Podcasts about massachusetts amherst

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Best podcasts about massachusetts amherst

Latest podcast episodes about massachusetts amherst

Indigo Radio
Dr. Bharat Rathod: Caste as a Protected Category in the Anti-discriminatory Framework

Indigo Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 64:08


Bharat Rathod has a doctorate degree in International Education from University of Massachusetts Amherst and his research interest comprises caste, higher education in India and diversity, equity and inclusion framework. His book, Dalit Academic Experiences: Stories of Caste, Stigma and Exclusion in Indian Higher Education, will be published in 2022. He worked in in the ‘Inclusive Universities: Linking Diversity, Equity and Excellence for the 21st Century' research project (2014 – 2017) which was funded by the United States-India Educational Foundation. Bharat is a trained facilitator and facilitated workshops on development topics and also worked as an instructional technologist at University of Massachusetts Amherst. He worked in the nonprofit sector and served as a leader in a community-based organization in his underprivileged neighborhood in India. Over the last decade, he has been associated with youth mentoring activities to promote higher education among the excluded communities in India. Bharat is developing an online mentoring platform, RiseUp Mentoring, to mentor and offer online resources to underrepresented youth from India. He has been associated with community development initiatives in India and involved with civil society organizations in India and the United States.

The James McMahon Music Podcast
'Maura isn't here to defend herself from being shamed - that's my job now' - a conversation with Julie Murray

The James McMahon Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 42:07


This episode originally aired on August 13th, 2021. ***If you have any interest in the true crime genre, you will know the name Maura Murray. She's the internet's favourite missing person, and you probably think you have an idea of who she is - certainly who she was. These are the facts; Maura was an American woman who disappeared on the evening of February 9th, 2004, after a car crash on Route 112 near Woodsville, New Hampshire, a village in the town of Haverhill, USA. Her whereabouts remain unknown. She was a 21-year-old nursing student completing her junior year at the University of Massachusetts Amherst at the time of her disappearance.Almost everything else is conjecture. And in the absence of facts, there is shame.On the third episode of Shame, James McMahon talks to Maura's older sister, Julie, about her fight to protect the dignity of a woman who has no ability to do so herself. It's emotional and insightful stuff - and it asks big questions about the purpose of the true crime genre, and what happens to the people who are left behind. Shame is a Spoook Media production. Spoook is also a record label, a promoter, a shop, a Substack - it's many things. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. And please do Like, Review and Subscribe - it actually really helps people find our podcasts!Watch the series trailer here: https://tinyurl.com/7r326hhc

New Books in British Studies
Andrew Hadfield, "Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in British Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 69:16


Andrew Hadfield is Professor of English at the University of Sussex. Andrew has written widely on topics ranging from class struggle in the Forsyte chronicles, Hamlet and Poland, and early modern political theory. He is the author of an authoritative biography of Edmund Spenser and the co-editor of Amazons, Savages, and Machiavels: Travel and Colonial Writing in English, 1550-1630: An Anthology. His new book is Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution, published through Manchester University Press. This new book explores the intimate relationship between literature and class in England (and later Britain) from the Peasants' Revolt at the end of the fourteenth century to the impact of the French Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century and beginning of the nineteenth. The book argues throughout that class cannot be seen as a modern phenomenon that occurred after the Industrial revolution but that class divisions and relations have always structured societies and that it makes sense to assume a historical continuity. The book explores a number of themes relating to class: class consciousness; class conflict; commercialisation; servitude; rebellion; gender relations; and colonisation. After outlining the history of class relations, five chapters explore the ways in which social class consciously and unconsciously influenced a series of writers: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Behn, Rochester, Defoe, Duck, Richardson, Burney, Blake and Wordsworth. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He holds a PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His peer-reviewed articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/british-studies

New Books in History
Andrew Hadfield, "Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 69:16


Andrew Hadfield is Professor of English at the University of Sussex. Andrew has written widely on topics ranging from class struggle in the Forsyte chronicles, Hamlet and Poland, and early modern political theory. He is the author of an authoritative biography of Edmund Spenser and the co-editor of Amazons, Savages, and Machiavels: Travel and Colonial Writing in English, 1550-1630: An Anthology. His new book is Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution, published through Manchester University Press. This new book explores the intimate relationship between literature and class in England (and later Britain) from the Peasants' Revolt at the end of the fourteenth century to the impact of the French Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century and beginning of the nineteenth. The book argues throughout that class cannot be seen as a modern phenomenon that occurred after the Industrial revolution but that class divisions and relations have always structured societies and that it makes sense to assume a historical continuity. The book explores a number of themes relating to class: class consciousness; class conflict; commercialisation; servitude; rebellion; gender relations; and colonisation. After outlining the history of class relations, five chapters explore the ways in which social class consciously and unconsciously influenced a series of writers: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Behn, Rochester, Defoe, Duck, Richardson, Burney, Blake and Wordsworth. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He holds a PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His peer-reviewed articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Andrew Hadfield, "Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 69:16


Andrew Hadfield is Professor of English at the University of Sussex. Andrew has written widely on topics ranging from class struggle in the Forsyte chronicles, Hamlet and Poland, and early modern political theory. He is the author of an authoritative biography of Edmund Spenser and the co-editor of Amazons, Savages, and Machiavels: Travel and Colonial Writing in English, 1550-1630: An Anthology. His new book is Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution, published through Manchester University Press. This new book explores the intimate relationship between literature and class in England (and later Britain) from the Peasants' Revolt at the end of the fourteenth century to the impact of the French Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century and beginning of the nineteenth. The book argues throughout that class cannot be seen as a modern phenomenon that occurred after the Industrial revolution but that class divisions and relations have always structured societies and that it makes sense to assume a historical continuity. The book explores a number of themes relating to class: class consciousness; class conflict; commercialisation; servitude; rebellion; gender relations; and colonisation. After outlining the history of class relations, five chapters explore the ways in which social class consciously and unconsciously influenced a series of writers: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Behn, Rochester, Defoe, Duck, Richardson, Burney, Blake and Wordsworth. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He holds a PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His peer-reviewed articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in European Studies
Andrew Hadfield, "Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 69:16


Andrew Hadfield is Professor of English at the University of Sussex. Andrew has written widely on topics ranging from class struggle in the Forsyte chronicles, Hamlet and Poland, and early modern political theory. He is the author of an authoritative biography of Edmund Spenser and the co-editor of Amazons, Savages, and Machiavels: Travel and Colonial Writing in English, 1550-1630: An Anthology. His new book is Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution, published through Manchester University Press. This new book explores the intimate relationship between literature and class in England (and later Britain) from the Peasants' Revolt at the end of the fourteenth century to the impact of the French Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century and beginning of the nineteenth. The book argues throughout that class cannot be seen as a modern phenomenon that occurred after the Industrial revolution but that class divisions and relations have always structured societies and that it makes sense to assume a historical continuity. The book explores a number of themes relating to class: class consciousness; class conflict; commercialisation; servitude; rebellion; gender relations; and colonisation. After outlining the history of class relations, five chapters explore the ways in which social class consciously and unconsciously influenced a series of writers: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Behn, Rochester, Defoe, Duck, Richardson, Burney, Blake and Wordsworth. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He holds a PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His peer-reviewed articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

The Roundtable
9/20/22 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 77:16


The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, investigative journalist and RPI adjunct Rosemary Armao, research professor and Stuart Rice Honorary Chair at the University of Massachusetts Amherst's College of Information and Computer Sciences (CICS) and Faculty Associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University Fran Berman, immigration attorney and Partner with the Albany law firm of Whiteman Osterman & Hanna, Cianna Freeman-Tolbert, and former Associate Editor of the Times Union Mike Spain.

New Books in Literary Studies
Andrew Hadfield, "Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 69:16


Andrew Hadfield is Professor of English at the University of Sussex. Andrew has written widely on topics ranging from class struggle in the Forsyte chronicles, Hamlet and Poland, and early modern political theory. He is the author of an authoritative biography of Edmund Spenser and the co-editor of Amazons, Savages, and Machiavels: Travel and Colonial Writing in English, 1550-1630: An Anthology. His new book is Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution, published through Manchester University Press. This new book explores the intimate relationship between literature and class in England (and later Britain) from the Peasants' Revolt at the end of the fourteenth century to the impact of the French Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century and beginning of the nineteenth. The book argues throughout that class cannot be seen as a modern phenomenon that occurred after the Industrial revolution but that class divisions and relations have always structured societies and that it makes sense to assume a historical continuity. The book explores a number of themes relating to class: class consciousness; class conflict; commercialisation; servitude; rebellion; gender relations; and colonisation. After outlining the history of class relations, five chapters explore the ways in which social class consciously and unconsciously influenced a series of writers: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Behn, Rochester, Defoe, Duck, Richardson, Burney, Blake and Wordsworth. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He holds a PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His peer-reviewed articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in Intellectual History
Andrew Hadfield, "Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 69:16


Andrew Hadfield is Professor of English at the University of Sussex. Andrew has written widely on topics ranging from class struggle in the Forsyte chronicles, Hamlet and Poland, and early modern political theory. He is the author of an authoritative biography of Edmund Spenser and the co-editor of Amazons, Savages, and Machiavels: Travel and Colonial Writing in English, 1550-1630: An Anthology. His new book is Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution, published through Manchester University Press. This new book explores the intimate relationship between literature and class in England (and later Britain) from the Peasants' Revolt at the end of the fourteenth century to the impact of the French Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century and beginning of the nineteenth. The book argues throughout that class cannot be seen as a modern phenomenon that occurred after the Industrial revolution but that class divisions and relations have always structured societies and that it makes sense to assume a historical continuity. The book explores a number of themes relating to class: class consciousness; class conflict; commercialisation; servitude; rebellion; gender relations; and colonisation. After outlining the history of class relations, five chapters explore the ways in which social class consciously and unconsciously influenced a series of writers: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Behn, Rochester, Defoe, Duck, Richardson, Burney, Blake and Wordsworth. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He holds a PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His peer-reviewed articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in Early Modern History
Andrew Hadfield, "Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in Early Modern History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 69:16


Andrew Hadfield is Professor of English at the University of Sussex. Andrew has written widely on topics ranging from class struggle in the Forsyte chronicles, Hamlet and Poland, and early modern political theory. He is the author of an authoritative biography of Edmund Spenser and the co-editor of Amazons, Savages, and Machiavels: Travel and Colonial Writing in English, 1550-1630: An Anthology. His new book is Literature and Class: From the Peasants' Revolt to the French Revolution, published through Manchester University Press. This new book explores the intimate relationship between literature and class in England (and later Britain) from the Peasants' Revolt at the end of the fourteenth century to the impact of the French Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century and beginning of the nineteenth. The book argues throughout that class cannot be seen as a modern phenomenon that occurred after the Industrial revolution but that class divisions and relations have always structured societies and that it makes sense to assume a historical continuity. The book explores a number of themes relating to class: class consciousness; class conflict; commercialisation; servitude; rebellion; gender relations; and colonisation. After outlining the history of class relations, five chapters explore the ways in which social class consciously and unconsciously influenced a series of writers: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Behn, Rochester, Defoe, Duck, Richardson, Burney, Blake and Wordsworth. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He holds a PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His peer-reviewed articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Video Essay Podcast
Third Anniversary Show: Part III

The Video Essay Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 51:04


Today's show is the final part of the podcast's third anniversary celebration. Will shares clips from episodes twenty-one through thirty-one of the show. Topics include: [02:43] - Kendahl Cruver on viewing an old film in new ways [05:10] - Kevin B. Lee on the exploratory video essay [07:45] - Jemma Saunders on homework and the parametric approach [11:54] - Estrella Sendra on introducing students to video essays [15:55] - John Gibbs on blending media and mind-mapping [18:44] - Doug Pye on language and criticism [23:08] - Terri Francis on discovery [26:48] - Tracy Cox-Stanton on the scholarly video essay [29:44] - Allison De Fren on the video essay and knowledge [32:51] - Ian Garwood on voiceover [34:28] - Broey Deschanel on YouTube algorithms and censorship [37:35] - Thomas Flight on workflow and sustainability [39:50] - Jordan Schonig on bringing scholarship to YouTube [42:18] - Ariel Avissar on TV Dictionary [46:00] - Barbara Zecchi on archival voids Learn more about our 2022 call for Cary Grant videos here. Watch parts one and two below! This episode was created as part of Will's preparation for an upcoming talk he is giving at "Theory & Practice of the Video-Essay: An International Conference on Videographic Criticism" later this week at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Support the podcast on Patreon. Follow the show on Twitter. Learn more at the pod's website. Get the free newsletter. This show is hosted, produced, and edited by Will DiGravio. Emily Su Bin Ko is the show's associate producer. Music via Free Music Archive.

MTR Podcasts
Artist Kesha Bruce

MTR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 39:06


Brief summary of episode:Kesha Bruce, Born and raised in Iowa, she completed a BFA from the University of Iowa before earning an MFA in painting from Hunter College in New York City. Kesha Bruce has been awarded fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA), The Vermont Studio Center, The CAMAC Foundation and the Puffin Foundation. Her work is included in the collections of The Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture (14 pieces), The Amistad Center for Art and Culture, The University of Iowa Women's Center, The En Foco Photography Collection and MOMA's Franklin Furnace Artist Book Collection. She has been represented by Morton Fine Art since 2011.Morton Fine Art is pleased to announce Take Me to the Water, a solo exhibition of mixed-media paintings by artist Kesha Bruce. An intuitive combination of painting, collage and textile art, Bruce's work represents the culmination of a holistic creative practice developed by the artist over several decades. Her eighth exhibition with the gallery, Take Me to the Water will be on view from September 17 to October 11, 2022 at Morton's Washington, D.C. space. The wall works of Kesha Bruce are less discrete executions of a concerted vision than the steady accumulation of a long creative process. Referred to by the artist simply as paintings, these mixed-media compositions are in fact patchworks of painted fabric, individually selected from Bruce's vast archive and pasted directly onto the canvas in a textile collage that can sometimes resemble a quilt. The result of a slow and perpetual artistic method, each work represents hours of treatment, selection and juxtaposition until the whole becomes manifestly greater than its parts. Bruce's process ends with her titling of each work: a poetic articulation of what the work is at this point capable of expressing for itself.Much like water, the routine behind Bruce's artmaking is cyclical and in service to a greater equilibrium – a pointed contrast to many of the epitomic works that make up much of the traditional art histories of the past several centuries, and which tend to aggressively emphasize rupture, madness and unsustainability as the most fruitful mothers of invention. Bruce's process is distinctly different, and points to more a promising alternative for artmaking, in which creativity and lived experience are inseparably intertwined. For Bruce, this means that art can be not only a form of self-care but an act of self-discovery. Noting that her color palette has become markedly warmer since she moved to Arizona (where she currently serves as the Director of Artist's Programs for the state's Commission on the Arts), the artist delineates her method as a form of strategic openness – making room and taking time to allow the materials to guide her toward their final form, rather than the other way around.The show's title, Take Me to the Water, alludes to a 1969 rendition of the traditional gospel song by Nina Simone at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Bruce locates something transcendent in the recording of Simone's performance that encapsulates what any form of artmaking, at its best, can be: a conversation between oneself and the divine. Deftly aware of the elemental power of water as a force that follows its own paths and forms its own shapes, Bruce identifies her artistic process closely with this element, and notes how the transcendental effects which result from it can be as overwhelming and rhythmic as the ocean waves of Big Sur. As an exhibiting artist for over 25 years, Bruce has steadily oriented her craft toward capturing and encouraging the process of artmaking as an end in its own right – a way both of making something new and taking stock of oneself. As an administrator who oversees the creative programming for the entire state of Arizona, Bruce is intuitively attuned to the reciprocal relationship between transcendent acts of self-expression and the quotidian struggle to survive. In this role, she is a mentor and advocate for hundreds of other artists; the example she sets in her own artistic practice, with its emphasis on personal growth over commercial capitulation, thus becomes a form of potent political praxis. The Truth In This ArtThe Truth In This Art is a podcast interview series supporting vibrancy and development of Baltimore & beyond's arts and culture. Mentioned in this episode:Kesha BruceCome see Kesha Bruce's 8th exhibition with Morton Fine Art starting Sept. 17 To find more amazing stories from the artist and entrepreneurial scenes in & around Baltimore, check out my episode directory. Stay in TouchNewsletter sign-upSupport my podcastShareable link to episode ★ Support this podcast ★

Progress, Potential, and Possibilities
Dr. Greg Lieberman, Ph.D. - Neuroscientist - Optimizing Human-System Performance, Army Research Lab

Progress, Potential, and Possibilities

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 53:22


Dr. Greg Lieberman, Ph.D. (https://www.arl.army.mil/arl25/meet-arl.php?gregory_lieberman) is a Neuroscientist, and Lead, Optimizing Human-System Performance, at the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command, Army Research Laboratory (DEVCOM ARL). DEVCOM ARL, as an integral part of the Army Futures Command, is the Army's foundational research laboratory focused on operationalizing science to ensure overmatch in any future conflict. DEVCOM ARL shapes future concepts with scientific research and knowledge and delivers technology for modernization solutions to win in the future operating environment. With a Ph.D. from the University of Vermont in Neuroscience, a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Cognitive Neuroscience from University of New Mexico, and a BA from University of Massachusetts Amherst in Psychology, Dr. Lieberman's research and research leadership experience ranges from genetics to learning theory, animal behavior to artificial intelligence, and human variability to team dynamics; with additional expertise in S&T strategy and the opportunities afforded by the Future of Work. Specific areas of Dr. Lieberman's technical expertise include maximizing human potential, human-autonomy teaming; neuroanatomical organization and connectivity; brain structure-function coupling; learning-driven neuroplasticity; non-invasive neurostimulation and cognitive enhancement; neuroimaging; mind-body medicine and mindfulness meditation; and the mechanisms of neurodegenerative disease, neuropathology, and brain injury.

Seasoned
The future of food tastes like plant-based proteins and cell-cultured meat

Seasoned

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 49:00


We talk with a food scientist Julian McClements about what we might eat in the future. Think: tastier, healthier versions of plant-based eggs, seafood, and meat. . .and fun stuff, like 3-D printed meat. Plus, we learn about meat grown from the cells of animals still mooing and clucking at the farm. COO Amy Chen of Upside Foods in California joins us. We also talk with Chase Purdy, author of Billion Dollar Burger: Inside Big Tech's Race for the Future of Food. And, Chef Plum experiments with grasshoppers and bakes a batch of gluten-free chocolate chip cookies with green banana flour. This show was produced by Robyn Doyon-Aitken and Catie Talarski. Guests: Julian McClements, Ph.D: Distinguished Professor at the Department of Food Science at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He is the author of Future Foods: How Modern Science is Transforming the Way We Eat. Amy Chen: COO Upside Foods, a food technology company in Berkeley, CA. Chase Purdy: New York-based writer and author of Billion Dollar Burger: Inside Big Tech's Race for the Future of Food. Featured Recipe: Chef Plum's Green Banana Flour Chocolate Chip Cookies Seasoned is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode! This episode originally aired January 13, 2022.Support the show: https://www.wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Disrupted
How children's television has evolved since 'Sesame Street'

Disrupted

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 49:00


Children's programming has evolved significantly since Sesame Street first debuted on PBS in 1969. On this week's Disrupted, we revisit our conversation with actor Sonia Manzano, who played Maria on Sesame Street for more than 40 years. And we talk to a child psychologist who consulted on the creation of kids shows like Bear in the Big Blue House and Gullah Gullah Island. GUESTS: Sonia Manzano: Actress, best known for work as Maria on Sesame Street. She's also the creator of the animated kids show Alma's Way and author of the book, Coming Up Cuban: Rising Past Castro's Shadow Daniel R. Anderson: Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and a former consultant for Nickelodeon and Sesame Workshop Disrupted is produced by J. Carlisle Larsen, Kevin Chang Barnum, and Catie Talarski. This episode of Disrupted was produced by James Szkobel-Wolff and Zshekinah Collier.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

THE PETA PODCAST
Ep.241: The Non-Menopausal Marmosets: When NIH Funds Bad Science, We All Lose

THE PETA PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 41:24


Here's what passes for science at a major U.S. university. Experiments on menopause involving animals who don't naturally experience menopause, and all intended to find treatments for menopause in humans. You don't need to be a scientist to think that doesn't make sense. And neither does the $4 million the National Institutes of Health gave a researcher at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst to do the research. PETA has filed a suit to get video and documents to expose and put a stop to the experiments. In the meantime, the wasteful experiments continue. Why do they happen? This is the way grant-funded science works in America. PETA is trying to change that with among other things the Research Modernization Deal. Emil talks about the UMASS case to Katherine Roe, Chief of PETA's Science Advancement and Outreach group. Go to PETA.org to learn more. The PETA Podcast PETA, the world's largest animal rights organization, is 6.5 million strong and growing. This is the place to find out why. Hear from insiders, thought leaders, activists, investigators, politicians, and others why animals need more than kindness—they have the right not to be abused or exploited in any way. Hosted by Emil Guillermo. Powered by PETA activism. Contact us at PETA.org Listen to the very first PETA podcast with Ingrid Newkirk Music provided by CarbonWorks. Go to Apple podcasts and subscribe. Contact and follow host Emil Guillermo on Twitter @emilamok Or at www.amok.com Please subscribe, rate and review wherever you get your podcasts. Help us grow the podcast by taking this short survey. Thanks for listening to THE PETA PODCAST! Originally released Sept. 13, 2022 © PETA, 2021-2, All rights reserved. copyright 2022  

The Big Rhetorical Podcast
Episode 108: Elena Kalodner-Martin

The Big Rhetorical Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 41:02


Episode 108 features a discussion with Elena Kalodner-Martin, winner of the 2022 TBR Podcast Emerging Scholar Award. This episode is part of the TBR Podcast Emerging Scholar Series. Elena Kalodner-Martin is a PhD candidate in Composition and Rhetoric at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where her research is at the intersection of technical communication, the rhetoric of health and medicine, and feminist studies. Her dissertation theorizes patient narratives on social media as a form of technical and technological expertise. Her latest work appears in Intercom and Programmatic Perspectives and is forthcoming from the Journal of Multimodal Rhetorics and the 2022 IEEE ProComm proceedings. Elena currently teaches writing in the disciplines courses in the College of Information and Computer Sciences at UMass and works as a research writer at Untold Content, an innovation storytelling firm. Visit thebigrhetorical.weebly.com or follow @thebigrhet on Twitter for more information about TBR Podcast.

The Video Essay Podcast
Third Anniversary Show: Part II

The Video Essay Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 31:02


Today's show is part two of the podcast's third anniversary celebration. Will shares clips from episodes eleven through twenty of The Video Essay Podcast. Topics include: [02:17] - Ariel Avissar on curating the Sight & Sound Poll [03:56] - Liz Greene on sound and the "audiovisual" essay [06:15] - Scout Tafoya on labor and The Unloved [10:02] - Leigh Singer on discovery and audience [11:52] - Shannon Strucci on YouTube thumbnails [14:33] - Adam Woodward on publishing via YouTube [16:56] - Jason Mittell on building community [20:32] - Cydnii Wilde Harris on creating while a student [25:03] - Professor Flowers on talking about race on YouTube [27:17] - Nelson Carvajal on collecting images Be on the lookout for part three and watch part one here. This episode was created as part of Will's preparation for an upcoming talk he is giving at "Theory & Practice of the Video-Essay: An International Conference on Videographic Criticism" later this month at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Support the podcast on Patreon. Follow the show on Twitter. Learn more at the pod's website. Get the free newsletter. This show is hosted, produced, and edited by Will DiGravio. Emily Su Bin Ko is the show's associate producer. Music via Free Music Archive.

The Video Essay Podcast
Third Anniversary Show: Part I

The Video Essay Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 18:24


The Video Essay Podcast turned three-years-old in July! On today's show, Will offers highlights from the first ten episodes of the show. Topics include: [02:15] - Catherine Grant on "working in the flow" [03:48] - Philip Brubaker on an early influence [05:20] - Grace Lee on drafting a script [06:59] - Jacob Swinney on the act of watching [08:17] - Adrian Martin on collaboration [10:51] - Jennifer Proctor on filmmakers as essayists [12:57] - Chloé Galibert-Laîné on the desktop documentary [14:43] - Johannes Binotto on inspirations [16:23] - Charlie Shackleton on an early work Be on the lookout for parts two and three! This episode was created as part of Will's preparation for an upcoming talk he is giving at "Theory & Practice of the Video-Essay: An International Conference on Videographic Criticism" later this month at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Support the podcast on Patreon. Follow the show on Twitter. Learn more at the pod's website. Get the free newsletter. This show is hosted, produced, and edited by Will DiGravio. Emily Su Bin Ko is the show's associate producer. Music via Free Music Archive.

Your History Your Story
S6 Ep06 Betsy Ross and the Making of American

Your History Your Story

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 67:18


If you were to think about Philadelphia and its' role in the early history of the United Sates, what or who would come to mind? Perhaps Independence Hall, the Liberty Bell, Ben Franklin or maybe Betsy Ross? When you think of Betsy Ross, you may remember her from a history book during your school days which showed an image of a woman sewing a flag or presenting it to General George Washington as the first flag of the United States. But, what do we really know about Betsy Ross beyond that image from our history books? In this episode of Your History Your Story, we will be speaking with Dr. Marla Miller, author and professor of history at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.Marla will be telling us about her book, “Betsy Ross and the Making of America”, which brings the reader back to Betsy Ross' world of 18th and early 19th century Philadelphia. It also explores Ross' family life, the many significant contributions she made to her trade and her place in history as a patriot during the American Revolution. Photo(s): Courtesy of Dr. Marla Miller and Your History Your Story Podcast Music: "With Loved Ones" Jay Man https://linktr.ee/yhyspodcast www.historicphiladelphia.org https://www.amazon.com/Betsy-Making-America-Marla-Miller/dp/0312576226

The Roundtable
9/2/22 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 81:30


The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, research professor and Stuart Rice Honorary Chair at the University of Massachusetts Amherst's College of Information and Computer Sciences (CICS) and Faculty Associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University Fran Berman, Cohoes City Director of Operations Theresa Bourgeois, and Siena College Professor of Comparative Politics Vera Eccarius-Kelly.

Smart Talk Podcast
35. A talk with America's top Marxist economist

Smart Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 40:40


Dr. Wolff is known as America's top Marxist economist. He earned his bachelor's in history from Harvard, two master's degrees in economics and history from Stanford and Yale, and his Ph.D. in economics from Yale University, as well. Dr. Wolff has taught both economics and international affairs for decades. He began his teaching career at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and eventually moved on to the New School. He appears in numerous journals as a critic of conventional capitalism and is a regular contributor to the "Monthly Review." He even has his own radio show where he breaks down current issues through a Marxist lens. Dr. Wolff and the Henry George School discussed post-WWII economic policy, how the US-China relationship affects the global world order, and why real wages stopped growing at a sustainable rate after the 1970s. To check out more of our content, including our research, visit our website: https://www.hgsss.org/

Awkward Conversations
Preventing Substance Misuse in College Students (Part 2)

Awkward Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 21:16


Choosing a college or a university with your child is a big decision.Today, we are continuing the conversation about substance use among college students by talking through how best to choose a school that is serious about substance abuse prevention.    Host and Full House and Fuller House star Jodie Sweetin, is once again joined by special guests: Amy McCarthy, Clinical Social Worker at Boston Children's Hospital, Rich Lucey, who is the Senior Prevention Program Manager of the Community Outreach and Prevention Support section for the DEA, Sally Linowski, who is the Associate Dean of Students Off Campus Student Life and Community Engagement at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and recent college graduate and star of season 1 of Awkward Conversations Seychelles Mizel.    In this episode, you will hear important advice for how to get the most out of your college campus tours by asking the right questions related to substance use prevention. Seychelles talks about using vlogs to get a better idea of campus life and culture before choosing a school. This episode ends with important advice for how to identify warning signs of substance abuse and how to use technology as a way to stay connected with your kids. IN THIS EPISODE: [00:30] What are questions that parents should ask when on campus tour about prevention services [04:34] What are campus culture things to look at when touring colleges [05:47] Seychelles' hot tip for how she chose which college to attend [08:00] What questions to ask for students who may be in recovery [13:22] Understanding the issues of substance abuse and what resources are available for students with substance abuse struggles [16:35] Warning signs of substance abuse KEY TAKEAWAYS: When touring colleges, be sure to ask about what mental health resources are available and what their policy is on substance use. You can also ask to meet with someone in the Student Affairs office to talk about prevention activities and services. One thing parents can do is make sure that your kids know they can always call if they are struggling with substance abuse or any other issues that they might face at school. Parents should embrace technology, like FaceTime, as a way to stay in touch with your student. It also helps when looking for warning signs of substance abuse so you can see their face, see how they are doing, or even see the people they are hanging out with. Resources:   Growing Up Drug Free: A Parent's Guide to Substance Use Prevention     Campus Drug Prevention    One Pill Could Kill   Never Thought I'd Say This Podcast with Jodie Sweetin     BIO:   Jodie Sweetin is an American actress and television personality known for her role as Stephanie Tanner in the ABC comedy series Full House and its Netflix sequel series Fuller House. Jodie is joined by Content Expert Amy McCarthy, a Senior Clinical Social Worker at Boston Children's Hospital. @jodiesweetin   Rich Lucey is a senior prevention program manager in the Drug Enforcement Administration's Community Outreach and Prevention Support Section. Rich plans and executes educational and public information programs, evaluates program goals and outcomes, and serves as an advisor to the Section Chief and other DEA officials on drug misuse prevention and education programs. Rich formerly served as special assistant to the director for the federal Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, and worked as an education program specialist in the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools.   Sally Linowski, Ph.D., CHES has 30 years of experience in substance abuse prevention, community building and teaching in higher education. She serves as a consultant to campuses nationally on the strategic implementation of comprehensive prevention programs, including extensive experience ensuring compliance with federal mandates and planning and implementing individual and environmental prevention approaches. She has expertise in building meaningful campus and town partnerships and engaging students in addressing off campus student concerns as peer leaders. Currently, Sally is Senior Director, Off Campus Student Life and Community Engagement at UMass Amherst, where she oversees the Off Campus Student Center, Sorority and Fraternity Life, and Student Parent Programs. Sally is an adjunct assistant professor at the UMass Amherst School of Public Health and Health Sciences and founder/co-chair of the Campus and Community Coalition to Reduce High Risk Drinking.       The views, information, or opinions expressed during the Awkward Conversation series are solely those of the individuals, speakers, commentators, experts and or hosts involved and do not necessarily reflect nor represent those of the production, associates or broadcaster or any of its employees. Production is not responsible and does not verify for accuracy any of the information contained in the series available for viewing. The primary purpose of this series is to educate and inform. This series does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. This series is available for private, non-commercial use only. The production, broadcaster or its channel cannot be held accountable for all or any views expressed during this program.   About Elks   As a 150-year-old organization, they are 100% inclusive with a membership of close to 1 million diverse men and women in over 2,000 Lodges nationally, and while they consider themselves faith based, they are nondenominational and open to all creeds. The Elks have always prided themselves on civic duty, and the Elks Drug and Alcohol Prevention (DAP) program is the nation's largest all volunteer Kids Drug & Alcohol Use Prevention program. The Elks are also strong supporters of our brave men and women in the military, having built and donated the nation's first VA Hospital to the U.S. government. The Elks have donated more than $3.6 billion in cash, goods, and services to enrich the lives of millions of people!    About DEA The United States Drug Enforcement Administration was created in 1973 by President Nixon after the government noticed an alarming rise in recreational drug use and drug-related crime. A division of the Department of Justice, DEA is tasked with enforcing the controlled substances laws by apprehending offenders to be prosecuted for criminal and civil crimes. DEA is the largest and most effective anti drug organization in the world, with 239 domestic locations and 91 foreign offices in 68 countries.   Elks Kid Zone Website     Watch Awkward Conversations Season 1 the series:  Awkward Breakfast Conversations - Ep. 1  Awkward Lunch Conversations - Ep. 2  Awkward Dinner Conversations - Ep. 3  Elks Drug Awareness Program Website  Elks DAP on Twitter    Elks DAP on Facebook  Elks DAP on YouTube  DEA Website  DEA on Instagram  DEA on Twitter  DEA on Facebook  DEA YouTube Channel 

New Books in European Studies
Sarah Neville, "Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 49:27


Over the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, works of botany underwent a radical change in the English book trade. A genre that was once produced in smaller cheaper formats became lavishly produced, authoritative editions. But as Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade (Cambridge UP, 2022) shows, the relationships between making, producing, and consuming of botanical and medical knowledge was much more fluid. Today I am discussing this new book with the author Sarah Neville. Sarah Neville is Associate Professor of English and Creative Director of Lord Denney's Players at Ohio State University. Sarah serves as an assistant editor of the New Oxford Shakespeare and an associate coordinating editor of the Digital Renaissance Editions, as well as the writer/producer/director of the documentary Looking for Hamlet, 1603, available on Youtube. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, Early Theatre, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

New Books Network
Sarah Neville, "Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 49:27


Over the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, works of botany underwent a radical change in the English book trade. A genre that was once produced in smaller cheaper formats became lavishly produced, authoritative editions. But as Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade (Cambridge UP, 2022) shows, the relationships between making, producing, and consuming of botanical and medical knowledge was much more fluid. Today I am discussing this new book with the author Sarah Neville. Sarah Neville is Associate Professor of English and Creative Director of Lord Denney's Players at Ohio State University. Sarah serves as an assistant editor of the New Oxford Shakespeare and an associate coordinating editor of the Digital Renaissance Editions, as well as the writer/producer/director of the documentary Looking for Hamlet, 1603, available on Youtube. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, Early Theatre, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in the History of Science
Sarah Neville, "Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in the History of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 49:27


Over the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, works of botany underwent a radical change in the English book trade. A genre that was once produced in smaller cheaper formats became lavishly produced, authoritative editions. But as Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade (Cambridge UP, 2022) shows, the relationships between making, producing, and consuming of botanical and medical knowledge was much more fluid. Today I am discussing this new book with the author Sarah Neville. Sarah Neville is Associate Professor of English and Creative Director of Lord Denney's Players at Ohio State University. Sarah serves as an assistant editor of the New Oxford Shakespeare and an associate coordinating editor of the Digital Renaissance Editions, as well as the writer/producer/director of the documentary Looking for Hamlet, 1603, available on Youtube. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, Early Theatre, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Communications
Sarah Neville, "Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Communications

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 49:27


Over the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, works of botany underwent a radical change in the English book trade. A genre that was once produced in smaller cheaper formats became lavishly produced, authoritative editions. But as Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade (Cambridge UP, 2022) shows, the relationships between making, producing, and consuming of botanical and medical knowledge was much more fluid. Today I am discussing this new book with the author Sarah Neville. Sarah Neville is Associate Professor of English and Creative Director of Lord Denney's Players at Ohio State University. Sarah serves as an assistant editor of the New Oxford Shakespeare and an associate coordinating editor of the Digital Renaissance Editions, as well as the writer/producer/director of the documentary Looking for Hamlet, 1603, available on Youtube. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, Early Theatre, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/communications

New Books in Early Modern History
Sarah Neville, "Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Early Modern History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 49:27


Over the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, works of botany underwent a radical change in the English book trade. A genre that was once produced in smaller cheaper formats became lavishly produced, authoritative editions. But as Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade (Cambridge UP, 2022) shows, the relationships between making, producing, and consuming of botanical and medical knowledge was much more fluid. Today I am discussing this new book with the author Sarah Neville. Sarah Neville is Associate Professor of English and Creative Director of Lord Denney's Players at Ohio State University. Sarah serves as an assistant editor of the New Oxford Shakespeare and an associate coordinating editor of the Digital Renaissance Editions, as well as the writer/producer/director of the documentary Looking for Hamlet, 1603, available on Youtube. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, Early Theatre, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in History
Sarah Neville, "Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 49:27


Over the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, works of botany underwent a radical change in the English book trade. A genre that was once produced in smaller cheaper formats became lavishly produced, authoritative editions. But as Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade (Cambridge UP, 2022) shows, the relationships between making, producing, and consuming of botanical and medical knowledge was much more fluid. Today I am discussing this new book with the author Sarah Neville. Sarah Neville is Associate Professor of English and Creative Director of Lord Denney's Players at Ohio State University. Sarah serves as an assistant editor of the New Oxford Shakespeare and an associate coordinating editor of the Digital Renaissance Editions, as well as the writer/producer/director of the documentary Looking for Hamlet, 1603, available on Youtube. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, Early Theatre, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Literary Studies
Sarah Neville, "Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 49:27


Over the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, works of botany underwent a radical change in the English book trade. A genre that was once produced in smaller cheaper formats became lavishly produced, authoritative editions. But as Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade (Cambridge UP, 2022) shows, the relationships between making, producing, and consuming of botanical and medical knowledge was much more fluid. Today I am discussing this new book with the author Sarah Neville. Sarah Neville is Associate Professor of English and Creative Director of Lord Denney's Players at Ohio State University. Sarah serves as an assistant editor of the New Oxford Shakespeare and an associate coordinating editor of the Digital Renaissance Editions, as well as the writer/producer/director of the documentary Looking for Hamlet, 1603, available on Youtube. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, Early Theatre, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

Exchanges: A Cambridge UP Podcast
Sarah Neville, "Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

Exchanges: A Cambridge UP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 49:27


Over the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, works of botany underwent a radical change in the English book trade. A genre that was once produced in smaller cheaper formats became lavishly produced, authoritative editions. But as Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade (Cambridge UP, 2022) shows, the relationships between making, producing, and consuming of botanical and medical knowledge was much more fluid. Today I am discussing this new book with the author Sarah Neville. Sarah Neville is Associate Professor of English and Creative Director of Lord Denney's Players at Ohio State University. Sarah serves as an assistant editor of the New Oxford Shakespeare and an associate coordinating editor of the Digital Renaissance Editions, as well as the writer/producer/director of the documentary Looking for Hamlet, 1603, available on Youtube. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, Early Theatre, and Shakespeare Studies.

New Books in Intellectual History
Sarah Neville, "Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 49:27


Over the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, works of botany underwent a radical change in the English book trade. A genre that was once produced in smaller cheaper formats became lavishly produced, authoritative editions. But as Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade (Cambridge UP, 2022) shows, the relationships between making, producing, and consuming of botanical and medical knowledge was much more fluid. Today I am discussing this new book with the author Sarah Neville. Sarah Neville is Associate Professor of English and Creative Director of Lord Denney's Players at Ohio State University. Sarah serves as an assistant editor of the New Oxford Shakespeare and an associate coordinating editor of the Digital Renaissance Editions, as well as the writer/producer/director of the documentary Looking for Hamlet, 1603, available on Youtube. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, Early Theatre, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in Medicine
Sarah Neville, "Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 49:27


Over the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, works of botany underwent a radical change in the English book trade. A genre that was once produced in smaller cheaper formats became lavishly produced, authoritative editions. But as Early Modern Herbals and the Book Trade (Cambridge UP, 2022) shows, the relationships between making, producing, and consuming of botanical and medical knowledge was much more fluid. Today I am discussing this new book with the author Sarah Neville. Sarah Neville is Associate Professor of English and Creative Director of Lord Denney's Players at Ohio State University. Sarah serves as an assistant editor of the New Oxford Shakespeare and an associate coordinating editor of the Digital Renaissance Editions, as well as the writer/producer/director of the documentary Looking for Hamlet, 1603, available on Youtube. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, Early Theatre, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/medicine

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 08.26.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 61:34 Very Popular


Strawberries could help reduce harmful inflammation in the colon University of Massachusetts, August 20, 202 Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a set of painful conditions that can cause severe diarrhea and fatigue. Treatments can include medications and surgery. But now researchers report that a simple dietary intervention could mitigate colonic inflammation and improve gut health. In this case, a strawberry—or rather, less than a cupful of strawberries—a day could help keep the doctor away. The dietary consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a lowered risk of IBD. To establish an effective and practical approach to decrease colonic inflammation in both IBD patients and the general population, Xiao and his team at the University of Massachusetts Amherst focused on strawberries due to their wide consumption.  The researchers found that dietary consumption of whole strawberries at a dose equivalent to as low as three-quarters of a cup of strawberries per day in humans significantly suppressed symptoms like body weight loss and bloody diarrhea in mice with IBD. Strawberry treatments also diminished inflammatory responses in the mice's colonic tissue. But decreased inflammation wasn't the strawberry's only conferred benefit during this study.  Following the dietary treatments of whole strawberries, the researchers observed a reversal of that unhealthy microbiota composition in the IBD mice. Xiao's team also obtained experimental data that indicated strawberries might impact abnormal metabolic pathways in the IBD mice, which in turn could lead to the decreased colonic inflammation they observed. Higher diet quality relates to decelerated epigenetic aging  Tufts University, August 1, 2022 DNA methylation–based epigenetic age measures have been used as biological aging markers and are associated with a healthy lifespan. Few population-based studies have examined the relation between diet and epigenetic age acceleration. We aimed to investigate the relation between diet quality and epigenetic age acceleration. We analyzed data from 1995 participants (mean age, 67 years; 55% women) of the Framingham Heart Study Offspring Cohort. Cross-sectional associations between the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) score and 3 whole-blood DNA methylation–derived epigenetic age acceleration measures—Dunedin Pace of Aging Methylation (DunedinPoAm), GrimAge acceleration (GrimAA), and PhenoAge acceleration (PhenoAA)—were examined. Conclusions:  Higher diet quality is associated with slower epigenetic age acceleration, which partially explains the beneficial effect of diet quality on the lifespan. Our findings emphasize that adopting a healthy diet is crucial for maintaining healthy aging. Feeling anxious or blue? Ultra-processed foods may be to blame Florida Atlantic University, August 25, 2022 Do you love those sugary-sweet beverages, reconstituted meat products and packaged snacks? You may want to reconsider based on a new study that explored whether individuals who consume higher amounts of ultra-processed food have more adverse mental health symptoms. Researchers from Florida Atlantic University's Schmidt College of Medicine and collaborators explored a nationally representative sample of the United States population to determine if individuals who consume high amounts of ultra-processed foods report significantly more adverse mental health symptoms including depression, anxiety and mentally unhealthy days.  They measured mild depression, number of mental unhealthy days and number of anxious days in 10,359 adults 18 and older from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results of the study, published in the journal Public Health Nutrition, showed that individuals who consumed the most ultra-processed foods as compared with those who consumed the least amount had statistically significant increases in the adverse mental health symptoms of mild depression, "mentally unhealthy days" and "anxious days." They also had significantly lower rates of reporting zero "mentally unhealthy days" and zero "anxious days." Findings from this study are generalizable to the entire U.S. as well as other Western countries with similar ultra-processed food intakes.   Many types of leisure time activities may lower risk of death for older adults National Cancer Institute, August 25, 2022 Older adults who participate weekly in many different types of leisure time activities, such as walking for exercise, jogging, swimming laps, or playing tennis, may have a lower risk of death from any cause, as well as death from cardiovascular disease and cancer, according to a new study led by researchers at the National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health. The findings suggest that it's important for older adults to engage in leisure time activities that they enjoy and can sustain, because many types of these activities may lower the risk of death, the authors wrote. Using data from 272,550 adults between the ages of 59 and 82 who had completed questionnaires about their leisure-time activities as part of the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, the researchers looked at whether participating in equivalent amounts of seven different exercise and recreational activities—including running, cycling, swimming, other aerobic exercise, racquet sports, golf, and walking for exercise—was associated with lowered risk of death. The researchers found that achieving the recommended amount of physical activity per week through any combination of these activities was associated with a 13% lower risk of death from any cause compared with no participation in these activities. When they looked at the role of each activity individually, playing racquet sports was associated with a 16% reduction in risk and running with a 15% reduction. However, all the activities investigated were similarly associated with lower risks of death. The levels of activity by the most active individuals (those who exceeded the recommended levels of physical activity) were associated with even greater reductions in the risk of death, but there were diminishing returns as activity levels increased. Even people who did some recreational activity, though less than the recommended amount, had a 5% reduction in risk of death than those who did not participate in any of the activities studied. These activities were also associated with a lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease and cancer. Playing racquet sports was associated with the greatest reduction in risk of cardiovascular deaths (27% reduction), while running was associated with the greatest reduction in risk of cancer deaths (19% reduction).   Avocado may resist the effects of leukemia University of Waterloo (Canada), August 19, 2022 One of the many health benefits avocados offer is their ability to ward off cancer. Avocados contain avocatin B, which is a compound found to fight against a type of leukemia called acute myeloid leukemia (AML), according to a study carried out by a researcher from the University of Waterloo, Canada. AML is known by many names, like acute myelocytic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, acute granulocytic leukemia, and acute non-lymphocytic leukemia. AML is a type of blood cancer that is most common in older people. Approximately 90 percent of people with this type of cancer die within five years of diagnosis. In the in vitro study, Canadian researcher Paul Spagnuolo found that avocatin B fights AML by targeting leukemia stem cells – which are the root of the disease – without harming healthy, non-cancerous cells. This indicated that the compound is both effective against AML and not toxic to the body. Avocados can also fight against prostate and oral cancer cells. Researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles conducted a review of studies on the potential health benefits of avocados and looked at evidence that specific avocado extracts can inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells and oral cancer cells. They found that the active compounds in avocados make them potentially beneficial for preventing cancer.   News addiction is linked to not only poor mental well-being but physical health too, new study Texas Tech University, August 25, 2022 People with an obsessive urge to constantly check the news are more likely to suffer from stress, anxiety, and physical ill health, finds a new study published in the peer-reviewed journal Health Communication. For many people, reading bad news can make us feel temporarily powerless and distressed. For others, being exposed to a 24-hour news cycle of continually evolving events can have serious impacts on mental and physical well-being—as these new findings, out today, show, with those who have a high-levels of news addiction reporting "significantly greater physical ill-being." "Witnessing these events unfold in the news can bring about a constant state of high alert in some people, kicking their surveillance motives into overdrive and making the world seem like a dark and dangerous place," says Bryan McLaughlin, associate professor of advertising at the College of Media and Communication at Texas Tech University. "For these individuals, a vicious cycle can develop, in which rather than tuning out, they become drawn further in, obsessing over the news and checking for updates around the clock to alleviate their emotional distress. But it doesn't help, and the more they check the news, the more it begins to interfere with other aspects of their lives." To study this phenomenon, McLaughlin and his colleagues,  analyzed data from an online survey of 1,100 US adults. The results revealed that 16.5% of people surveyed showed signs of "severely problematic" news consumption. Such individuals frequently became so immersed and personally invested in news stories that the stories dominated the individual's waking thoughts, disrupted time with family and friends, made it difficult to focus on school or work, and contributed to restlessness and an inability to sleep. 73.6% of those recognized to have severe levels of problematic news consumption reported experiencing mental ill-being "quite a bit" or "very much"—while frequent symptoms were only reported by 8% of all other study participants. 61% of those with severe levels of problematic news reported experiencing physical ill-being "quite a bit" or "very much" compared to only 6.1% for all other study participants. According to McLaughlin, the findings show that there is a need for focused media literacy campaigns to help people develop a healthier relationship with the news.

New Books Network
Ruben Espinosa, "Shakespeare on the Shades of Racism" (Routledge, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 58:45


In Shakespeare on the Shades of Racism (Routledge, 2021), Ruben Espinosa explores the works of the early modern dramatist in the context of Trump-era immigration policies, anti-Black police violence, and the enduring legacy of white supremacy in American life. Espinosa is Professor of English at Arizona State University. He is the author of the previous monograph, Masculinity and Marian Efficacy in Shakespeare's England, and the co-editor of the collection Shakespeare and Immigration, both available through Routledge. Shakespeare on the Shades of Race, an urgent new book that offers an important critique of racism and white supremacy to bear on As You Like It, The Tempest and Othello, alongside Luis Alberto Urrea's The Devil's Highway, Toni Morrison's Desdemona, and Keith Hamilton Cobb's American Moor. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Literary Studies
Ruben Espinosa, "Shakespeare on the Shades of Racism" (Routledge, 2021)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 58:45


In Shakespeare on the Shades of Racism (Routledge, 2021), Ruben Espinosa explores the works of the early modern dramatist in the context of Trump-era immigration policies, anti-Black police violence, and the enduring legacy of white supremacy in American life. Espinosa is Professor of English at Arizona State University. He is the author of the previous monograph, Masculinity and Marian Efficacy in Shakespeare's England, and the co-editor of the collection Shakespeare and Immigration, both available through Routledge. Shakespeare on the Shades of Race, an urgent new book that offers an important critique of racism and white supremacy to bear on As You Like It, The Tempest and Othello, alongside Luis Alberto Urrea's The Devil's Highway, Toni Morrison's Desdemona, and Keith Hamilton Cobb's American Moor. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in History
Ruben Espinosa, "Shakespeare on the Shades of Racism" (Routledge, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 58:45


In Shakespeare on the Shades of Racism (Routledge, 2021), Ruben Espinosa explores the works of the early modern dramatist in the context of Trump-era immigration policies, anti-Black police violence, and the enduring legacy of white supremacy in American life. Espinosa is Professor of English at Arizona State University. He is the author of the previous monograph, Masculinity and Marian Efficacy in Shakespeare's England, and the co-editor of the collection Shakespeare and Immigration, both available through Routledge. Shakespeare on the Shades of Race, an urgent new book that offers an important critique of racism and white supremacy to bear on As You Like It, The Tempest and Othello, alongside Luis Alberto Urrea's The Devil's Highway, Toni Morrison's Desdemona, and Keith Hamilton Cobb's American Moor. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Dance
Ruben Espinosa, "Shakespeare on the Shades of Racism" (Routledge, 2021)

New Books in Dance

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 58:45


In Shakespeare on the Shades of Racism (Routledge, 2021), Ruben Espinosa explores the works of the early modern dramatist in the context of Trump-era immigration policies, anti-Black police violence, and the enduring legacy of white supremacy in American life. Espinosa is Professor of English at Arizona State University. He is the author of the previous monograph, Masculinity and Marian Efficacy in Shakespeare's England, and the co-editor of the collection Shakespeare and Immigration, both available through Routledge. Shakespeare on the Shades of Race, an urgent new book that offers an important critique of racism and white supremacy to bear on As You Like It, The Tempest and Othello, alongside Luis Alberto Urrea's The Devil's Highway, Toni Morrison's Desdemona, and Keith Hamilton Cobb's American Moor. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/performing-arts

New Books in Critical Theory
Ruben Espinosa, "Shakespeare on the Shades of Racism" (Routledge, 2021)

New Books in Critical Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 58:45


In Shakespeare on the Shades of Racism (Routledge, 2021), Ruben Espinosa explores the works of the early modern dramatist in the context of Trump-era immigration policies, anti-Black police violence, and the enduring legacy of white supremacy in American life. Espinosa is Professor of English at Arizona State University. He is the author of the previous monograph, Masculinity and Marian Efficacy in Shakespeare's England, and the co-editor of the collection Shakespeare and Immigration, both available through Routledge. Shakespeare on the Shades of Race, an urgent new book that offers an important critique of racism and white supremacy to bear on As You Like It, The Tempest and Othello, alongside Luis Alberto Urrea's The Devil's Highway, Toni Morrison's Desdemona, and Keith Hamilton Cobb's American Moor. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

New Books in Early Modern History
Ruben Espinosa, "Shakespeare on the Shades of Racism" (Routledge, 2021)

New Books in Early Modern History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 58:45


In Shakespeare on the Shades of Racism (Routledge, 2021), Ruben Espinosa explores the works of the early modern dramatist in the context of Trump-era immigration policies, anti-Black police violence, and the enduring legacy of white supremacy in American life. Espinosa is Professor of English at Arizona State University. He is the author of the previous monograph, Masculinity and Marian Efficacy in Shakespeare's England, and the co-editor of the collection Shakespeare and Immigration, both available through Routledge. Shakespeare on the Shades of Race, an urgent new book that offers an important critique of racism and white supremacy to bear on As You Like It, The Tempest and Othello, alongside Luis Alberto Urrea's The Devil's Highway, Toni Morrison's Desdemona, and Keith Hamilton Cobb's American Moor. John Yargo is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Boston College. He recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Early Theatre, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices