing them up,' and I was talking to them and saying, ‘break down a job! Let people be able to work on projects to be able to build up their skillset. Maybe they don't have what it takes today, fully, on paper to be what you might be looking for, but maybe you can give them exposure to that, and help them from the inside of your organization to take on those roles.” Kate: All of these changes to work and the workplace mean that a lot of office workers can demand more from their jobs. Rather than settle for something nearby with a rigid schedule, people can choose a job that fits their lifestyle. As more of these jobs are automated, we are hopefully heading for an age where people who were relegated to the so-called “unskilled” jobs will be able to find careers that work for them. Because it is more than the workplace that is changing, it's also the work itself. I asked Giselle what types of jobs we might see in the future, and she had this to say. Giselle: “As we continue to explore the workplace, the worker, and the work that's being done, as digital transformation keeps occurring, we keep forming new roles. But we also see a resurgence and reemergence of certain roles taking more importance than even before. For example, leadership development is on the rise more than ever. Why? Because if you look at the last few years and the way that people have been leaving their workplaces, and going to others and jumping ship, there's a need for leaders to lead well. Officers of diversity have been created in organizations that never had it before because the way the world was going, people had to start opening up roles like that when they didn't even have a department before. As we move into more virtual experiences, we need creators. We're seeing organizations, big technology organizations, people who enable virtual and video interactions are creating layers of experience that need those same designers and that same talent—gamers and all types of creators—to now come into their spaces to help them start shaping the future of what their next technology offerings are gonna look like. Before, if you used to be into photography or graphic design or gaming or whatever, now there's space for you in these organizations that probably specialize in human capital management, social management… To give you a quick example, Subway! Subway opened up a virtual space and they allowed an employee to man a virtual store, so you could go virtually, into a Subway, order a subway sandwich down the line like you're there in person, and there's someone that's actually manning that. That's a job. And apart from all of that side of the world, we need people to manage, we need legal counsel, we need people who work on AI and ethics and governance—data scientists on the rise, roles that are about data analytics… When Postmates came out and they were delivering to people's homes or wherever it was, college campuses, etc., with a robot, the person who was making sure that robot didn't get hijacked, vandalized, or whatever the case is—it was a human person, a gamer, it was a young kid working from their apartment somewhere, they could virtually navigate that robot so that if it flipped over on its side or whatever, it would take manual control over it, set it right back up, and find it and do whatever it needed to do. So that's an actual role that was created.” Kate: While many people fear that as jobs disappear, people will have to survive without work — or rather, without the jobs that provide them with a livelihood, an income, a team to work with, and a sense of contribution — the more comforting truth is that we've always found jobs to replace the ones that went out of fashion. When cars were invented, the horse-and-buggy business became far less profitable, but those workers found something else to do. We shouldn't be glib or dismissive about the need individual workers will have for help in making career transitions, but in the big picture, humans are adaptable, and that isn't something that looks like it will be changing any time soon. Giselle: “Where we're seeing the direction of work going right now, people want to have more agency over how they work, where they work, themselves, etc. I think people want to own how they show up in the world, people want to own more of their financial abilities, they want to keep more of their pay… If you just wade through all of the buzzwords that are coming out lately, people want to imagine a different world of work. The future of work should be a place where people are encouraged to bring their true full selves to the table, and that they're heard. I think we've had way too much of a focus on customer experience because we're trying to drive profitability and revenue, but internally, behind the scenes, that's another story that we really need to work on.” Kate: The more aware we are of the way things are changing, the better able we are to prepare for the future we want. Even in the face of automation and constantly-evolving technologies, humans are adaptable. One thing that won't be changing any time soon? Workers aren't going to stop craving agency over their jobs and their lives, and employers aren't going to stop needing to hire talented and high-value employees to help their businesses thrive. Hopefully you've heard a few ideas in this episode of ways to lean into the change and make your business, or your life, a little bit better. Even more hopeful is the possibility that, after so much disruption and uncertainty, we may be entering a moment where more people at every stage of employment feel more empowered about their work: freer to express their whole selves in the workplace, and able to do work that is about more than paying the bills. That's a trend worth working toward. Thank you so much for joining me this week on The Tech Humanist Show. In our next episode, I'm talking about why it behooves businesses to focusing on the human experience of buying their product or service, rather than the customer experience. I'll see you then.

HR Leaders
Why A Foundation of Trust Is Key To Remote Work Success

HR Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 41:00


In this episode of the HR Leaders podcast, I'm joined by my guest, Kenneth Miepe, Vice President, People & Culture, EMEA at Valtech.We discuss: Why A Foundation of Trust Is Key To Remote Work SuccessThis episode of the HR Leaders Podcast is brought to you by AceUpIf there's a lesson in everything, what did the pandemic teach us about work, leadership, and the role coaching can play in our future? Download the report to access a collection of highlights to help you shape a post-pandemic workplace that works for everyone: https://bit.ly/381qQF5

More Intelligent Tomorrow: a DataRobot Podcast
Disrupting a Market is Rarely an Overnight Transformation - Peter Coffee

More Intelligent Tomorrow: a DataRobot Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 42:49


Disrupting a market is rarely an overnight transformation. And the right leaders see disruption as an ongoing process, not a one-time event. Peter Coffee was the first person at Salesforce with the word “platform” in his title. This was in an era where the idea of cloud computing was still in its infancy. He's spent the last 15 years helping transform Salesforce from a company that sold CRM software into one that offers an entire cloud platform designed to enable companies to offer complete solutions to their customers.MIT host Dave Anderson caught up with Peter and asked him about how he thinks the future of the workforce will shape up over the coming years.76% of workers say they are unequipped for the future of work. The traditional way to address this problem would have been to hire new talent out of college who would come in equipped with the tools and skills needed for the new landscape of the business world. But Peter feels new talent doesn't yet have the experience developed over time to really help customers solve their problems. He feels the answer to this problem is continuous education within the workforce. That's the idea behind Salesforce's Trailhead product. "We need to get back to a much more organic idea of what it means to learn and to adapt."Usually, AI projects fail because of a team's ability to implement, learn, and change the way they work. Changing the idea of ongoing skill learning requires it to be part of a company's culture. And to change that culture, you need to hire people who can change it.  Peter says, if you hire for talent, you're hiring for skills that can be taught. But if you hire for fit, you're hiring for someone who won't challenge you in your thinking. He suggests you hire someone who will challenge you."People are so much more capable than they're treated as being."Dave wonders if a lack of urgency is part of the reason more companies don't make similar changes.Too many companies focus on what they do and not on why. If they open themselves up to asking why they do what they do, then they're open to creating disruptive solutions.Companies tend to focus on what leads to being better, faster, and cheaper than their competitor. But there's a physical limit to those factors. Offering solutions to your customers opens limitless opportunities.The iPod is a great example. Steve Jobs's vision wasn't about making a digital music player, it was about putting thousands of songs in your pocket. It was about offering the whole solution. This meant the iPod could adapt and grow with each generation to be an ecosystem and not just a single purpose device.Listen to this episode to learn about:Preparing the workforce for the futureWhat it takes to be a better leaderCreating moments of transitionA new concept for continuous learning in the workplaceThe keys to giving customers a differentiating experience

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S36E6 - The Ability to Adapt and Change Perspective in a World that is Constantly Changing, with Robert Overweg

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 40:59


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover talks with Robert Overweg about the ability to adapt and change perspective in a world that is constantly changing. See the video here: https://youtu.be/S04LNbxIIIY. Robert Overweg (https://www.linkedin.com/in/robertoverweg/) is the founder of the Adaptable Mindset program. He and his team empower people to develop their own Adaptable Mindset, to develop mental flexibility. Learn how to create mental space and to find new possibilities. In our rapidly changing world we keep feeling the impact of unpredictable events to which we have to adapt. Robert teaches how adaptability is about empowerment and finding new perspectives. The Adaptable Mindset program has been applied at several Fortune 500 companies (Chanel, Heineken), multiple SMEs and innovative schools. They have also supported over a thousand students and solopreneurs with their online program. Robert has over a decade of experience in innovation and digital transformation with clients like Vodafone, Liberty global, eBay, Heineken, a variety of startups, and innovative schools. He is also an artist and exhibited at the Centre Pompidou and the media biennial in Seoul. As a frequent speaker at institutes like MIT, SXSW, and the European Commission. Robert speaks about ways to use tech to work smarter and add value to the world. It's Robert's goal to empower people to live a life full of possibilities. Please leave a review wherever you listen to your podcasts! Get 3 months of GUSTO free when you run your first payroll, at Gusto.com/hci Check out the HCI Academy: Courses, Micro-Credentials, and Certificates to Upskill and Reskill for the Future of Work! Check out the LinkedIn Alchemizing Human Capital Newsletter. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Future Leader. Check out Dr. Westover's book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine. Ranked #5 Workplace Podcast Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast Ranked #7 HR Podcast Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts Each HCI Podcast episode (Program, ID No. 592296) has been approved for 0.50 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR™, aPHRi™, PHR®, PHRca®, SPHR®, GPHR®, PHRi™ and SPHRi™ recertification through HR Certification Institute® (HRCI®). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Future of Work With Jacob Morgan
Chris Voss, Former FBI Lead Negotiator and Author of Never Split The Difference On The Most Effective Negotiation Tactics To Use At Work And Life

The Future of Work With Jacob Morgan

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 61:30


Christopher "Chris" Voss is an American businessman, author, and academic. Chris is a former FBI hostage negotiator, The Black Swan Group Ltd CEO in East Grinsted, England, and co-author of Never Split the Difference. He is an adjunct professor at Harvard Law School, the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University, and a lecturer at the University of Southern California's Marshall School of Business. What does Chris take on ways to make negotiations smooth and error-free? Are there any critical points one should remember when negotiating in sales or in real life to win in their favor? Is it essential to be more active in listening rather than just hearing surface-level reasoning? Should you show vulnerability when dealing with hostage negotiations? --------------------- This episode is sponsored by SAP Concur. Integrate travel, expense, and invoice processes into one seamless, connected platform, for complete visibility into employee spend. Learn more at www.concur.com. --------------------- The #1 challenge for organizations right now is how to attract and retain talent. Organizations are stuck in old ways of thinking about work and they are struggling! In my new PDF, I outline 7 ways the workforce is changing and what you and your organization need to do to adapt. The Great Resignation is The Great Opportunity if you are willing to take action! Click here to download the PDF. --------------------- Get the latest insights on the Future of Work, Leadership and employee experience through my daily newsletter at futureofworknewsletter.com  Let's connect on social! Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/jacobmorgan8 Instagram: https://instagram.com/jacobmorgan8 Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jacobm Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FuturistJacob

Business Wars
Sponsored: Welcome to the Future of Work (Dell Podference) | 2

Business Wars

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 32:05


Since the pandemic began, many of us have traded our blazers for t-shirts and loafers for slippers as remote work has become the new normal. There's been a fundamental shift in what employees expect from their workplace — and spoiler alert, going in five days a week isn't it. So how can business owners adapt to this changing landscape without losing employees in this hot labor market?Stanford Economics Professor Nick Bloom has studied productivity and remote work for two decades. On this episode, Nick joins Business Wars host David Brown to explore the future of work, and the role technology will play in helping businesses keep up.Listen to new episodes 1 week early and to all episodes ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/businesswars.Support us by supporting our sponsor!Dell Technologies - Let Dell Technologies help safeguard your business with modern devices and Windows 11 Pro. And search Dell Technologies' Small Conference Podference on Audacy.com, Spotify, or Apple Podcasts starting May 10th.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Mamamia Out Loud
Taylor Swift & Being A 'Cringeworthy Try-Hard'

Mamamia Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 40:55


Want more Mamamia Out Loud? Subscribe to Mamamia for unlimited access to Out Loud, five days a week. Taylor Swift has some life hacks for you. What do they teach us about the myth of effortlessness? Does being eager become 'cooler' with age? Or, is aspiration done? Plus, what does the future of work look like? Organisational psychologist Dr. Amantha Imber talks us through productivity, and how we should be using our time. And, our best and worst of the week, which includes an annual snub, a new TV, and contact in a non-contact sport. The End Bits: Subscribe to Mamamia RECOMMENDATIONS: Mia wants you to watch Motherland on Apple TV+ You can listen to Amantha Imber on her podcast How I Work. Pre-order Amantha's book Time Wise here GET IN TOUCH: Feedback? We're listening! Call the pod phone on 02 8999 9386 or email us at podcast@mamamia.com.au CREDITS: Hosts: Mia Freedman, Jessie Stephens, and Holly Wainwright Producer: Emma Gillespie Audio producer: Leah Porges Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present, and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Just by reading our articles or listening to our podcasts, you're helping to fund girls in schools in some of the most disadvantaged countries in the world - through our partnership with Room to Read. We're currently funding 300 girls in school every day and our aim is to get to 1,000. Find out more about Mamamia at mamamia.com.au Become a Mamamia subscriber: https://www.mamamia.com.au/mplus See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

New Work Chat
#107 mit York Karsten von Hubspot: Warum Unternehmen ihre Kultur ernster nehmen sollten

New Work Chat

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 49:25


York Karsten, Principal Solutions Engineer bei dem amerikanischen Software-Unternehmen Hubspot, gibt uns Einblicke in die Bedeutung und Pflege der Unternehmenskultur, die man in einem 128-seitigen Culture Deck niedergeschrieben hat. Hubspot bietet mittlerweile mehr als 143.000 Kundinnen und Kunden in über 120 Ländern eine CRM Lösung.

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
1981: Gigster - Talking NFTs, Web3 and Blockchain

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 31:15


Gigster is on a mission to companies develop software applications with the speed of a startup, coupled with the quality and expertise of the most innovative global talent. Cory Hymel leads all things Web3 as the Director of Blockchain at Gigster, a company dedicated to helping businesses develop software applications with the speed of a startup, coupled with the quality and expertise of the most innovative global talent. Cory also manages academic partnerships to help further research into distributed teams and the future of work. I invited Cory on the podcast to share his insights on what he sees as emerging trends for mass adoption and early execution of enterprise impacting technology like NFTs, blockchain and Web3. We also discuss how to create a roadmap for an NFT marketplace development project and why inter-blockchain communication is the key to blockchain mass adoption. We explore the topic of high Ethereum gas fees and why Gas is vital on the Ethereum network as it avoids poor performance and security issues for every transaction.  

The Sound of Economics
Job quality is about more than working conditions

The Sound of Economics

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 33:58


People spend a significant portion of their lives at work; job thus has a huge impact on a person's well-being. This week on The Sound of Economics, Giuseppe Porcaro is joined by Laura Nurski and Janine Berg to discuss how to enhance job quality, how technology will impact its dimensions and how to involve workers in the design of technology. This podcast was produced within the project “Future of Work and Inclusive Growth in Europe“, with the financial support of the Mastercard Center for Inclusive Growth. Relevant publication: Nurski, L. and M. Hoffmann (2022) ‘Beating burnout: identifying bad jobs and improving job quality', Policy Contribution 07/2022, Bruegel

The Vitalize Podcast
Investing in Emerging Markets, Lessons from Raising a Second Fund, and the Story behind Those Twitter Threads, with Elizabeth Yin of Hustle Fund

The Vitalize Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 28:29


Justin Gordon (@justingordon212) talks with Elizabeth Yin (@dunkhippo33), Co-Founder and General Partner at Hustle Fund, a VC fund that invests in pre-seed software startups. Hustle Fund is often the first check into a startup or in the first round of funding. Beyond the usual criteria that VCs typically look for, they prioritize founders' speed of execution above all else. Per their name, they also make a fast decision after speaking with a company.Elizabeth is a tech entrepreneur turned startup investor. Her mission for the next 30-40 years is to democratize wealth through entrepreneurship. She also blogs about how to raise early stage capital. Previously, Elizabeth was a partner at 500 Startups where she invested in seed stage companies and ran the Mountain View accelerator. In a prior life, Elizabeth co-founded and ran an adtech company called LaunchBit (acq 2014). Elizabeth has a BSEE from Stanford and an MBA from MIT Sloan.Elizabeth has reviewed over 20k startup pitches from around the world in the last few years and has helped numerous portfolio founders raise hundreds of millions of dollars. Her work and writing on startup fundraising has been featured in numerous publications including TechCrunch, Forbes, Huffington Post, BetaKit, and more.Website: Hustle FundLinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/elizabethyin/Twitter: @dunkhippo33Elizabeth's Website: https://elizabethyin.com/ Show Notes: The transition from founder to investor and why Elizabeth doesn't actually see herself as a VC The variety of ways Hustle Fund is supporting founders and investors beyond investing capital Behind the scenes of developing Camp Hustle How Angel Squad came about and the power of angel investing communities Elizabeth's perspective on crowdfunding How Hustle Fund provides value and stands out in a crowded industry Becoming widely known for her Twitter threads What Hustle Fund looks for in their potential investments How they evaluate founders in emerging markets Lessons from raising a second fund Their fund strategy and portfolio construction What's next for Hustle Fund More about the show:The Vitalize Podcast, a show by Vitalize Venture Capital (a seed-stage venture capital firm and pre-seed 300+ member angel community open to everyone), dives deep into the world of startup investing and the future of work.Hosted by Justin Gordon, the Director of Marketing at Vitalize Venture Capital, The Vitalize Podcast includes two main series. The Angel Investing series features interviews with a variety of angel investors and VCs around the world. The goal? To help develop the next generation of amazing investors. The Future of Work series takes a look at the founders and investors shaping the new world of work, including insights from our team here at Vitalize Venture Capital. More about us:Vitalize Venture Capital was formed in 2017 as a $16M seed-stage venture fund and now includes both a fund as well as an angel investing community investing in the future of work. Vitalize has offices in Chicago, San Francisco, and Los Angeles.The Vitalize Team:Gale - https://twitter.com/galeforceVCCaroline - https://twitter.com/carolinecasson_Justin - https://twitter.com/justingordon212Vitalize Angels, our angel investing community open to everyone:https://vitalize.vc/vitalizeangels/

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S36E5 - The 5 Critical Components for Creating Global Communities of Change, Maxine L. Johnson

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 37:21


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover talks with Maxine L. Johnson about the 5 critical components for creating global communities of change. See the video here: https://youtu.be/59eLUn0frvM. Maxine L. Johnson (https://www.linkedin.com/in/maxjohns/) is an author, co-author, certified life coach, transformation specialist and expert speaker serving professional women who are purposed to lead. Featured in USA Today as one of the Top 15 Entrepreneurs to watch in 2021, Medium, Kivo Daily, "Speak that Talks" Talk Show, Total Transformational Radio and Keynote Speaker for Canon, Inc (VA). An experienced HR Practitioner where she has over 25 years of HR experience, she is the CEO and Founder of WIFE Boss Academy, home of The Influential Female where she coaches professional women who are unfulfilled in their careers and help them discover they are purposed to lead. She is passionate about encouraging and inspiring women to be their best selves. Over the years, she has worked with women globally, helping them find positive change. She is known for creating the “The 5 Critical Components for Creating Global Communities of Change.” Please leave a review wherever you listen to your podcasts! Get 3 months of GUSTO free when you run your first payroll, at Gusto.com/hci Check out the HCI Academy: Courses, Micro-Credentials, and Certificates to Upskill and Reskill for the Future of Work! Check out the LinkedIn Alchemizing Human Capital Newsletter. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Future Leader. Check out Dr. Westover's book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine. Ranked #5 Workplace Podcast Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast Ranked #7 HR Podcast Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts Each HCI Podcast episode (Program, ID No. 592296) has been approved for 0.50 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR™, aPHRi™, PHR®, PHRca®, SPHR®, GPHR®, PHRi™ and SPHRi™ recertification through HR Certification Institute® (HRCI®). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Balancing Act with Dr. Andrew Temte
”Nobody Wants to Work Anymore,” Part 3 (feat. Jared Lindzon)

The Balancing Act with Dr. Andrew Temte

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 31:09


Future of work thought leader, public speaker, and journalist Jared Lindzon joins us for part 3 of our miniseries entitled "Nobody Wants to Work Anymore," a continuing exploration of new attitudes toward work and the challenges surrounding today's labor markets. Jared's insights have been published in numerous publications including Fast Company, Toronto's The Globe and Mail, Time Magazine, the BBC, the New York Times, and many others.

Peggy Smedley Show
Textiles Go Circular

Peggy Smedley Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 14:27


Only about 15% of used clothes and other textiles in the United States get reused or recycle. The rest head straight to the landfill or incinerator. Peggy talks about how to address this, citing research in a new report about how to facilitate a circular economy for textiles. She also discusses: The biggest hurdles facing the textile industry. What can be done to address these hurdles. Actions that businesses can take now to move to a more circular economy. peggysmedleyshow.com  (5/17/22 - 771) IoT, Internet of Things, Peggy Smedley, artificial intelligence, machine learning, big data, digital transformation, cybersecurity, blockchain, 5G, cloud, sustainability, future of work, podcast This episode is available on all major streaming platforms. If you enjoyed this segment, please consider leaving a review on Apple Podcasts.

Peggy Smedley Show
The Cost of Building Decarbonization

Peggy Smedley Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 27:27


Peggy and Kim Cheslak, director of codes, New Buildings Institute, discuss a new study on building decarbonization. She says one of the primary questions is: what does it cost? Thus, it went into the study with two primary goals: to confirm or disprove the theory that electrifying buildings saves or costs homeowners or building owners money over time and to also look at the societal benefits of electrifying buildings. They also discuss: If an all-electric building is less expensive to build, own, and operate. If there are concerns about the grid and variability across the country. How building codes intersect. newbuildings.org  (5/17/22 - 771) IoT, Internet of Things, Peggy Smedley, artificial intelligence, machine learning, big data, digital transformation, cybersecurity, blockchain, 5G, cloud, sustainability, future of work, podcast, Kim Cheslak, New Buildings Institute This episode is available on all major streaming platforms. If you enjoyed this segment, please consider leaving a review on Apple Podcasts.

Peggy Smedley Show
Adaptable

Peggy Smedley Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 15:41


Peggy and Alexa Carlin, Women Empower X, talk about her new book Adaptable. She says she has gone through a number of challenges that are very related in the sense that we all go through so many challenges—and there is a time where we can either let our obstacles stop us or fuel us forward. They also discuss: How to show other women that they can do it. How to share obstacles and have the courage to do so. The importance of showing others that we are not alone. alexacarlin.com (5/17/22 - 771) IoT, Internet of Things, Peggy Smedley, artificial intelligence, machine learning, big data, digital transformation, cybersecurity, blockchain, 5G, cloud, sustainability, future of work, podcast, Alexa Carlin, Women Empower X This episode is available on all major streaming platforms. If you enjoyed this segment, please consider leaving a review on Apple Podcasts.

Federal Newscast
Agencies may need to change to adapt to post-COVID workplaces

Federal Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 9:01


CIO Classified
Defining Data Intensity and How to Apply It with Jay Upchurch, EVP and CIO at SAS, and Oliver Schabenberger, Chief Innovation Officer at SingleStore

CIO Classified

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 37:49


Data is everywhere, in everything, but how do you know if your company is optimized for a data-driven future? A new term is emerging that might be the best way to tell: data intensity. You'll hear from Jay Upchurch, EVP and CIO at SAS, and Oliver Schabenberger, Chief Innovation Officer at SingleStore, as they define data intensity, share advice to improve data literacy, and discuss why curiosity is key for innovation, employee retention, and more.---------Quotes“I think to the traditionalist…the idea of citizen ‘anything' scares them, you know? It's just different. I think that's where companies, especially modern companies, lean into that uncomfortableness. They lean into it for scale and how to grow. They lean into it for curiosity. When you shy away from the idea of enabling the citizens, then that means you're not feeding fuel to the curiosity that propels us forward.” - Jay Upchurch, EVP and CIO, SAS“Data intensity is a manifestation of tech intensity. We ask ourselves, ‘What data resources do we have? What data resources do we need to become more data-driven, and what can we build with it?' It's recognizing that data intensity is increasing everywhere, and that is a good thing. There's more data and we have more uses for data. You want to go from a more descriptive, backward-looking, historical-looking approach to data to a more forward-looking, predictive approach.” - Oliver Schabenberger, Chief Innovation Officer, SingleStore---------Time Stamps:* (1:47) Meet Oliver & Jay, and learn about SAS and SingleStore* (6:45) What is data intensity? * (12:12) Why data intensity can become the new KPI * (15:03) Are CIOs responsible for employees' data literacy?* (22:36) How promoting curiosity can help employee retention * (26:42) What managers can do to improve the employee experience * (29:27) Secrets more CIOs should know * (32:50) Oliver and Jay ask each other questions--------SponsorThis podcast is brought to you by Asana. Asana is a leading work management platform that empowers teams to orchestrate their work — from daily tasks to big strategic initiatives — all in one place. By enabling the world's teams to work together effortlessly, Asana helps organizations of all sizes and industries achieve their goals, faster. Learn more at Asana.com.--------LinksConnect with Jay on LinkedInConnect with Oliver on LinkedInLearn more about SASLearn more about the SingleStore

HR Leaders
You Can Change Other People: Four Steps to help the People Around you make Positive Change

HR Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 39:52


In this episode of the HR Leaders podcast, I'm joined by my guest, Howie Jacobson, Executive Coach, Author, ultimate Frisbee Player, Behaviour Nerd and host of the Plant Yourself Podcast.Howie is co-author, with Peter Bregman, of You Can Change Other People, and the author of Google AdWords For Dummies. Also, with Peter Bregman, he is co-author of the Coaching for Performance chapter in the AMA's Certified Professional in Management Body of Knowledge series. His writings have also appeared in Fast Company, Harvard Business Review, CNN, and Market Watch. We discuss: Body Language Secrets To Win More NegotiationsThis episode of the HR Leaders Podcast is brought to you by AceUpIf there's a lesson in everything, what did the pandemic teach us about work, leadership, and the role coaching can play in our future? Download the report to access a collection of highlights to help you shape a post-pandemic workplace that works for everyone: https://bit.ly/381qQF5

People Problems
046 - All the Feels

People Problems

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 63:39


We're joined by Mollie West Duffy (of Liz + Mollie) to talk about their new book 'Big Feelings' out now!... We discuss Mollie's shockingly new and helpful insights on the overly discussed topic of burnout, the role of emotions in work and the workplace, and how to generally be ok when things are not so ok. This ep is a sort of proverbial tonic for your sore, aching soul; drink up! * Want to connect with Mollie? Check out their book and website: lizandmollie.com or follow on Instagram at @lizandmollie * Brought to you by www.inkdstores.com - free corporate webstores. Mentioned People Problems for a 20% discount off any swag order and build your custom company swag store for free today! * Your tribe of People peers awaits you in 2022... Yes, you'll learn things, and yes, you'll earn professional credentials... but it won't be boring. We promise. Listeners receive 20% off with code 'PPLProblems20' for your first two years of membership at The People Ops Society!

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S36E4 - The Importance of Executive Presence and Overcoming Presentation Panic, with Ted May

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 46:47


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover talks with Ted May about the importance of executive presence and overcoming presentation panic. See the video here: https://youtu.be/NlxdkRi0k1A. Ted May (https://www.linkedin.com/in/ted-may-a6b0166/) specializes in Executive Presence and Presentation development. He is an Affiliated Faculty member in three Master's degree programs at George Mason University's graduate business school, leads workshops on Stage Presence for Executives at the Studio Acting Conservatory, and has corporate and individual clients as a consultant. He is the author of Presentation Panic: how to deliver a successful business presentation. Please leave a review wherever you listen to your podcasts! Get 3 months of GUSTO free when you run your first payroll, at Gusto.com/hci Check out the HCI Academy: Courses, Micro-Credentials, and Certificates to Upskill and Reskill for the Future of Work! Check out the LinkedIn Alchemizing Human Capital Newsletter. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Future Leader. Check out Dr. Westover's book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine. Ranked #5 Workplace Podcast Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast Ranked #7 HR Podcast Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts Each HCI Podcast episode (Program, ID No. 592296) has been approved for 0.50 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR™, aPHRi™, PHR®, PHRca®, SPHR®, GPHR®, PHRi™ and SPHRi™ recertification through HR Certification Institute® (HRCI®). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Snacks Daily

Casper. Allbirds. Warby Parker. The Millennial-infused Direct-to-Consumer unicorns you love are injured, so they're going indirect. Uber just unveiled its newest updates — they all seem focused on optimizing your bachelorette party. And Google just built a new campus that includes their own hotel, but even they have no clue what the future of work looks like.  $UBER $WRBY $BIRD $GOOG Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, and Tiktok: @tboypod And now watch us on Youtube Want a Shoutout on the pod? Fill out this form Got the Best Fact Yet? We got a form for that too Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Future of Work With Jacob Morgan
Stop Calling Them "Soft Skills"

The Future of Work With Jacob Morgan

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 4:35


I never liked the phrase soft skills. To me, it implies that things like communication, empathy, self awareness, and emotional intelligence are less valuable and less tangible than things like reading, math, and science. Many leaders and HR professionals actually agree that soft skills are more important now than these traditional hard skills. It's these human soft skills that ultimately distinguish us from machines. AI is already augmenting human decision making. It's out thinking, out maneuvering, out strategizing and outperforming us in many capacities. But not when it comes to the skills that make us who we are as human beings. It's because of these “soft skills” that we were still able to bring in new customers and close deals. We were still able to support and help each other. And create customer and employee experiences that matter. So let's call them what they really are, not soft skills, but skills. Let's recognize how crucial and invaluable they truly are for our personal and professional success. --------------------- This episode is sponsored by SAP Concur. Integrate travel, expense, and invoice processes into one seamless, connected platform, for complete visibility into employee spend. Learn more at www.concur.com. --------------------- The #1 challenge for organizations right now is how to attract and retain talent. Organizations are stuck in old ways of thinking about work and they are struggling! In my new PDF, I outline 7 ways the workforce is changing and what you and your organization need to do to adapt. The Great Resignation is The Great Opportunity if you are willing to take action! Click here to download the PDF. --------------------- Get the latest insights on the Future of Work, Leadership and employee experience through my daily newsletter at futureofworknewsletter.com  Let's connect on social! Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/jacobmorgan8 Instagram: https://instagram.com/jacobmorgan8 Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jacobm Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FuturistJacob

Asian Hustle Network
Emma Hong Guo // S2 Ep 150 // Growing and Navigating Offsyte During the Pandemic

Asian Hustle Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 36:35


Welcome back to Season 2, Episode 150 of the Asian Hustle Network Podcast! We are very excited to have Emma Hong Guo on this week's show. We interview Asian entrepreneurs around the world to amplify their voices and empower Asians to pursue their dreams and goals. We believe that each person has a message and a unique story from their entrepreneurial journey that they can share with all of us. Check us out on Anchor, iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play Music, TuneIn, Spotify, and more. If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and leave us a positive 5-star review. This is our opportunity to use the voices of the Asian community and share these incredible stories with the world. We release a new episode every Wednesday and Saturday, so stay tuned! Emma Guo is the co-founder and CEO of Offsyte (www.offsyte.co), the one-stop-shop for discovering and booking amazing team-building events, anything from magic shows to boba-making classes, graffiti workshops, and more. Emma received her master's degree in Technology from Carnegie Mellon University, after graduating from Fudan University in Electrical Engineering. Before starting Offsyte, she worked as a Software Engineer and then Engineering Manager at several tech companies in the SF Bay Area, most recently at Lyft where she was managing an engineering team focusing on driver quality. She launched Offsyte in 2020 with a mission of shaping the world's transition to the future of work, and helping teams all over the world stay connected and engaged. To stay connected within the AHN community, please join our AHN directory: bit.ly/AHNDirectory --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/asianhustlenetwork/support

Modern Mantra Podcast
The Role of Spirituality in the Future of Work

Modern Mantra Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 63:39


In this episode, Nick and Elijah talk about the role of spirituality in the future of work and different principles for operating a high-vibe organization. Some of the topics that they speak to are:What does a “spiritually motivated” company translate toThe real presence of a company and its impact in the collective consciousnessHow does a “spiritually motivated” company conduct businessThe Modern Mantra way of doing businessOur continuous iteration as individuals and as an entityA better filter than placing the focus on a specific topic or product that we touchHaving other sources of information from other realms that we can pull fromThe similarities of how technology moves information and how we move energy in the spiritual realmThe beautifully constructed pieces of technology in non-physical realmThe next iterations of technology and augmented realityUse cases for these technology in terms of environmental healingWhat happens if all scare resources gets measurable by technologyThe narrative of environmental degradation and crypto

WorkLab
Microsoft's Vetri Vellore on how to help employees see their impact

WorkLab

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 14:58


What motivates people to do their best work? It helps to understand how their contributions fit into their organizations' greater goals or purpose. Vetri Vellore, a Microsoft corporate vice president, explains how objectives and key results, or OKRs, can help forge that sense of connection—especially in hybrid work.    WorkLab Episode link WorkLab Microsoft 365 blog post Microsoft Viva goals

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
1979: SAP SuccessFactors - Workforce Psychology and HR Technology

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 44:18


In today's episode of Tech Talks Daily, Dr. Steven Hunt, Chief Expert, Technology & Work at SAP, joins me in a conversation about Workforce Psychology, HR Technology & Business Strategy. Steven shares his origin story, and we discuss how technology is influencing the way we work and how this has evolved over the last few years. Shifting demographics combined with the digitalization of all aspects of life are transforming the nature of work. This is forcing companies to rethink how they design jobs and recruit, develop, and engage employees. In Talent Tectonics: Navigating Global Workforce Shifts, Building Resilient Organizations, and Reimagining the Employee Experience, Steven Hunt explains how technology is changing the purpose of work and why creating effective employee experiences is critical to building organizations that can thrive in a world of accelerating change and growing skill shortages. I learn more about how a technology company like SAP embraces this area of focus and how it impacts new software solutions being developed. We also explore the role of technology in all of this and what tools are critical in this future of work evolution. About Steven A recognized expert on strategic human resources (HR), Dr. Hunt has had a pivotal role in developing systems that have improved productivity and engagement of millions of employees working for hundreds of companies around the globe. A well-known speaker, author, and thought leader on strategic human resources, Dr. Hunt has written over 100 articles, published two books, and supported strategic HR efforts working with companies across five continents. Dr. Hunt holds a Ph.D. in industrial-organizational psychology from The Ohio State University, a B.A. in applied mathematics and psychology from the University of California, San Diego, and certification as a Strategic Professional of Human Resources (SPHR) from the Society of Human Resource Management. He has experience as an advisory board member for the Society of Human Resource Management, the Workforce Institute, the Journal of Management, and other talent management organizations. Prior to joining SuccessFactors, Dr. Hunt held positions with Kronos Talent Management Division, Starbucks Coffee Corporation, SHL Inc., Personnel Decisions International, and the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories. Find out more information on today's conversation at http://talenttectonics.com/

What's Left?
The Work of the Internet (w/ Justin E.H. Smith)

What's Left?

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 76:10


In this wide-ranging discussion, Oliver talks to philosophy and history professor Justin E.H. Smith about his new book The Internet is Not What You Think It Is. Suggested Reading Smith, "It's All Over," https://thepointmag.com/examined-life/its-all-over/ "It's All Just Beginning," https://thepointmag.com/examined-life/its-all-just-beginning/ "The Internet Is Not as New as You Think," https://www.wired.com/story/the-internet-is-not-as-new-as-you-think/ "Working Arrangement," https://www.laphamsquarterly.org/family/working-arrangement "Meritocracy and the Future of Work," https://www.newstatesman.com/ideas/2021/04/meritocracy-and-future-work Justin E.H. Smith's substack: https://justinehsmith.substack.com/

Sync
88 - Documentation is Vital but Not Fun...Scribe Creates Instant Visual Guides with CEO Jennifer Smith

Sync

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 45:53


As remote work continues to explode, we have a variety of tools, and our team members are spread out around timezones, capturing processes and knowledge has never been more important.Unfortunately, this aspect of most organizations is either nonexistent or completely lacking. Knowledge is often trapped inside people, buildings, as well as real-time communication channels like messaging and video calls.Scribe wants to change that with instant visual guides to create effortless, visual step-by-step how to guides.In today's conversation with CEO Jennifer Smith, we discuss why companies often fail with creating documentation, where Scribe fits in the landscape of today's tools, how Scribe's customers use the tools to create amazing, visual how-to guides, and it's new feature called Pages.Watch the video version of this episode.Scribe Scribe website Scribe on LinkedIn Jennifer on LinkedIn Follow free remote work guides @kenyarmosh /in/kenyarmosh kenyarmosh.com

Business Second Opinion
S5 Ep188: Work Design for Development

Business Second Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 38:45


Once in a while, we see new ideas about the Future of Work and how to design work. Most designs are moving from traditional command and control to a Do less Harm paradigm and making it a better place to work. e.g. get rid of supervisors. It is rare to have articles or ideas on learning as a result of work Design in the Do Good Paradigm. Carol's third book, The Regenerative Business: Redesign Work, Cultivate Human Potential, Achieve Extraordinary Outcomes offers better path. So, prepare yourself to question all your good deeds again.

Slate Daily Feed
Better Life Lab: Is America Ready for a Guaranteed Basic Income?

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 36:36


Michael Tubbs grew up in poverty. And when, at 26, he was elected mayor of his hometown, he decided to do something about it. And what he did in Stockton, California, no American mayor had done before. He started giving poor people cash. No strings attached. Stockton's pilot program in Guaranteed Basic Income started lifting people out of poverty. It gave parents more time with their kids. And it was actually cost-effective. So as we look to the Future of Work and Wellbeing, could Guaranteed Basic Income programs play a central role in lifting all of us up — and boosting the standard of life for all Americans? Guests Michael Tubbs, elected mayor of Stockton, California in 2016 at the age of 26 — the youngest mayor in the country. He is known nationally for establishing the first city-led Guaranteed Basic Income program in America, which has inspired dozens of other cities across the country to try similar programs. Having lost his re-election bid in 2020, Tubbs recently founded the nonprofit End Poverty in California. Natalie Foster, co-founder, co-director Economic Security Project, which worked closely with Tubbs on Stockton's Guaranteed Basic Income program John Summers, participant in pilot guaranteed basic income program Cambridge RISE in Massachusetts. Resources Stockton's Basic Income Experiment Paid Off, Annie Lowrey, The Atlantic The Potential for a Guaranteed Income: A Conversation with Four Mayors, New America California, 2021. The Future of Leisure, Stuart Whatley, Democracy Journal, 2012 The Evolving Concept of Time for Work, Leisure, Pew Research, 2008 Less Work and More Leisure: Utopian Visions and the Future of Work, CBC Radio, 2018 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Better Life Lab | The Art and Science of Living a Full and Healthy Life

Being unemployed in the United States is bad for you.  It's bad for your mental, physical and emotional health. Bad for your family stability. Bad for your ability to survive.  It's just bad news, period. The research shows that 83 percent of laid-off workers develop a serious stress-related condition. And as we look at the future of work, that's a problem for the American economy. Because one of the big questions about the American workplace is:What if, in the a future, we actually have less work … and more unemployment? Guests Kiarica Shields, hospice nurse in Georgia who lost her job early in the pandemic, and eventually lost her home and her car. Her unemployment insurance stopped inexplicably, and after she her appeal, she was told she was ineligible for coverage because she worked a single day on another job.  Mark Attico  - furloughed at the start of the pandemic in his job planning business travel. Was on unemployment for months, and with the pandemic supplement his income was actually enough to pay his bills, and gave him time to reconnect with his teenage son - and hold out for a better job that fit his skills and paid well. Dorian Warren, co-president of Community Change. Sarah Damaske, author of The Tolls of Uncertainty: How Privilege and the Guilt Gap Shape Unemployment in America. Resources Reforming Unemployment Insurance: Stabilizing a system in crisis and laying the foundation for equity, A joint project of Center for American Progress, Center for Popular Democracy, Economic Policy Institute, Groundwork Collaborative, National Employment Law Project, National Women's Law Center, and Washington Center for Equitable Growth, June, 2021 A Playbook for Improving Unemployment Insurance Delivery, New America New Practice Lab, 2021 A Plan to Reform the Unemployment Insurance System in the United States, Arindrajit Dube, The Hamilton Project, April 2021  How Does Employment, or Unemployment, Affect Health, RWJF, 2013  Single transitions and persistence of unemployment are associated with poor health outcomes, Herber et al, 2019 The Toll of job loss, Stephanie Pappas, American Psychological Association, 2020

FUTUREPROOF.
The Future of Work (ft. Future Forum)

FUTUREPROOF.

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 33:08


Future Forum is a consortium launched by Slack focused on building a way of working that is flexible, inclusive, and connected. They conduct research and convene executives to design a people-centered and digital-first workplace. You might be familiar with their quarterly Future Forum Pulse survey of 10,000+ knowledge workers around the globe. They also produce playbooks to help decision-makers tackle real-world challenges like how to measure the success of digital-first teams, how to make hybrid work work, and how to build for diversity, equity, and inclusionToday we have the Future Forum's leadership in the house: Brian Elliott, Sheela Subramanian, and Helen Kupp.  They're here to discuss, among other things, their new book: “How the Future Works” —which was such an audacious title, it intrigued the heck out of me, and having read an advance copy, I'm happy to say it delivers. 

Inside Outside
Creativity's Obstacles & Opportunities with Monica Kang, Founder & CEO of Innovators Box & Author of Rethink Creativity

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 21:27


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Monica Kang, Founder and CEO of InnovatorsBox and Author of Rethink Creativity. Monica and I talk about some of the obstacles and opportunities around creativity. And how individuals and companies can benefit from enhancing their curiosity, creativity, and courage. Let's get started.Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help the new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started.Interview Transcript with Monica Kang, Founder and CEO of InnovatorsBox and Author of Rethink CreativityBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing guest. Today we have Monica Kang. She is Founder and CEO of InnovatorsBox and Author of Rethink Creativity. And also has a children's book called Have You Seen My Friends? So welcome to the show Monica.Monica Kang: Thank you for having me. Brian Ardinger: One of the things that we do in our Inside Outside community is ask our audience out there, who should we be talking to? And what are some of the interesting things that you're seeing out there? And somebody said, hey, you should talk to Monica. I think the first question I want to ask is probably a softball for you, but why does creativity matter. And why does it matter more today than ever before?Monica Kang: I'll start with maybe the notion of, I feel creativity is one of the words that we don't realize how much of a jargon it is. Because we use it so much. We say like, oh, you're creative. You're not creative. Or like, that was creative. That was innovative. We put in our marketing materials. We put in our campaigns. We put it in how we describe things.But if you really break it down, like, do people really understand or live the value that what it is. I think that was part of the reason why when you go back to why it's so important to talk about this is actually because of that. Because we use it all the time, but so many people don't realize the root and the nuances. And hence, don't realize this is jargon, that we're just keep throwing it around without the full intention. And so, I first fell into it because of that very situation. I was originally in nuclear weapons security. Government work. Wanted to be a diplomat all my life. That having grown up in DC and in the States, as well as in Korea and worked in Europe. And, you know, hey, I'm not comfortable with science and math. So, this sounds like the perfect path. And like, I love people and building relations. And so, I was good with a lot of things, but like creativity, wasn't really a thing that I would describe I was good at. Even though now looking back, I realize I had. And only until when I find myself really getting depressed and stuck in a dream job where I realized that I was finding myself literally crying to work, feeling upset, not knowing what to do in a job that I fell in love with. And I'm like, what is wrong with me? Like I'm solving a very important mission. Mission-driven. Preventing bad guys from having nuclear weapons. We're working in the government. It's really hard to get into this industry too. And yet feeling stuck. And what helped me gave the courage of, you know, walking to work instead of taking the bus to work. Getting curious about all these different surroundings. And realizing how one life decision can make a huge difference. Because now I felt so curious in the office got even more energetic. Even though the work description hasn't changed at all. It got me curious about understanding about, well, what happened. And people did ask me like Monica, whatever you're doing, you seem happier. And that's where I realized creativity was one of the key elements.I didn't know back then, but it was the mindset of simply doing something different. Finding the courage to take different things. Try different things. Ask different questions. Even organizing my process of the project differently because as I looked at the traffic in the fourth street every day, I'm like am I creating traffic in the way I do things unconsciously. Just like how there's always traffic here. Like at this time? What do I need to do differently? And getting curious about it. And that's where I learned that comment that I started the beginning. That question of creativity, innovation. There's so much history and research behind it. That I had no idea. And because we throw around the word and use it so much, that I misunderstood what it meant.And I didn't know that it was for everyone. I didn't know that something that we can all do more. And regardless of where we are, it expressed differently. And I think it's even more needed now because of the pandemic. Brian Ardinger: Oftentimes I think the perception of creativity is it's some kind of magic. Or it's something that other people do. Or, you know, some, other people can possess that, but I can't do that. So, this idea of creativity not being magic. That being every day and available to anybody to possess or use, talk about how you identified that little nugget and what are some of the tactical things that you do to bring out that magic. Monica Kang: So, I love that you said it. Because immediately one book that I'm remembering, it's about daily habits. And I was mindful because I'm like, wow. So, all these creative, innovative historical people around the world, like they had to work hard to be a better writer. What, like, they didn't just magically write that book. And like became a best seller. And like, no, they had to write every day. The musicians had to write music every day. And I'm like, wait, if that's how it is.Like I wonder in the traditional non art industry, how they do creative. Of course, same thing. I think of new ideas every day. They had to try new things every day. Get rejected every day. And I'm like, oh my gosh. I mean, even the story of how WD40 product came about. Are you familiar with the WD40 products? So, it's that spray, right. You know why that name is called WD40. Brian Ardinger: I do not. Monica Kang: The reason why they named WD40 for that product was not a coincidence. It means water displacement, right? 40. Which indicates that it took 40 times to perfect that formula. Brian Ardinger: Ah. I hadn't heard that story. Monica Kang: How often are we willing to try 40 times. Hear 40 nos. Before we get to that yes. Not a lot. And I think that brings a weight. Hence to that question of what can we do every day, is that it's building the routine. As I learned about these daily routines of all these famous people of what they've had to do every day. Learning about stories like WD40, that how many attempts that people had to try.And my day-to-day activity, that means that I need to just make it a routine of constant learning and trying new things. And so, one activity I always share as a recommendation is like, what's a five minute time that you can always block to do something different. Or to do something intentionally differently.So maybe it's that, okay, if you always commute somewhere, could you try a different commute, maybe at least two or three times when you're not in a rush hour. Maybe you take a different path. Maybe it's that you take the same commute, but you'll listen to different music. Or maybe you'll listen to different podcasts. Maybe you're going to listen to this one time and then another podcast. Maybe it's that you actually take a silent ride sometimes. Just like Pink. Even though that looks like a naive, like how is that going to make me more creative? By making that simple decision, you're letting your mind wander in different ways. And explore different things. Which gets into the practice of thinking differently. Which is the essence of creativity to get to innovation and all these new ideas.So, to get to that WD40 product, they probably had to do a lot of that, somewhat unorthodox, like somewhat unexpected things that led to that 40th idea and innovation. And so, the key of those different elements is that you have to make it a habit. And it has to also be celebrated and enjoyable, but that's why I shared the tip with like, find a routine in your day.That you can do easily. That it doesn't feel like I don't have time to do that. I don't have time. Think about your exercise. Think about your sleep hours. Hopefully everyone's sleeping well. Sleep routine, like things. When it's built-in routine, it's a little bit easier, but then you can commit and see the change over time.Brian Ardinger: I use a similar technique called Scheduling Your Senses. So, each week you think about what sense do I want to focus on? So, this week I'm going to focus on taste. And I'm going to really focus, you know, a particular time period on what I'm tasting. How does that make me feel? And so, each week you pick a different sense that you want to do, and, you know, it comes down to, like you said, changing your environment. And getting you out of the normal rut that you have. You mentioned one of the obstacles to creativity is this idea of fear. And you know, when you think about WD40, having to try 40 times. You know, I'm sure they didn't go into it saying, hey, we're going to fail 40 times. Or going in with the mindset of I'm scared that I'm going to have to try this 40 different times to get to a solution. Talk about fear and the role of creativity. And how we can overcome that fear. Because I think that's one of the major barriers to creativity. Monica Kang: I think fear is unavoidable. But I think some of the mis-notion we have is that everything always has to be fearful. And I think that's where we miss the chance to celebrate what that growth stage looks like.The act of doing something different, sometimes doesn't always have to be fearful. Me listening to a different podcast, not a fearful thing. But I'm learning new insights. Me focusing on different senses might not be fearful. As it gets to certain decision-making of like, oh, because now I focused on the taste, I realized the way we're cooking right now in this kitchen is actually not good.And I need to tell my boss about it. If the customers are unhappy. That's where the fear encourages decision is. And so, I think when we asked that question, I think we see innovation, creativity in this box of like, okay, we got to think of this new idea, and we have to present it. But actually, even before we get to that stage of fear, there's all these other elements that we built resilience and skills of thinking differently that got us there.And so, the tip that I often share is like first recognize that being creative is you got to pass the fear bridge. But when you're there, remember that, hey actually even the parts to get there, there was a lot of courage into that. And you might not have realized. It might just not have looked as scary as that bridge you're about to cross, that looks really scary. But it wasn't as easy as you thought. And actually, that street that you look back, if you turn around and literally look back at those moments, that became not as scary, because you actually built resilience. There's hemisphere of how much you can experiment has grown so much that it becomes less scary. And in fact, when you cross this bridge, now I'm going to have to tell my chef and my boss about this big, scary decision. Now, the next time you need to do that, it's no longer being as scary. So, our horizon of what we feel we can continue to do will change and evolve, which I think is the part that is so fun to realize that creativity innovation mindset, just like our physical health and muscle is not a static thing. It's going to continue to evolve. Right. Just because I exercise every day, doesn't mean that I'm healthy and I'm done. I can be even healthier. I can be more cautious and same thing with my creative thinking muscle. And think those are the nuances that we miss. Brian Ardinger: I like where you're going. You know, it's almost about how do you reframe the journey from if you think about a particular project and you think about this big project is going to make or break my career. Versus approaching it from the standpoint of like, hey, I'm going to try and experiment. Or I'm going to do this side project. And positioning it in such a way that it frames it differently so that the things that you do learn and that when you do fall down, which are inevitably going to happen. It changes the way you perceive that falling down as part of the journey rather than the journey and the outcome of the journey. Monica Kang: And one thing, Brian, if I can piggyback on that. I share this actually my book Rethink Creativity as well. That, you know, the thousand shades of fear, because one thing that I think is also key is just because I might not be scared of a certain decision, does that mean another person will feel the same way. And I think that's what's actually part of the fear. We need to talk more. And especially as leaders, many of those who's probably listening. You might actually already be here and listening to this episode because you're already pre actually pretty good with it. You're like, no, I've got a good handle of fear. What might be actually harder is actually encouraging your different people. Encouraging your different colleagues. Noticing that like wait, checking ourselves to let when that person says that that's a scary decision, am I actually empathizing and sitting with them. Or coming from the nose up and say, look, yeah, no, don't worry friend. You're going to be fine. That's not scary. And amplifying actually how we feel. And so, fear comes in different shapes, sizes, different times. Actually, the very thing that I might not be scared with one person could be the very thing I'm scared with another person or in another situation. And so it's ever changing.And so, by us having aware. Having fear simply means that we have the alertness. There's a reason why as human beings, we survive, right? We were fearful of the weather conditions. The animals attacking us. Got to protect ourselves. That's actually how we were able to thrive and still exist as an, you know, a being. So, fear isn't just always a bad thing. It's helping try to kick in to protect you. So, look out for these different cues. And I think especially as leaders, it's so key that we don't just simplify. Get rid of your fear. And like stop being fearful. Can we take the time to process it? We need to actually acknowledge all of that and actually ourselves too. Brian Ardinger: So, let's dig into that a little bit, you know. How do you design this creative workplace or workplace for all? You know, how does diversity affect creativity and how are you seeing some companies tackling that problem from an organizational perspective versus the individual perspective?Monica Kang: Well, let's first start with diversity. I think I'm really excited about going back to your very first question. Why so timely to be more creative. And I think the time is even better. We are now seeing more research. People are more aware. People want to learn. More honestly, as somebody who's specializing creative workplace building, it is an exciting time because more people are wanting to have those conversations and say help. I do want to do this. I don't know how. And so, I want to know that this is really timely because no matter what stage you are as a leader, wanting to do this. That you making a commitment and taking one step at a time is part of the thing that will help change the company. So even if that simple decision is that we're going to start doing some one-on-ones. Or we're going to start doing some team building activities at the very beginning and check-in. Actually, that might be the change in itself. That might actually be the kind of activity that your people are missing to feel the courage, to speak up. To feel psychological safety. Which is very key to ignite and creativity and opening up people's mind and feeling that what they can bring up. But if I come into the meeting room and I feel like, okay, Brian's going to be a little upset if I bring this up. Then it's one idea that I don't share. It's one problem. And Brian might be like, well, Monica might frown next time I share this, and he doesn't share one thing. Guess what? We're going to actually see, not only business consequences, but a lot of people, of course, who's going to be impacted because we stopped sharing.And so even that simple decision of like opening up could feel simple. Everyone is testing out right now. So, this good time, this is another example of the fear stopping you. Start with what you're comfortable with, which might be that simply, maybe let's read this article and talk about it. Or, hey, I learned this cool thing from this podcast that Brian and Monica were talking about. I'm inspired. Let's try this out. That could be the starting point. It doesn't always have to be like this big, humongous thing. That's going to lead to culture organization changing. So that's actually the very first tip I share with leaders to make it tangible relatable. And then two, as a result to know that this is a marathon. Yes, we want results as soon as possible for order something. I wanted to get the delivery, right. There was time and effort put in to make that process happen. And I love Simon Sinek's video, where he talks about the intensity versus consistency. He talks about the people development in the workplace. And the beautiful analogy he shares about is our brushing our tooth. If you asked me like, you know, what's the perfect formula to brush the tooth in life versus not to like prevent your mouth from having cavities. Like, I will not know the answer because, you know, maybe I skipped one day. Maybe I skipped three days. Like with that impact, is that the cause like, maybe, but we won't know. But it's the consistent that I brush my teeth every day that I keep my teeth healthy. Same thing on organizations. It's the simple moments of like, let's turn off their phones. Hey, Brian, how are you really doing. Like, oh, Monica actually, this is how I feel now that we've connected. We now open up. You know, Brian, I know we're done with the meeting, but I have this really question I want to ask you. Can I bring this up? I feel would really appreciate cause you just shared about, you know, how you feel. Now, okay. Brian, he's already right now, you're listening, but like he already stood up and like, oh, tell me more Monica. Right? The body language already brings up unconsciously. And I think he shares how it's the consistency that's key. And so again, the second tip I recommend for everyone is that no matter what, or the house solution you have for your culture and people development, the key is the consistency. Not just a one-time retreat of hurray and we're done. But what's the everyday routines that you want to embed.And so, when you even do a retreat or innovation workshop, or you invite a speaker, the question that I hope you always ask yourself, if this is what you're really committing to and what to do, because I know what you do, that's why you're listening to this episode. Think of something that you can do consistently.That is low hanging fruit. That is budget friendly, you know, got to be realistic, right? I'm not saying that you have to spend a lot of money, budget friendly. Implementable as well. And you might be surprised even in that five-minute activity in simply having rows of like no phones in the meeting. Log off. Something like that. So those are kind of tangible places I recommend.Brian Ardinger: That makes great sense. The last topic I want to talk about is the world of work is changing. Obviously. You've been in this space for pre pandemic and now through pandemic. What are some of the trends and things that you're seeing? What are some of the best practices, especially as we kind of move into this new hybrid environment that you're seeing when it comes to creativity.Monica Kang: So many, a particular point I want to highlight is actually generational. And I want to say this because when we see us wanting to express more creatively and we feel we can't. We like to figure out the cost. Right. And our consciousness is that, oh, it's because they're young. Oh, it's because they haven't worked in the company long enough.Oh, it's because they don't get my industry. There's always a, because of. I want to give the courage to recognize that instead of channeling that voice of why don't they get it the way I do. I wonder why they feel that way. I wonder why they say they don't want to get back to the office?I wonder why they say that? I feel fine. I can share all my ideas. I wonder why they say they don't feel comfortable sharing ideas? We got this fancy new office. We're doing all these breakout sessions. Instead of saying like, why are they not. Reframe that to I wonder why. And focus on the lens of listening and wanting to understand.Maybe they're going to share some stuff that you realize, whoa, like we were not ready for it. We don't know how to solve it. And that's okay too. It's not about always needed to have immediately all the answers, but let's problem solve this together. Thank you for sharing that. I had no idea that's how you feel.And part of this is them wanting to be acknowledged or appreciated and heard. And hey, ask them what they think is the best idea. They might actually have a really good idea that we completely missed out. And Brian to your question of what's changing is that more people are wanting to now finally try this. Which has always been important before. But not doing the consequence. Great resignation and even more has been greater. I think it's great that we're finally, hopefully seeing more workplaces where we make this the norm. That, of course we should understand what people want. And of course, this is hard because everyone wants something different. And sometimes we say what we want, but we don't really maybe need it.I might say I want ice cream, but maybe I shouldn't have ice cream today. Cause I already had my chocolate earlier. Right. Like we're people. It's going to be messy. But that's part of the beauty of it. Of feeling like we can bring out all our different insights. And sometimes the choice is that because we feel safe sometimes, I don't want to share out. And might just be like, okay, I just want to do work and that's it.And that's okay too. And I think part of it's like, what's the choice that you're going to make each day as a leader. As a creator. And as an innovator in your workplaces. Even if you're not in leadership for those who's listening like Monica, Brian, that's great, but what if I'm not a leader. You start with setting your boundaries. And where you want to start planting the seeds of where you can do this. So, I hope that gives an encouragement of a starting point. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: This has been fantastic. And I appreciate you giving these tactical tips that anybody within the organization can start making progress when it comes to creativity and innovation. So, I want to thank you for coming on Inside Outside Innovation. If people want to find out more about yourself or your books or your company, what's the best way to do that?Monica Kang: Find me in any of the platforms. I'm on most of the social media platforms, but you know, connect with me on LinkedIn at Monica H Kang. K A N G. And then also follow us at InnovatorsBox. I also recommend the book as well. I think you'll enjoy it. And if you go actually to my book's website, for both of them, we have a lot of free worksheets and tools. Also because of our mission to make creativity, culture, and leadership accessible, we have a lot of free resources and tools. Including some of these topics. So, if you can't find it just simply email me, let me know. And also in some tools in Korean and other languages as well, because we want to make this globally accessible. So, we also make music as well, because not everyone's a reader or workshop person. You can find us at InnovatorsBox studios, where we create music to inspire creativity. Brian Ardinger: Thanks, Monica. I really do appreciate you coming on the show and look forward to continuing the conversation in the years to come.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. 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