Podcasts about designing

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Drafting of a plan or convention for the construction of an object or of a system; process of creation; act of creativity and innovation

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  • Oct 14, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about designing

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Latest podcast episodes about designing

All Crime No Cattle
Ep 92: The Queen of Tejano, Part II

All Crime No Cattle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 96:41


In the second part of this series, we rejoin Selena's story in 1994. We discuss the timeline of her final weeks as well as her killer's trial, dubbed in the media as Texas' "Trial of the Decade."Sources:Colloff, P. (2010, April). Dreaming of Her. Texas Monthly. https://www.texasmonthly.com/arts-entertainment/dreaming-of-her/Falcon, M. (2018, March 29). Everything you need to know about Selena Quintanilla Perez. Corpus Christi Caller-Times. https://www.caller.com/story/entertainment/2018/03/29/facts-selena-quintanilla-perez/461856002/Guerra, J. (2020, March 25). Designing a dream: Martin Gomez says Selena was ‘not of this world.' Preview | Houston Arts & Entertainment Guide. https://preview.houstonchronicle.com/selena/designing-a-dream-martin-gomez-says-selena-was-15154889 Listen to 911 calls made after Selena was shot in Corpus Christi, Texas. (2021, March 31). ABC7 New York. https://abc7ny.com/10462396/Mendoza, M. (2015, March 3). 26 claims you may not know that emerge in the new release of “Selena's Secret.” MySA. https://www.mysanantonio.com/entertainment/arts-culture/books/article/New-edition-of-controversial-book-detailing-6112278.phpOrozco, C. (1996, January 1). Selena Quintanilla Perez (1971-1995). Texas State Historical Association Handbook of Texas. https://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/entries/quintanilla-perez-selena-selenaPatoski, J. N. (1995, May). The Queen Is Dead. Texas Monthly. https://www.texasmonthly.com/articles/the-queen-is-dead/Patoski, J. N. (1995, December). The Sweet Song of Justice. Texas Monthly. https://www.texasmonthly.com/articles/the-sweet-song-of-justice/Perez, C. (2013). To Selena, with Love. Celebra. Quintanilla, A. (2021). A Father's Dream: My Family's Journey in Music. Cafe Con Leche Books. Reinert, P. (1995, October 18). Ranger says police ignored the suicide story. Houston Chronicle.Sabawi, F. (2021, September 14). Chris Perez says he has ‘amicably resolved' yearslong legal battle with Selena's family. KSAT. https://www.ksat.com/news/local/2021/09/14/chris-perez-says-he-has-amicably-resolved-yearslong-legal-battle-with-selenas-family/Selena. (n.d.). Selena Wiki. https://selena.fandom.com/wiki/SelenaValdez, C. (2005). Justice for Selena: The State Versus Yolanda Saldivar. Trafford.Good News Links:Cole, Judy. “Firefighters Finally Reach Deaf Dog Trapped in Storm Drain After 10 Hours of Trying.” Good News Network, September 8, 2021. https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/firefighters-reach-deaf-dog-trapped-in-storm-drain-texas/?fbclid=IwAR1GwbM8TbxYJivqvIj1pmb6cwkNhFTVqhw_cdHK1RsZ0oXCZegOZUeNrTs.Osborne, Ryan. “Watch Texas Firefighters Rescue Deaf Dog from Storm Drain.” WFAA ABC Channel 8, August 22, 2021. https://www.wfaa.com/article/news/local/watch-arlington-texas-firefighters-rescue-a-15-year-old-deaf-dog-from-a-storm-drain/287-ada666bb-011f-40db-8483-50655ae9a0bc.Check out more All Crime No Cattle at our website allcrimenocattle.com.Visit our Patreon page to support the show and earn some awesome rewards: https://patreon.com/allcrimenocattle. Get some ACNC merch: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/all-crime-no-cattle-podcast-shop?ref_id=9435. Find us on Twitter: @ACNCpodcast and on Instagram: @allcrimenocattle. Tip Jar: https://paypal.me/allcrimenocattle.And always remember: crime is bigger in Texas, y'all!

Coach and Coordinator Podcast
Preparing Game Plans, In-Game Communication - Grant Caserta, DC, Illinois Wesleyan

Coach and Coordinator Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 22:16


Today's guest on the Coach and Coordinator podcast is Grant Caserta. Caserta is the defensive coordinator and secondary coach at Illinois Wesleyan. He was a finalist for Football Scoop's Division III Coordinator of the Year following a 2016 season in which his defense held opponents to under 200 yards per game. He dives into designing game plans, prepping scout teams and game day communication. Show notes -Assigning the coaching staff tasks for game-day -Using film throughout the season -Designing practice to look like the game plan -Preparing the scout team to mimic the opponent -How freshmen and JV teams work into the program -Rotating between offense and defense in practice -Staying close to base -How Caserta responds to scripted plays -Procedure for in-game communication -How players communicate during the game -Husson's favorite defensive call -The winning edge Learn Defense: coachtube.com/courses/football/team-defense

Design is Everywhere
Beyond the Word: Designing Type

Design is Everywhere

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 46:42


How does type affect the brand identity? In this week's episode, we learn about the power of typography to transform the voice of a brand. Sam is joined by Blake Goodwin, the Founder and President of Proportion Design, a Boston-based branding agency whose work spans all areas of the built environment, extensive lifestyle and consumer verticals, and a broad range of corporate services. Blake chats about his projects and process. Later on in the show, they are joined by Matteo Bologna, the Principal, Creative Director, and Founder of Mucca Design, an award-winning New York-based branding firm that transforms businesses through uncommon creative solutions. Together they discuss how they incorporate typography in their own brand identity projects and how they discovered their love for type design.   For links to resources we discuss in this episode, visit our show page:  Beyond the Word: Designing Type

Tonebenders Podcast
176 - Recording & Designing Underwater Sounds Roundtable

Tonebenders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 32:14


We are joined by Barry Donelly, Kristen Quinn, Benoît Marsalone and Arnaud Noble to talk about recording and designing sounds for underwater scenes in films and games. We discuss our favourite underwater recording sessions, what works and doesn't work with hydrophones and when it is best to fake it with water sounds recorded with normal microphones. See Show Notes and full Bios at https://tonebenderspodcast.com/176-recording-designing-underwater-sounds-roundtable/

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
Genetics, Obesity, Diabetes, And Risk Of COVID: A Functional Medicine Perspective with Dr. Ronesh Sinha

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 65:41


This episode is brought to you by Kettle & Fire, Beekeeper's Naturals, and Thrive MarketDid you know that 63% of Covid-19 hospitalizations can be linked back to at least one of four pre-existing conditions, all of which are largely preventable through diet and lifestyle choices? Obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and heart failure are strongly linked to more severe Covid outcomes. These cardiometabolic diseases represented a different type of pandemic, long before Covid-19 hit. We can make incredible reductions to our risk of these health problems, and even reverse them, using the power of food. Even people with genetic predispositions can significantly reduce the risk of any of these diagnoses and the Covid consequences that can come with them. Today on The Doctor's Farmacy, I talk to Dr. Ronesh Sinha, author of The South Asian Health Solution. He is an internal medicine physician who runs a lifestyle clinic in Silicon Valley focused on reversing insulin resistance in ethnically diverse patients. He is also an expert in corporate wellness and serves as the Chief Medical Officer for Silicon Valley Employer Forum, where he serves as a global adviser to shape health benefits for over 55 major Silicon Valley companies. This episode is brought to you by Kettle & Fire, Beekeeper's Naturals, and Thrive Market.Right now, you can get 25% off Kettle & Fire bone broth plus free shipping by using the code HYMAN at kettleandfire.com/hyman. Get 20% off your first Beekeeper's Naturals order by visiting beekeepersnaturals.com/HYMAN and entering the code HYMAN at checkout.Thrive Market is offering all Doctor's Farmacy listeners an extra 25% off your first purchase and a free gift when you sign up for Thrive Market. Just head over to thrivemarket.com/Hyman. Here are more of the details from our interview (audio version / Apple Subscriber version): Why South Asians are at uniquely high risk of developing insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (7:19 / 3:46)The dangers of a high starch and sugar vegetarian diet (11:00 / 7:24)Designing a healthy pregnancy (13:41 / 11:00)The importance of muscle in metabolic health and aging (16:59 / 13:38)The dietary framework Dr. Sinha uses with his patients (23:12 / 15:45)Dr. Sinha's approach to understanding cholesterol, metabolic disease, statins, and lipid panels (27:43 / 23:00)Cooking with ghee and coconut oil vs. vegetable and seed oils (36:41 / 31:35)Thinking of Covid-19 as a lifestyle disease (45:35 / 40:25)The link between body fat, diet, and Covid-19 outcomes (47:39 / 42:30)Simple lifestyle changes to reduce your risk of severe outcomes from Covid-19 (49:32 / 45:15) Learn more about Dr. Ronesh Sinha at culturalhealthsolutions.com and check out his new podcast, Meta Health Podcast. Follow Dr. Sinha on Instagram @roneshsinhamd. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast
Designing Industrial Reality in 3D

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 43:28


In episode 51 of the podcast, the topic is: Designing Industrial Reality in 3D. Our guest is Marcelo Coelho (@marcelocoelho), Head of Design at Formlabs and Lecturer at MIT. In this conversation, we talk about the emerging practices of industrial design in additive manufacturing using 3D printing, machine learning and a high degree of customization. After listening to this episode, check out:Formlabs: https://formlabs.com/ Marcelo Coelho: https://cmarcelo.com/Augmented is a podcast for industrial leaders, process engineers and shop floor operators, hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim (@trondau), presented by Tulip, the frontline operations platform, and associated with MFG.works, the industrial upskilling community launched at the World Economic Forum. Augmented--the industry 4.0 podcast.In this conversation, we talked about the emerging practices of industrial design in additive manufacturing. Trond's takeaway: Making products accessible is hard work. Industrial design is not an afterthought. The best companies are getting good at it. Why? Because they are bringing customers closer to them, to learn and explore. In fact, people are potentially getting closer to the making process than ever before. We have the opportunity to literally shape our future, our surroundings, and the things we touch, use, work with and enjoy in our leisure. That's a whole other level of customization. Forget personalization, this is way more than being able to adapt to your personality, it is attuning to your very purpose and context as a situated human being with everchanging resources, needs and interests.Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you liked this episode, you might also like episode 36, Digital Lean, episode 29, The Automated Microfactory or episode 33, Sustainable Manufacturing at Scale. Hopefully, you'll find something awesome in these or other episodes. If so, do let us know by messaging us, we would love to share your thoughts with other listeners. The Augmented podcast is created in association with Tulip, connected frontline operations platform that connects the people, machines, devices, and the systems used in a production or logistics process in a physical location. Tulip is democratizing technology and empowering those closest to operations to solve problems. Tulip is also hiring. You can find Tulip at Tulip.co. Please share this show with colleagues who care about where industry and especially industrial tech is heading. To find us on social media is easy, we are Augmented Pod on LinkedIn and Twitter, and Augmented Podcast on Facebook and YouTube:LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/augmentedpodFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/AugmentedPodcast/Twitter: https://twitter.com/AugmentedPodYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5Y1gz66LxYvjJAMnN_f6PQSee you next time. Augmented--industrial conversations that matter. 

Clever
Ep. 157: Designing for Dramatic Effect with Yasmine Ghoniem

Clever

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 54:12


Interior designer and self-described “cocktail,” Yasmine Ghoniem has lived a whirlwind life across continents, cultures, and careers. Born in Kuwait to Australian and Egyptian parents, she lived throughout the Middle East before moving to the United States to attend Savannah College of Art and Design. She always had a deep love for music, feeling destined to be a performer, she formed indie rock bands with family and friends throughout the years. Yasmine eventually put down roots in Sydney, Australia where she founded and leads YSG Studio, an interior design studio focusing on residential and hospitality. She brings her eclectic influences and flair for the theatrical drama of staging and storytelling to all of her spaces. Intoxicating indeed! Images, links and more from Yasmine!Please say Hi on social! Twitter, Instagram and Facebook - @CleverPodcast, @amydevers, @designmilkIf you enjoy Clever we could use your support! Please consider leaving a review, making a donation, becoming a sponsor, or introducing us to your friends! We love and appreciate you!Clever is hosted by Amy Devers and produced by 2VDE Media, with editing by Rich Stroffolino, production assistance from Ilana Nevins and Anouchka Stephan, and music by El Ten Eleven.Clever is proudly distributed by Design Milk.Clever is a member of the Airwave Media podcast network. Visit airwavemedia.com to discover more great shows. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/clever. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Cardboard Herald
Bruno Cathala on designing during a pandemic, solo gaming & the future of Cyclades - TCbH Interviews

The Cardboard Herald

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 48:19


Talking with one of my favorite designers of all time. I knew that he couldn't share much on Cyclades so I didn't press the issue but I'm glad we got the info we did! 00:00 - Quarantine impact on game design05:52 - Prototyping & adapting to TTS08:56 - Thoughts on Solo Gaming14:34 - Authorial Intent & Fan Variants19:30 - When to bring in other designers23:09 - Trek 1228:11 - Starting a design from theme, mechanism or component29:20 - Competing with yourself?33:47 - New edition of Cyclades39:55 - Kingdomino: Origins43:55 - NicodemusLinks:Our Site - https://www.cardboardherald.comOur Video Channel - https://www.youtube.com/TheCardboardHeraldOur Twitter - https://twitter.com/CardboardHeraldOur Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/user?u=9669551

Powerline Podcast
077 | Simon Levin | Dragon Wear

Powerline Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 48:43


At True North Gear® / Dragon Wear, they know tough tools are essential for tough jobs. And your job is one of the toughest. That's why founder Alyx Fier started building rugged, groundbreaking gear in his garage in 1992. His work began with an idea and a home sewing machine after he learned how fire gear wasn't being designed around the specialised needs of the crews who actually used it. Fier also knew that fit and design issues were causing back problems for wildland firefighters, and he thought he could make a difference with his brand of intelligently-designed packs and gear. That's how the company was born. Nearly three decades later, They've grown into a multi-brand company that distributes ISO 9001 registered products around the world. Even with their growth, they continue to be a family owned company, operated out of Seattle, Washington, and just up the street from that garage where it all began. Throughout the years they've remained focused on their mission of keeping their customers at the center of everything that they do. They regularly ask for and harness user feedback to create brand new designs or improve upon current products. Designing dependable, high-performance gear is the way they support your valuable work in life-risking environments each and every day. I thoroughly enjoyed this conversation and I know you will learn a lot from it.   Discount Promo Starting today thru November 19th get 10% off your first order at DragonWear using promo code DWPODCAST10. Find DragonWear on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn,  and hit that follow.   Powerline Podcast merch www.powerlinepodcast.com *Totally revamped with new gear and free shipping*  

The Driven Chat Podcast
Building Bond Cars, Sculpting Art & Designing Icons with Jean-Vyes Tabourot, Jonny Ambrose & Etienne Salome

The Driven Chat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 86:05


This week the Driven Chat Podcast comes to you from Sleeping With Art - a new event celebrating automotive art! We have three chats for the price of one this week where we talk to three very different artists exhibiting their work at the event. First up is Jean-Yves Tabourot, who is known now as a painter of beautiful and iconic cars but previously was an engineer for Williams Racing, where he was involved in building racing cars and film cars. The significant car he was involved in was the Jaguar CX75 - the villain car in the James Bond Spectre film. Jean-Yves talks about his direct involvement in building the CX75 and how it was used whilst filming Spectre.Our second guest is Jonny Ambrose, an artist and sculptor celebrated for creating some of the most fantastic works of art, showcasing the shapes and forms of some of the most iconic cars and racing cars we all know and love. Jonny talks about his processes, his methods and his journey as an artist. Our third and final guest is Etienne Salome, a car designer responsible for helping create some of the ultimate flagship cars whilst working for Bugatti. Leaving behind the world of EB110's and Veyrons, Etienne now designs yachts and limited production automobiles such as the Arkonic Land Rover Defender 90. Don't forget! You can email the show via podcast@drivenchat.com or DM us on your preferred social media feed (@DrivenChat) to speak to the team! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Teaching Today
Intellectual Student Engagement

Teaching Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 40:16


Dr. Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz returns to share her insight on engaging scholars at all levels. Designing authentic and engaging instruction is challenging, but essential — when done well, intellectual engagement creates a ripple effect that helps develop students' creative and critical thinking skills. How can you capture, retain, and maintain engagement in your classroom?

Counsel to Counsel - Career Advice for Lawyers
Episode 72-Selling a Law Practice With the Law Practice Exchange

Counsel to Counsel - Career Advice for Lawyers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 52:53


In the past year, I've been talking a lot on this show about The Next Stage, my program to help senior lawyers figure out what comes next.  My guests have discussed ways that lawyers can find meaning later in their careers.  One topic that we've addressed is succession planning, or ways that lawyers can ensure that what they have built will live on as they scale back or exit the practice of law. In larger firms, succession planning may mean handing the reins of leadership over time to the next generation and starting a process of transitioning the clients.  For smaller firms, there may not be a deep bench ready to take over.  In those instances, lawyers may simply opt to practice until they are no longer able to because of incapacity or death.  Some lawyers will simply close their doors. But some small firms may choose another option, and that is a sale. In this episode, Tom Lenfenstey discusses selling a law practice.  Tom is a lawyer and CPA in North Carolina who runs the Law Practice Exchange where he helps senior lawyers get value from the enterprise that they have spent a lifetime building.  Tom speaks and writes regularly on the subject and is author of Designing a Succession Plan for Your Law Practice. Additional Resources Succession Planning For Your Career: What Comes Next Episode 67-Retirement By Design (for Lawyers)

Remake
025. Designing for Digital Democracy

Remake

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 83:48


TODAY'S GUEST Pia Mancini is a co-founder and CEO at Open Collective, a chair of the Democracy Earth Foundation, and a democracy activist who helped create the DemocracyOS platform and launched a Net Party in Argentina. Her TED Talk, about upgrading democracy for the internet era, has exceeded a million views and helped reshape the conversation around the meeting place of democracy and the internet. She is a Y Combinator alum, a young global leader at the World Economic Forum, and she's also Roma's mum.   EPISODE SUMMARY In this conversation we talk about: Her journey from empowering citizens in the political process to empowering collectives to self-fund and self-govern Her vision for a more inclusive and expansive digital democracy The tension between idealism and the realities of life, politics, and system We also discuss: How do we, as individuals, create a system and an environment that affects change? How can we use technology to upgrade democracy? How do we trust ourselves and each other? There is no more important discussion, I believe, than how our new technologies should be used and woven into the fabric of our public life. And how to move from chaotic, even destructive populism, to a constructive model of participation and empowerment. My conversation with Pia is one of the most fascinating conversations, in an ongoing series of design conversations we've lined up for you on design for democracy, social change, and positive impact.   TIMESTAMP CHAPTERS [2:48] Life During Covid [10:26] Early Influences [20:54] Upgrading Democracy [30:23] DemocracyOS and Liquid Democracy [38:07] The Dream of a Borderless and Equal World [46:24] Net Party and the Clash with Reality [53:33] Maintaining Hope and Motivation [58:40] Building a New Narrative [1:03:55] A Transition to an Open Collective [1:21:14] A Sermon of Inspiration     EPISODE LINKS Pia's Links

The Brain and Brand Show
The Neuroscience of Designing Happiness

The Brain and Brand Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 17:19


Timothy shares 3 behavioural design ideas, as well as conversations and research with strangers, about what makes them happy.

How You Create
Designing Generative NFT Art with Jeremy Booth

How You Create

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 84:12


Jeremy Booth is a creative illustrator whose work focuses on commercial, editorial, and mural illustrations. His philosophy is to create bold illustrations that communicate well and are hard to forget. He has worked with brands such as Amazon, Slack, Warby Parker, Orange, ADP, Charles Schwab, CNES, Invision, and many more. And now he works full-time as a product illustrator for Coinbase.Most recently, Jeremy has been designing a new generative NFT art project called Bushidos. It is an 8,888 NFT samurai that defends the Ethereum blockchain from centralization and FUD. Jeremy and his team have been an active community and shares his learning from building his own collection and NFT community. The NFTs will be minted in October of 2021. Join their discord community for more information on how to participate –– https://www.bushidos.io

Black & Yellow
Classics: The Bamboo Ceiling

Black & Yellow

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 68:18


Asian Americans are the most represented racial group in white-collar jobs, but not in higher level managerial positions. In this episode, we explore the reason why, and give you ways to break through the bamboo ceiling.Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is:RIFRUF (@rifrufqueens)- Designing driven dog shoes www.rifrufqueens.comPaper Project (@paperproject_ny)- Natural and functional products made with Japanese paper yarn. Anti- Odor, Dry touch, Moisture Wicking www.paper project my.comFind us on Social Media:@blackandyellowpodcastAlana J. Webster: @renegadeoffunKaytie Ohashi : @disvillainsscholar / Podcast: @wwofdisvillainsTikTok: @disvillainsscholarEmail us: podcastblackandyellow@gmail.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

101 Ways To Save The Planet
Saving the Planet by designing better cities (with Alyn Griffiths, author of The Future City)

101 Ways To Save The Planet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 55:21


What might the city of the future look like, and how might it meet the needs of future generations while limiting damage to our planet's fragile ecosystem? This is the central question of a new book by author, journalist and Scotsman, Alan Griffiths. His book is called “The Future City” -  and is an insightful introduction to the most exciting ideas in urban building and development. It highlights 40 revolutionary projects that address crucial issues in design planning for cities of the future. “The Future City” will be available in stores as of Monday, October 11, and is currently available for order online (link below). After hearing our incredibly hopeful conversation today, we're sure you'll be running to pick it up!SHOW NOTES:Where to find AlynWebsite - www.alyngriffiths.comInstagram - www.instagram.com/alyngriffithsThe Future City - https://www.amazon.com/Future-City-Visionary-Architecture-Design/dp/9401478589Other notesSupport New Zealand Indigenous youth leader and activist, India Logan Riley, in ringing Indigenous youth to COP26 by making a PayPal donation to Indigenousyouthcop26@gmail.comShare other projects worthy of listener support by emailing - bonnie@earthregarded.com101 Ways Blog - www.savetheplanetpodcast.com/categories

Design Lab with Bon Ku
EP 44: Designing Stories as a Physician and Screenwriter | Roshan Sethi

Design Lab with Bon Ku

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 32:28


Roshan Sethi is a screenwriter and is a radiation oncologist at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. He graduated from Yale University and Harvard Medical School where he began his screenwriting career. He co-created Fox's The Resident and has written for TV shows including Code Black and Black Box. Recently he wrote and directed 7 Days, a rom-com that was featured this year at the Tribeca Film Festival. Bon and Sethi talk about the parallels between screenwriting and medicine, writing as an act of empathy, and the art of storytelling.

All the Hacks
The Science of Behavior Change with Kristen Berman

All the Hacks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 55:07


Behavioral Scientist Kristen Berman joins Chris to discuss what research shows about why people act so irrationally, how we can actually change our own behaviors, why she thinks habits are overrated, and some great hacks for increasing happiness. Kristen Berman (@bermster) co-founded Irrational Labs  and Common Cents Lab at Duke University, and is a founding team member of Google's behavioral science unit. Kristen also co-authored a series of workbooks called Hacking Human Nature for Good: A practical guide to changing human behavior and is the host of the new podcast: Science of Change.  Full show notes available at: https://www.allthehacks.com/behavior-change-kristen-berman Selected Links From The EpisodeConnect with Kristen Berman: Website | LinkedIn | TwitterKristen's New Podcast: The Science of ChangeIrrational Labs: Website | Newsletter | Online BootcampsRescue Time App: WebsiteHabit Discontinuity theory  How to use other people to achieve your goalsWhy Habits are overratedGet a dog (and why you shouldn't try to create habits)Give yourself a deadline - the deadline made me do it. 3 ways to stress less about moneyCollection of Rule of Thumb research Full Show NotesWho is Kristen Berman? [00:14]What actually influences our decision-making? [01:59]Is efficient decision-making as simple as changing your environment? [3:20]Why saving is NOT a habit. [05:49]Setting up decision days. [09:10]How you can stop procrastinating with your decisions. [10:37]Why online communities focused on money motivate you. [13:25]How you should act when you have a really busy to-do list. [15:21]What voting, flu shots, and your to-do list have in common. [18:39]Why teaching someone something is simply not enough (according to scientific research) [20:10]Setting up systems for your life that suit your personality and your ERRORS. [22:54]How to make committing to working out easier. [28:03]Here's why (and how) you should disrupt your life more often. [30:32]One thing everyone can do to optimize their life experience. [35:44]An easy hack to feel happier almost instantly. [37:47]Why you should get uncomfortably specific about your goal behaviors. [38:52]How to have self control in a world full of impulse triggers. [42:00]Is being aware of your biases enough to change your behavior? [45:11]Why opting out of things can make you happier. [46:38]Designing for peak experiences when you travel.  [48:25]How to have more interesting conversations. [49:56]What is Kristen Berman up to these days? [52:46] Connect with All the HacksAll the Hacks: Newsletter | Website | Facebook | EmailChris Hutchins: Twitter | Instagram | Website | LinkedIn

RUN LIKE CLOCKWORK: SMALL BUSINESS OPERATIONS
128: Breaking the cycle of short term decision making

RUN LIKE CLOCKWORK: SMALL BUSINESS OPERATIONS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 25:25


Over the past several weeks we've talked about common cycles business leaders + team members get stuck in: burnout, hiring + firing, being in motion instead of in action, and now today we're talking about getting stuck in short term ways of thinking.   In this episode of the Run Like Clockwork podcast, Adrienne + Tyler wrap up our Breaking the Cycle series by giving you tools to break the cycle of short term decision making so you can operate your business for long-term success.   Some of the things they cover: How your vision can be an efficiency tool Using financial forecasting for future-focused decision making Breaking the cycle by moving from Doing to Designing   We hope you have enjoyed and found value from the Breaking the Cycle series! You can catch up on past episodes and gain actionable strategies for breaking out of the cycles that so many business leaders and team members get stuck in. There is a better, more efficient way!   If you would like support in moving towards long-term vision + ways of operating, we'd love to work with you! Apply for our Accelerator program. You will also get instant access to a free, private training all about “How to take your 4 week vacation in the next 12 months” which dives deep into how to design your business + team that runs itself.

Startist Society
44: Designing & Selling Calendars

Startist Society

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 28:20


This week, we're continuing our series about selling art for the holidays. Nikki shared last week that calendars have been her best-selling item ever. This week we're taking a deep dive into creating and selling calendars, with Laura interviewing Nikki about her experience. TOPICS DISCUSSED: How Nikki got started with calendars The timeline and process for designing calendars Different types of calendars you can create  Designing your own vs using templates / online tools Nikki's fav print on demand company for calendars Pricing - Nikki shares real numbers! How many to order and if you should offer pre-sales Shipping, marketing, and selling your calendars online and off What to do with your extra stock Nikki's 2022 calendar Read the transcript and grab Nikki's free calendar resource download in the STARTIST SOCIETY SHOW NOTES: startistsociety.com/calendars JOIN THE STARTIST SOCIETY FB GROUP: facebook.com/groups/startistsociety/ FOLLOW STARTIST SOCIETY ON INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/startistsociety/ LIKE WHAT YOU HEAR? BUY US A COFFEE BOURBON: buymeacoffee.com/startistsociety/

Business Bros
Designing the right space with Tamara Romeo

Business Bros

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 36:50


817- My name is Tamara, but at work, I'm also known as "The Design Boss" because I own an award-winning Interior design firm. We create amazing environments for people to work in & live in! The name says "San Diego" and "office"...but don't let that fool you! We've worked across the country and across the globe on multi-family projects, senior living, student housing, lux modern residential & more! Right now we have projects in Las Vegas, Puerto Rico, & Chicago...so really we can work anywhere, even virtually!! ________ Want your customers to talk about you to their friends and family? That's what we do! We get your customers to talk about you so that you get more referrals with video testimonials. Go to www.BusinessBros.biz to be a guest on the show or to find out more on how we can help you get more customers! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/businessbrospod/support

WIRED Business – Spoken Edition
Why Tesla Is Designing Chips to Train Its Self-Driving Tech

WIRED Business – Spoken Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 5:57


Developing AI is costly and time-consuming. Custom silicon can give companies an edge.

Design Thinking 101
Three Little Words for Better (Business) Relationships // ALD 008 — Ep79

Design Thinking 101

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 8:03


Thank you for listening to this Ask Like a Designer episode of the Design Thinking 101 Podcast. This episode is about the tremendous power in three little words and a superpower for people who want to think and solve like a designer: listening. This episode is based on this article: ALD008 // Three Little Words for Better (Business) Relationship. Read the article and others like it on Fluid Hive's Ask Like a Designer. In these short Ask Like a Designer episodes on the Design Thinking 101 podcast, you'll find new ways to explore the show's stories and ideas about design-driven innovation. I'll share methods, templates, and ideas that have worked in my practice in teaching. What did you think of this episode? Please send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team.  Cheers ~ Dawan Design Thinking 101 Podcast Host President, Fluid Hive   Show Highlights [00:56] It is listening, not love, that is at the core of a strong relationship. [01:16] The three little words: tell me more. [01:47] Why “tell me more” is so powerful. [01:56] “Tell me more” is better than “why.” [02:36] The importance of good listening. [02:50] There are many ways of using and phrasing “tell me more.” [02:55] When someone stops talking. [03:15] Parroting the other's words. [03:33] Parrot questions. [03:51] Long silences can encourage someone to keep talking. [04:14] Spotlighting the other's silences. [04:42] Noticing changes. [05:07] Listening is different from interviewing, advising, or negotiating. [05:25] When we listen, we learn. [05:50] Designing an event means creating an environment for good listening. [06:06] Listening is not passive [06:12] Listening is fundamental to design. [06:35] Free Ask Like a Designer tool to help you practice “tell me more” and in turn, become a better listener.   Design Thinking 101 Learning — Courses and More Design Thinking 101 Learning helps people learn, lead and apply design-driven innovation. Each training course focuses on a different collection of actions and skills critical to using design thinking effectively and getting the results you seek. Please join me in the first course, Design Thinking 101 — Framing: Creating Better Solutions by Finding More Valuable Problems to Solve.  Each course is structured to help your innovation actions create what you need for the people you serve, your organization and yourself.   Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like  Ask Like a Designer — DT101 E61 Design, and One Question to Rule Them All // ALD 002 — DT101 E63 There Are No Problems Worth Solving — Only Questions Worth Asking // ALD 003 — DT101 E65 Your Good-Life OS: Designing a System for Living Well and Peak Performance // ALD 004 — DT101 E67 The Swiss-Army Lives of How-Might-We Questions // ALD 005 — DT 101 E69 Designing Facilitation: A System for Creating and Leading Exceptional Events // ALD 006 — DT101 E73 The Innovation Saboteur's Handbook // ALD 007 – DT101 E77

Tea For Two
Ep 51. Magnetic Aesthetic - 6 thing you have to be doing as of yesterday

Tea For Two

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 28:39


This episode is for those who are doing the things and ready to step it up with their content. If you are JUST getting started and find yourself in overwhelm just knowing you need to post consistently I would maybe go back and listen to Ep 3 - 10 best attraction marketing tips Ep 4- Everything IG stories Ep 36- Insta Aesthetics - that dreamy feed In todays episode were talking 1. How to figure out your aesthetic/ style 2. Standing out in stories 3. Favorite apps for aesthetics these days. (apps mentioned: Unfold, Wordswag, StoryLuxe, Lift, StoryChic, Mojo, GoDaddy- used to be called Over, Canva) 4. Designing your feed (apps mentioned: Preview & Planoly for this) 5. Consistency making sure your stuff is recognizeable 6. GETTING THE CONTENT Be sure to let us know what you'd love us to cover and what you are loving so far about the podcast. WE LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOUUUUUU. Rate, Comment and subscribe to TeaForTwo :) Follow us at @kaycroley & @riannevangorden See you all next Tuesday. xoxo

TacticalPay Radio
Concealed Carry Clothing With Jan Wolbrecht of Incognito Wear IX

TacticalPay Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 26:53


If you want to wear clothing that makes you look good, and also allows for personal protection... carrywear is the perfect solution. Jan Wolbrecht, Creator and Founder of Incognito Wear IX, joins the show to share her story and discuss what goes into clothing that is both fashionable and functional for concealed carry. Designing clothing that looks great, and also allows everyday people to hide their firearms in plain sight isn't easy, but the results speak for themselves. Listen along as Jan breaks it all down. For more information and to view the show notes, visit: https://www.tacticalpay.com/079-incognitowearix/

WhiskyCast
Designing a Bespoke Whisky...for a Bespoke Design

WhiskyCast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 57:29


Master Blender Sandy Hyslop usually creates his whiskies and lets someone else worry about the packaging, but for the debut of the Royal Salute Couture Collection, he had the challenge of creating a 21-year-old whisky to match designer Richard Quinn's bespoke decanter. We'll discuss that challenge and the craft of whisky blending on WhiskyCast In-Depth. In the news, longtime Laphroaig manager John Campbell is stepping down, while the Heaven Hill strike in Kentucky is now in its third week. We'll have those stories, along with the latest whisky news and a bit of advice: watch out for desk chairs...they can have a mind of their own!

The Real Reel
Designing a Dating App and Building a Business You Love with Austin Kevitch

The Real Reel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 57:06


Episode 129: You are going to want to swipe right on today's episode as Natalie welcomes the founder of Lox Club, Austin Kevitch, to share some insider tips on how to stand out in the dating app scene. With more people staying home and turning to their devices to find love, Austin jumped on the opportunity to make a tongue and cheek dating app to help singles find someone their grandma would approve of. Austin is no stranger to the app development game as he's built 30 apps in total! And now, his app Lox Club is generating some serious buzz from major publications such as The New York Times, Vogue, and Forbes for its unique and lighthearted approach to dating that focuses more on personality than photos. Tune in to hear how a fictional story about a speakeasy in a deli turned into an app, why it is so important build a business you would use yourself, and how Facetime can help you find that special someone.   Thank you so much for being a part of our podcast community! Please be sure to rate, follow, review, and of course, post to your highlight reel. Follow your host Natalie on Instagram @nataliebarbu and @therealreelpodcast.  Follow Austin on Instagram @austinkevitch and Lox Club @loxclub  Thank you to our sponsors for making this episode possible. Check out these deals just for you:  CANVA - Go to canva.me/realreel to get your FREE 45-day extended trial.  QUIP - Go to getquip.com/realreel to save $10 on a quip Smart Electric Toothbrush.  CUROLOGY - Go to curology.com/real for a free 30-day trial and just pay for  shipping and handling!  SMASH & TESS – Go to smashtess.com/realreell to shop and use code REALREEL at check out for 15% off your purchase!  SHAMELESS PETS – Go to shamelesspets.com and use code realreel for 25% off.        Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Building the Backend: Data Solutions that Power Leading Organizations
Designing a Modern Data Architecture – Teradata

Building the Backend: Data Solutions that Power Leading Organizations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 44:09


This is a podcast episode you do not want to miss with Stephen Brobst, CTO @ Teradata. We discuss all things Data Warehouses, the shift to the distributed cloud and, key principles to implementing  successful DW's. Top 3 Value Bombs: Large organizations are shifting more to a distributed / inter-cloud architecture for many reasons, a couple of reasons are data sovereignty, increasing residency and reducing costs.Just because your DW does not support indexing does not mean you do not need them. One of the most common reasons DW's fail is they are led by IT and not the business. The DW should be led directly by the business needs and most important initiatives. 

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More

Dr. Rhea Mehta and Gina Uppal from Bowhead Health are in the house to share some provocative thinking about how to design digital health tools so that they end up in the hands of those who need them. How do we learn to design around those who may not want to engage? All that, plus the Flava of the Week about how healthcare decision making is often irrational, non-conscious, and emotion-based. Find all of our network podcasts on your favorite podcast platforms and be sure to subscribe and like us. Learn more at www.healthcarenowradio.com/listen/

Slate Daily Feed
Working: Designing Costumes for Steve Martin and Others in Only Murders in the Building

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 57:11


This week, host Isaac Butler talks to Dana Covarrubias, costume designer for the popular Hulu series Only Murders in the Building, starring Steve Martin, Martin Short, and Selena Gomez. In the interview, Dana explains how her early work as an actor influences her decision-making as a costume designer. She also breaks down some of the creative thinking that went into the wardrobes for each of the main characters in Only Murders in the Building.  After the interview, Isaac and co-host June Thomas discuss Dana's technique of establishing backstories for every character, even the minor ones.  In the exclusive Slate Plus segment, Dana talks about designing the wardrobes for some of the supporting characters. Then she talks about how to deal with the costume design equivalent of writer's block.  Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com or give us a call at (304) 933-9675. Podcast production by Cameron Drews. If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Big Mood, Little Mood—and you'll be supporting the work we do here on Working. Sign up now at slate.com/workingplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Culture Gabfest
Working: Designing Costumes for Steve Martin and Others in Only Murders in the Building

Culture Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 57:11


This week, host Isaac Butler talks to Dana Covarrubias, costume designer for the popular Hulu series Only Murders in the Building, starring Steve Martin, Martin Short, and Selena Gomez. In the interview, Dana explains how her early work as an actor influences her decision-making as a costume designer. She also breaks down some of the creative thinking that went into the wardrobes for each of the main characters in Only Murders in the Building.  After the interview, Isaac and co-host June Thomas discuss Dana's technique of establishing backstories for every character, even the minor ones.  In the exclusive Slate Plus segment, Dana talks about designing the wardrobes for some of the supporting characters. Then she talks about how to deal with the costume design equivalent of writer's block.  Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com or give us a call at (304) 933-9675. Podcast production by Cameron Drews. If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Big Mood, Little Mood—and you'll be supporting the work we do here on Working. Sign up now at slate.com/workingplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Working
Designing Costumes for Steve Martin and Others in Only Murders in the Building

Working

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 57:11


This week, host Isaac Butler talks to Dana Covarrubias, costume designer for the popular Hulu series Only Murders in the Building, starring Steve Martin, Martin Short, and Selena Gomez. In the interview, Dana explains how her early work as an actor influences her decision-making as a costume designer. She also breaks down some of the creative thinking that went into the wardrobes for each of the main characters in Only Murders in the Building.  After the interview, Isaac and co-host June Thomas discuss Dana's technique of establishing backstories for every character, even the minor ones.  In the exclusive Slate Plus segment, Dana talks about designing the wardrobes for some of the supporting characters. Then she talks about how to deal with the costume design equivalent of writer's block.  Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com or give us a call at (304) 933-9675. Podcast production by Cameron Drews. If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Big Mood, Little Mood—and you'll be supporting the work we do here on Working. Sign up now at slate.com/workingplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Just Bein' Honest
Episode 192 : TRINA FELBER : SKIN DETOX with Primal Life Organics // PART 2

Just Bein' Honest

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 56:02


On this Episode, number 192, of the “Just Bein' Honest Podcast”, we have a fantastic returning guest, TRINA FELBER of Primal Life Organics. She is back for PART 2 - (To listen to Part 1, Click HERE) - to discuss everything SKIN DETOX! Did you know that your body actually wants to go back to normal?! Yep. We are just continuously stripping it away, intoxicating the bloodstream, bombarding it with hormone disruptors + dehydrating it to the point of pre-mature aging!This is a knowledge bomb jam packed full of healthy takeaways, such as "WHY YOU SHOULD OMIT ONE PARTICULAR INGREDIENT AT ALL COSTS + WHY?!" (Seriously, you will be blown away!!!I hope you enjoy the show, and when you are ready to take on the experience of "Designing your own Life" - I am gifting you a FREE session of clarity work and all the questions you want to ask, I am here to answer. Together, we can get you to the place you are meant to be. Please contact @JustBeinHonestKB on Instagram for more information on how to schedule a time. xoxoWe are diving in deep about:What is the ONE ingredient that should be OMITTED from skincare + Why?FROM THE EARTH Ingredients that have natural SPF Sun Protection!Common Skincare is DEHYDRATING + actually causing WRINKLES! How?!WIN! You could WIN a bundle of my favorite wellness products! All you have to do is leave a COMMENT + 5-STAR RATING over on APPLE PODCASTS / iTUNES (Subscribing is a PLUS!) - WAIT, we have MORE giveaways to come, stay tuned!P.S. DID YOU SEE OUR NEW WEBSITE?www.JustBeinHonest.comResources:@JustBeinHonestKB@TrinaFelber@Primallifeorg*** Thank you to today's Sponsors! Grab them now :* C E R E A L | H E A L T H . By LOVEBIRD FOODSUse code: HONEST10 for 10% OFF! Get the healthiest cereal!* D O G | H E A L T H . By BOTANICAL BONESUse code: HONEST10 for 10% OFF! My + Poppy's FAVORITE + CLEANEST Dog Treats!* D E N T A L + S K I N | H E A L T H . By PRIMAL LIFE ORGANICS* Exclusive, limited time offer for JBH Podcast listeners: Save 60% off the regular price of the teeth whitener at Primallifeorganics.comGrab your: Teeth WhitenerGrab your: Dental Detox Kit* C B D + S E L F C A R E . By PRIMAWellbeing essentials made with broad spectrum hemp CBDand functionally innovative botanicals — and the highest standards of purity, potency and transparency. Use code: "HONEST" for 15% OFF!!!* G U T + B R A I N | H E A L T H . By ION BIOMEION*Gut Health supports the body's production of beneficial enzymes through redox signaling (cellular communication).Those beneficial enzymes support the tight junctions (the seals between cells) in our gut lining – the barrier protecting us from toxic substances like glyphosate and gluten while allowing the entry of beneficial nutrients. Shop + Save with the Subscription + Bundles: ION BIOMEThe "Just Bein' Honest" Podcast is a production made from the ♡xoxo KB*Business Inquiries : katherine@justbeinhonest.com*Music : "Alone" by Emmit Fenn // "Bravado" by Rondo BrothersSPONSORS + PARTNERSHIPS: My platform is rooted on the bases of natural healing and clean product integrity - Products linked are affiliate relationships, meaning if one purchases through this link, I may benefit a small commission from your support.SUPPORT OUR SHOW! We would be honored if you'd like to contribute to the production + time that goes in to creating our show : SUPPORT NOW!

All Crime No Cattle
Ep 91: Queen of Tejano Part I

All Crime No Cattle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 80:26


Selena Quintanilla-Perez first stepped into the Tejano music scene in South Texas in the early 1980s. A Mexican-American from Texas whose first language was English, Selena's dedication, hard work, and incredible family bond helped her breakthrough national, cultural, and language barriers in a music genre that was previously always dominated by men. She was the total package: stunningly beautiful, with a powerful singing voice, incredible dance moves, and a sense of humor that disarmed everyone. She was proving herself to be a capable businesswoman and entrepreneur making a name for herself in the fashion industry. And she did all of it before she was senselessly gunned down only two weeks before her 24th birthday. Join us as we discuss the music, fashion, and cultural icon that was Selena in this special two-part series.Sources:Colloff, P. (2010, April). Dreaming of Her. Texas Monthly. https://www.texasmonthly.com/arts-entertainment/dreaming-of-her/Falcon, M. (2018, March 29). Everything you need to know about Selena Quintanilla Perez. Corpus Christi Caller-Times. https://www.caller.com/story/entertainment/2018/03/29/facts-selena-quintanilla-perez/461856002/Guerra, J. (2020, March 25). Designing a dream: Martin Gomez says Selena was ‘not of this world.' Preview | Houston Arts & Entertainment Guide. https://preview.houstonchronicle.com/selena/designing-a-dream-martin-gomez-says-selena-was-15154889 Listen to 911 calls made after Selena was shot in Corpus Christi, Texas. (2021, March 31). ABC7 New York. https://abc7ny.com/10462396/Mendoza, M. (2015, March 3). 26 claims you may not know that emerge in the new release of “Selena's Secret.” MySA. https://www.mysanantonio.com/entertainment/arts-culture/books/article/New-edition-of-controversial-book-detailing-6112278.phpOrozco, C. (1996, January 1). Selena Quintanilla Perez (1971-1995). Texas State Historical Association Handbook of Texas. https://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/entries/quintanilla-perez-selena-selenaPatoski, J. N. (1995, May). The Queen Is Dead. Texas Monthly. https://www.texasmonthly.com/articles/the-queen-is-dead/Patoski, J. N. (1995, December). The Sweet Song of Justice. Texas Monthly. https://www.texasmonthly.com/articles/the-sweet-song-of-justice/Perez, C. (2013). To Selena, with Love. Celebra. Quintanilla, A. (2021). A Father's Dream: My Family's Journey in Music. Cafe Con Leche Books. Reinert, P. (1995, October 18). Ranger says police ignored the suicide story. Houston Chronicle.Sabawi, F. (2021, September 14). Chris Perez says he has ‘amicably resolved' yearslong legal battle with Selena's family. KSAT. https://www.ksat.com/news/local/2021/09/14/chris-perez-says-he-has-amicably-resolved-yearslong-legal-battle-with-selenas-family/Selena. (n.d.). Selena Wiki. https://selena.fandom.com/wiki/SelenaGood News Links:funky town fridge. “Funky Town Fridge.” Accessed September 26, 2021. https://www.funkytownfridge.org.Steve, Monacelli. “Off to a Good Start.” Fort Worth Weekly, August 30, 2021, sec. Metro. https://www.fwweekly.com/2021/08/30/off-to-a-good-start/.Check out more All Crime No Cattle at our website allcrimenocattle.com.Visit our Patreon page to support the show and earn some awesome rewards: https://patreon.com/allcrimenocattle. Get some ACNC merch: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/all-crime-no-cattle-podcast-shop?ref_id=9435. Find us on Twitter: @ACNCpodcast and on Instagram: @allcrimenocattle. Tip Jar: https://paypal.me/allcrimenocattle.And always remember: crime is bigger in Texas, y'all!

Dream Nation
Suzy Batiz: Founder of Poo-Pourri on her ALIVE OS course and designing the life of your dreams.

Dream Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 42:38


Suzy talks about returning to Poo-Pourri as CEO, manifestation loops, doing Ayahuasca in the jungles of Peru, raising kids while running a business, alive ideas, and the difference between resonance and dissonance.

Comics Experience Make Comics Podcast
#229 – Designing Pages and Grids with Gannon Beck

Comics Experience Make Comics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 28:43


Writer & artist Gannon Beck (Space Corps) talks about designing pages including using 9 and 16 panel grids, what he's learned from newspaper comic strips and a 4 panel grid. Gannon also talks about upcoming CEX Publishing print release of Space Corps.

Speaking of Sex with The Pleasure Mechanics
Designing The Ultimate Handjob Machine

Speaking of Sex with The Pleasure Mechanics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 37:26


What does it take to design the ultimate handjob machine? Can a device really deliver smooth satisfying strokes? How can we keep the Sex in SexTech? In this special episode of Speaking of Sex, we speak to Jens Petter Wilhelmsen, founder of the company behind The Handy, the world's most innovative and satisfying stroking device. […] The post Designing The Ultimate Handjob Machine appeared first on Pleasure Mechanics.

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More
The Incrementalist: Designing a Resilient Healthcare System with Margaret Lozovatsky, Novant Health.

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 24:41


Host Dr. Nick van Terheyden aka Dr. Nick discusses “Designing a Resilient Healthcare System” with Margaret Lozovatsky, SVP & Chief Health Informatics Officer at Novant Health. Discussion topics include, helping clinicians understand the benefits of EHRs, race car designed TeleICU carts, and incremental suggestions for developing your own career pathway in informatics. To stream our Station live 24/7 visit www.HealthcareNOWRadio.com or ask your Smart Device to “….Play HealthcareNOW Radio”. Find all of our network podcasts on your favorite podcast platforms and be sure to subscribe and like us. Learn more at www.healthcarenowradio.com/listen

Ophthalmology off the Grid by Eyetube
Designing Your Own IOL Formulas

Ophthalmology off the Grid by Eyetube

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 35:04


Blake Williamson, MD, MPH, and Tal Raviv, MD, are joined by Graham Barrett, MD—a world-renowned ophthalmologist and professor from Australia—to discuss his autonomous set of IOL formulas, the Barrett Suite, and his process for designing his own IOL.

Beer Mile Podcast
Ep54 - Greg Itahara: The Master of Customs — Designing Customs for Clayton Murphy, Jordan Gusman, WesFly, Nike, and More

Beer Mile Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 87:44


Greg Itahara has designed custom singlets and shoes for the likes of Clayton Murphy, Jordan Gusman, WesFly, The Harrier, Lost Boys Track Club, and the Beer Mile boys. He walks us through his design and print process, sources of inspiration, the work he's done for pro runners and brands like Nike, and his future aspirations. In the video version, he shows off some of the customs he's currently working on so tap on the link below to see his work straight from the studio. Video version: https://youtu.be/zLlJ7hgVHnE Follow Greg on Insta here Brought to you by MANSCAPED: Use code BEERMILE for 20% Off + Free Shipping at MANSCAPED.COM BEER MILE PODCAST LISTENERS UNITE!! Join our team "Beer Mile Nation" when you register for the UA All Out Mile. It is a global, virtual mile offering big prize money and is completely FREE to participate. The team that gets the most members to register earns $15,000 to donate to the youth sports charity of their choice, so please take 20 seconds to get registered, join team Beer Mile Nation, and get your friends and family to get in on the fun as well. Head over to UAALLOUTMILE.com, click on 'Register Here', sign up, and then head over to the Teams tab to join "Beer Mile Nation". That's it! Enter our giveaway for free BeerMile.com Swag: Give a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts or share the Beer Mile Podcast on your Insta story. Send us a DM with a screenshot on Instagram to @The_Beer_Mile: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/beer-mile-podcast/id1535570203 Help us grow the podcast: Support the show: https://anchor.fm/beer-mile-media/support Subscribe to Beer Mile Media on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/beermilemedia Drop Us A Line Leave us a voice message and we will include it on the show: https://anchor.fm/beer-mile-media/message Social Follow Beer Mile Media on Instagram Follow Beer Mile Media on Facebook Follow Beer Mile Media on Twitter Follow Beer Mile Media on TikTok Join the Beer Mile Strava Club Follow Chris on Strava Follow Chris on Instagram Follow Adam on Instagram Follow Adam on Strava --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/beer-mile-media/support

The Green Dragon Podcast
Ep 95 Designing and Sculpting Digital Miniatures

The Green Dragon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 261:40


Jeremy interviews Andrew Medbury from Medbury Miniatures to learn about digital design and sculpting. We talk a lot about using historical influences to inform the design process. https://www.facebook.com/Medburyminiatures/

Science of CX
Jim Tincher : How Can You Measure the Emotional Effectiveness of Your CX Strategy

Science of CX

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 35:32


Joining me on the show for the second time now is Jim Tincher. Jim is a nationally recognized customer experience expert, journey mapper, trainer, speaker, and author.  He sees the world through the eyes of customers, and draws on years of experience, cutting-edge scientific research, and real-world success stories to help audiences understand how to win over customers.  To listen to our previous interview, feel free to listen to episode 31; Determining the Killer Metrics for Your CX Initiative with Jim Tincher  Below are some of the main topics Jim and I discuss on today's episode.  Changemakers. Who they are and why they tend to focus on value.The North Star Emotion. Designing products and services so that they bring out one emotion instead of multiple emotions. Deliberate change management. How to get everyone on the same page in an organizational setting.   Leveraging data and technology. Predictive Value Chains. -  Promoter Scores and how it improves retention. The link between promoter scores and emotions; Why and how emotions predict future Promoter Scores. How to design an experience for the right emotion. Using your North star emotion to gain competitive advantage in business.  Connect with Jim Website - https://heartofthecustomer.com/  LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/jimtincher/   Email - Jim@heartofthecustomer.com/ 

Greater Than Code
252: Designing For Safety with Eva PenzeyMoog

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 60:45


TRIGGER WARNING: Domestic Violence, Abuse, Interpersonal Safety 01:26 - Eva's Superpower: ADHD and Hyperfocus * Workplace Accommodation * At-Will Employment (https://www.ncsl.org/research/labor-and-employment/at-will-employment-overview.aspx) 08:19 - Design for Safety (https://abookapart.com/products/design-for-safety) * Tech Used For Interpersonal Harm * Might vs When * Eva Penzey Moog | Designing Against Domestic Violence (https://vimeo.com/373462514) * Weaponizing Technology 12:45 - What Engineers Need to Know * Control/Shared Accounts * Surveillance * Location Data 15:02 - Expanding Our Understanding of What “User” Means * “User as an abstraction.” 20:43 - Parallels with Security * Personas / Archetypes * Adding Layers of Friction * Ongoing Arms Race 22:23 - Spreading Awareness Across Teams Focused on Feature Delivery * Safety Designers as a Specialized Role? * Generalists vs Specialists; Literacy vs Fluency * This Book Is For Everyone: Engineers, Designers, Product Managers, etc. 31:38 - Thinking Beyond The User * Constituency * Design Justice: Community-Led Practices to Build the Worlds We Need By Sasha Costanza-Chock (https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/design-justice) 35:25 - Traditional Design Thinking Protects White Supremacy * We Prioritize The Safety of Marginalized People Over the Comfort of Unmarginalized People * How Design Thinking Protects White Supremacy (https://www.eventbrite.com/e/how-design-thinking-protects-white-supremacy-tickets-168123071633) (Workshop) * Kim Crayton (https://www.kimcrayton.com/): Intention Without Strategy is Chaos * Sitting with Discomfort 40:21 - Putting Ergonomics, Safety, and Security Behind Paywalls * “Ergonomics is the marriage of design and ethics.” * The History of Seatbelts (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zEQ6AojkEeo) * Government Regulation * Worker Organizing 45:58 - Tech Workers and Privilege * Overpaid/Underpaid Reflections: Mandy: Inclusive and accessible technology includes people experiencing domestic abuse. Damien: If a product can be used for harm, it will be. Coraline: How systems are weaponized against marginalized and vulnerable folks. The internet is good for connecting people with shared experiences but we're breaking into smaller and smaller groups. Are we propping up systems by taking a narrow view based on our own experiences? Eva: Who didn't teach you about this? It's our job to keep ourselves safe in tech. Tech companies need to take more responsibility for user safety. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: MANDY: Welcome to Greater Than Code, Episode number 252. My name is Mandy Moore and today, I'm here with Damien Burke. DAMIEN: Hi, and I am here with Coraline Ada Ehmke. CORALINE: Wow. I actually showed up for once. [laughs] I'm very happy to be with y'all today and I'm very excited about the guest that we have today. Her name is Eva PenzeyMoog and Eva is a principal designer at 8th Light and the author of Design for Safety. Before joining the tech field, she worked in the non-profit space and volunteered as a domestic violence educator and rape crisis counselor. At 8th Light, she specializes in user experience design as well as education and consulting in the realm of digital safety design. Her work brings together her expertise in domestic violence and technology, helping technologists understand how their creations facilitate interpersonal harm and how to prevent it through intentionally prioritizing the most vulnerable users. Eva, I'm so happy to have you here today. Hi! EVA: Hi, thanks so much for having me. I'm so excited to be here. CORALINE: So if I recall correctly and it has been a while so Mandy, correct me if I'm wrong, but I think we open with the same question that we've been opening with for 251 other episodes and Eva, that is, what is your superpower and how did you discover, or develop it? EVA: Yeah, so my superpower is my ADHD, actually [chuckles] and specifically my ability to hyperfocus and I didn't really acquire and start to until the age of 25, which is when I was diagnosed. For people who don't know, hyperfocus is basically exactly what it sounds like. It's a state of very intense focus that people with ADHD will sometimes go into. It's not something you really have control over, it's not something you can just turn on, or off, and it isn't necessarily good, or bad. But for me, I'm really lucky because it often gets triggered when I start to code. So as I was starting to learn code and then I switched over to focusing on design and frontend like CSS and SAAS. But as I was learning that stuff, it gets triggered all the time. So I can sit down and code and oftentimes, hours have gone past and so long as I don't like miss any meetings or forget to eat, it's totally a superpower. CORALINE: That's amazing. I've talked about before, I live with bipolar disorder and I tend to stay in a low-grade manic state as my resting place and I experience very similar things with that hyper focus and just losing hours on a task and sometimes, it's very positive and I get a lot done and sometimes, I'm like, “What the hell did I do?” [chuckles] EVA: Right. CORALINE: But I think it's great that—I've been talking to some other folks with ADHD, with bipolar—the judo moves we can do takes something that really negatively affects us in a lot of ways and finding a way to turn it around, like you said, and use it as a superpower. Those are the strategies we develop when we live with things like this and I'm always happy when people have figured out how to get something good out of that. EVA: Yeah, totally and realizing that you have this thing that happens. Because I'm sure it's been happening my whole life, but I didn't recognize it, or understand it and then just being able to name it and see that it's happening is so powerful. And then to be like, “Oh, I can maybe do certain things to try to get into it,” or just being aware that it's a thing it's like very powerful. CORALINE: I'm kind of curious, Eva, if you don't mind us talking about ADHD for a little while? EVA: Sure. Yeah. CORALINE: Okay. I have a friend who is – actually, a couple of friends who were very recently diagnosed with ADHD and they had so much trouble in the traditional tech were workplace, especially working for companies that have productivity metrics like lines of code, or number of commits, or something like that. It was really difficult for both of these friends to operate in an environment where you're expected to have very consistent output day over day and not having accommodation, or not having the ability to design their work in such a way that maximizes the positives of how they work and minimizes the negatives of how they work. Is that something you've struggled with as well? EVA: Yeah, and that's so unfortunate that your friends because like I said, I feel like it is a superpower and most workplaces, they should be trying to harness it and understand that, you can have really, really awesome employees with ADHD. If you set them up for success, they can be so successful. But it is something – so I've only ever worked at 8th Light actually, when I was interviewing, over 5 years ago now, and started doing, trying to find my first job in tech, after doing a bootcamp, I interviewed at a couple different places and none of them felt super great. But obviously, I was just really eager to get my first job. But then I went into 8th Light and 8th Light was one of the places where I really, really did want to work there and was really excited for the interview. But when I got to the office, it was very quiet and there was an open workspace, but people were working very quietly and there were like lots of rooms. I got into that and I was like, “Oh, thank God” like, this is exactly the space I need. I can't handle too much activity. I can't handle offices where they're actually playing music; that type of thing is my nightmare and I don't actually like wearing headphones all day like that. That's not just a easy fix for me and for a lot of people with ADHD. So I felt like right away, now I want to work here even more and I've been really lucky that it's been a really good setup for someone like me to work and I have gotten some accommodations which has been good. I feel like if you don't give accommodations, they're breaking the law, they need to do that. DAMIEN: This is really, really validating because I've had similar experiences of that. Even just this morning where I was in the code and I had no idea how much time was going by and I had no awareness of anything else. That's possible because of the environment I have that I work in. Whereas, previous jobs I've had with bullpens and just open office plans, I was in incredibly miserable there and I didn't understand how people could get any work done in those environments. So just this understanding of how people are different; in what environments some people thrive in and other environments other people thrive in. EVA: Yeah. So have you always worked from home, or has this been a pandemic thing? DAMIEN: This has been probably about 10 years. Yeah. [laughs] I went home and never left. [laughs] EVA: Nice. [chuckles] CORALINE: I've done something very similar. I started working from home, I think in 2015 and not for a great reason, but I found the exact same thing that you're talking about. Like I am very sensitive to my environment. I use music to control my mood and like you, Eva, I hate headphones. So I do wonder, you mentioned accommodations and the legal perspective on that. In Illinois where – Eva, you live in Illinois, too. Are you local for 8th Light? EVA: Yeah. I live in Chicago. CORALINE: We have that will employment and it's really easy to discriminate against folks on multiple axes rather than providing our accommodations. Without will employment, they can just let you go and you have no proof that it was because they're ableist, or racist or transphobic, or whatever. EVA: Oh, yeah. That's so rough. Pritzker's got to get on that. Our governor. [chuckles] CORALINE: So do you want to tell us a little bit about the book that you just wrote? I understand a lot of people are finding a lot of value in it and really opening their eyes to a lot of maybe issues they weren't aware of. EVA: Yeah. So my book, Design for Safety, came out in early August and it's been really great to see people's reactions to it. I got my first formal book review, which was really cool and it was overall very positive, which has been very exciting. I'm hopeful that it is helping people understand that this is a thing because it's different, I feel like than a lot of other problems. Someone else explained this to me recently and I had this light bulb moment that I'm not providing a solution to a problem that people know that they have this problem, like how their tech is used for interpersonal harm and now I have a solution like, here's this book that's going to tell you how to fix it. It's more that people don't even know that this is a problem. So I'm educating on that as well as trying to give some of the solutions on how to fix it. It has been a lot of people just saying like, “I had no idea about any of this. It's been so eye-opening and now I'm going to think about it more and do these different things.” So that's been really great to see that just people's awareness is going up, basically. MANDY: I really like on the website, the sentence that there's a pullout quote, or I'm not sure if it's even a pullout quote, but it says, “If abuse is possible, it's only a matter of time until it happens. There's no might, so let's build better, safer digital products from the start.” I like that. EVA: Yeah, thanks. I was very intentional and well, this goes back to when I was doing a conference talk. Before I wrote the book, I did a conference talk called Designing Against Domestic Violence and I thought a lot about the type of language should I use; should I say might happen, or should I say will happen? I eventually settled on it's going to happen even if it hasn't happened yet, or oftentimes, I think we just don't know that it's happened. People who have gone through domestic violence, some of then we'll talk openly about it. But most people just don't, which makes sense. It's this really intense, personal thing to go through and there's so much judgment and survivors get blamed for all these things. So it makes sense that people don't want to talk that much about it. I ended up thinking we just need to say that it will happen. DAMIEN: That's amazing. So I really want to know everything about this book. [chuckles] but to start with, you said the book is designing for safety and you witnessed this a little bit with domestic violence, violence and abuse. Can you talk about safe from what sort of things you mean when you say safety there? EVA: Yeah, for sure because I know safety is a big word that can mean a lot of different things. But the way that I'm talking about it in my work is in terms of interpersonal safety. So it's like how is someone who has a relationship with you in an interpersonal way going to use technology, weaponized technology, in a way that was not meant to be used? We aren't designing tech with these use cases in mind, but how is it ultimately going to be weaponized for some type of abuse? Domestic violence is really the emphasis and my big focus and was mentioned in the intro, some background in domestic violence space. But there's also issues with child abuse and elder abuse, especially in terms of surveillance of those groups as well as surveillance of workers is another thing that came up a lot as I was researching that I didn't get as much into in the book. But it's basically anytime there's an interpersonal relationship and someone has access to you in this personal way where you're not just an anonymous stranger, how is tech going to be used to exert some form of control, or abuse over that person? DAMIEN: Wow, that is a very important subject. So I'm an engineer who doesn't have a lot of knowledge about interpersonal violence, domestic abuse, anything of that nature and I know you've written a whole book [laughs] and we only have an hour, or so here, but what are the first things that people, or engineers need to know about this? EVA: Yeah, so I think the first thing is to understand that this is a problem and that it's happening and to go through some different examples of how this happens, which is what the first couple chapters of the book are all about. It's different forms of this interpersonal abuse via technology in the form of shared accounts is a really big one and this question of who has control and nebulous issues of control. There's also surveillance is a really big one and then location data as well. So I guess, I don't want to say like, “Oh, just read the book,” but learning a little bit about the different – there's so many different examples of how this works. Just to start to build that mental model of how this happens like, someone taking advantage of certain affordances within a shared bank account software, or someone using an internet of things device to gaslight someone, or torment them. There's so many different examples. Location data shows up in all sorts of really sneaky in terms of stalking. It's not purely putting a tracker on someone's car, or even like Google Map and sharing your location is a more straightforward thing. But there's also, it shows up in other ways like, a grocery store app that has a timestamp and location. You can learn someone's grocery shopping habits and maybe you're estranged from this person, or they've left you because you're abusive, but they don't know that their stuff is showing up in this app and their location data. So it shows up in all sorts of different ways. This is a very long way to answer your question, but I think the first thing is to start to understand how this stuff works so that you're just aware of it and then from there, I have a whole chapter about how to implement a practice of designing for safety at your company. It is a little more design focused, but I think engineers can absolutely be doing this work, too. Even if it's just like quick research on how are any product with any type of message feature is going to be used for abuse and there's lots of literature out there. So just looking at some articles, thinking about ways that aren't covered already, that just having a brainstorm about what are some new ways this might be used for abuse and then thinking about how to prevent them. CORALINE: One of the things that I was thinking about after reading your book, Eva, is at a metal level, or zooming out a bit. I think a lot of the ways that we design software, we have this idealized and homogenous notion of a user. I think that in a lot of cases, especially if you're working on a project that's like more, or less one of those scratch your own itch problems, you tend to think of yourself as the user. It's great to have that empathy for the end user, but what we don't have, I don't think as a field, is an understanding that user is an abstraction and it is a useful abstraction. But sometimes you need to zoom down a little bit and understand the different ways that people want to use the software and will use the software and what makes them different from this average idealized user. That was one of the things that really struck me, especially from the process you were describing, is expanding our understanding of what user means and anticipating the different use cases with hostile users, with actively abusive users, and I think thinking of abstraction is super helpful, but I feel like sometimes we need to zoom down and think differently about really who the people are and what their circumstances might be. EVA: Yeah. Oh man, I just wrote down what you said, user is an abstraction. That's such a good way to think about it that I haven't heard before, but you're absolutely right that it's encapsulating such a big group of people. Even if for a small product, something that's not like Twitter that's open to billions of people, even something that's a subscription, or something that's going to have a smaller user base. There's going to be such a diverse, different group within there and to just think of the term user as a catchall is definitely problematic. Sorry, I'm just processing that user is an abstraction, that term because we use it so much as designers, definitely. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: And anyone in tech is always using this term, but problematizing that term in a new way is really interesting to me. And I think my other thought about this is that we talk a lot about needing to think about more than just happy path and I feel like even that, at least in my experience, has been other things that are also very important where it's like, let's think about someone who has a crappy Wi-Fi connection, or someone who's low vision. Like there are all these other very important things to think about in terms of accessibility and inclusivity. I think I see what I'm doing as just adding another group into the mix of let's think about people who are currently surviving domestic violence, which is maybe a little bit harder to bring up than those other two that I mentioned because it's just so dark and it's something that we just don't want to have to think about, or talk about during work. It's just such a bummer, but it is really important to have this new group added when we're thinking about inclusive and accessible tech. DAMIEN: There's a really great parallel here, I think with security minded design and research. Again, that's another user who is not behaving in the happy path. That's not behaving the way your normal users are behaving and you have to design your system in such a way to be resilient to that. So I love this user as an abstraction, then breaking it down into all these ways and then also, there's a huge value to diversity in your team with this sort of thing. CORALINE: Absolutely. DAMIEN: You can understand the very different types of users having people on the team who can understand blackhat users who are going to be trying to use your servers to mine Bitcoin, or [laughs] blind users, low vision users, or colorblind users, for goodness' sake. And then in addition to that, people again, who are experiencing domestic violence, other to terms of other forms of interpersonal abuse and just being able to understand all those users and their experiences with the things you're building and designing. EVA: Yeah, definitely those are all really good points. Just going back to what you said about the parallels with security is something I've actually been thinking about that a lot, because I think there are lots of parallels to that, or useful things about how security professionals think about their work and operate. Especially the big one for me right now is thinking about a security professional. They're never going to be like, “Okay, we did it. Our system is secure. We're done. We have arrived.” That's not a thing and I feel like it's very similar with designing for safety, or even inclusion. There's just, you're never – I feel like we've had a mental model of “I can think about these things, I can check these boxes, and now, my product is inclusive, or my product is accessible.” I feel like we should be thinking more like security professionals where there's always going to be more things like, we always have to be vigilant about what's the next way that someone's going to misuse tech, or the group that's going to be identified that we've totally left out and is being harmed in some way. So I think that's just a useful shift that I'm thinking a lot about. CORALINE: And Damien, I'm so glad you brought up the parallels with security. I was actually going there as well. One of the things that I've been thinking about from an ethical source perspective is insecurity that, I think two tools that would be super useful. First of all, personas and secondly—I guess, three things—understanding that safety can be a matter of adding layers of friction to disincentivize abusive behavior and like you said, recognizing this is an ongoing arms race. Every new feature that you design opens up some kind of attack, or abuse factor and if you're not planning for that from the outset, you're going to be caught later when harm has been done. EVA: Yeah, absolutely. Since you brought up personas, there is something in the process that I created that's a similar tool where I call them archetypes because they're a little different from personas. But it's identifying who is the abuser in this scenario, who is the survivor, and what are their goals and that's basically it, we don't need to get into anything else. I don't think, but just articulating those things and then even having a little printout, kind of similar to the idea with personas like, oh, you can print them out for your sales team, or whoever it is to keep these people in mind. A similar idea of just having them printed out an on your wall so that it's something that you're thinking about like, “Oh, we have this new feature. We probably need to think about how is this abuser person that we've identified who would want to use our product to find the location data of their former partner,” whatever it is. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: Use this. CORALINE: From a mechanical perspective, Eva, one of the one of the challenges I had at GitHub when I was working on community and safety is that the other engineers and the other groups were creating so many new features. I felt like the knowledge about how feature can be abused, or like you said, will be abused wasn't spread very effectively throughout, especially a large software organization, and it fell on a small team of folks who frankly were not consulted. A feature would go out and we'd be like, “Holy crap, you can't do that because of this, this, and this.” So do you have any do you have any thoughts? I know you said print it out, or put it on the wall, but do you have any thoughts for how to spread that awareness and that mode of thinking across teams who frankly may be very, very focused just on feature delivery and will see any consideration like that as slowing them down, or having negative impact on “productivity”? EVA: Yes. I have many thoughts. [chuckles] So this is bringing up something for me that I've struggled with and thought about is should there be specialized teams in this area? I feel like yes, we want people with special knowledge and experts and that's really important, but also, I feel like the ideal scenario is that it's just everyone's job. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: Those teams were already doing things and it wasn't seen as “Oh, Coraline's team is going to come in and now we have to consult with those people,” or whatever because it's not our job, it's their job. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: Which this isn't a very maybe satisfying answer to your question because I feel like it involves a huge shift in the way that we think about this stuff, but it is something I've thought about in terms of should I call myself a safety designer? Is that something I want to do? Do I want this to be like a specialized role? Maybe is that a goal where people start to see that? Because there are people who specialize in inclusive design, or accessible design. But then the downside of that is does that just give someone else even more leeway to be like, “Not my job, I don't have to worry about this. And then we have the problems, like what you just described. I don't know, I feel like it's such a big shift that needs to happen. CORALINE: Yeah. One of the models I've been thinking about and I was thinking of this in terms of generalists versus specialists is generalists, or to map that to domain that we're talking about now, the other engineers in your group, or in your company. I feel like there has to be a balance between specialization and general knowledge. The way I describe that is everyone should have literacy on a particular topic and the basic vocabulary for it and a general knowledge of the concepts augmented by a specialist who has fluency. So kind of a dynamic relationship between literacy and fluency. Do you have any thoughts on that? EVA: I love that. I'm literally writing that down. A generalist with literacy and a specialist with fluency is such a good way to think about it because I feel like I do say this. I don't want people who read my book, or see my talk to think like, “Oh, I have to be like her, I have to learn all this stuff. I have to really dig into domestic violence works and what it means and laws.” I don't want people to feel like they have to do that because it's just such a dark, heartbreaking thing to have to think and read about every day and I don't think that's a realistic goal. But I think being a generalist with literacy is realistic augmented by specialist with fluency; I'm just like basically repeating what you just said. [chuckles] But that's just a really brilliant way to think about it. DAMIEN: That pattern actually really matches something that I learned from another Greater Than Code guest. I'm sorry, I can't remember their name right now. I believe we were talking about inclusivity and what they said was like, “It's not the expert's job to make the product, or the company inclusive. [chuckles] It's the expert job to support – it's everybody's job to make it inclusive. It's the expert's job to be an expert and to support them.” We also use again, a metaphor from security. We don't have security experts whose job it is to make your app secure, we have security experts whose job it is to support everybody in keeping your app secure. CORALINE: Yeah. DAMIEN: So I feel like that this matches really well. The job of the person with this expertise is to support, to educate, to guide not because they can't do all the work together all themselves, like Coraline said. There's just too many features being added for [laughs] for some team somewhere to go, “Oh no, this is fine,” or “That's not fine.” EVA: Yeah, totally, and I feel like that just brought up something for me, Damien, about the speed at which we work, too many features being added, not enough time to actually do this work, and how—this is getting at just way bigger critique of tech in general. DAMIEN: Yeah. EVA: But it's okay to slow down once in a while. I feel like just the urgency thing causes so many problems outside of just what we're talking about. But this is another big one that I feel like it's okay to spend an afternoon thinking through what are the ways this is going to be not inclusive, or unsafe and that's totally fine. But I fall into it, too where I'm like, “I want to deliver things quickly for my client,” or if I'm doing so internal for a flight, I want to get done quickly. I don't want to hold people up. So it is a really hard thing to break out of. CORALINE: It seems to me, Eva, that this kind of knowledge, or this kind of literacy, or this kind of making it part of the process can fall solely on engineers. Because in a lot of places, we have of product managers who are setting deadlines for us. How do you communicate to them why this work is so important when they may only see it as like, “Well, you're getting in the way of us hitting a release date and we have a press release ready,” or “We want our debut this feature at a particular time, or place”? MANDY: And now we want to take a quick time out to recognize one of our sponsors: Kaspersky Labs: Rarely does a day pass where a ransomware attack, data breach, or state sponsored espionage hits the news. It's hard to keep up, or know if you're protected. Don't worry, Kaspersky's got you covered. Each week, their team discusses the latest news and trends that you may have missed during the week on the Transatlantic Cable Podcast mixing in humor, facts and experts from around the world. The Transatlantic Cable Podcast can be found on Apple Podcasts & Spotify, go check it out! EVA: Yeah, totally. So I think ideally, this comes from everyone. My book is called Design for Safety, but I really hope that people are reading it, who are also engineers and who are also project managers—basically anyone who has a say in how the product is actually going to function, I think should be doing this work. But specifically, if you have a project manager who is rushing everyone and saying, “We don't have time for this,” I do have a couple different strategies in my book about this, where it's like we can use statistics to talk about that this is a thing that is impacting a lot of our users. It's 1 in 3 women, 1 and 4 men in the US have experienced severe physical, domestic violence and that's just severe physical, domestic violence. There's so much domestic violence that doesn't have a physical component to it so that could be like a third of our user base. So bringing stuff up like that to try to get some buy-in, but then also my process, I have little time estimate. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: So saying like, “We want to do research; it's going to be 6 hours.” “We want to do a brainstorm; it's going to be 2 hours.” Giving people very specific things that they can say yes to is always going to be better than just an open-ended, “We want to design for safety.” CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: And someone being like, “I don't know what that means, but we have a deadline.” Saying like, “We're going to do a brainstorm to identify ways that our product will be used for harm. We want to do it next week and we want to spend 4 hours on it” is going to be a lot better. DAMIEN: And I want to call out how important and useful the language you use there was you said because when you find something, when you do that brainstorm, or whatever analysis process, you go like, “Oh, here's the way our products will be used for harm.” Because if you say to a product manager, “Here's a way our product might be used for harm,” they go, “Well, okay.” [laughs] “Might not be.” [laughs] If you say, “Here's a way our product will be used for harm.” Well, now that leaves a lot less of wiggle room. EVA: Hmm, yeah. That's a really good point that I actually hadn't thought about. I think the other thing is there's tangible outcomes from something like that brainstorm, or these different activities that I have outlined. You can actually show the person, like, “Here's what we did. Here's what we came up with,” which isn't necessarily – I wish we didn't have to always do that; always have some type of very explicit outcome from everything we do. But I do think that's a reality that we have that this process kind of helps with. CORALINE: I want to go back to the user thing. Again, one of the things that we're thinking about our ethical source is thinking beyond the user and thinking about not just who is using the technology that we're creating, but the people that the technology we're creating is being used on. EVA: Yes. That's such a good point. I'm actually curious, have you come up with a term for that type of user? Like nonuser? CORALINE: I have not yet, but that's a great call out. Language is so important so, yeah. EVA: Yeah. I don't know that it exists and I've seen nonuser, but I don't know that that's agreed upon. DAMIEN: I've gotten as far, the best I've come up with is constituency. CORALINE: That is very interesting, Damien because one of the things we're developing is a governance tool. The W3C, when they were working on the HTML standard—this was a couple of years ago, I think—they mentioned something called a priority of constituent and this was very much from a standards body perspective, but it was one sentence and I think it is such a powerful sentence. Just for their example, they said, “In times of conflict, we prioritize end users over developers, over browser manufacturers, over spec writers, over technical purity.” [laughter] EVA: Wow. CORALINE: That's one sentence, but writing that down, I think can really help cut through a lot of a lot of the noise and a lot of the gray area maybe that's the most encountered. It's so simple and you can do it in a single sentence. So absolutely, the notion of constituencies and being explicit about whose safety, convenience, or what have you you're optimizing for. EVA: Yeah. That's really important and I have two thoughts. One is that this comes up a lot in the surveillance space where it's like, what sort of rights, or priority should we be giving someone who is walking on the sidewalk in front of a house that has a Ring camera that's facing out to capture the porch, but is ultimately capturing the sidewalk in the street? What are the rights of that person, that nonuser, who has not agreed to be filmed and isn't part of this product's ecosystem, but is still being impacted by it? It's something I think about a lot, especially there's so many in my neighborhood I see. Since I wrote the book, I see the Ring cameras everywhere, including in places where they're not really to be like on the outside of someone's gate, just facing the sidewalk. It's like, you're not even recording your own property at that point. It's just the gate, or it's just the sidewalk, I mean, which I feel is very problematic. You also said that it's important to explicitly call out who you're prioritizing and that's something – I read this book called Design Justice by Sasha Costanza-Chock, which was very lifechanging and it's just such a good book. It's a little more theoretical. She explicitly says it's not a guide, but she talks about this, about how it's really important to, if you are going to choose not to be inclusive, or safe, or justice focused, whatever it is, you need to explicitly say, “We are choosing to prioritize the comfort of this group over the safety of this group. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: Or whatever it is. Like, you need to actually just spell that out and be upfront about it. DAMIEN: Yeah. It reminds me of, I think I learned this from Marla Compton. Although, I don't know if she originated it. I guess, she probably didn't, but the phrase she taught me was, “We prioritize the safety of marginalized people over the comfort of non-marginalized people.” It's such a powerful statement. CORALINE: It really is. DAMIEN: Yeah, and just making that explicit like, “These are the tradeoffs and these are where we side on them.” CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: Yeah. Oh, yeah. That's such a good one. I did this workshop recently, it's called How Traditional Design Thinking Protects White Supremacy, but they talked a lot about how feeling entitled to comfort is just such a white supremacist thing and I feel shows up in different forms of oppression as well like men's comfort, et cetera. But that's something I've been thinking about a lot is the feeling of a right to comfort and how that also includes a right to not have to have any type of conflict and a fear of conflict. How these things all play together and how it's all part of white supremacy and how it shows up in our culture, in our workplaces. It was a great workshop. I would highly recommend it because it's also been a lifechanging thing as I digest all of the different things from it. DAMIEN: It's so powerful to name that as comfort. CORALINE: Yeah. DAMIEN: Like, this is what we're protecting. We're protecting these people's comfort [chuckles] and this is what it will cost. CORALINE: I think about what Kim Crayton said for a year is, “Get comfortable with being uncomfortable.” EVA: Yeah, that's such a good one. I love her. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: I quoted her in my book about, oh, I forget what it is. It's something about not having strategy is chaos. CORALINE: Oh my God. EVA: Like, the need for strategy. CORALINE: I learned so much from her from that one statement. That was literally lifechanging for me. That was literally lifechanging for me because I always had a negative feeling about strategy, like strategy is coercive, or insincere. And then another friend of mine I was talking to about it said strategy is good when it's not a zero-sum game. EVA: Mm. CORALINE: I think we maybe we can think about personal safety and abuse factors in that way. EVA: Yeah, definitely. I think the full quote is “Intention without strategy is chaos.” CORALINE: Yeah, that. EVA: That has been very definitely influential for me and as I feel like a big part of the reason, that idea is why I wrote my book and did my conference talk is because I was feeling frustrated with – it's a lot easier to raise awareness about an issue than it is to have actual strategies for fixing it. I felt like I would always get really fired up reading something, or listening to a talk and be like, “Yeah, this is such a huge problem. We need to fix it,” and then didn't have a takeaway, or anything that I could really do at work other than just being told to think about this, or consider this, which I'm like, “When do I do that?” CORALINE: And what does that look like? EVA: Yeah, you can't think about all of the different things we need to think about from 9:00 to 5:00 while we're at work every day. We need a strategy to do that, which is why I like made these different activities that I have in my process. But going back to this white supremacy and design workshop that I did, I also learned in there about how some other ways that white supremacy shows up is having an action bias and a sense of urgency. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: And how a lot of that can come from people, especially white people, not being able to like sit with discomfort when we're faced with really uncomfortable topics and a desire to jump into action before we fully understand the problem and have internalized it. So now I'm feeling like I need to backtrack a little bit and be like, “Yes, provide action.” But also, it is good to do deep learning. I think we need both, but I feel like a lot of people, it's one, or the other. Let's do a ton of learning, or let's jump right into action. I have always been a jump right into action person and now I'm realizing it's okay to take a beat and do some deep learning and to sit with all the discomfort of the heavy topic. CORALINE: A friend of mine gave me a concept that I like a lot. He has a definition of ergonomics that is the marriage of design and ethics. When I use the term ergonomics in that sense, what I mean is how easy is it to do a particular action. One of the things that I see quite a bit—something, I think is a terrible consequence of the web, frankly—is putting ergonomics behind paywalls and asking people who use our software to yield some degree of agency, or digital autonomy, or security in exchange for features. EVA: Hmm. So interesting. CORALINE: So I'm curious maybe how you would frame designing for safety, some of the other axes of oppression that we discussed on the show today, from the perspective of the ethical aspect of our design decisions. What workflows are we optimizing for? What workflows are we putting behind a paywall, or in exchange for okay, you're signing up. The [inaudible] says you're buying into surveillance capitalism and you just simply have to do that if you want an email account, if you want a Twitter account, what have you. EVA: Yeah. I do feel like there is a bit of an issue with putting safety and security sometimes behind a paywall where you can literally pay more to not get advertised to, for example. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: Which it's like, I get that products have to charge money and it's like we shouldn't – the flipside of that is well, we can't just work for free. I see that a lot with journalism when people are criticizing paywalls and it's like well, but journalists have to get paid. They can't work for free just like everyone else. But I do feel that with things like being able to opt out of advertising and I feel like there are other things. Nothing's coming in right now, but different ways that you can ease some of the crappier parts of tech, if you have enough money, to buy into the paid versions of things is definitely problematic. Who are we keeping out when we do that and who are we saying doesn't deserve this privacy and the safety? What should just be standard? The seatbelt; I'm obsessed with the history of the seatbelts. CORALINE: [chuckles] I still have the [inaudible] that's been going around. EVA: Yeah. CORALINE: It's amazing. EVA: I've talked about this in many different places, but the seatbelt used to be something that you had to pay extra for. In today's dollars, it would've been like 300 extra dollars when you bought a car to get seat belts and only 2% of the people, in 1956 when they were introduced, actually paid for them and probably even less were actually using them. And then there was a revolution in the auto industry led by activists and everyday people. It definitely not come from the auto industry; they had to be forced into these different things. But now seat belts, the government basically, they passed a law and they said, “You have to just include seat belts as a standard feature.” I think about that a lot in tech. The things now that we're making people pay for, should some of those just be standard features and how are we going to get there? Probably government regulation after a lot of activism and everyday people rallying against these different things with big tech. But I think we're going to get there with a lot of things and we're going to see a lot of seatbelts, so to speak, become just standard features and not something you have to pay for. CORALINE: And I wonder, you mentioned government regulation; I have literally zero faith in government doing anything effective in the online world at all because our government is powered by 65-year-old white men that are rich and there's no incentive for them to care about this even if they did have the basic literacy about how this stuff works. It seems to me one of the things that we've been seeing really emphasize is, especially during in post lockdown, is worker organizing and I wonder if there's a strategy here for empowering the engineers, who frankly, we are being treated rockstars right now. I hate that term rockstar, but we're overpaid, we're pampered—a lot of folks, obviously, not everyone. So can we leverage our power? Can we leverage the privilege of being in such an in-demand profession to affect change in organizations that have no financial incentive to think about stuff like this at all? EVA: Yeah. So many things I want to respond to. Definitely, I think worker power is like such a strong point in all of this and I feel like we are the ones leading out on this. A lot of it is coming from people who work in tech and understand the issues. Like, writing, speaking, and doing these different things to help everyday people who don't work in tech understand like, “Hey, actually, here's why Facebook is really terrible.” A lot of that is coming from people in tech, even former Facebook employees even. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: Which is different, I think from the paradigm shift we had with the auto industry. I don't know, I would have to look, but I'm pretty sure is not coming from car designers and engineers weren't helping lead that charge the way that we are. But I also want to respond to something you said about tech workers being overpaid and pampered, which yes, I agree with you. But I also think there are privileges that everyone should have and that no one should of and I feel like everyone deserves to be well paid, to be comfortable and have all these perks, and whatnot. I had a career in nonprofit before this so I have so much internalized just baggage about and guilt around feeling with my pay, my benefits, and all these things. The work I do now, compared to the work I was doing in the nonprofit, which was helping kids who were basically on a road to dropping out before graduating high school, which was really important work and I made so much less money and worked so much harder. But I feel like everyone deserves to be as well paid as we are and it is possible. CORALINE: Yes. EVA: So I just wanted to kind of throw that out there as well that we – [chuckles] I feel like I'm trying to just absolve myself from being a well-paid tech worker. But I do think we deserve this and also, everyone else deserves similar treatment. CORALINE: Absolutely. DAMIEN: Yeah. I feel the same way, especially—to take an example within a tech company—as an engineer, I get paid a lot more than customer service people. CORALINE: Yeah. DAMIEN: And that doesn't mean I'm overpaid, [chuckles] it means they're underpaid. CORALINE: Yeah. DAMIEN: A lot. [laughs] CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: Yeah, and I feel like this whole conversation, honestly, this is a freaking tactic. This is what the people at the top, this is how they want us to feel; pitting us against each other, feeling like it's not that – the sales people, that's normal and we're overpaid. It's like, no, actually we're paid a livable amount where we can live comfortably and they're exploited even more than we are. That's how I'm trying to think about things because I do feel like this other way of looking at it is just absolutely a tactic of, I don't know, the 1%, whatever you want to call them. The company leaders definitely don't want us to feel like we're – they would rather us feel that we're overpaid and pampered than just compensated for the labor we do in a fair way, MANDY: Have us feel the shame and guilt around it, too. Before I was in tech, I went from welfare to making a reasonable standard of living in a year and sometimes, I still feel guilty about it. It's a heck of a feeling. EVA: Yeah, and I feel like that didn't just come out of nowhere. We've been taught that we should feel guilty for just surviving. I don't know. Because I think even in tech, it's a lot of people there's still so many issues with burnout, with—I don't know about you all, my body sometimes just hurts from not moving enough during – like, there's still all these like different things that could be better. But the feeling that we should feel guilty for having some comfort and decent pay, I think that's definitely a strategy that has come from these different powerful groups. It didn't just come out of nowhere. CORALINE: I appreciate y'all pushing back on that. I guess, I'm speaking from an emotional place. Eva, you went from nonprofit and the tech. In April, I went from tech and the nonprofit and personally, I took a 30% pay cut and – [overtalk] EVA: Oh, wow. CORALINE: It just really made very visible and very personal seeing what we value as a society and what we don't value as a society. I'm still comfortable; I still have a living wage and everything. But look at what happened during the lockdown with “frontline workers.' They're heroes, but we don't want to pay them more than minimum wage. So I definitely agree with what you're saying about other people being underpaid and I definitely hear what you're saying about that guilt, but guilt is a form of discomfort. What are you going to do with that? What are you going to do with the privileges and the power that we have as a result of the way we're treated in this industry? I feel like that's the more important thing and what do you do with it? Are you giving back? Are you giving back in a substantive way, or are you giving back to assuage your guilt? It's nuanced. As y'all are pointing out, it is nuanced. EVA: Yeah. It's very complicated, but I feel like agitating for those—sorry, Damien, I think you said support people—getting paid more, that's something we can agitate for. I know someone, I'll call her an online friend of mine in the infertility space, which I'm very involved in as I go through my journey. I hate that word, but I've made all these online friends who are going through it and one of them is a paralegal and she is obviously hoping, although it's not going well, to get pregnant. But she was looking into the parental benefits and realized that the lawyers where she works had, I think it's 18 weeks fully paid off and then everyone else got this weird piecemeal of 6 weeks paid off, then there's FMLA, and then there's PTO, and all this stuff that amounted to a lot less, and you had to like use all of your PTO and all these different things. She actually was able to—with some of the lawyers help, I believe—get that policy change that it was just the same for everyone because it was like, “I didn't go to law school. So therefore, I don't need as much time with my newborn? How does that make sense?” CORALINE: [chuckles] Yeah. EVA: So I feel there is a lot of potential to have more equality in our companies, especially as the most powerful people often in the companies, to push for that change to happen. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: There needs to be a lot of solidarity, I think, between these different types of workers. CORALINE: Yeah, and that's a great example of that. MANDY: Well, this has been an absolutely fantastic conversation and I feel so privileged just to be sitting here kicking back and just taking in the back and forth between the rest of you. I wrote down a bunch of a things, but one of the biggest takeaways that I have had from this episode, and especially if you've been listening to the show the past couple episodes, we've been talking about a lot of accessibility things. Eva, you said something that was mind-blowing for me and it shouldn't be mind-blowing, but it was because I was like, didn't even ever think of that and what the hell is wrong with me for not even ever thinking about that? but inclusive and accessible includes people experiencing domestic abuse. It's not something – I guess, because as what you said, people don't talk about it. So just keeping that in mind was pretty pertinent to me. I also liked what Coraline said about specialization and then the general knowledge and literacy versus fluency. That was really good as well. So it's been an awesome conversation. Thank you. Damien, what do you have? DAMIEN: Oh, well, this has been really awesome and I want to of first thank Eva for being our guest here and for the work you do and this book. The thing that's going to be sticking with me, I'll be reflecting on for a while, is this sentence both well, if the product can be used for harm, it will be, which is not only a really powerful thing to keep in mind when designing and building a thing, but also, a powerful sentence that is really useful in communicating these issues. So thank you very much for that. CORALINE: One of the things that and actually Eva, this was a reaction I had when I first read your book is, I think a lot of us, a growing number of us, have at least an awareness, if not a personal experience, with how systems are weaponized against marginalized, or vulnerable folks. So I think it's really important that in your book, you focus very specifically on a particular domain of abuse, abuse of power and loss of agency and loss of privacy, loss of physical safety. One of the things I've been thinking about a lot is how the internet has been really good for connecting people with shared experiences and creating communities around the shared experiences. But I do worry that we're breaking into smaller and smaller and smaller groups and I see that. I don't know if it's intentional, but it certainly is a way, I think that we're propping up, that we're being coerced into propping up these systems by taking a narrow view based on our own experiences. I don't see that as a criticism. What I see it as is an opportunity to connect with other folks who experience that same kind of systemic damage in collaborating and trying to understand the different challenges that we all face. But recognizing that a lot of it is based frankly, white supremacy. We used to talk about patriarchy; I think the thinking broadly has evolved beyond that. But I would love to see your publisher start putting books together on different particular axes, but also, looking at ways that we can bridge the differences between these different experiences of intentional, or unintentional harm. So that's something that I think I'm going to think about. EVA: Nice. I can't give any spoilers, but I do think my publisher might have something in the works that it's getting at some of this stuff. Wonderful. EVA: Which is exciting. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: Yeah, okay. Man, those are all so good. My reflection, I'm just thinking a lot about our conversation about the way that people in tech might feel like we're overpaid, or pampered and how that feels like an intentional thing that has come from somewhere and things like that don't just – it always comes from somewhere. I'm thinking Mandy, about what you said in your reflection. You said, “What's wrong with me for not thinking about this?” I always feel like when I hear people say things like that, it's like well, when were you – I think more who didn't teach you about this? Why wasn't this part of your education as you were learning to code and before you joined the industry? I feel like that's more where the blame lies than with individuals, but yeah. Something I was thinking about earlier today, before we started recording, is that this idea of user safety, that it's like our job to keep ourselves safe on tech and there's so many resources out there, different articles, and different things. I've been thinking similarly about that, but that's a marketing campaign. That's something that the leaders of big tech done to intentionally shift responsibility from themselves and onto the end user. We're expected to be legal experts, read these agreements, and understand every single thing about a product that no one uses every single feature, but we're expected to understand it. If we don't and something goes wrong, either interpersonal harm, what I do, or with like oh, someone guessed your password or whatever it was, it's your fault instead of it being the tech company's responsibility. I feel like that's another thing that I'm thinking like that didn't come from nowhere, that came from somewhere. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: It feels like a very intentional strategy that big tech has used to blame us for when things go wrong. Not to say that we get to be absolved of everything, people have responsibilities and whatnot, but I feel like a lot of times it's like this comes from somewhere and I'm trying to think more about that kind of stuff. This conversation was really awesome for helping me process some of those and expand my thoughts a little bit more. So thank you all, this was just really awesome. DAMIEN: Thank you. Thank you for being here. MANDY: Thank you for coming. CORALINE: Yeah. So happy to talk to you, Eva. EVA: Yeah. You, too. MANDY: All right, everyone. Well, with that, we will wrap up and I will put a plug in for our Slack community. You can join us and Eva will get an invitation as well to come visit us in Slack and keep these conversations going. Our website to do that is patreon.com/greaterthancode. Patreon is a subscription-based thing that if you want to you can pledge to support the show. However, if you DM any one of us and you want to be let in and you cannot afford, or just simply don't want to, monetarily support, we will let you in for free. So just reach out to one of the panelists and we'll get you in there. So with that, I will say thank you again. Thank you, everybody and we'll see you next week! Special Guest: Eva PenzeyMoog.

Black Girls Guide To Fertility
Non-Toxic: Designing a safe space to optimize fertility

Black Girls Guide To Fertility

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 26:55


Sonhara talks with Debra of Vegan Design about creating a non-toxic home-life to optimize fertility. 

Adventures In Design
Designing Superman | The DKNG Show 41

Adventures In Design

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 72:35


DKNG Shares the details on creating the vinyl packaging and illustrations for the original Superman movie soundtrack and breakdown a recent gig poster automobile illustration for 311. 

The Big Talk with Tricia Brouk
Leadership and Vulnerability from the Hamilton Stage

The Big Talk with Tricia Brouk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 45:36


This week on The Big Talk, I am sharing an incredible conversation with my dear friend Antuan Magic Raimone.  Together, we are talking about leadership, vulnerability, and a true favorite of theatre lovers around the world, Hamilton. Magic is a New York City-based TEDx speaker, performer, and advocate. As a childhood sexual abuse survivor, he is using his voice to help those who have not found their own. He is a member of the Office of Victim Services Advisory Council and has given keynotes at the University of Virginia and the SPECTRUM Conference in Albany, NY, as well as the United States Merchant Marine Academy (USMMA).  With more than 20 years of professional performance experience, he is currently with the Pulitzer Prize and 11x Tony Award-winning Hamilton as a Universal Swing, covering the six male ensemble members for the five U.S. companies. Additional credits include the 4x Tony Award-winning In the Heights (Broadway, Off-Broadway, and First National Tour—Graffiti Pete U/S, Associate D/C, and Vacation Swing) and six years with the Radio City Christmas Spectacular (Ensemble). Becoming Magic is Antuan's debut as an author.  We start with Magic's backstory and how seeking therapy for the childhood sexual abuse he experienced actually brought him to becoming a speaker. He truly wanted to help the center that helped him, and without any financial means to do so, he volunteered to speak — to use his voice to assist others in getting help, too. And the power of Magic's influential voice has only grown since then! In this episode, we'll explore: Magic's first invitation to a TEDx stage and what he felt in that moment How he landed his role in Hamilton, what it was like when the pandemic left theatres dark, and what's its like now to be back in rehearsals  Designing and curating the life that you desire and making space for what is meant for you What it's like to work in a space that's intentional and purposefully offering support for you as whole, vulnerable people How you can learn to love yourself and become magic in your own life Magic's current favorites — Book: Oh, The Places You'll Go!, Speakers: Brené Brown and Dax Shepard, and Podcasts: Armchair Expert and The Laverne Cox Show More from Magic   His book, Becoming Magic: A Path of Personal Reconstruction   His TEDx Lincoln Square Talk, Soldier of Love: My Survivor Journey   Website: www.thesoldieroflove.us (When you sign up for the newsletter, you will receive FREE access to the first chapter of Magic's book.)   Instagram: @antuanmagicraimone   Twitter: @antuanraimone and @magicantuan   FB: Antuan Magic Raimone   LinkedIN: Antuan Raimone

The Brülosophy Podcast
Episode 205 | exBEERience: Designing Beer Recipes

The Brülosophy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 88:58


Brewing is a mix of science and art, the latter of which comes into play when designing recipes. In this episode, contributor Cade Jobe joins Marshall to discuss their experiences coming up with their own beer recipes over the years. The Brülosophy Podcast is brought to you by Imperial Yeast who provide brewers with the most viable and fresh yeast on the market. Learn more about what Imperial Yeast has to offer at ImperialYeast.com today.

Clear To Send: Wireless Network Engineering
CTS 274: Designing Wi-Fi for Lecture Halls

Clear To Send: Wireless Network Engineering

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 44:49


Designing Wi-Fi for university lecture halls can be challenging. From dealing with BYOD, high density, aesthetics, and more.. How do you tackle it? What should you consider? And what will the results be? There are many challenges to consider such as high density, high capacity, BYOD, aesthetics, application usage, and more. All must be considered […] The post CTS 274: Designing Wi-Fi for Lecture Halls appeared first on Clear To Send.

Creative Capital
Creative Capital Podcast 100: Designing Your Lifestyle Around Your Investments with Jennifer Beadles

Creative Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 62:03


Welcome back to the Creative Capital Podcast with Josh Ferrari! In this episode, I welcome Jennifer Beadles! At 21 years old, Jennifer had bought her first house, and a real estate developer hired her. She found herself learning the ropes of building new construction, hiring subcontractors, dealing with red tag notices and grumpy neighbors who didn't want new houses blocking their view. While she loved the variety and constant challenge of finding solutions to complex issues in the development world, she wanted to do and learn more. So in 2009, she officially ditched her 9-to-5 job and become a real estate agent specializing in working with investors. Since her goal was to achieve financial freedom through real estate investing, she figured what better way to earn a living than to help others achieve what she was setting out to achieve. Jennifer has sold more than $120M+ in real estate while buying rentals and building up her own passive income streams.   In this episode, Jennifer talks about designing your lifestyle around the investments you make. She talks about the importance of being clear on what you want to do and what it actually takes to bring your real estate business to the next level and live a time and financially free lifestyle. Listen in! [00:01 - 11:45] Introduction     An overview of the episode Welcoming Jennifer to the show How she got into real estate investing Her experience as a realtor How she built her real estate portfolio   [11:46 - 20:34] Taking Your Real Estate Business to the Next Level   Jennifer on when she decided to get more deals Having a mindset shift How she built a business that allowed her to travel The importance of asset management in real estate   [20:35 - 33:32] Designing Your Lifestyle Around the Investments You Make   How to design your lifestyle around your investments Being clear on what you want to do Why choosing an asset class to invest in is important Buy what you can afford Just get started! Choosing how you'll make money in real estate What are interested in? How much time can you dedicate to it? How much capital do you have?   [33:33 - 47:47] A Closer Look at a Life of Time and Financial Freedom   Jennifer shares her daily routine It's all about experiences Helping people get started on their journey Saving money by living overseas Figure out the ‘why' first, and  the ‘how' will follow [47:48 - 50:20] The Pod Decks Segment   What, are you bored of? What is one interesting fact about your ancestors? [50:21 - 01:02:02] The Core Four   What is your favorite real estate-related book? Rich Dad Poor Dad  What do you think your unique skill is that helped you become successful? Systems, processes, and optimization Tell me something that's true about real estate that almost nobody agrees with you on You can invest in the US without being in the US What one piece of advice would you give the listeners wanting to succeed in real estate investing? Get started! Connect with Jennifer! A summary of the episode Closing words Key Quotes:    “Once I got really clear on what I wanted my lifestyle to look like, then it's just working backwards.” - Jennifer Beadles   “The key is [to] just get started. Whatever that looks like for you – based on your goals, based on your comfort level, based on your risk tolerance, whatever feels right – just do it. Just get started.” - Jennifer Beadles   “By focusing first on the why and the what, the how comes later. If you have a compelling reason why to do something, then you're going to do it. But if you don't have a compelling reason why, if you don't really know the direction you're going, then it's going to be really tough.” - Jennifer Beadles Resources Mentioned: Rich Dad Poor Dad The 4-Hour Work Week Connect with Jennifer on LinkedIn!   Check out Greenlight Equity Group and ROI ByDesign!   Chelsea's Meetup Group: https://www.meetup.com/salt-lake-city-multi-family-meetup-group/ You can reach and connect with me on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Youtube  For more information about Ferrari Capital visit us on our website https://www.ferraricapital.com   SUBSCRIBE to this podcast for more episodes on how to create your own future through smart and lucrative investments.  LEAVE A 5-STAR REVIEW and share this podcast with someone you know who wants to experience massive growth and success in their business.   Listen to our previous episodes here