Podcasts about ATT

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  • 4,299PODCASTS
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  • Jan 22, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about ATT

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Latest podcast episodes about ATT

Source Code
Microsoft buys Activision, antitrust ramps up and 5G gets crazy

Source Code

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 47:32


Nick Statt joins the show to discuss Microsoft's $68.7 billion acquisition of Activision Blizzard, and what it means for the tech and game industries. Then, Issie Lapowsky talks about a big week in antitrust reform, and whether real progress is being made in the U.S. Finally, Hirsh Chitkara explains why AT&T, Verizon, the FAA and airlines have been fighting for months about 5G coverage.For more on the topics in this episode:Nick Statt on TwitterMicrosoft's big bet on the future of gamingMicrosoft's Activision Blizzard acquisition will reshape the game industryActivision Blizzard's workplace crisis instigated Microsoft saleWhat the Activision Blizzard deal means for game devs and platforms — PolygonIssie Lapowsky on TwitterThe antitrust boom is comingTim Cook, Ted Cruz and the strange politics of tech antitrustHirsh Chitkara on TwitterThe FAA that cried wolf on 5GAirlines ground 5G deployment for the third timeFor all the links and stories, head to Source Code's homepage.

The Mobile User Acquisition Show

Our first guest of 2022 is Faith Price. Faith heads the paid UA team at DoubleDown Interactive and has spent a large part of her career managing UA and ASO. She has managed over 20 soft launches throughout her career. Yet, her most recent launch was a very unique challenge for her – because this was the first one she managed after Apple's introduction of the ATT. It was impossible to estimate results with no prior data points. Measurement was broken with SKAN. These were among the very many challenges which Faith had to address. Today she pulls the curtains back on the many learnings which she shares in this interview.For a very instructive look at how the soft launch playbook has changed post ATT, please check out this episode with Faith Price.KEY HIGHLIGHTS

Canary Cry News Talk
DEVILS OF DAVOS

Canary Cry News Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 220:00


Canary Cry News Talk #435 - 01.19.2022  DEVILS OF DAVOS WEBSITE/SHOW NOTES: CanaryCryNewsTalk.com SUPPLY DROP: CanaryCrySupplyDrop.com LINKTREE: CanaryCry.Party SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com ravel Podcast (Basil's other podcast) Facelikethesun Resurrection (Gonz' new YouTube channel) Truther Dating App (Created by Canary Cry Producers; not affiliated)   INTRO Space Pope Reptilian: 2 Top aids test positive (NY Times)   FLIPPY 0:04:02  Clip: Cocobo AI ensures safe public, Japan (DesignBoom)   GREAT RESET 0:16:45  Davos day 1 round up (WEF) → Four “Experts” explain what's next for C19 (WEF) → E-Resilience for 2030 inclusive digital society (UNESCAP)   COVID19/I AM WACCINE 0:47:02  CDC says Natural Immunity outperformed jabs, delta (DailyCaller/CDC source)(sir sigrah) → Scotland, case rates lowest in unjabbed, double jabbed rise hospitalizations (Herald Scotland) Clip: 1 year old suffers C19, message from mom (CNN) Clip: Suspended doctor due to jab views to sue Houston Methodist  → WHO asks jab manufacturers for data to ensure equity (Reuters)   Party Pitch 1:15:06  BREAK 1: Executive Producers, Paypal, Patrons   POLYTICKS 1:51:23  Supreme Court Gorsuch refused to wear mask (CNBC) → Sotomayor says she did not ask Gorsuch to wear mask (Wapo)   5G 2:02:20  After years of hype, AT&T and Verizon launches 5G network (CNBC) → Airlines cancel flights over concerns with 5G (Newsweek)   BREAK 2: Art, Reviews, Jingles, Meet Ups 2:19:56    METAVERSE/MONEY 2:41:33  5 reasons why Microsoft purchased Activision Blizzard for $69 million (Bloomberg) → Microsoft patent 060606 (Google Patents) Coinbase and Mastercard partner for oncoming NFT market (Bloomberg) → UK regulators fine Mastercard, others, for prepaid card cartel (Reuters)   AI 3:05:30  7 AI trends for 2022 (Enterprise Project)   ADDITIONAL STORIES: Now you can rent a robot arm for less than paying a human (Wired) Huenit ultimate working assistant robot arm (HypeBeast) 3D printing robot spine for practicing surgery (MedXpress) Innovative new robotics (Health Care Packaging) New Zealand new head for Antarctica base redevelopment (Voxy) Clip: Japan, robot arm tests removing nuclear waste (NHK) more Cobid: Nocebo effect, 2/3 affects from jab aren't from jab, study claims (Guardian) More from Davos (CNN) Cannabis compound prevented C19 infection, lab study (Bloomberg) Israeli scientist, fourth jab not good enough against Omicron (Forbes) → Matt Gates cancels membership at Capital Hill Club due to shot mandate (Twitter) → No waccine, No French Open for Djokovic (Reuters)   PRODUCERS ep. 435: Executive Producer Maria** Sir Aaron Knight of the cute little Piggies**   Canary Cry Supply-Drop lovinYAH Sanford S Gretchen G   Producers Christian D, Geoff B, Sarah L, Palmer B, MORV, HeatherSirRuss, JC, Sir Casey the Shield Knight, Sir Scott Knight of Trut, Sir Sammons Knight of the Fishes, Runksmash, Child of God, DrWhoDunDat, Veronica D, Gail M, Amanda P   TIMESTAMPS: Jackie U   AUDIO PRODUCTION (Jingles, Iso, Music): Marty B   ART PRODUCTION (Drawing, Painting, Graphics): Dame Allie of the Skillet Nation Sir Dove Knight of Rusbeltia   CONTENT PRODUCTION (Microfiction etc.) Runksmash - Covered in scratches, Gonz takes Monty 33 and fastens them to a converted Chinese killbot, “Basil, the mullet blows in the wind!” He shouts into the radio. Taking his cue, Basil tearfully launches his space yacht as the 72 cats begin playing rugby.

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles
Russian Diplomat: Countdown Has Begun

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 76:22


The Biden Administration stands accused today of one of the world's most glaring examples of government incompetence. 5G cellphone communications has been successfully deployed in over 40 countries. AT&T and Verizon turned on their 5G transmitters today in selected US cities. 5G service in some American cities was curtailed near airports. That's because US Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg utterly failed to prepare US airports for the arrival of 5G. Meanwhile, Russia continues to ask for a written response from NATO and the Biden Administration to the Ukraine question, implying that the clock is ticking towards conflict, and that “the countdown has begun.” Rick Wiles, Doc Burkhart. Airdate 1/19/22

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Why are U.S. airlines concerned about 5G?

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 4:32


Verizon and AT&T are forging ahead with their plan to switch to new high speed 5G service nationwide -- but with an important exception near U.S. airports and runways. Those exceptions were made Tuesday because of fears that the new technology could interfere with plane technology and potentially impact landings. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien unpacks the details. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani
Jorge Masvidal, Tyron Woodley, Ilia Topuria, Eric Nicksick, and more

The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 237:37


Ilia Topuria around (7:47) discusses his late opponent change at UFC 270, if he wants to face Movsar Evloev again, who he wants to face next, his childhood and more. Eric Nicksick around (31:24) discusses Francis Ngannou's upcoming title clash with Ciryl Gane at UFC 270, the old training footage released between the two fighters, how Ngannou has improved, what it feels like to be kicked by Ngannou, Gane's strengths, and more. Tyron Woodley around (1:03:11) explains why he was knocked out by Jake Paul, how good Paul really is, if he will box Dan Hardy next, and more.  GC and Helwani around (1:44:16) break down the top bets for this Saturday's UFC 270. In the latest edition of On the Nose around (2:09:16), Ariel Helwani talks about the controversy around the new Paddy Pimblett fight, the Conor McGregor and Dillon Danis friendship, a fourth fight for Deiveson Figueiredo and Brandon Moreno, and more. Jorge Masvidal around (3:14:17) discusses how he ended up fighting Colby Covington at UFC 272, Covington's trash talk, Amanda Nunes leaving ATT, and much more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Real America with Dan Ball
1/19/22 - Conservative truth tellers under partisan attack!

Real America with Dan Ball

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 60:02


The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2758 - When Men Accidentally Become Gods w/ Anna Della Subin

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 54:38


Sam and Emma Anna Della Subin, senior editor at Bidoun Projects, to discuss her recent book Accidental Gods: On Men Unwittingly Turned Divine, on the pervasive and frequently overlooked figure that began popping up at the dawn of “New World” imperialism, and has since emerged, both through oppression and resistance, countless times in the face of a singular authority. Subin begins by bringing Sam and Emma back to the end of the 1400s, looking at the “explorers” from Columbus to Cortez that saw their reception by indigenous folks as an expression of deification and mysticism, rather than an intense recognition of their sudden appearance and authoritarian claim to power. These stories were then told and retold by European settlers, bolstering the religious imperialism that defined their ideology, justifying their claim to the lands of entire civilizations, and explaining away the terror they wrought as, at worst, Godly fear that must occur to bring them the light of Christianity and the West. Next, Anna explores how these myths were central to the creation and recognition of race as a social signifier, as Spanish colonizers brought their blood puritanism to the Americas with the primary identifier shifting from religion to skin color as they converted the region. Moving forward in history, Anna, Sam, and Emma then dive into the roles of Accidental Gods that emerged under colonization, but without the imperial goals, such as Haile Selassie and Gandhi, as the imposition of their deification came from around them, bolstering the people's belief in their resistance and emancipation, before they look at more contemporary examples of the vitriolic accidental gods that emerged, from Major John Nicholson to General MacArthur, as people they stood above attempted to reclaim the power exercised upon them. Lastly, they touch on the accidental deification that we see today, from Donald Trump to Capitalism as a whole, and the “cargo cult” of the British and American doctrine. Sam and Emma also touch on the disgusting politicization of MLK and Voting Rights, two things that never EVER had to do with politics. And in the Fun Half: Josh calls in to chat about Bernie doing all of the heavy lifting when it comes to disseminating COVID information, Bob from FL totally debunks mistrust of the CIA, and Sam and Emma are blown away by Gary Chambers's senatorial campaign announcement. Dan Crenshaw cracks under the pressure of a pre-teen using his own words against him, and Emma and Sam take on Ron DeSantis codifying protections for white fragility into Floridian education policy. They also explore Orange County's health director being placed on administrative leave for questioning his department's public health practices, and OAN possibly going under after losing their corporate funding from AT&T, plus, your calls and IMs! Purchase tickets for the live show in Boston on May 15th HERE: https://thewilbur.com/artist/majority-report/ Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com: https://fans.fm/majority/join Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here:  https://madmimi.com/signups/170390/join Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store: https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ Check out today's sponsors: Magic Spoon: Magic Spoon is a new cereal company that's discovered a way to recreate your favorite childhood cereals with 0 sugar, 12 grams of protein, and only 3 net grams of carbs in each serving. Go to to https://magicspoon.com/pages/partner?partner=majorityreport&utm_source=majorityreport&utm_medium=Podcast for your custom bundle of cereal and try it today! Be sure to use our promo code MAJORITYREPORT at checkout to save five dollars off your order. Support the St. Vincent Nurses today! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/leftreckoning Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/literaryhangover Check out The Nomiki Show on YouTube. https://www.patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/mattbinder Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/ExpandTheDiscourse Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada. https://www.patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at https://www.twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere. https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere  Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop The Majority Report with Sam Seder - https://majorityreportradio.com/

Motley Fool Money
Alphabet's Discipline, 5G's Potential

Motley Fool Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 28:08


Microsoft's acquisition of Activision Blizzard wasn't just a shot at Meta Platforms. Shares of Sony continue to fall in the wake of Microsoft's move, causing some to question the future of Sony's PlayStation. Tim Beyers analyzes the shifting landscape in entertainment, including Google's move to shut down its original programming division at YouTube. He also discusses whether winning regulatory approval to become a bank holding company makes SoFi Technologies a more attractive investment and Verizon and AT&T changing some of their plans for today's nationwide rollout of 5G. Plus, Ricky Mulvey talks with John Laconte from The Vail Daily about how Vail Mountain Resorts is managing a labor shortage after a difficult holiday season. To get a free copy of our Investing Starter Kit go to www.fool.com/StarterKit and we'll email it to you. Stocks: SONY, GOOG, GOOGL, MSFT, ATVI, META, SOFI, SQ, VZ, T, MTN Host: Chris Hill Guests: Tim Beyers, John LaConte Producer: Ricky Mulvey Engineers: Dan Boyd, Rick Engdahl

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show: 01.19.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 60:33


5G's Crimes Against Humanity   Richard Gale and Gary Null PhD Progressive Radio Network, January 19, 2022     The roll out of the new C-Band 5G service by AT&T and Verizon scheduled for January 19, has raised alarms for major airline executives who have warned that it will create “catastrophic” interference with flight navigation systems and pilot safety during take off and landing.  The risks will be greater during bad weather. Among the warnings are major disruptions in commerce and supply chain, the overriding of aircrafts' electronic safety systems and radio altimeters, and the grounding of flights that will leave “tens of thousands of Americans grounded.” According to CNN, the airlines estimate that upwards to 1,000 flights will be disrupted daily. The 5G threat is particularly heightened in low-visibility conditions. Chief executives from American Airlines, United, Delta, Southwest and Jet Blue have demanded that 5G be blocked within a two-mile radius of major US airports. FedEx and UPS have also joined the airlines' complaints. Foreign airlines such as Dubai's Emirates, Air India, Japan Air, Lufthansa and British Airways have already changed or canceled flights to the US. Two of the world's largest plane manufacturers, Airbus and Boeing, have also issued warnings.    This has become an ongoing battle between the Federal Aviation Administration and the private telecomm industry and its Washington lobbyists. The FAA has been warning about 5G interruption of planes' navigation systems for quite some time.  The telecomm industry's unwillingness to budge is most disturbing because the Biden administration has already permitted 90 percent of wireless tower deployment to roll out as scheduled.  It is only in the vicinity of major airports where the FAA and airlines demand restrictions due to safety concerns. However, as we have reported for the past several years, the telecomm giants, notably AT&T and Verizon, and its leading media spokespersons at CNN and the New York Times, have undermined and denied 5G's risks, especially to human health and the environment, ever since wireless technologies were first commercialized.   5G is destined to be a permanent fixture across the nation. There is barely a chance to prevent it. The thousands of medical and environmental studies confirming high EMF's dangers and the petitions signed by thousands of international scientists to halt its deployment are unequivocally ignored or worse ostracized and canceled.  It is estimated that there are over 10,000 peer-reviewed clinical studies mentioning serious molecular biological injury and defects to organs, neurons, cells and cellular function, and DNA damage to plants, animals and humans alike.  Between August 2016 and September 2018 alone, over 400 new studies on electromagnetic radiation risks were compiled by public health Professor Joel Moskowitz at the University of California at Berkeley.   Despite the pandemic, lockdowns and social distancing have not hindered 5G's progress to connect every American into its spider's web.  In December 2019, T-Mobile reached its goal of nationwide 5G coverage of over 1.3 million square miles (34 percent of the US) and AT&T reached its milestone to reach 179 million people. The 5G roll out is also crucial for international globalists to usher in the Fourth Industrial Revolution.  The World Economic Forum's presentation, “Why is 5G Important for the Fourth Industrial Revolution,” outlines the multi-trillion dollar impact advanced connectivity will have on manufacturing, wholesale and resale, smart cities and homes, public services, transportation, real time banking, finance and insurance, agriculture and forestry, micro chip surveillance, real estate, education, mining, health and medicine.   We must not hold any false hopes that the Biden administration will ultimately side with the airlines' safety concerns. During the 2020 election, the Biden campaign received $97 million from the Communications/Tech sector versus Trump's $18 million.  Alphabet (Google), Microsoft, Amazon, Facebook, Apple, AT&T and Comcast overwhelmingly contributed to Biden's war chest.   The American public is being bamboozled with blatant falsehoods to embrace 5G as a necessary and innovative technology that will benefit and improve our lives. But the real truth is the exact opposite.    The following information has been abbreviated from scientific literature that is fully validated and has been stated by international experts such as Drs. Devra Davis and Martin Pall about EMF's adverse effects to government leaders and national legislators repeatedly. This outline was presented by Dr. Martin Pall, a Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry and Medical Sciences at Washington State University to the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Pall is recognized worldwide as an expert in EMF and 5G's detrimental effects on biological systems and the diseases associated with wireless technologies.   Lower Fertility:  Alters the structure of the testes and ovaries, lowers sperm count and the number of egg follicles, increases spontaneous abortion and lowers the levels of three sex hormones. Neurological and Neuropsychiatric Effects:  There has been a dramatic increase in the following conditions since the advent of mobile phones, the internet, and wireless technologies:  insomnia, fatigue, depression, headaches and cognitive dysfunction, anxiety, and loss of memory. Animal studies have shown that EMFs produce major changes in brain structure, which is likely happening to everyone who has extensive daily exposure to EMFs Cellular DNA Damage:  There are three types of DNA damage observed in EMF exposure:  single and double DNA breaks and oxidized DNA bases.  These can cause cancer and mutations in the sexual germ lines. Apoptosis:  EMFs contribute to programmed cell death that in turn leads to reproductive and neurodegenerative disorders. Oxidative Stress:  Free radical damage that has been associated with numerous health conditions including cancer, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, myocardial infarction, stroke, chronic inflammation, Parkinson's, multiple sclerosis, cellular death and aging Endocrine Effects: According Dr. Pall, every hormonal system in the body is adversely affected by EMF exposure. Excessive Intracellular Calcium:  Ca2+ is critical for cellular activity Cancer:  There are 35 separate scientific reviews of the body of peer-reviewed literature providing evidence that EMFs increase carcinogenesis, promote and progress tumor development and contribute to metastasis.   There are also other medical conditions that have been shown to be associated likely with EMF exposure:   Cardiac Effects.  EMFs interfere with the electrical control of the heart that can produce tachycardia, bradycadia, arrhythmia and abnormal heart palpitations. Early Onset of Alzheimer's and Dementia:  In recent years and in parallel with increased EMF exposure, signs of symptoms associated with Alzheimer's are being observed in people age 30 and younger. Dr. Pall has called this "digital dementias." ADHD and Autism:  The epidemic in ADHD and autism witnessed in each younger generation may be caused by late prenatal and early post-natal EMF exposure. Each of these neurological conditions is associated with the increase of calcium over-penetrating cell linings due to EMF pulsations and disrupting synapse formations.   Everyone will be affected by 5G's radiation. But it will not require three decades to observe its injurious effects. Unlike cigarettes, nobody has a choice whether you wish to be exposed to 5G or not. 5G's EMF radiation is all-pervasive.    The mainstream media, in particular the New York Times, which has a collaborative agreement with the leading 5G provider Verizon, have no intention to warn the public about any of the scientific findings mentioned above. There is a growing consensus in the scientific and medical community that 5G will usher an epidemic of disease never before witnessed in human history. It is too difficult to make forecasts. Nevertheless, if the past and current research on EMF's adverse effects on health and the environment during the past 50 years are any indication, we are entering a new epoch of disease and neurological disorders that humanity is completely unprepared to handle.    This is a consequence of what happens when an entire nation is trapped into carelessly trusting elected presidents and legislators whose campaigns are bankrolled by the Telecomm giants and Silicon Valley, and a media empire ruled by serial liars and masters of disinformation campaigns for private corporate interests. This is vulture capitalism at is worse.  

Squawk Pod
M&A in the Metaverse, 5G in the Skies, & Trades on the Peloton

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 34:12


Microsoft's enormous deal for Activision Blizzard might be the catalyst for consolidation of metaverse projects in 2022. AT&T and Verizon have turned on a major new part of 5G coverage, but alarm from some airlines has delayed the launch near U.S. airports. Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg discusses 5G safety and how the new 5G C-band coverage could supercharge the internet, just in time for more metaverse projects. Plus, Pfizer's new Covid antiviral drug is effective against the omicron variant, and stock sales from Peloton executives are raising some eyebrows while CNBC's Robert Frank raises the bar for anchor workouts.  In this episode:Hans Vestberg, @hansvestbergBrian Trunzo, @NTBroCathy Hackl, @CathyHacklJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkBecky Quick, @BeckyQuickAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkinJulia Boorstin, @JBoorstinKatie Kramer, @Kramer_Katie

Worldwide Exchange
Making Sense of the Market Volatility; Airlines vs. Telecoms: Who's Right in the Battle over 5G?; Movin' Out: The States With the Most Inbound Moves

Worldwide Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 47:11


All-Star traders Jeff Kilburg and Jenny Harrington help explain what's behind the volatility in the markets to start the new year. Plus, former Spirit Airlines CEO Ben Baldanza discusses the dispute between airlines, Verizon and AT&T over the rollout of new 5G wireless service. And, new data on where Americans are moving, and the news may surprise some residents of the Golden State.

POLITICO Dispatch
Airlines face their next challenge: 5G

POLITICO Dispatch

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 12:56


5G, more like 5 o-m-g! Amid concerns that AT&T's and Verizon's 5G rollout could cause thousands of flight cancellations and disruptions, the wireless companies agreed to heed the warnings of the aviation industry and scale back their rollout. How'd this get to be such a mess in the first place? Oriana Pawlyk reports.

Be Positive | Stay Positive
Episode 368: It’s Easy To Not Be Motivated

Be Positive | Stay Positive

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 9:54


Self-motivation is not always easy. Often time our brain makes excuses so we can accept not doing something. I experienced this first-hand yesterday.Don't forget about my new book The Positive Perspective.My new book addresses several life situations in a straightforward, simplistic way. Many of life's problems are created by us and can be fixed when you change your perspective. Emotions like love, anger, sadness, and fear, are created in our minds. When we try to predict the future it's natural to visualize the worst-case scenario. It doesn't have to be that way once you understand how to use the power of your mind.The Positive Perspective is available on AMAZON. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08YS62QZT/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=the+positive+perspective&qid=1615781990&sr=8-1If you're enjoying the show, it's safe to assume there are others out there like you who would also enjoy the show. Help them find it. Please share this podcast and maybe the person you share it with will overcome that one thing in life they were struggling with.Check out the Be Positive Stay Positive merchandise. https://teespring.com/stores/stay-positive-4All profits from merchandise go to maintain the equipment used to produce this show.Tell me your story. Go to http://BePositivePodcast.com/yourstory and tell me all about it. I'll discuss it on an upcoming podcast and give you a shout-out on the air.Website - http://bepositivepodcast.comYouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBoaClvyCPEHFmOQ9f5hPlw?"Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/bepositivepodcastTwitter - https://twitter.com/NatBePositiveInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/drumman101Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/be-positive-podcastListen on AMAZON - https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/fef90539-d637-4101-8f5a-81cce3f2078c/be-positive-stay-positive-podcast.#bepositive #positivity #subconsciousmind #infiniteintelligence #PositivePodcast #PositivePerspectiveMPB Print & Sign Superstore888-292-0001915 Greenbag Road,Morgantown WV, 26508mpbonline.comMorgantown | Bridgeport | Charleston | Steubenville | WaynesburgMPB Godaddyhttps://account.godaddy.com/products/user: 57143729password: MPBgraphics#1pin: 0915Websitehttps://mpbonline.com/wp-adminmpbgraphicsp$VfUAMN64https://morgantownprintingandbinding.com/wp-admin/mpbgraphicsMPBgraphics#915Twitterhttps://twitter.com/MPB_TweetMPB_tweetpassword13Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/mpb_prints/mpb_printspassword19Applempbgraphics1@gmail.comMPBgraphics#915Adobenbarouch@mp-b.comMPBgraphics#1Graphics915)JJ - 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NBC Nightly News
Tuesday, January 18, 2022

NBC Nightly News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 18:58


AT&T and Verizon delay 5G rollout near some airports, government's free Covid testing site launches one day early, and Russian invasion fears inside Ukraine.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: Jan. 6 panel subpoenas Rudy Giuliani, three other Trump allies

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 5:32


In our news wrap Tuesday, a congressional committee subpoenaed former Trump adviser Rudy Giuliani in the Jan. 6 investigation. A federal judge approved a debt restructuring plan that ends Puerto Rico's struggle to emerge from bankruptcy. Warnings flew back and forth between Russia and NATO powers over Ukraine. Verizon and AT&T agreed to delay activating 5G cell towers near major U.S. airports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Tuesday January 18 - Full Show

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 102:10


The Democrats blame game continues as polling hits an all-time low. Michigan Democrats put out a statement saying parents shouldn't play a role in their childrens' education. Top US military officials test positive for COVID while its strict vaccine mandate remains in place. An email circulating online was sent to Carhartt's employees which reiterates the company's mandatory vaccination program. Hong Kong will kill thousands of hamsters after testing positive for COVID. Tennis Superstar Novak Djokovic gets banned from the French Open. Protestors outside the Capitol stage a hunger strike over voting rights. AT&T and Verizon delay their rollout of 5G technology due to the FAA lagging behind schedule. XStrategies CEO Alex Bruesewitz joins us to discuss the January 6th witch hunt.Please visit our great sponsors:Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world.Patriot Mobile https://PatriotMobile.com/DanaFree Activation with promo code DANA. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT.Black Rifle Coffeehttps://blackriflecoffee.com/DANATVUse code DANATV for 20% off your first coffee club purchase, coffee and select gear. Legacy Precious Metalshttps://legacypminvestments.comPick up your free guide to precious metal investments today.Superbeetshttps://DanasBeets.comGet up to 45% off PLUS free shipping at DANASBEETS.COM.Tommy Johnhttps://tommyjohn.comGet 20% off your first order

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Tuesday January 18 - Full Show

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 102:10


The Democrats blame game continues as polling hits an all-time low. Michigan Democrats put out a statement saying parents shouldn't play a role in their childrens' education. Top US military officials test positive for COVID while its strict vaccine mandate remains in place. An email circulating online was sent to Carhartt's employees which reiterates the company's mandatory vaccination program. Hong Kong will kill thousands of hamsters after testing positive for COVID. Tennis Superstar Novak Djokovic gets banned from the French Open. Protestors outside the Capitol stage a hunger strike over voting rights. AT&T and Verizon delay their rollout of 5G technology due to the FAA lagging behind schedule. XStrategies CEO Alex Bruesewitz joins us to discuss the January 6th witch hunt.Please visit our great sponsors:Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world.Patriot Mobile https://PatriotMobile.com/DanaFree Activation with promo code DANA. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT.Black Rifle Coffeehttps://blackriflecoffee.com/DANATVUse code DANATV for 20% off your first coffee club purchase, coffee and select gear. Legacy Precious Metalshttps://legacypminvestments.comPick up your free guide to precious metal investments today.Superbeetshttps://DanasBeets.comGet up to 45% off PLUS free shipping at DANASBEETS.COM.Tommy Johnhttps://tommyjohn.comGet 20% off your first order

MoneyBall Medicine
What Exponential Change Really Means in Healthcare, with Azeem Azhar

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 57:25


As we say here on The Harry Glorikian Show, technology is changing everything about healthcare works—and the reason we keep talking about it month after month is that the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road. Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential. And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View. And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society. He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it. Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change—so we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble. If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.So, when you step back and think about it, why is it that people like me write books or make podcasts about technology and healthcare?Well, like I just said, it's because tech is changing everything about healthcare works—and the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past.In fact, the change feels like it's accelerating. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road.Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential.And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View.And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society.He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it.Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change. So we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble.If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Azeem and I focus on different corners of the innovation world. But our ideas about things like the power of data are very much in sync. So this was a really fun conversation. Here's Azeem Azhar.Harry Glorikian: Azeem, welcome to the show.Azeem Azhar: Harry, what a pleasure to be here.Harry Glorikian: I definitely want to give you a chance to sort of talk about your work and your background, so we really get a sense of who you are. But I'd first like to ask a couple of, you know, big picture questions to set the stage for everybody who's listening. You like this, your word and you use it, "exponential," in your branding and almost everything you're doing across your platform, which is what we're going to talk about. But just for people who don't, aren't maybe familiar with that word exponential. What does that word mean to you? Why do you think that that's the right word, word to explain how technology and markets are evolving today?Azeem Azhar: Such a great question. I love the way you started with the easy questions. I'm just kidding because it's it's hard. It's hard to summarize short, but in a brief brief statement. So, you know, exponential is this idea that comes out of math. It is the idea that something grows by a fixed proportion in any given time period. An interest-bearing savings account, 3 percent growth or in the old days, we'd get 3 percent per annum, three percent compounded. And compound interest is really powerful. It's what your mom and your dad told you. Start saving early so that when you're a bit older, you'll have a huge nest egg, and it never made sense to us. And the idea behind an exponential is that these are processes which, you know, grow by that certain fixed percentage every year. And so the amount they grow grows every time. It's not like going from the age of 12 to 13 to 14 to 15 were actually proportionately—you get less older every year because when you go from 15 to 16, you get older by one fifteenth of your previous age. And when you go from 50 to fifty one, it's by one 50th, which is a smaller proportion. Someone who is growing in age exponentially would be growing by, say, 10 percent every year. So you go from 10 to 11 and that's by one year. From 20, you go to 22, two years. From 30 to 33. So that's the idea of an exponential process. It's kind of compound interest. But why I use the phrase today to describe what's going on in the economy and in the technologies that drive the economy, is that many of the key technologies that we currently rely on and will rely on as they replace old industrial processes are improving at exponential rates on a price-performance basis.Azeem Azhar: That means that every year you get more of them for less, or every year what you got for the the same dollar you get much more. And I specifically use a threshold, and that threshold is to say essentially it's an exponential technology if it's improving by double digits, 10 percent or more every year on a compounding basis for decades. And many of the technologies that I look at increased by improve by 30, 40, 50, 60 percent or more every year, which is pretty remarkable. The reverse of that, of course, is deflation, right? These capabilities are getting much cheaper. And I think the reason that's important and the reason it describes the heartbeat of our economies is that we're at a point in development of, you know, sort of economic and technological development where these improvements can be felt. They're viscerally felt across a business cycle. Across a few years, in fact. And that isn't something that we have reliably and regularly seen in any previous point in history. The idea that this pace of change can be as fast as it as it is. And on the cover of my book The Exponential Age, which I'm holding up to you, Harry. The thing about the curve is is that it starts off really flat and a little bit boring, and you would trade that curve for a nice, straight, sharp line at 45 degrees. And then there's an inflection point when it goes suddenly goes kind of crazy and out of control. And my argument is that we are now past that inflection point and we are in that that sort of vertical moment and we're going to have to contend with it.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, we are mentally aligned. And I try to talk to people about this. I mean, when we were doing the genome project that Applied Biosystems, you know, when we had finished, I think it was 2 percent or 4 percent of the genome, everybody's like, Oh, you have like ninety something [to go], and they couldn't see the exponential curve. And then we were done like five years later. And so it's it's this inability of the human mind. You know, it's really not designed to do that, but we're not designed to see exponential shift. We're sort of looking around that corner from an evolutionary perspective to see what's happening. But, you know? Exponential growth is not a new concept, if you think about, you know, really, I think the person that brought it to the forefront was Gordon Moore, right? With, you know, how semiconductor chips were going to keep doubling every two years and cost was going to stay flat. And you know, how do you see it playing out? Today, what is so different right now, or say, in the past two, three, four, five years. What you can see going forward that. May not have been as obvious 10 or 15 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, it is an idea that's been around with us for a long time. You know, arguably Thomas Malthus, the British scholar in the 18th century who worried about the exponential growth of the population destroying the land's carrying capacity and ability to produce crops. And of course, we have the sort of ancient Persian and Hindu stories about the vizier and the chessboard, who, you know, puts a grain of rice and doubles on each square and doubles at each time. So it's an idea that's been around for a while. The thing that I think has happened is that it's back to its back to that point, the kink, the inflection in the curve. The point at which in the story of the chess, the king gets so angry with his vizier that he chops off his head. The point with the semiconductors, where the chips get so powerful and so cheap that computing is everything, and then every way in which we live our lives is mediated through these devices. And that wasn't always the way. I mean, you and I, Harry, are men of a certain age, and we remember posting letters and receiving mail through the letterbox in the morning. And there was then, some 15 years later, there were, or 20 years later, there was a fax, right? I mean, that's what it looked like.Azeem Azhar: And the thing that's different now from the time of Gordon Moore is that that what he predicted and sort of saw out as his clock speed, turns out to be a process that occurs in many, many different technology fields, not just in computing. And the one that you talked about as well, genome sequencing. And in other areas like renewable energy. And so it becomes a little bit like...the clock speed of this modern economy. But the second thing that is really important is to ask that question: Where is the bend in the curve? And the math purists amongst your listeners will know that an exponential curve has no bend. It depends on where you zoom in. Whatever however you zoom, when you're really close up, you're really far away. You'll always see a band and it will always be in a different place. But the bend that we see today is the moment where we feel there is a new world now. Not an old world. There are things that generally behave differently, that what happens to these things that are connected to exponential processes are not kind of geeks and computer enthusiasts are in Silicon Valley building. They're happening all over the world. And for me, that turning point happens some point between 2011, 2012 and 2015, 2016. Because in 2009, America's largest companies wereAzeem Azhar: not in this order, Exxon, Phillips, Wal-Mart, Conoco... Sorry, Exxon Mobil, Wal-Mart, ConocoPhillips, Chevron, General Motors, General Electric, Ford, AT&T, Valero. What do all of them have in common? They are all old companies are all built on three technologies that emerged in the late 19th century. The car or the internal combustion engine, the telephone and electricity. And with the exception of Wal-Mart, every one of those big companies was founded between about 1870 and sort of 1915. And Wal-Mart is dependent on the car because you needed suburbs and you needed large cars with big trunks to haul away 40 rolls of toilet paper. So, so and that was a century long shift. And then if you look out four years after 2009, America's largest firms, in fact, the world's largest firms are all Exponential Age firms like the Tencent and the Facebooks of this world. But it's not just that at that period of time. That's the moment where solar power became for generating electricity became cheaper than generating electricity from oil or gas in in most of the world. It's the point at which the price to sequence the human genome, which you know is so much better than I do, diminished below $1000 per sequence. So all these things came together and they presented a new way of doing things, which I call the Exponential Age.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, in my last book. I, you know, I do state that the difference between evolution and revolution is time, right? If you wait long enough, things happen evolutionarily, but at the speed that things are changing, it feels revolutionary and in how it's affecting everybody. So let's rewind and talk about your background. You've been active as a business columnist, as a journalist, a startup founder, a CEO, a leader of corporate innovation, incubators at Reuters and a venture capital partner. Lately you've built what eems like a very busy career around books and talks and podcasts and all around this theme of accelerating technologies, I'd love to hear how you how you first got interested in all these themes about technological change. You know, how society can manage this change? I know you were in Oxford. You got your master's degree in the famous PPE program. The politics, philosophy and economics. You know, was it soon after that that you went down this road? Or is Oxford where it all started?Azeem Azhar: It started well before then in, in a weird way. So, so you know, my interest really is between sits between technology and an economic institutions and society. And I, I was born, like most of us are, to two parents, and my parents were working in in Zambia in the early 70s, and my dad was working on helping this newly independent country develop economic institutions. It didn't have them and it needed them to go through that sort of good institutions, make for healthy economies, make for social welfare and sort of civil politics. That's the argument. So he was out there doing all of that. And I was born the year after Intel released its 4004 chip, which is widely regarded as the sort of the chip that kicked off the personal computing revolution. And so, so in the backdrop of people talking about development and development economics and being curious about my own personal story, I was exposed to these ideas. I mean, you don't understand them when you're eight or 10 and you know, but you're exposed to them and you have an affiliation to them and so on. And at the same time, computers were entering into the popular consciousness.Azeem Azhar: You know, you had C-3PO, the robot and computers in Star Trek, and I saw a computer in 1979 and I had one from 1981. And so my interest in these things, these two tracks was start set off quite early on and I really, really loved the computing. And I did, you did notice, but you don't necessarily understand that, why computers are getting more and more powerful. My first computer only had one color. Well, it had two, white and black. And my second could manage 16 at some time, probably not 16. Eight out of a palette of 16 at any given time. And they get better and better. And so alongside my life were computers getting faster. I'm learning to program them and discovering the internet and that, I think, has always sat alongside me against this kind of family curiosity. I suspect if my parents had been, I don't know, doctors, I would have been in your field in the field of bioinformatics and applying exponential technologies to health care. And if my parents had been engineers, I would have been doing something that intersected engineering and computing.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, no, it's you know, it's interesting, I remember when we got our first chip, when I was first learning about, you know, computers like it was, you know, eight bits, right? And then 16 bits and oh my god, what can we do with them? And we were building them, and I actually have to get you a copy of my new book because I think if you read the first chapter and what you just said, you'll be like, Oh my God, we have more in common than we may think, even though you know you're where you are and I'm in the health care field to. But you were co-founder and CEO of a company, I believe that was called PeerIndex, which was a startup in the late 2000s. And even back then, you were trying to quantify people's influence on different social media platforms. And I'm trying to remember like, do I even know what the social media platform was back in 2000? It seems like so long ago, and you successfully sold it to Brandwatch in, like, 2014. What did that experience sort of teach you about, you know, the bigger issues and how technology impacts society and vice versa? Because I have to believe that you know your hands on experience and what you were seeing has to have changed the way that you thought about how fast this was going and what it was going to do.Azeem Azhar: Oh, that is an absolutely fantastic, fantastic question. And. You know, you really get to the heart of all of the different things that you learn as a founder. When we when I started PeerIndex, the idea was really that people were going on to the internet with profiles that they maintained for themselves. So up until that point, apart from people who had been really early on the internet, like you and I who used Usenet and then early web pages for ourselves, no one really had a presence. And these social apps like MySpace and Twitter and LinkedIn and Facebook show up and they start to give people a presence. And we felt that initially there would be a clear problem around trying to discover people because at the time the internet was an open network. You could look at anyone's page on Facebook. There weren't these walled gardens. And we looked down on them. So we thought initially that there would be a an opportunity to build some kind of expertise system where I could say, "Listen, find me something that someone who knows something about, you know, sushi restaurants in Berlin." And it would help me find that person. I could connect their profile and talk to them because it was the really early, naive days before Facebook or LinkedIn had advertising on them. And we could we kind of got the technology to work, but actually the market was moving and we couldn't land that.Azeem Azhar: And so we had to kind of pivot, as you do several times, ultimately, until we became this kind of influence analytics for marketers. But the few things that I learned. So the first one was how quickly new players in a market will go from being open to being closed. So it was 2011 when Facebook started to put the shutters down on its data and become a closed garden. And they realized that the network effect and data is what drove them forward. And the second thing was the speed with which what we did changed. So when we were getting going and doing all of this kind of analytics on Twitter and Facebook. They didn't really have data science teams. In fact, Twitter's first data scientists couldn't get a US visa and ended up helping, working with us for several months. And I think back to the fact that we used five or six different core technologies for our data stores in a seven-year period. And in that time, what we did became so much more powerful. So when we started, we had maybe like 50,000 people in this thing, it was really hard to get it to work. The entire company's resources went on it. At one point we were we had about 100 million people in the data in our dataset, or 100 million profiles in the data.Azeem Azhar: They were all public, by the way. I should say this is all public data and it was just like a search engine in a way. And in order to update the index, we would need to run processes on thousands of computers and it would take a big, big, big servers, right? And it would take a day. Yeah. By the time we sold the company, a couple more iterations of Moore's Law, some improvements in software architecture, we were updating 400 million user profiles in real time on a couple of computers. Yep, so not only do we quadrupled the dataset, we had increased its, sort of decreased its latency. It was pretty much real time and we had reduced the amount of computers we needed by a factor of about 400. And it was a really remarkable evolution. And that gets me to the third lesson. So the second lesson is really all about that pace of change in the power of Moore's law. And then the third lesson was really that my engineers learned by doing. They figured out how to do this themselves. And whereas I was sort of roughly involved in the first design, by the time we got to the fifth iteration this was something of a process that was entirely run by some brilliant young members of the team.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, you've got to actually cook something to understand how to do it and taste it and understand how it's going to come out. So your new book, The Exponential Age, came out this fall. You know, in the first chapter, you sort of identify two main problems, right? One is how do we perceive technology and then or the way we relate to technology and. Can you describe the two problems as you see them and maybe, maybe even hint a little? I don't want I don't want if people want to buy the book, I want them to buy it, but maybe hint that the solution?Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Well, I mean, there are there are a couple of issues here, right, in the Exponential Age. The first is that technology creates all sorts of new potentials and we live them. We're doing this over Zoom, for example. Right. And there are. But the arrival of new potentials always means that there's an old system that is going to be partially or entirely replaced. And so I describe that process as the exponential gap. It is the gap between the potentials of the new and the way in which most of us live our lives. And the thing is, the reason I say "the way most of us live our lives" is because our lives, even in America, which doesn't like its sort of government, are governed by institutions and by regulations. You know, when you when you start to cook, you wash your hands, right? There's no law. That's just an institution, its common habit. If you have teenage kids like I do, you're battling with the fact that people are meant to talk over dinner, not stare at their phones. In the UK there is an institution that says on a red light traffic signal, you never turn. You wait. It's not like the US where you can do that. Now some of these institutions are codified like our traffic laws, and some are not.Azeem Azhar: There are then more formal institutions of different types like, you know, the Fed or NATO or the Supreme Court. And the purpose of institutions, social, formal, legal, informal is to make life easier to live, right? Right, you don't have to remember to put our pants on. I will read a rule that says, put your pants on before you leave the house. It's like you just put them on and everybody kind of knows it. And there's no law that says you should or shouldn't, right. So they become very valuable. But the thing is that the institutions in general, by their nature, don't adapt to at the speed with which these new technologies do adapt. And even slower moving technologies like the printing press really upended institutions. I mean, Europe went into centuries of war just after the printing press emerged. So, so the central heart of the challenge is, on the one hand, we have these slightly magical technologies that do amazing things, but they somewhat break our institutions and we have to figure out how we get our institutions to adapt better. But there's a second complication to all of this, which is that which is, I think, more one that's about historical context. And that complication is that the way we have talked about technology, especially in the West in the last 40 or 50 years, has been to suggest that technology is deterministic.Azeem Azhar: We're a bit like people in a pre-med, pre-science era who just say the child got the pox and the child died. We say the technology arrived and now we must use it. The iPhone arrived and we must use it. TheFacebook arrived, and we must use it. We've gotten into this worldview that technology is this sort of unceasing deterministic force that arrives from nowhere and that a few men and women in Silicon Valley control, can harness it. We've lost sight of the fact that technology is something that we as members of society, as business people, as innovators, as academics, as parents get to shape because it is something that we build ourselves. And that for me was a second challenge. And what I sought to do in the book, as I was describing, the Exponential Age is not only persuade people that we are in the Exponential Age, but also describe how it confuses our institutions broadly defined and also explain why our response has sometimes been a bit poor. Some a large part of which I think is connected to putting technology on a particular pedestal where we don't ask questions of it. And then hopefully at the end of this, I do give some suggestions.Harry Glorikian: Well, it's interesting, right, I've had the pleasure of giving talks to different policy makers, and I always tell them like, you need to move faster, you need to implement policy. It's good to be a little wrong and then fix it. But don't be so far behind the curve that you, you know, some of these things need corralling otherwise, they do get a lot of, you know, get out of hand. Now in health care, we have almost the opposite. We're trying to break the silos of data so that we can improve health care, improve diagnosis, improve outcomes for patients, find new drugs. Harry Glorikian: So I'm going to, I'm going to pivot there a little bit and sort of dive a little deeper into life sciences and health care, right, which is the focus of the show, right? And in the book, you you say that our age is defined by the emergence of several general-purpose technologies, which I'm totally aligned with, and that they are all advancing exponentially. And you actually say biology is one of them. So first, what are the most dramatic examples in your mind of exponential change in life sciences? And how do you believe they're affecting people's health?Azeem Azhar: Well, I mean, if you got the Moderna or BioNTech vaccination, you're a lucky recipient of that technology and it's affecting people's health because it's putting a little nanobots controlled by Bill Gates in your bloodstream to get you to hand over all your bitcoin to him, is the other side of the problem. But I mean, you know, I mean, more seriously, the Moderna vaccine is an example that I give at the at the end of the book comes about so remarkably quickly by a combination of these exponential technologies. I'm just going to look up the dates. So on the 6th of January 2020, there's a release of the sequence of a coronavirus genome from from a respiratory disease in Wuhan. Yeah, and the the genome is just a string of letters, and it's put on GenBank, which is a bit like an open-source story storage for gene sequences. People started to download it, and synthetic genes were rapidly led to more than 200 different vaccines being developed. Moderna, by February the 7th, had its first vials of its vaccine. That was 31 days after the initial release of the sequence and another six days they finalized the sequence of the vaccine and 25 more days to manufacture it. And within a year of the virus sequence being made public, 24 million people had had one dose of it.Azeem Azhar: Now that's really remarkable because in the old days, by which I mean February 2020, experts were telling us it would take at least 18 months to figure out what a vaccine might even look like, let alone tested and in place. So you see this dramatic time compression. Now what were the aspects at play? So one aspect at play was a declining cost of genome sequencing, which the machines are much cheaper. It's much cheaper to sequence these samples. That means that the entire supply chain of RNA amplifiers and so on a more widely available. This then gets shared on a website that can be run at very few dollars. It can get access to millions of people. The companies who are doing the work are using synthetic genes, which means basically writing out new bases, which is another core technology that's going through an exponential cost decline. And they're using a lot of machine learning and big data in order to explore the phenomenally complex biological space to zero in on potential candidates. So that the whole thing knits together a set of these different technologies in a very, very powerful and quite distributed combination.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer. It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's step back here for just a minute. So I wonder if you have a thesis—from a fundamental technology perspective, what's really driving the exponential technological change, right? Do you think that that, is there a force maybe outside of semiconductors that are driving biology forward? What's your view? I mean, if you took the computational tools away from life sciences and drug developers, would we still see the same rapid advances in that area, and the answer could be no, because I can tell you my thoughts after you tell me yours.Azeem Azhar: Well, we wouldn't see the same advances, but we would still see significant advances and it's hard to unpack one from another. But if you look at the I mean, you worked on the genome sequencing stuff. So you know that there's a lot of interesting aspects to do with the reagents that are used the electrochemistry, the arrays and making little ongoing improvements in those areas. There are also key improvements in the actual kind of automation of the processes between each to each step, and some of those automations are not, they're not kind of generalized robots, soft robots, they are trays that are being moved at the right time from one spot to another, stop on a kind of lab bench. So you'd still see the improvements, but you wouldn't see the same pace that we have seen from computing. And for two reasons. So one is that kind of the core ability to store lots of this data, which runs into the exabytes and then sift through it, is closely connected to storage capacity and computation capability. But also even the CAD package that the person used to redraw the designs for the new laboratory bench to handle the new vials of reagents required a computer. But yes, but you know, so what? What's your understanding as someone who is on the inside and, note to listener, that was a bit cruel because Harry is the expert on this one!Harry Glorikian: And oh no, no, no, no. I, you know, it's interesting, right… I believe that now that information is more readily available, which again drives back to sensors, technology, computation, speed as well as storage is changing what we do. Because the information feeds our ability to generate that next idea. And most of this was really hard to get. I mean, back in the day, I mean, if you know, now I wear a medical device on my on my wrist. I mean, you know this, I look as a as a data storage device, right? Data aggregation device. And this I look at it more as a coach, right? And but the information that it's getting, you know, from me on a momentary basis is, I mean, one of the companies I helped start, I mean, we have trillions of heartbeats, trillions. Can you imagine the analytics from a machine learning and, you know, A.I. perspective that I can do on that to look for? Is there a signal of a disease? Can I see sleep apnea or one of the I could never have done that 10 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, even 10, how about I mean, five maybe, right? I mean, the thing that I find remarkable about about all of this is what it's told me. So I went from I used to check my bloods every year and so I would get a glucose reading or an insulin reading every year. I then put a CGM on continuous glucose monitor and I wore it for 16 to 18 weeks and it gave me a reading every 15 months minutes. So I literally went from once a year, which is 365 times 96, 15 minute intervals. So it's like a 40,000-fold improvement. I went to from to that every 15 minutes, and it was incredible and amazing and changed my life in so many good ways, which I'm happy to go into later. But the moment I put the 15 minute on, I kid you not, within an hour I was looking for the streaming cGMPs that give you real time feed. No 15-minute delay. And there is one that Abbott makes through a company, sells through a company called Super Sapiens. But because suddenly I was like a pilot whose altimeter doesn't just tell them you're in the air or you've hit the ground, which is what happened when I used to go once a year, I've gone to getting an altitude reading every minute, which is great, but still not brilliant for landing the plane to where I could get this every second. And this would be incredible. And I find that really amazing. I just I just and what we can then do with that across longitudinal data is just something else.Harry Glorikian: We're totally aligned. And, you know, jumping back to the deflationary force of all this. Is. What we can do near-patient, what we can do at home, what we can do at, you know, I'll call it CVS, I think by you, it would be Boots. But what these technologies bring to us and how it helps a person manage themselves more accurately or, you know, more insightfully, I think, brings us not to chronic health, but we will be able to keep people healthier, longer and at a much, much lower cost than we did before because. As you know, every time we go to the hospital, it's usually big machines, very expensive, somebody to do the interpretation. And now if we can get that information to the patient themselves and AI and machine learning can make that information easier for them to interpret. They can actually do something actionable that that that makes a difference.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I think it's a really remarkable opportunity with a big caveat that where we can look at look historically, so you know, we're big fans of the Hamilton musical in my household. And if you go back to that time, which is only a couple of hundred years ago and you said to them, this is the kind of magic medicine they'll have in the US by 2020. I mean, it's space tech. It's alien space tech. You know, you can go in and we measure things they didn't even know could be measured, right, like the level of antibodies in the bloodstream. And you can get that done in an hour almost anywhere, right? Yeah. And it's really quite cheap because GDP per capita in the per head in the US is like $60,000 a year. And I can go and get my blood run. A full panel run for $300 in London, one of the most expensive cities in the world. 60 grand a year. $300. Well, surely everybody's getting that done. And yet and you know this better than me. Right. You know this better than me that despite that, we don't have everyone getting their bloods done because it's just so cheap, right, there are other structural things that go on about who gets access, and I think America is a great example of this because for all the people who read, we are aware of Whoop, and have, you know, biological ages that are 10 years younger than their chronological age, you've also got like a much, much larger incidence of deaths by drug overdose and chronic obesity and sort of diseases of inflammation and so on. And that's despite having magical the magical space technology of the 2020s. So the question I think we have to have is why would we feel that next year's optoelectronic sensors from Rockly or the Series 7 or Series 8 Apple Watch will make the blindest bit of difference to health outcomes for the average American.Harry Glorikian: Now, I totally agree with you, I mean, I think half of it is education, communication. You know, there's a lot of social and political and policy and communication issues that exist, and actually that was going to be my next, one of my next questions for you, which is: What are some of the ways that exponential change challenges our existing social and political structures? And you know, do you see any—based on all the people that you've talked to, you know, writing the book, et cetera—insights of how we're going, what those are and maybe some ideas about how we can move beyond them.Azeem Azhar: Hmm. Well, I mean, on the health care side, I think one of the most important issues is and this is I mean, look, you've got an American audience and your health system is very different to, let's just say everyone.Harry Glorikian: Actually, the audience is global. So everybody, I have people that all over the world that listen to this.Azeem Azhar: Fair enough. Okay. Even better, so the rest of the world will understand this point, perhaps more, which is that, you know, in many place parts of the world, health care is treated as not, you know, it's treated differently to I take a vacation or a mutual bond that you buy, right or a car, it's not seen purely as a kind of profit vehicle. It's seen as something that serves the individual and serves a community and public health and so on matters. And I think one of the opportunities that we have is to think out for it, look out for is how do we get the benefits of aggregated health data, which is what you need. You need aggregate population wide data that connects a genotype to a phenotype. In other words, what the gene says to how it gets expressed to me physically to my biomarkers, you know, my, what's in my microbiota, what my blood pressure is on a minute by minute basis and my glucose levels and so on. And to whatever illnesses and diseases and conditions I seem to have, right, the more of that that we have, the more we can build predictive models that allow for the right kind of interventions and pre-habilitation right rather than rehabilitation. But in order to do that at the heart of that, yes, there's some technology. But at the heart of that is how do we get people's data in such a way that they are willing to provide that in a way that is not forced on them through the duress of the state or the duress of our sort of financial servitude? And so that, I think, is something that we really, really need to think about the trouble that we've had as the companies have done really well out of consumer data recently.Azeem Azhar: And I don't just mean Google and Facebook, but even all the marketing companies before that did so through a kind of abusive use of that data where it wasn't really done for our benefit. You know, I used to get a lot of spam letters through my front door. Physical ones. I was never delighted for it, ever. And so I think that one of the things we have to think, think about is how are we going to be able to build common structures that protect our data but still create the opportunities to develop new and novel therapeutic diagnosis, early warning systems? And that's not to say there shouldn't be profit making companies on there that absolutely should be. But the trouble is, the moment that you allow the data resource to be impinged upon, then you either head down this way of kind of the sort of dominance that Facebook has, or you head down away the root of that kind of abuse of spam, junk email and so on, and junk physical mail.Azeem Azhar: So I think there is this one idea that that emerges as an answer, which is the idea of the data commons or the data collective. Yeah. We actually have a couple of them working in health care in in the U.K., roughly. So there's one around CT scans of COVID patients. So there's lots and lots of CT scans and other kind of lung imaging of COVID patients. And that's maintained in a repository, the sort of national COVID lung imaging databank or something. And if you're if you're an approved researcher, you can get access to that and it's done on a non-commercial basis, but you could build something commercially over the top of it. Now the question is why would I give that scan over? Well, I gave give it over because I've been given a cast-iron guarantee about how it's going to be used and how my personal data will be, may or may not be used within that. I would never consider giving that kind of data to a company run by Mark Zuckerberg or, you know, anyone else. And that, I think, is the the cross-over point, which is in order to access this, the benefits of this aggregate data from all these sensors, we need to have a sort of human-centric approach to ensure that the exploitation can happen profitably, but for our benefit in the long run.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I'm looking at some interesting encryption technologies where nothing is ever unencrypted, but you can, you know, the algorithm can learn from the data, right? And you're not opening it up. And so there, I believe that there are some solutions that can make give the side that needs the data what they need, but protect the other side. I still think we need to policymakers and regulators to step up. That would cause that shift to happen faster. But you know, I think some of those people that are making those policies don't even understand the phone they're holding in their hands most of the time and the power that they're holding. So. You know, last set of questions is. Do you think it's possible for society to adapt to exponential change and learn how to manage it productively?Azeem Azhar: It's a really hard question. I'm sure we will muddle through. We will muddle through because we're good at muddling through, you know? But the question is, does that muddling through look more like the depression years. Or does that muddling through look like a kind of directed Marshall Plan. Because they both get through. One comes through with sort of more productive, generative vigor? What I hoped to do in the book was to be able to express to a wider audience some underlying understanding about how the technologies work, so they can identify the right questions to to ask. And what I wanted to do for people to work in the technology field is draw some threads together because a lot of this will be familiar to them, but take those threads to their consequences. And in a way, you know, if I if I tell you, Harry, don't think of an elephant. What are you thinking about right  now?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Yeah, of course it's not, you know, suggestive.Azeem Azhar: And by laying out these things for these different audiences in different ways, I'm hoping that they will remember them and bear those in mind when they go out and think about how they influence the world, whether it's decisions they make from a product they might buy or not buy, or how they talk influence their elected officials or how they steer their corporate strategy or the products they choose to build. I mean, that's what you would you would hope to do. And then hopefully you create a more streamlined approach to it to the change that needs to happen. Now here's the sort of fascinating thing here, is that over the summer of 2021, the Chinese authorities across a wide range of areas went in using a number of different regulators and stamped on a whole set of Exponential Age companies, whether it was online gaming or online education. The big, multi sided social networks, a lot of fintech, a lot of crypto. And they essentially had been observing the experiment to learn, and they had figured out what things didn't align with their perceived obligations as a government to the state and to the people. Now, you know, I'm using that language because I don't want this to become a kind of polarized sort of argument.Azeem Azhar: I'm just saying, here's a state where you may not agree with its objectives and the way it's accountable, but in its own conception, it's accountable to its people and has to look out for their benefit. And it took action on these companies in really, really abrupt ways. And. If you assume that their actions were rational and they were smart people and I've met some of them and they're super smart people, it tells you something about what one group of clever people think is needed at these times. This sort of time. And I'm not I'm not advocating for that kind of response in the US or in Western Europe, but rather than to say, you know, when your next-door neighbor, and you live in an apartment block and your next-door neighbor you don't like much runs out and says the whole building is on fire. The fact that you don't like him shouldn't mean that you should ignore the fact that there's a fire. And I think that some sometimes there is some real value in looking at how other countries are contending with this and trying to understand the rationale for it, because the Chinese were for all the strength of their state, were really struggling with the power of the exponential hedge funds in their in their domain within Europe.Azeem Azhar: The European Union has recognized that these companies, the technologies provide a lot of benefit. But the way the companies are structured has a really challenging impact on the way in which European citizens lives operate, and they are making taking their own moves. And I'll give you a simple example, that the right to repair movement has been a very important one, and there's been a lot of legislative pressure in the in Europe that is that we should be have the right to repair our iPhones and smartphones. And having told us for years it wasn't possible suddenly, Apple in the last few days has announced all these repair kits self-repair kits. So it turns out that what is impossible means may mean what's politically expedient rather than anything else. And so my sense is that that by engaging in the conversation and being more active, we can get ultimately get better outcomes. And we don't have to go the route of China in order to achieve those, which is an incredibly sort of…Harry Glorikian: A draconian way. Yes.Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Very, very draconian. But equally, you can't you know where that where I hear the U.S. debate running around, which is an ultimately about Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, and not much beyond that, I think is problematic because it's missing a lot of opportunities to sort of write the stuff and foster some amazing innovation and some amazing new businesses in this space.Harry Glorikian: Oh yeah, that's, again, that's why, whenever I get a chance to talk to policymakers, I'm like, “You guys need to get ahead of this because you just don't understand how quickly it's moving and how much it's going to impact what's there, and what's going to happen next.” And if you think about the business model shifts by some of these... I mean, what I always tell people is like, okay, if you can now sequence a whole genome for $50 think about all the new business models and all the new opportunities that will open up versus when it was $1000. It sort of changes the paradigm, but most people don't think that we're going to see that stepwise change. Or, you know, Google was, DeepMind was doing the optical analysis, and they announced, you know, they could do one analysis and everybody was like, Oh, that's great, but it's just one. And a year later, they announced we could do 50. Right? And I'm like, you're not seeing how quickly this is changing, right? One to 50 in 12 months is, that's a huge shift, and if you consider what the next one is going to be, it changes the whole field. It could change the entire field of ophthalmology, especially when you combine it with something like telemedicine. So we could talk for hours about this. I look forward to continuing this conversation. I think that we would, you know, there's a lot of common ground, although you're I'm in health care and you're almost everywhere else.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I have to say that the opportunity in in health care is so global as well because, you know, if you think about how long and how much it costs to train a doctor and you think about the kind of margin that live that sits on current medical devices and how fragile, they might be in certain operating environments and the thought that you could start to do more and more of this with a $40 sensor inside a $250 smartwatch is a really, really appealing and exciting, exciting one. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Well, thank you so much for the time and look forward to staying in touch and I wish you great success with the book and everything else.Azeem Azhar: Thank you so much, Harry. Appreciate it.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and the MoneyBall Medicine show at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show. You can also find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

MLM Nation
How to Recruit Better By Using the 4 Personality Types by Michael Stotts

MLM Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 34:51


Michael Stotts shares how to connect and recruit better in network marketing by understanding the 4 personality typesWho is Michael Stotts?Michael Stotts was recruited to play Division 1 baseball at Jackson State. He graduated with a degree in computer engineering and then later earned a masters degree at Howard UniversityAfter graduation, Mike had a successful 17 year career in the telecom industry working for companies like AT&T, Siemans and Cisco Systems. He eventually left telecom and worked in the real estate industry before everything crashed in 2007/2008.In 2016, Mike got started with his current network marketing company and within 4 1/2 months he and his wife reached the top.Today he's a 6 figure earner with a team around the world.Favorite QuoteNot believing is more difficult than believingRecommended Books by Michael StottsThe Strangest Secret by Earl NightingaleYou 2 by Price PritchettBelieve Nation by David Imonitie  Recommended Online AppHealth AppRecommended Prospecting ToolVideoContact InfoMichael Stotts on Facebook , Instagramwww.elsamorgan.com

The Marketing Book Podcast
366 Leading the Customer Experience by Brad Cleveland

The Marketing Book Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 71:59


Leading the Customer Experience: How to Chart a Course and Deliver Outstanding Results by Brad Cleveland About the Book: Many organizations and leaders struggle to respond effectively to fast-evolving customer expectations driven by innovations in products, services, and technologies such as AI and mobile. Failing to build the necessary strategy, culture, and processes, they suffer from high costs, dissatisfied customers, and brand damage. The mandate to get customer experience right is real and urgent. Leading the Customer Experience is a guide to shaping experiences that win loyalty and deliver outstanding business results. It provides a bold, step-by-step approach that will get you and your team pointed in the right direction. And equipped to make sound decisions along the way. Leading the Customer Experience is easy to understand and imminently practical. It is based on the author's extensive experience both as a founding partner of one of the world's most influential customer management organizations, and his work with B2B and B2C organizations in the private and public sectors. The author's down-to-earth explanations cut through jargon and clutter, while stories and examples bring important principles to life. Leading the Customer Experience is relatable to anyone leading, managing, or aspiring to better understand the customer experience. About the Author: Brad Cleveland is known globally as one of today's foremost experts in customer strategy and management. A sought-after consultant and speaker, he has worked in 45 of the 50 U.S. states and over 60 countries, and his clients have included many of today's service leaders like Apple, American Express, and AT&T (and those are just some of the A's on his client list). He's also advised governments in the United States, Australia, and Canada. Brad's books and articles have been translated into over a dozen languages, and he is an instructor for LinkedIn Learning with featured courses on customer strategy and management, customer service leadership, and customer experience leadership. He has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Fast Company, Inc. Magazine, Forbes, U.S. News and World Report, CNN Money, the Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Financial Times, and the New York Times, as well as on major television networks (PBS, CNBC, Fox, MSNBC, and others), and NPR's All Things Considered. Brad was a founding partner and former CEO of the International Customer Management Institute (ICMI) now part of London-based Informa plc. And interesting facts – he is a licensed pilot, he once flew on the Concorde from London to New York, and he read the draft version of this book out loud to his wife and daughter for 10 hours straight while on a road trip! Click here for this episode's website page with the links mentioned during the interview... https://www.salesartillery.com/marketing-book-podcast/leading-customer-experience-brad-cleveland

The Art of Masculinity
Episode 247: Finding Emotions with Dr. John Schinnerer

The Art of Masculinity

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 57:40


On this episode, we talked about: Looking at emotions and how to deal with them Acknowledging emotions instead of hiding them Externalizing blame on others What's underneath the anger? Overfocusing on negative thoughts Interrupting the anger cycle Universal anger triggers Understanding that we are imperfect Rising in the energetic output of anger Playing around with embarrassment You can't outthink your way from emotions Denying and suppress Getting better at emotional awareness Learning how to be better in all aspects of life Men box culture Serving your needs and those around you Knowing your tools in every situation "Where is the room in this idea of success for things like happiness, or relaxation or contentment?" "One of the major things that we need to work on its self awareness and then you can work on greater self-acceptance" "Our anger, it's our business. My anger it's my business, my problem, it's nobody else's problem, I have to figure it out on my own"   About Dr. John: Dr. John Schinnerer coaches clients to perform at their peak from the boardroom to the bedroom.  Dr. John graduated from U.C.  Berkeley with a Ph.D. in educational psychology.  Dr. John was one of three experts to consult with Pixar on the Academy Award-winning movie, Inside Out. He has spoken to organizations such as Stanford Medical School, U.C. Berkeley, Kaiser Permanente, Sutter Health, Yahoo, AT&T, and the Gap. He has been featured in national media such as U.S. News and World Report, Readers Digest, and SELF Magazine. He is a nationally recognized speaker and an award-winning author. He has been on stage or on air with Lt. Governor John Garamendi, Olympic medalist Paul Kingsman, Dr. Daniel Amen, Dan Millman, Dr. Fred Luskin from Stanford, and Dr. Jonathan Haidt from the University of Virginia. He has impacted individuals at companies such as Okta, Twilio, Indeed, AskJeeves, Visa, Cisco, Starbucks, Yahoo, FedEx, Stanford, Cal, UPS, Schreiber Foods, Kaiser Permanente, and Sutter Health. He was featured in a documentary entitled, Skewed, by Paola Bossola, on the effects of violence in the media. He wrote the award-winning book, “How Can I Be Happy?” His areas of expertise range from high performance, to stress management, to positive psychology, to anger management, to creating happy, thriving relationships.  Over 10,000 people have taken his online anger management course. He recently recorded micro-courses on anger management and forgiveness for Simple Habit; they have been listened to over 60,000 times in the first 4 months. Dr. John hosts a podcast to help men evolve towards greater success, happiness, and connection, The Evolved Caveman. Visit GuideToSelf.com to learn more about Dr. John. Or follow on Instagram at TheEvolvedCaveman.    You can follow and support Dr. John at:  IG: @theevolvedcaveman Web: https://theevolvedcaveman.com/ Podcast: The Evolved Caveman   Let's connect over on Instagram: @Johnny.Elsasser

Immigration Review
Ep. 89 - Precedential Decisions from 1/3/2022 - 1/9/2022 (continuance; U-visa; prosecution witness and particularity; particularly serious crime; Texas Assault - Family Violence; res judicata; adjustment of status and discretion; administrative notice)

Immigration Review

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 31:15


[2:44] Cabrera v. Garland, No. 20-1943 (4th Cir. Jan. 6, 2022)continuance; U-visa; good cause standard; reputable presumption where collateral relief is prima facie approvable  [9:58] Herrera-Martinez v. Garland, No. 20-1423 (4th Cir. Jan. 5, 2022)particular social group; prosecution witness; particularity; limiting language; fear of drug traffickers; credibility; Honduras [16:32] Aviles-Tavera v. Garland, No. 20-60587 (5th Cir. Jan. 4, 2022)particularly serious crime; Texas Assault - Family Violence; res judicata; issue preclusion; change in law; USA v. Fuentes-Rodriguez; crime of violence under § 16(a); motion to reopen [24:02] Mutua v. U.S. Att'y Gen., No. 20-13129 (11th Cir. Jan. 5, 2022)adjustment of status; discretion; standard of review; arrest but no conviction; administrative notice  *Sponsors and friends of the podcast!Kurzban Kurzban Tetzeli and Pratt P.A.www.kktplaw.com/Immigration, serious injury, and business lawyers serving clients in Florida, California, and all over the world for over 40 years.Docketwisewww.docketwise.com/immigration-review"Modern immigration software & case management"*Want to become a patron of Immigration Review? Check out our Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/immigrationreview*CONTACT INFORMATIONEmail: kgregg@kktplaw.comFacebook: "Immigration Review Podcast" or @immigrationreviewInstagram: @immigrationreviewTwitter: @immreview*About your host: https://www.kktplaw.com/attorney/gregg-kevin-a/*More episodes at: https://www.kktplaw.com/immigration-review-podcast/*Featured in the top 15 of Immigration Podcast in the U.S.! https://blog.feedspot.com/immigration_podcasts/DISCLAIMER: Immigration Review® is a podcast made available for educational purposes only. It does not provide specific legal advice. Rather, the Immigration Review® podcast offers general information and insights regarding recent immigration cases from publicly available sources. By accessing and listening to the podcast, you understand that there is no attorney-client relationship between you and the podcast host. The Immigration Review® podcast should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state. MUSIC CREDITS: "Loopster," "Bass Vibes," "Chill Wave," and "Funk Game Loop" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/immigrationreview)

Vetenskapsradion Hälsa
Fibromyalgi behandlad på ett udda sätt av Michelle - med smärta som skapar lycka(R)

Vetenskapsradion Hälsa

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 19:37


25-åriga Michelle Rickardsson är en av cirka 200 000 personer i Sverige, främst kvinnor, som fått diagnosen smärtsyndromet fibromyalgi. Efter behandling valde hon att satsa på en sak som gör henne lycklig. Att just hitta något som gör att man mår bra har stöd i forskningen kring fibromyalgi. Michelle valde att satsa på den svåra träningsformen poledance. Michelles läkare Diana Kadetoff konstaterar att just Michells knep saknar vetenskapligt stöd. Det som rekommenderas är stegvis träning med lugnare träningsformer, men det viktiga är att hitta motivationen. Camilla Svensson, professor i cellulär och molekylär smärtfysiologi vid Karolinska institutet, berättar om vad man tror är förklaringen till att oftast kvinnor drabbas av fibromyalgi. Björn Gerdle, professor emeritus i smärt- och rehabiliteringsmedicin vid Linköpings universitet, förklarar varför det är svårt att hitta någon fungerande läkemedelsbehandling mot fibromyalgi.Programmet är en repris från 8 oktober 2021Programledare: Annika Östman annika.ostman@sverigesradio.seProducent: Jonna Westin jonna.westin@sverigesradio.se

Nightly Business Report
Tech wreck, the new Blackberry, and the afternoon action

Nightly Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 44:30


The great dispersion continues into the third trading session of the year. High multiple stocks are suffering, while low multiple stocks outperform. Plus Value outperforms Growth, and Industrials outperform Tech. Should you chase these moves, or fade them? We'll discuss. Plus, the last remaining Blackberry phones went dark yesterday, as the company pivots to its software business. We'll talk to the CEO about the next chapter. And, we'll highlight the afternoon action in markets. We've got the story & the trade in Intel, AT&T and Beyond Meat.

The Personal Computer Radio Show
The Personal Computer Radio Show - 01.05.22

The Personal Computer Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 55:00


" The Personal Computer Show Wednesday January 5, 2022 PRN.fm Streaming on the Internet 6:00 PM Eastern Time Happy New Year IN THE NEWS o There is a Cold War! It is Not Military Arms But Semiconductor Chips o More People Are Using Android Apps on Chromebooks o VIA to Cease Chip Development o FCC Program Helps Pay for the Internet IT Pro Series with Benjamin Rockwell o Complaints for IT Part 1 of 5 From The Tech Corner o The James Webb Space Telescope: Hunky-Dory o DuckDuckGo Previews Desktop Browser Technology Chatter with Benjamin Rockwell and Marty Winston o Switching from AT&T to T-Mobile o Year-End First Look at Different Products "

Dagens dikt
Månadens diktare: Jerker Sagfors

Dagens dikt

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 1:28


Dikt: "Moorleiche" Uppläsning: författaren Jerker Sagfors är poet och bosatt i Trollhättan, där han också är konstnärlig ledare för Trollhättans poesifestival. Han debuterade 2007 med den Lorca-influerade diktsamlingen Grön, grön.2015 utkom De döda kommer från Karelen (W&W) som väckte viss uppmärksamhet i Sverige, men kanske ännu mer i Finland. Sagfors poesi har beskrivits som ekokritisk, suggestiv och lakoniskt humoristisk. I hans dikter riktas blicken på såväl detaljer som helheter för att utröna hur det lilla och det stora förutsätter varandra.I den nya diktsamlingen,"Att lämna sitt hus", skildras en samtid som har för mycket, men ändå inte kan avstå från att begära mer. 2015 tilldelades Jerker Sagfors av Svenska akademien stipendium ur Erik och Stina Lundbergs minnesfond.DIKTSAMLING: De döda kommer från Karelen (Wahlström & Widstrand, 2015)MUSIK Igor Stravinsky: Berceuse ur EldfågelnEXEKUTÖR Christian Lindberg, trombon och Roland Pöntinen, piano

SoFi Daily Podcast
SoFi Daily Podcast - 1/5/2022

SoFi Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 5:13


US stocks were mixed Tuesday. Plus, Fanatics will acquire Topps, AT&T and Verizon will delay their 5G rollout, and the CDC changes booster shot guidance.

Kulturreportaget i P1
Lögner, fläckar och pengar – konsten att få tillbaka de stulna KB-böckerna

Kulturreportaget i P1

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 56:28


Hösten 2021 förkunnade Kungliga Biblioteket att ytterligare tio av de böcker som stals under många år hade återkommit. Hur gick det egentligen till? Det handlar om Alfons, bläckfläckar och besatthet. Från 1986 och fram till 2004 stal den så kallade "KB-mannen" särskilt värdefulla böcker från biblioteket och sålde till en tysk auktionsfirma. Sedan, när allting uppdagades, tog han sitt liv.Stölderna, och hans öde, fick stor uppmärksamhet och resulterade bland annat i en prisad radiodokumentär och ett tv-drama i tre delar. Men vad hände egentligen med själva böckerna?Kulturredaktionens Mattias Berg har följt det här fallet närgånget och bland annat gjort ett långt kulturreportage om just sökandet efter böckerna världen över.  Nu har han - efter höstens braskande nyhet om de tio återkomna böckerna - uppdaterat och byggt ut sitt reportage. Det har blivit ett nästan antikt ödesdrama: med en förövare, två spanare och en välgörare i en ny huvudroll. Med sina lögner, sina pengar och sin vana att hantera den kufiska samlarvärlden.

#Sparpodden
Bli bättre på börspsykologi - Cristofer Andersson - Sparpodden 426

#Sparpodden

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 44:35


Vi börjar det nya börsåret med att ge en del tips kring hur både erfarna och nya investerare kan bli bättre på att hantera börspsykologi. Att upptäcka sina egna tankevurpor och att jobba på att stärka sin mentala styrka är ständigt aktuellt för investerare på börsen, inte minst när det har gått väldigt bra ett tag. Veckans gäst är ett kärt återbesök av Christofer Andersson som har skrivit ett gäng böcker på temat börsspsykologi. Dessutom kommer han släppa en ny bok under året som kommer, vilket mäktigt namn den få det hör du i avsnittet. ;) Lyssna in!

Studio DN
Hur svårt är det att lära sig nytt som äldre?

Studio DN

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 11:26


Att lära sig nya saker som vuxen behöver inte vara så svårt. Däremot kan det krävas lite mer tålamod för att få ny kunskap att fästa vid högre ålder. Vad kan man själv kan göra för att hålla hjärnan i trim – och vilka riskfaktorer påskyndar minnets nedförsbacke? DN:s reporter Ida Yttergren reder ut i Studio DN. Programledare: Ülkü Holago. Producent: Sabina Marmullakaj. Ljudtekniker: Patrik Miesenberger.

The Guy Gordon Show
John Cox ~ The Guy Gordon Show

The Guy Gordon Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 8:52


January 4, 2022 ~ John Cox, President & CEO of Safety Operating Systems, talks with Guy Gordon about AT&T and Verizon delaying their plans to rollout 5G infrastructure near airports.

SkyWatchTV Podcast
Five in Ten 1/4/22: Mass Formation Psychosis

SkyWatchTV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 16:00


A phrase used by Dr. Robert Malone, co-inventor of mRNA vaccine, has gone viral thanks to his interview last week with Joe Rogan. It accurately describes the state of fear induced by government authorities who have been caught or admitted to using “totalitarian” methods of “mind control.” 5) Corporate media confirms governments using “propaganda techniques” to instill pandemic fear; 4) Chinese real estate giant Evergrande ordered to demolish 39 buildings at $13 billion resort; 3) AT&T, Verizon refuse to delay 5G rollout; 2) NASA hires 24 theologians to discuss impact of discovery of extraterrestrial life; 1) Number of cars burned in France New Year's Eve down sharply this year thanks to COVID.

Global Product Management Talk
366: This is modified Agile for hardware development

Global Product Management Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 38:00


Global Product Management Talk is pleased to bring you the next episode of... Product Mastery Now with host Chad McAllister, PhD. The podcast is all about helping people involved in innovation and managing products become more successful, grow their careers, and STANDOUT from their peers. About the Episode:  Today we are talking about using a modified version of Scrum for hardware projects. Many teams have tried adopting Scrum for developing hardware products, not always successfully. This is such as big topic, we have not one but two guests to help us with it—Dorian Simpson and Gary Hinkle. They think they have the answer for applying Agile principles to hardware projects, and they call it the Modified Agile for Hardware Development (MAHD) Framework. Dorian has a deep background in product development, starting in engineering and then moving to business leadership roles.  These include roles at Motorola and AT&T along with dozens of companies as an innovation and product development consultant. He's also the author of The Savvy Corporate Innovator, which is about applying Agile principles to idea development in organizations. Gary also has an extensive background in product development with senior roles at SAIC and Tektronix. He has held R&D leadership roles and founded Auxilium in 2002 to help companies improve their R&D and leadership practices and transform their new product development using Agile practices.

Dagens dikt
Månadens diktare: Jerker Sagfors

Dagens dikt

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 0:53


Dikt: De döda kommer från Karelen Uppläsning: författaren Jerker Sagfors är poet och bosatt i Trollhättan, där han också är konstnärlig ledare för Trollhättans poesifestival. Han debuterade 2007 med den Lorca-influerade diktsamlingen Grön, grön.2015 utkom De döda kommer från Karelen (W&W) som väckte viss uppmärksamhet i Sverige, men kanske ännu mer i Finland. Sagfors poesi har beskrivits som ekokritisk, suggestiv och lakoniskt humoristisk. I hans dikter riktas blicken på såväl detaljer som helheter för att utröna hur det lilla och det stora förutsätter varandra.I den nya diktsamlingen,"Att lämna sitt hus", skildras en samtid som har för mycket, men ändå inte kan avstå från att begära mer. I sin kuslighet och språkliga precision är De döda kommer från Karelen en drabbande läsupplevelse. Ragnar Strömberg, Göteborgs-PostenDIKTSAMLING: De döda kommer från Karelen (Wahlström & Widstrand, 2015)MUSIK Trad från Ryssland: Sång för att tillbringa mörkretEXEKUTÖR Sirmakka

Kulturreportaget i P1
Tragedin Diana – Kristen Stewart om att spela den mytologiserade prinsessan

Kulturreportaget i P1

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 21:20


I Diana-skildringen "Spencer", som utspelar sig under ett outhärdligt julfirande på godset Sandringham, gestaltar Kristen Stewart prinsessan som letar efter en väg ut ur det kungliga fängelset. P1 Kulturs reporter Karin Svensson träffade henne och regissör Pablo Larreín för att få svar på frågan om vad det är i berättelsen om prinsessan Diana som fortfarande fängslar publiken?

Vetandets värld
Den fossila fällan – Kolet kopplar greppet om våra liv (R)

Vetandets värld

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 19:38


Del 3. Att gå till jobbet, passa tider, resa och att ha fritid är nytt för människan på 1800-talet. Idag ser vi det här och massproducerade varor som självklara delar av vår vardag, men vi tänker kanske inte på att det var fossila bränslen som födde hela denna nya livsstil, och att det kan göra det svårare att bryta klimatutvecklingen. Den industriella revolutionen och utvecklingen av järnvägar och ångfartyg på 1800-talet satte fart på de fossila utsläppen från kolet som eldades, men bidrog också till att ställa om hela samhället, med lönearbete och massproduktion på fabriker och helt ny pålitlighet för transporter som blev oberoende av vädret och nu kunde börja följa tidtabeller. Mycket av detta har levt kvar in i vår tid och bidrar till att det nu är svårt att ställa om. Dessutom finns all den koldioxid som släpptes ut under 1800-talet kvar i atmosfären. Men var det en oundviklig utveckling eller hade det kunnat gå annorlunda?- Den tidens människor valde inte att hamna här i smogen lika lite som vi har valt att leva under klimatkrisen, säger Sarah Baines på The Science and Industry Museum i Manchester. Men, säger hon, det är viktigt att inte se en utveckling som oundviklig, allt handlar om ett antal beslut som människor och samhällen fattar, och framför allt så har vi idag möjligheten att tänka annorlunda och fatta bra beslut för vår framtid utifrån den kunskap vi har, menar hon.Det här är tredje delen i serien "Den fossila fällan - hur vi skapade klimatkrisen".Medverkande: Arne Kaijser, professor emeritus i teknikhistoria, KTH; Mikael Höök, docent i naturresurser och hållbar utveckling, Uppsala Universitet och Sarah Baines, curator of engineering, The Science and Industry Museum, Manchester.Programmet är en repris från 25/10 2021.Reporter: Björn Gunér bjorn.guner@sr.seProducent: Peter Normark peter.normark@sr.se

Squawk on the Street
2022 Market Kick-off, Carl and Jim Back at the NYSE, Omicron Spreads and FDA Approves Pfizer Booster for Kids 12-15, While Tesla Surges on Record Deliveries.

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 43:05


On the first trading day of 2022, Carl Quintanilla, Jim Cramer and David Faber explored what to expect from stocks this year after a bullish 2021. Carl and Jim returned to the NYSE for the first time since testing positive for COVID. The anchors discussed the challenges the country faces as the omicron variant outbreak accelerates – as well as developments including The FDA decision to authorize Pfizer COVID vaccine booster shots for children as young as twelve. Cramer says "I am done begging people to get vaccinated." The big stock story: Tesla shares surge after the company announced record fourth-quarter vehicle deliveries and an 87% jump in 2021 deliveries from a year ago. Also in focus: Wall Street's bullish calls on the chip sector, AT&T and Verizon reject the FAA's request to delay the launch of 5G services -- and Apple resumes its march toward a $3 trillion market cap.

Dagens dikt
Månadens diktare: Jerker Sagfors

Dagens dikt

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 1:38


Dikt: ur "Att lämna sitt hus" (It lit, 2021) 1a rad: Att lämna sitt hus Uppläsning: författaren Jerker Sagfors är poet och bosatt i Trollhättan, där han också är konstnärlig ledare för Trollhättans poesifestival. Han debuterade 2007 med den Lorca-influerade diktsamlingen Grön, grön.2015 utkom De döda kommer från Karelen (W&W) som väckte viss uppmärksamhet i Sverige, men kanske ännu mer i Finland. Sagfors poesi har beskrivits som ekokritisk, suggestiv och lakoniskt humoristisk. I hans dikter riktas blicken på såväl detaljer som helheter för att utröna hur det lilla och det stora förutsätter varandra.I den nya diktsamlingen,"Att lämna sitt hus", skildras en samtid som har för mycket, men ändå inte kan avstå från att begära mer. 2015 tilldelades Jerker Sagfors av Svenska akademien stipendium ur Erik och Stina Lundbergs minnesfond.Hans dikt är rakt på sak, så direkt att den omöjligt kan misstolkas. Det är en dikt som till och med ovana läsare kan tillägna sig (hallå, riksdagspolitiker!). Bernur i sin blogg om Att lämna sitt husMUSIK Matti Bye: GläntaEXEKUTÖR Matti Bye, piano

Så in i Själen
60. Dr Diamantis - Bokaktuell med ”Nyckeln till din hälsa – Självläkning med kinesisk medicin”

Så in i Själen

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 59:07


I veckans avsnitt av ”Så in i Själen” har jag bjudit tillbaka en av mina högt uppskattade gäster Doktor Diamantis, och det med anledning av han är bokaktuell med ”Nyckeln till din hälsa – Självläkning med kinesisk medicin”. Dr Diamantis studerade kinesisk medicin i Shanghai – på Kinas motsvarighet till läkarlinjen. Att hjälpa människor med en hälsobalans är hans kall i livet och hans klinik är fullbokad långt framöver, och på sitt instagramkonto ger han råd och delar med sig av sin kunskap – och nu är det alltså dags för boken! Spännande! Så vi ska naturligtvis prata om vad läsaren kan få till sig där och sedan om hur viktig själen är i hälsoprocessen. Varmt välkomna till ett samtal i ”Så in i Själen”Producerat av Silverdrake Förlag.Redaktör: Marcus Blomgrenmarcus@silverdrakeforlag.sewww.silverdrakeförlag.se See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Tankar för dagen
Patricia Tudor Sandahl - Ta det lite lugnt!

Tankar för dagen

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 4:20


När jag ser tillbaka tror jag att jag många gånger kan ha haft för bråttom att genomföra förändringar, stora som små, och att det fick mig att tappa perspektiv. Om Patricia Tudor Sandahl:Patricia Tudor-Sandahl föddes i England 1940 och kom till Sverige 1964 där hon blev fil dr i pedagogik, leg psykolog och psykoterapeut. Hon är retreatledare, föredragshållare samt författare till femton böcker på existentiella teman. Under elva år har hon medverkat i Tankar för dagen samt varit Sommarpratare (2000) och Vinterpratare (2011). Att det finns mer att hämta hos oss människor, ett utrymme att växa i, är ett genomgående tema i hennes författarskap. Vi kan bli lite mer människa om vi vill det. Vi är aldrig färdiga. Utveckling pågår hela livet.Producent:  Mette Göthberg tankar@sverigesradio.se

Stil
Fruktporr, Jean-Michel Basquiats lägenhet och den kompletta guiden till att posera med filosofers verk – en tillbakablick på Stil-året 2021

Stil

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 55:10


Sakta har tiden börjat ticka ner och 2021 är snart till ända. Därför ska vi fyra av ett hejdundrande reprisfyrverkeri med reportage från året som gått för att fira! Sakta har tiden börjat ticka ner och det är bra bara några få timmar kvar av 2021. Därför ska vi i veckans program fyra av ett reprisfyrverkeri med reportage från året som gått reportage om, och med, några färgstarka personer och företeelser som alla har med stil att göra, på det ena eller andra viset.Vi pratar med Alexis Adler som delade lägenhet med konstnären Jean-Michel Basquiat i slutet av 1970-talet. Vi lär vi oss att posera med filosofiböcker tillsammans med filosofen Sven-Olov Wallenstein. Vi tittar närmare på porrig frukt i konsten, talar med Josephine Bergqvist och Livia Schück, mer kända som designduon Rave Review, och ringer upp konstnären Joe Hedlund, som i sin heminredning låter skönhet gå före funktion.Gott nytt år önskar Stilredaktionen!

Mofjrdtalks
78. GOING DEEPER - Tydliga intentioner för en mer levande relation

Mofjrdtalks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 58:19


”Att det finns en positiv intention bakom varje skitbeteende rättfärdigar inte beteendet i sig, utan hjälper oss att öka förståelsen för varför personen framför mig agerar som den gör” I veckans avsnitt pratar vi om hur ett tydligt fokus på intentioner i en relation kan bidra till ökad förståelse och djupare kontakt. Vilka ritualer kan vi använda oss av för att stämma av intentionerna för vår relation och vad vi önskar ha mer eller mindre av framåt? Vilken energi vill vi lyfta in i vår relation nu när vi kliver in i ett nytt år? Hur kan tydliga intentioner bidra till ökad förståelse och djupare kontakt? Hur kan ett fokus på intentioner hjälpa oss i vår kommunikation till varandra? Det här är ett samtal som vi hoppas ska bidra till en känsla av att ”wow, kan det vara såhär enkelt att kommunicera med tydlighet?”. Som det numera ofta blir i dessa samtal så öppnar vi även upp för sårbarhet då en av oss blir medvetna om ett mönster som väcker känslor… Gott nytt år från oss, och lycka till med intentions-fokuset! DIGITAL GUIDE: INTENTIONER FÖR ETT LEVANDE LIV - En guide som hjälper dig att sätta intentioner för det liv som du vill leva: https://mofjrd.com/intentioner-for-ett-levande-liv/ Skicka din gåva via SWISH: 123 614 75 24 Skicka din gåva via PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/mofjrd Sponsorer och samarbeten: madeleine@mofjrd.com Mer från Madeleine: https://www.mofjrd.com Mer från Going Deeper: https://www.mofjrd.com/goingdeeper Mer från Peter: https://www.hursvartkandetvara.com/ Madeleine på Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mofjrd Peter på Instagram: https://www.instagram.com Joina Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/mofjrdcommunity

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
1828: BlueOcean and the AI-Driven Brand Navigator

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 19:38


Grant McDougall is a marketing and advertising veteran who hit a tipping point in the agency space after working with brands like AT&T and Chevron. He started BlueOcean, an AI driven platform helping companies like Google and Microsoft track, measure, and compare their brand health to competitors using AI. The company also recently announced a $15M Series A funding. As we all know, branding is one of the most critical assets for a company. It can significantly impact customer loyalty, stock price, employee retention, and other key metrics of success. So I invited Grant on the podcast to explore how conventional marketing agencies are not capable of giving their clients relevant and actionable information to outpace their competition.  The growing and future of consumer privacy compliance have allowed users to manage their data tracking, but this popular option has developed challenges for marketers across all platforms. We discuss how AI technology for data insight has become the core for services like BlueOcean who offer data input reports to help financial institutions.

Det skaver
#109 Sexigt fitthår, dödsångest = fomo och myslistor

Det skaver

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 64:22


Vi snackar kroppshår. Fitthår. Armhålehår. Håriga ben. Att vaxa eller inte vaxa? Varför hålls det på så mycket? Vi delar våra egna känslor kring vår egna kroppsbehåring. Nadia har flygit till London och funderat över dödsångest. Är det egentligen bara fomo det handlar om? Och så har vi alla med oss en varsin lista som vi delar med oss av. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Immigration Review
Ep. 87 - Precedential Decisions from 12/20/2021 - 12/26/2021 (political persecution in Congo; VAWA motion to reopen; criminal bars to cancellation; habeas, in custody, and deportation; due process; CIMT and marijuana)

Immigration Review

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 45:01


[2:13] Nsimba v. Att'y Gen. U.S., No. 20-3565 (3d Cir. Dec. 22, 2021)pattern or practice of persecution; well-founded fear; similarly situated family members; Union for Democracy and Social Progress; summons vs. arrest warrant; corruption & persecution; difficulty obtaining evidence; physical harm not required; reasonable relocation; Congo  [9:13] Yasin v. Att'y Gen. U.S., No. 20-2509 (3d Cir. Dec. 20, 2021)VAWA motion to reopen; INA § 240(c)(7)(C)(iv)(III); discretion; INA § 242(a)(2)(B)(ii) [14:03] Ramirez-Medina v. Garland, No. 16-73325 (9th Cir. Dec. 22, 2021)non-LPR cancellation of removal; INA § 240A(b)(1)(C); multiple offenses; statutory interpretation; use of the singular; Dictionary Act; Pereida  [17:49] Argueta Romero v. DHS, No. 20-12487 (11th Cir. Dec. 20, 2021)jurisdiction; “in custody”; habeas; INA § 242(a)(5); INA § 101(g); self-removal; statutory interpretation & lenity; Chevron deference; 8 U.S.C. § 1326; definition of deportation  [29:39] Rodriguez-Jimenez v. Garland, No. 21-70064 (9th Cir. Dec. 21, 2021)due process; remand; prejudice; reviewing BIA decisions [33:08] Walcott v. Garland, No. 18-70393 (9th Cir. Dec. 22, 2021)CIMT; small amount of marijuana; least culpable conduct; drug trafficking; evolving definition of CIMT; societal norms; deference to CIMT definition; divisibility *Sponsors and friends of the podcast!Kurzban Kurzban Tetzeli and Pratt P.A.www.kktplaw.com/Immigration, serious injury, and business lawyers serving clients in Florida, California, and all over the world for over 40 years.Docketwisewww.docketwise.com/immigration-review"Modern immigration software & case management"*Want to become a patron of Immigration Review? Check out our Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/immigrationreview *CONTACT INFORMATIONEmail: kgregg@kktplaw.comFacebook: "Immigration Review Podcast" or @immigrationreviewInstagram: @immigrationreviewTwitter: @immreview*About your host: https://www.kktplaw.com/attorney/gregg-kevin-a/*More episodes at: https://www.kktplaw.com/immigration-review-podcast/*Featured in the top 15 of Immigration Podcast in the U.S.! https://blog.feedspot.com/immigration_podcasts/DISCLAIMER: Immigration Review® is a podcast made available for educational purposes only. It does not provide specific legal advice. Rather, the Immigration Review® podcast offers general information and insights regarding recent immigration cases from publicly available sources. By accessing and listening to the podcast, you understand that there is no attorney-client relationship between you and the podcast host. The Immigration Review® podcast should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state. MUSIC CREDITS: "Loopster," "Bass Vibes," "Chill Wave," and "Funk Game Loop" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/immigrationreview)

Emprendeduros
EP. #72 | CHILE TIENE NUEVO PRESIDENTE ¡¿ES SOCIALISTA?!

Emprendeduros

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 71:19


¡Emprendeduros! En el episodio de hoy Rodrigo y Alejandro nos dan la ultima actualización de mercado del 2021 donde hablan de las acciones de los gobiernos alrededor del mundo en reacción a la variante Omicron, la falla del plan Build Back Better de Biden, los nuevos problemas en china y una actualización de cryptos. Después hablan de la nueva compra de Oracle. También hablan del nuevo presidente de Chile y sus expectativas. Finalmente hablan de AT&T saliendo del mundo del espectáculo despues de unas perdidas gigantes.

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Absurd Truth: Woke Bedtime

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 17:39


*Note: This is a best-of Absurd Truth podcast*AT&T has initiated diversity training including white guilt, meanwhile wokeism has come for children's nighttime reading.Please visit our great sponsors:Patriot Mobile https://PatriotMobile.com/DanaFree Activation with promo code DANA. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT. Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world. Delta Rescuehttps://deltarescue.orgGet your complete Estate Planning kit at deltarescue.org/dana today and let your passion for animals live well into the future. Black Rifle Coffee Companyhttps://blackriflecoffee.com/danatvUse code DANATV to save 20% off your first coffee club, coffee and select gear purchase. Legacy Precious Metalshttps://legacypminvestments.comPick up your free guide to precious metal investments today.Moinkhttps://moinkbox.com/DANASign up now and get Free Ground Beef for a year with promo code DANA.

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Absurd Truth: Woke Bedtime

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 17:39


*Note: This is a best-of Absurd Truth podcast*AT&T has initiated diversity training including white guilt, meanwhile wokeism has come for children's nighttime reading.Please visit our great sponsors:Patriot Mobile https://PatriotMobile.com/DanaFree Activation with promo code DANA. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT. Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world. Delta Rescuehttps://deltarescue.orgGet your complete Estate Planning kit at deltarescue.org/dana today and let your passion for animals live well into the future. Black Rifle Coffee Companyhttps://blackriflecoffee.com/danatvUse code DANATV to save 20% off your first coffee club, coffee and select gear purchase. Legacy Precious Metalshttps://legacypminvestments.comPick up your free guide to precious metal investments today.Moinkhttps://moinkbox.com/DANASign up now and get Free Ground Beef for a year with promo code DANA.

MMA Fighting
Trocação Franca | Amanda Nunes Subestimou Julianna Peña, Diz Treinador (+ Amanda Ribas)

MMA Fighting

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 87:24


Julianna Peña quebrou a banca e finalizou Amanda Nunes para levar o cinturão peso-galo no UFC 265 e Luiz Claudio, treinador de jiu-jitsu da venezuelana, conversou com o podcast sobre a zebra histórica em Las Vegas. O brasileiro, faixa-preta formado por Rickson Gracie, acredita que Nunes subestimou sua aluna no UFC 265, mas espera luta mais dura na revanche. Luiz Claudio também falou do retorno de Yair Rodriguez contra Max Holloway e seus próximos passos na organização. O podcast falou, ainda, com Amanda Ribas, que analisou sua luta com Michelle Waterson e a queda da xará — e companheira de equipe — no UFC 265. O melhor do MMA brasileiro no Trocação Franca, toda quarta-feira, com o jornalista Guilherme Cruz e convidados. Julianna Peña tapped Amanda Nunes to score an all-time upset and become the bantamweight champion at UFC 265, and her jiu-jitsu coach Luiz Claudio stopped by the podcast to discuss the massive victory in Las Vegas. The Rickson Gracie black belt believes Nunes underestimated Peña, but expects a tougher fight when they meet for a rematch. Claudio also weighed in on Yair Rodriguez's performance against Max Holloway and what could be next for him. Trocação Franca also welcomes Amanda Ribas to chat about her upcoming clash with Michelle Waterson and ATT teammate Amanda Nunes losing at UFC 265. Listen to Trocação Franca with Guilherme Cruz every Wednesday to hear from the biggest names on the hottest topics in the Brazilian combat sports world. Follow Guilherme Cruz @Guicruzzz Subscribe: http://goo.gl/dYpsgH Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/u8VvLi Visit our playlists: http://goo.gl/eFhsvM Like MMAF on Facebook: http://goo.gl/uhdg7Z Follow on Twitter: http://goo.gl/nOATUI Read More: http://www.mmafighting.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices