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Annual festival held in Austin, Texas, U.S.

  • 4,108PODCASTS
  • 7,668EPISODES
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  • May 27, 2022LATEST

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    Best podcasts about sxsw

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    Latest podcast episodes about sxsw

    Dream Chasers Radio
    Interview with new wave film artist KHVLFVNI

    Dream Chasers Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 14:00


    New wave film artist from a small town, Monrovia, in the L.A County. Working under some of the best directors and content creators in Hollywood as an intern, KHVLFVNI has been behind the scenes in major scenarios. Between completing an internship at COMPLEX magazine and touring for the second time to SXSW music interactive KHVLFVNI is now writing his own material as well as collaborating with other like minded individuals. Check out the content and contact for future projects. Thank-you for the support.

    Books on Pod
    #249 - Ron Howard & Nathan Mook on WE FEED PEOPLE

    Books on Pod

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 6:53


    Oscar-winning director Ron Howard and World Central Kitchen CEO Nathan Mook chat with Trey Elling about WE FEED PEOPLE during South By Southwest 2022. The Apple+ documentary, directed by Howard, details the tireless work and humanitarian aid provided by renowned chef José Andrés through his organization, World Central Kitchen. Nathan Mook (0:44) Ron Howard (3:17)

    improv4humans with Matt Besser
    Rianne Downey on improv4humans LIVE from SXSW 2022

    improv4humans with Matt Besser

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 52:39


    Scottish singer-songwriter Rianne Downey joins John Gemberling, Danielle Schneider, and Matt Besser for a LIVE improv4humans from SXSW! Rianne performs songs that inspire scenes about threats of the devil at your door, singing too loudly at a concert, losing a grudge list, insincere awwww-ing, and much more!

    Ride the Omnibus
    Mama Bears

    Ride the Omnibus

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 26:02


    Ariel sits down with documentary filmmaker Daresha Kyi to talk about her film Mama Bears, about Christian mothers who choose to embrace and advocate for their LGBTQIA+ kids.Support the show

    The Horn Austin
    Trey Elling Talks To Nolan Ryan, His Two Sons, And The Director Of Facing Nolan At SXSW

    The Horn Austin

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 9:51


    Trey Elling Talks To Nolan Ryan, His Two Sons, And The Director Of Facing Nolan At SXSW by The Horn 104.9 & AM 1260

    The Horn Austin
    Chad & Trey, May 24th, 2022 - Hour 3

    The Horn Austin

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 34:33


    Trey plays an interview with Nolan Ryan from his SXSW podcast "Books on Pod" plus Why Today Matter's featuring a food you like but everyone else hates. Stems and Seeds looks at the All-Big 12 Conference Baseball team...

    Books on Pod
    #247 - Nolan Ryan, et al on FACING NOLAN

    Books on Pod

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 11:10


    Several people responsible for the new Nolan Ryan documentary, FACING NOLAN, chat with Trey Elling on the red carpet before the film's premiere at SXSW 2022. The interviewees include: Bradley Jackson - Director (0:33) Reid & Reese Ryan - Executive Producers & Nolan's sons (3:22) Nolan Ryan - Major League Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher & Robin Ventura's daddy (9:16)

    SoundGirls Podcast
    Salim Akram: Monitor engineer for Billie Eilish and Finneas

    SoundGirls Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 45:08


    Salim Akram is a live sound engineer specializing in mixing monitors. He currently works as the Monitor Engineer for seven-time Grammy Award-winning artist Billie Eilish and eight-time Grammy Award-winning producer and artist Finneas.  In 2019, he was featured in FOH Magazine and was a Parnelli nominee for the Monitor Engineer of the Year. After attending Art Institute of New England, Salim began to synthesize his technical skills in engineering with his life-long passion for playing music. He and his closest friends co-founded the band Bad Rabbits, where Salim would go on to not only tour with major artists such as Kendrick Lamar, Steve Aoki, Allen Stone, and Taking Back Sunday – but he would have the opportunity to work with producers Teddy Riley, Michael Elizondo, James Fauntleroy, et. al. in the studio. Bad Rabbits has won numerous Boston Music Awards, including Artist of the Year, perform as guests on Jimmy Kimmel Live, Arsenio Hall, and Craig Ferguson, and perform at huge festivals such as Vans Warped Tour, Reading and Leeds, and SXSW. While Bad Rabbits was writing music and taking an interlude on touring, Salim dove head-first into regular house engineering roles with local venues owned and operated by Bowery/AEG and City Winery, while simultaneously expanding his freelancing repertoire to include contract work for corporate juggernauts such as Dell, Apple, and Google, as well as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Chanel, Puma, Sephora, and the Simmons Leadership Conference. However, when he was asked to build the touring monitor rig for Glassjaw, he realized it was just the catalyst he needed to get back on the road.  Salim was introduced to Ms. Eilish in 2018 and continues to work as her Monitor Engineer through today. When he isn't on tour, he resides in Boston, Massachusetts, and enjoys photography, cooking, and traveling.  Interviewer Host & Producer: Rebecca Wilson Executive Producers: Beckie Campbell & Susan Williams Edited by: Robbie Mortimer soundgirls.org  Sponsored by QSC https://www.qsc.com

    Saúde Digital
    #Ep.147 - HackTown - O maior festival de inovação e criatividade da América Latina

    Saúde Digital

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 26:42


    SD147 – HackTown - O maior festival de inovação e criatividade da América Latina. Neste podcast, vamos conversar com o João Rubens Costa Fonseca, Co-fundador, Chefe de parcerias da HackTown e CMO do Grupo Ted, para conhecer o HackTown. O HackTown é o maior festival de inovação e criatividade da América Latina, que acontece entre os dias 15 e 18 de setembro de 2022, e promove a inovação, a criatividade e a tecnologia. Ele é considerado o SXSW da América Latina. E você, nosso ouvinte, receberá um desconto de 15% para participar do HackTown. Clique aqui para acessar seu desconto! Neste episódio, o que você vai encontrar: O background do João  Ele chegou a Santa Rita do Sapucaí/MG aos 15 anos de idade, atraído pela oferta de capacitação em tecnologia que a cidade oferece. Ele fez Escola Técnica, ingressou no Instituto Nacional de Telecomunicações (INATEL) e formou-se Engenheiro de Telecomunicações. Ele se considera um engenheiro "abraçar de árvores" e com 3 sócios, investiu na ideia de trazer  uma conexão para empreendedores em uma revolução criativa. O HackTown Evento que não tem forma: criado para conectar os empreendedores da cidade. Autêntico, brasileiro, focado na economia criativa, o festival vem para trazer a perspectiva de inovação, criatividade e tecnologia e hoje só é limitado pelo tamanho da cidade. O HackTown é um festival cujo objetivo é trazer as tendências em diversas áreas, promover conexões, reunir mentes brilhantes e tirar as pessoas de sua zona de conforto. A vocação para o sucesso O festival foi projetado em sua 1ª edição para 3 pontos de palestras simultâneas para 50 pessoas. Ele foi realizado em + de 15 pontos para mais de 600 pessoas. Os números do festival: estimativa de público para a edição 2022 de +30k; + de 35 pontos na cidade com conteúdos e palestras trazendo assuntos diversos; + de 800 atividades rolando no evento durante 4 dias; à noite: um verdadeiro festival de música com + de 10 palcos, trazendo as tendências da música. A tranversalidade Startups; Médicos; Corporações; Chefs de cozinha; e muita música. Como funciona Não é só um evento de conteúdo, é uma experiência de networking, conteúdo e cultura em uma autêntica cidade do interior de MG chamada Santa Rita do Sapucaí. Há uma promoção proposital de conexão dos participantes com diferentes áreas de atuação e a transversalidade de conteúdo propõe essa troca. Você representa uma empresa e quer falar com o João para receber o Media Kit? Envie um e-mail para joao@hacktown.com.br Comunidade Online Saúde Digital Podcast Você é médico e quer interagir comigo e com outros colegas inovadores da medicina digital?  Entre na Comunidade do Podcast Saúde Digital no SDConecta! Episódios Anteriores - Acesse! SD146 - Escala App: Intraempreendedorismo de sucesso SD145 - Conheça a ECMO: Oxigenação por Membrana Extracorpórea SD144 - O Médico de Família e a Atençao Primária à Saúde SD143 - Startup Pill: conheça o modelo Dark Pharmacy SD142 - QSaúde: a busca pela transformação da saúde suplementar Música | ZakharValaha da Pixabay Música | Alex_Make Music da Pixabay

    Tell Me About It With Jade Iovine
    We're Bed People (Not Bad People) with Casey Wilson

    Tell Me About It With Jade Iovine

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 71:08


    Casey is a dream TMAI guest. First of all, she, like me, is fluent in Real Housewives and dropped the most shocking Housewives truth bomb in this episode that absolutely shook me to my core. Secondly, she wrote one of my favorite books, The Wreckage of My Presence, in which she generously details ALL of her cringiest moments and bad feelings. She also shines a light on a formative childhood experience that she and I both went through and commiserated about extensively.    We talked about getting fired from SNL, losing her mom, finding love after rejection, the mystique and rulebook of the “cool girl” and how we have both nurtured (...and resisted) our undying and unwavering devotion to bed.    Casey Wilson is an actress, writer, director and podcaster. You know her from Happy Endings, Saturday Night Live, The Shrink Next Door, Marry Me, Black Monday, Mrs. Fletcher, and Curb Your Enthusiasm, as well as films such as Gone Girl, Julie and Julia, and Always be My Maybe. Casey co-wrote and co-starred in the movies Bride Wars and Ass Backwards with her longtime collaborator June Diane Raphael. Alongside Danielle Schneider, she co-hosts the hit podcast Bitch Sesh. Her directorial debut, Daddio, premiered at SXSW and TIFF. Casey lives with her husband and two young sons in Los Angeles.   Seriously, go buy The Wreckage of My Presence. I cannot recommend this book enough. You'll feel like you're hanging with your best friend who has the best stories, and you won't want it to end.    Executive Producer Nick Stumpf Produced by Catherine Law Edited and Engineered by Brandon Dickert See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    What’s Your Limp?
    Spencer Cook (Filmmaker)

    What’s Your Limp?

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 43:30


    Spencer Cook is a first time filmmaker, writer and actor whose short film, ACT OF GOD, won the audience award in the Texas Short Film category at SXSW.Spencer also happens to have Muscular Dystrophy. His film hilariously (and honestly) portrays the struggles (both internal and external) that people in the disabled community have to live with. In his conversation with Jordan, Spencer shares his story of how he fell into the world of filmmaking, what inspired him to make ACT OF GOD and what is next for him on this journey.Be sure to follow Spencer at @SCookSays on Instagram!

    In Conversation
    Brian Eno x Beatie Wolfe — Art & Climate (04.22.22)

    In Conversation

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 89:19


    Brian Eno and Beatie Wolfe talk Art and Climate on dublab for this Orange Juice for the Ears special that marks Earthday 2022. Their conversation was recorded live in Austin where it was SXSW's Featured Session for the day art/climate converged. The conversation between musical visionaries Brian Eno and Beatie Wolfe covers how art can play a vital role in response to the climate emergency, with Brian sharing his music industry charity EarthPercent and Beatie sharing ‘From Green to Red,' an environmental protest piece built using 800,000 years of NASA data to visualize rising CO2 levels. This show also marks the day EarthPercent x Earth Day campaign launches where Brian Eno and Beatie Wolfe join 100+ artists offering a track to support organizations doing vital work to help tackle the climate emergency. All info earthpercent.bandcamp.com. This show closes with the record Songs of the Humpback Whale by Dr Roger Payne. dublab is a non-profit listener supporter radio station. Become a Sustaining Member at: https://www.dublab.com/support/memberships --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dublab-inconversation/support

    Bitcoin, Fiat & Rock'n'Roll
    News: Stablecoin TerraUSD implodiert und der Kryptomarkt leidet

    Bitcoin, Fiat & Rock'n'Roll

    Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 66:08


    In einer neuen News-Episode von Bitcoin, Fiat & Rock'n'Roll nehmen Alex, Michael und Manuel den Zusammenbruch des Terra-Ökosystems unter die Lupe. Der Luna Coin, der Anfang April noch fast 120 USD kostete, wird aktuell aufgrund einer hyperinflationären Todesspirale zu einem Bruchteil eines Cents gehandelt. Die ausstehende Menge ist von 377 Mio am 11. Mai auf 653.000 Mio am 14. Mai gestiegen. Der algorithmische Stablecoin UST ist nur noch Cents wert. Wie konnte es so weit kommen? Wieso fand kurzzeitig auch ein “De-Pegging” des größten Stablecoins Tether Dollar (USDT) statt? Warum leidet im Zuge der Terra-Implosion die gesamte Krypto-Industrie unter einem starken Preiseinbruch? All das beleuchten wir im Deep Dive dieser Episode. Was erwartet euch darüber hinaus in der Episode? Unter anderem folgende Themen: Regulierung in der EU und Deutschland: Die EU iteriert im sogenannten Trilog-Verfahren ihre Transfer of Funds Regulation. Während eine Verifizierungspflicht für sogenannte unhosted wallets offenbar fällt, soll die Meldepflicht für Krypto-Exchanges sogar verschärft werden. In Deutschland publiziert das Bundesfinanzministerium (BMF) ein Schreiben zu Krypto-Besteuerung. Das Dokument enthält rechtliche Definitionen und steuerliche Einordnungen für virtuelle Währungen und Token. Die Verlängerung der Spekulationsfrist von einem Jahr auf zehn Jahre wird bei der Nutzung von Kryptowährungen zum Staking und Lending nicht umgesetzt. Run auf NFT-Drop löst Ethereum-Gaskrieg aus: Ein Run auf den neusten NFT-Drop des Bored Ape Yacht Club (BAYC) hat die Ethereum-Blockchain mit exorbitanten Gas Fees unter Druck gesetzt. Die BAYC-Erfolgswelle wird mit dem Metaverse Otherside in Zusammenhang gebracht, für das der BAYC gratis Grundstücke für BAYC-Sammler versprochen hatte. Der Ethereum-Erfinder Vitalik Buterin reagiert auf Otherside-Gaskrieg und fordert, dass Etherum-Layer-2-Skalierungslösungen ihre Transaktionsgebühren auf unter 0,05 US-Dollar pro Transaktion senken sollten. Instagram unterstützt jetzt NFTs von Ethereum, Polygon, Solana und Flow: Instagram wird keine Gebühren für das Posten und Teilen von NFTs berechnen, wie es Twitter im Januar für seine sechseckigen NFT-Profilbilder tat. Meta-CEO Zuckerberg hatte im März auf der SXSW angekündigt, dass NFTs auf Instagram Einzug halten würden. Viel Spaß beim Hören dieser News-Episode!

    Collider Conversations
    Everything Everywhere All At Once Interview: Stephanie Hsu

    Collider Conversations

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 44:34


    Everything Everywhere All At Once is changing the game in a very big way for breakout star Stephanie Hsu. No synopsis can do the full film justice, but just in case you've yet to experience the phenomenon, Everything Everywhere All At Once focuses on Michelle Yeoh's Evelyn Wang, a woman struggling to keep her family's laundromat afloat with her husband, Waymond (Ke Huy Quan). Evelyn is so wrapped up in that, filing her taxes, and her father's (James Hong) arrival from China that she fails to notice how much her daughter Joy (Hsu) really needs her. As though things couldn't get more complicated, in comes another version of her husband, Waymond from the “Alphaverse.” The multiverse is in danger, and he thinks that Evelyn has the power to save it. Everything Everywhere All At Once began racking up positive reviews out of its SXSW world premiere and gained even more before hitting theaters on March 25th. From there, the film's star continued to soar, inspiring many to give this wacky multiverse adventure oozing with heart a go. In fact, it's currently getting mighty close to becoming A24's highest-grossing release at the domestic box office. It's a marvel of a movie that could and should continue to make waves through 2022. Admittedly, I was a little late to the game on Everything Everywhere All At Once, only catching the film two weeks into its theatrical release, but you can bet the first thing I did when I got home from the screening was send the necessary emails to get Stephanie Hsu on an episode of Collider Ladies Night. Check out this episode of the show to hear all about Hsu's journey from thinking she'd stick to experimental theater to booking roles in The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel and Everything Everywhere All at once! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
    S36E6 - The Ability to Adapt and Change Perspective in a World that is Constantly Changing, with Robert Overweg

    Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 40:59


    In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover talks with Robert Overweg about the ability to adapt and change perspective in a world that is constantly changing. See the video here: https://youtu.be/S04LNbxIIIY. Robert Overweg (https://www.linkedin.com/in/robertoverweg/) is the founder of the Adaptable Mindset program. He and his team empower people to develop their own Adaptable Mindset, to develop mental flexibility. Learn how to create mental space and to find new possibilities. In our rapidly changing world we keep feeling the impact of unpredictable events to which we have to adapt. Robert teaches how adaptability is about empowerment and finding new perspectives. The Adaptable Mindset program has been applied at several Fortune 500 companies (Chanel, Heineken), multiple SMEs and innovative schools. They have also supported over a thousand students and solopreneurs with their online program. Robert has over a decade of experience in innovation and digital transformation with clients like Vodafone, Liberty global, eBay, Heineken, a variety of startups, and innovative schools. He is also an artist and exhibited at the Centre Pompidou and the media biennial in Seoul. As a frequent speaker at institutes like MIT, SXSW, and the European Commission. Robert speaks about ways to use tech to work smarter and add value to the world. It's Robert's goal to empower people to live a life full of possibilities. Please leave a review wherever you listen to your podcasts! Get 3 months of GUSTO free when you run your first payroll, at Gusto.com/hci Check out the HCI Academy: Courses, Micro-Credentials, and Certificates to Upskill and Reskill for the Future of Work! Check out the LinkedIn Alchemizing Human Capital Newsletter. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Future Leader. Check out Dr. Westover's book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine. Ranked #5 Workplace Podcast Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast Ranked #7 HR Podcast Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts Each HCI Podcast episode (Program, ID No. 592296) has been approved for 0.50 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR™, aPHRi™, PHR®, PHRca®, SPHR®, GPHR®, PHRi™ and SPHRi™ recertification through HR Certification Institute® (HRCI®). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Startup of the Year Podcast
    #0089 - Accelerating Startups with Travis Holoway, Rodney Williams, and Lesa Mitchell

    Startup of the Year Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 18:56


    On this episode of the Startup of the Year Podcast, we hear a panel discussion from our last Summit called “Startup Lessons from Accelerating Startups” with Travis Holoway and Rodney Williams of the Established Ventures portfolio company, SoLo Funds (solofunds.com), and Lesa Mitchell, formerly of Techstars and now with HighAlpha Innovation. The crew talk about helping people and their “fastest growing fintech” startup and other startup tips and lessons learned. Also, we are continuing our segment where we highlight one startup from our community during every episode. In this episode the company is BlueRecruit, which is a direct-hire marketplace for skilled-trade workers who want to build their career and the companies desperate for their talent. They have removed the inefficiencies of resumes and job posts and focus on the skills and experiences that matter. Go to bluerecruit.us to learn more! We live streamed our Summit, so if you were not able to attend in-person, make sure to watch it on our YouTube channel at: soty.link/ESTYouTube Lastly, we invite you all to join our community today to access the support, expert advice, and resources you need to elevate your startup by going to: www.est.us/join Thank you for listening, and as always, please check out the Established website and subscribe to the newsletter at www.est.us Checkout Startup of the Year at www.startupofyear.com Subscribe to the Startup of the Year Daily Deal Flow: www.startupofyear.com/daily-dealflow Subscribe to the Startup of the Year podcast: www.podcast.startupofyear.com Subscribe to the Established YouTube Channel: soty.link/ESTYouTube *** Startup of the Year helps diverse, emerging startups, founding teams, and entrepreneurs push their company to the next level. We are a competition, a global community, and a resource. Startup of the Year is also a year-long program that searches the country for a geographically diverse set of startups from all backgrounds and pulls them together to compete for the title of Startup of the Year. The program includes a number of in-person and virtual events, including our annual South By Southwest startup pitch event and competition. All of which culminate at our annual Startup of the Year Summit, where the Startup of the Year winner is announced, along with an opportunity at a potential investment. Established is a consultancy focused on helping organizations with innovation, startup, and communication strategies. It is the power behind Startup of the Year. Created by the talent responsible for building the Tech.Co brand (acquired by an international publishing company), we are leveraging decades of experience to help our collaborators best further (or create) their brand & accomplish their most important goals. Connect with us on Twitter - @EstablishedUs and Facebook - facebook.com/established.us

    Screaming in the Cloud
    At the Head of Community Development with Wesley Faulkner

    Screaming in the Cloud

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 35:19


    About WesleyWesley Faulkner is a first-generation American, public speaker, and podcaster. He is a founding member of the government transparency group Open Austin and a staunch supporter of racial justice, workplace equity, and neurodiversity. His professional experience spans technology from AMD, Atlassian, Dell, IBM, and MongoDB. Wesley currently works as a Developer Advocate, and in addition, co-hosts the developer relations focused podcast Community Pulse and serves on the board for SXSW.Links Referenced: Twitter: https://twitter.com/wesley83 Polywork: https://polywork.com/wesley83 Personal Website: https://www.wesleyfaulkner.com/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Finding skilled DevOps engineers is a pain in the neck! And if you need to deploy a secure and compliant application to AWS, forgettaboutit! But that's where DuploCloud can help. Their comprehensive no-code/low-code software platform guarantees a secure and compliant infrastructure in as little as two weeks, while automating the full DevSecOps lifestyle. Get started with DevOps-as-a-Service from DuploCloud so that your cloud configurations are done right the first time. Tell them I sent you and your first two months are free. To learn more visit: snark.cloud/duplo. Thats's snark.cloud/D-U-P-L-O-C-L-O-U-D.Corey: What if there were a single place to get an inventory of what you're running in the cloud that wasn't "the monthly bill?" Further, what if there were a way to compare that inventory to what you were already managing via Terraform, Pulumi, or CloudFormation, but then automatically add the missing unmanaged or drifted parts to it? And what if there were a policy engine to immediately flag and remediate a wide variety of misconfigurations? Well, stop dreaming and start doing; visit snark.cloud/firefly to learn more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I am joined again for a second time this year by Wesley Faulkner. Last time we spoke, he was a developer advocate. And since then, as so many have, he's changed companies. Wesley, thank you for joining me again. You're the Head of Community at SingleStore, now. Congrats on the promotion.Wesley: Thank you. It's been a very welcome change. I love developer advocates and developer advocacy. But I love people, too, so it's almost, I think, very analogous to the ebbs and flow that we all have gone through, through the pandemic, and leaning into my strong suits.Corey: It's a big deal having a ‘head of' in a role title, as opposed to Developer Advocate, Senior Developer Advocate. And it is a different role. It's easy to default into the world of thinking that it's a promotion. Management is in many ways orthogonal to what it takes to succeed in an actual role. And further, you're not the head of DevRel, or DevRelopers or whatever you want to call the term. You are instead the Head of Community. How tied is that to developer relations, developer advocacy, or other things that we are used to using as terms of art in this space?Wesley: If we're talking about other companies, I would say the Head of Community is something that's under the umbrella of developer relations, where it's just a peer to some of the other different elements or columns of developer relations. But in SingleStore specifically, I have to say that developer relations in terms of what you think about whole umbrella is very new to the company. And so, I consider myself the first person in the role of developer relations by being the Head of Community. So, a lot of the other parts are being bolted in, but under the focus of developer as a community. So, I'm liaisoning right now as helping with spearheading some of the design of the activities that the advocates do, as well as architecting the platform and the experiences of people coming in and experiencing SingleStore through the community's perspective.So, all that to say is, what I'm doing is extremely structured, and a lot of stuff that we're doing with the efficacy, I'm using some of my expertise to help guide that, but it's still something that's kind of like an offshoot and not well integrated at the moment.Corey: How has it changed the way that you view the function of someone who's advocating to developers, which is from my cynical perspective, “Oh, it's marketing, but we don't tell people it's marketing because they won't like it.” And yes, I know, I'll get emails about that. But how does it differ from doing that yourself versus being the head of the function of a company? Because leadership is a heck of a switch? I thought earlier in my career that oh, yeah, it's a natural evolution of being a mediocre engineer. Time to be a mediocre manager. And oh, no, no, I aspired to be a mediocre manager. It's a completely different skill set and I got things hilariously wrong. What's it like for you going through that shift?Wesley: First of all, it is kind of like advertising, and people may not think of it that way. Just to give an example, movie trailers is advertising. The free samples at the grocery store is advertising. But people love those because it gives an experience that they like in a package that they are accustomed to. And so, it's the same with developer relations; it's finding the thing that makes the experience worthwhile.On the community side, this is not new to me. I've done several different roles, maybe not in this combination. But when I was at MongoDB, I was a technical community manager, which is like a cog in the whole giant machine. But before that, in my other life, I managed social and community interactions for Walmart, and I had, at the slow period, around 65, but during the holidays, it would ramp up to 95 direct reports that I managed.It's almost—if you're a fan of The Princess Bride, it's different than fighting one person. Sometimes it's easier to fight, like, a squad or a gang of people. So, being Head of Community with such a young company is definitely a lot different than. In some ways, harder to deal with this type of community where we're just growing and emerging, rather than something more well-established.Corey: It probably gives you an interesting opportunity. Because back when I was doing engineering work as an SRE or whatever we call them in that era, it was, “Yeah, wow, my boss is terrible and has no idea what the hell they're doing.” So, then I found myself in the role, and it's, “Cool. Now, do all the things that you said you would do. Put up or shut up.”And it turns out that there's a lot you don't see that our strategic considerations. I completely avoided things like managing up or managing laterally or balancing trade-offs in different ways. Yeah, you're right. If you view the role of management as strictly being something that is between you and your direct reports, you can be an amazing manager from their perspective, but completely ineffective organizationally at accomplishing the goals that have been laid out for you.Wesley: Yeah. The good thing about being head of and the first head of is that you help establish those goals. And so, when you take a role with another company saying, “Hey, we have headcount for this,” and it's an established role, then you're kind of like streamlining into a process that's already underway. What's good about this role specifically, a ‘head of,' is that I help with not only designing what are the goals and the OKRs but deciding what the teams and what the team structure should look like. And so, I'm hiring for a specific position based on how it interacts with everything else.So, when I'm coming in, I don't say, “Well, what do you do?” Or, “How do you do it?” I said, “This is what needs to be done.” And that makes it so much easier just to say that if everything is working the way it should and to give marching orders based on the grand vision, instead of hitting the numbers this quarter or next quarter. Because what is core to my belief, and what's core, too, of how I approach things is at the heart of what I'm trying to do, which is really great, in terms of making something that didn't exist before.Corey: The challenge, too, is that everyone loves to say—and I love to see this at different ways—is the evolution and understanding of the DevRel folks who I work with and I have great relationships with realizing that you have to demonstrate business value. Because I struggle with this my entire career where I know intrinsically, that if I get on stage and tell a story about a thing that is germane to what my company does, that good things are going to happen. But it's very hard to do any form of attribution to it. In a different light, this podcast is a great example of this.We have sponsors. And people are listening. Ideally, they aren't fast-forwarding through sponsor messages; I do have interesting thoughts about the sponsors that I put into these ads. And that's great, but I also appreciate that people are driving while they're listening to this, and they are doing the dishes, they are mowing the lawn, and hopefully not turning up the volume too loudly so it damages their hearing. And the idea that they're going to suddenly stop any of those things and go punch in the link that I give is a little out to lunch there.Instead, it's partially brand awareness and it is occasionally the, “Wait. That resonates exactly with the problem that I have.” So, they get to work or they get back in front of a computer and the odds are terrific they're not going to punch in that URL of whatever I wound up giving; they're going to type in whatever phrases they remember and the company name into Google. Now—and doing attribution on something like that is very hard.It gets even more hard when we're talking about something that is higher up the stack that requires a bit more buy-in than individual developers. There's often a meeting or two about it. And then someone finally approaches the company to have a conversation. Now, does it work? Yes. There are companies that are sponsoring this stuff that spend a lot of time, effort, and money on that.I don't know how you do that sort of attribution; I don't pretend to know, but I know that it works. Because these people whose entire job is making sure that it does tell me it does. So, I smile, I nod, and that's great. But it's very hard to wind up building out a direct, “If you spend X dollars sponsoring this, you will see Y dollars in response.” But in the DevOps world, when your internal doing these things, well, okay because to the company, I look an awful lot like an expensive developer except I don't ever write production code.And then—at least in the before times—“So, what does your job do? Because looking at the achievements and accomplishments last quarter, it looks an awful lot like you traveled to exotic places on the company dime, give talks that are of only vague relevance to what we do, and then hang out at parties with your friends? Nice job, how can I get that?” But it's also first on the chopping block when okay, how do we trim expenses go? And I think it's a mistake to do that. I just don't think that story of the value of developer relations is articulated super-well. And I say that, but I don't know how to do a much better job of it myself.Wesley: Well, that's why corporate or executive buy-in is important because if they know from the get-go while you're there, it makes it a little bit easier to sell. But you do have to show that you are executing. So, there are always two parts to presenting a story, and that's one, the actual quantitative, like, I've done this many talks—so that output part—I've written this many blog posts, or I've stood up this many events that people can attend to. And then there's the results saying, people did read this post, people did show up to my event, people did listen to my talk that I gave. But you also need to give the subjective ones where people respond back and say, “I loved your talk,” or, “I heard you on Corey's podcast,” or, “I read your blog posts,” because even though you might not understand that it goes all the way down in a conversion funnel to a purchase, you can least use that stand-in to say there's probably, like, 20, 30 people behind this person to have that same sentiment, so you can see that your impact is reaching people and that it's having some sort of lasting effect.That said, you have to keep it up. You have to try to increase your output and increase your sphere of influence. Because when people go to solve their problem, they're going to look into their history and their own Rolodex of saying what was the last thing that I heard? What was the last thing that's relevant?There is a reason that Pepsi and Coke still do advertising. It's not because people don't know those brands, but being easily recalled, or a center of relevance based on how many touchpoints or how many times that you've seen them, either from being on American Idol and the logo facing the camera, or seeing a whole display when you go into the grocery store. Same with display advertising. All of this stuff works hand in hand so that you can be front-of-mind with the people and the decision-makers who will make that decision. And we went through this through the pandemic where… that same sentiment, it was like, “You just travel and now you can't travel, so we're just going to get rid of the whole department.”And then those same companies are hunting for those people to come back or to rebuild these departments that are now gone because maybe you don't see what we do, but when it's gone, you definitely notice a dip. And that trust is from the top-up. You have to do not just external advocacy, but you have to do internal advocacy about what impacts you're having so that at least the people who are making that decision can hopefully understand that you are working hard and the work is paying off.Corey: Since the last time that we spoke, you've given your first keynote, which—Wesley: Yes.Corey: Is always an interesting experience to go through. It was at a conference called THAT Conference. And I feel the need to specify that because otherwise, we're going to wind up with a ‘who's on first' situation. But THAT Conference is the name.Wesley: Specify THAT. Yes.Corey: Exactly. Better specify THAT. Yes. So, what was your keynote about? And for a bit of a behind-the-scenes look, what was that like for you?Wesley: Let me do the behind-the-scenes because it's going to lead up to actual the execution.Corey: Excellent.Wesley: So, I've been on several different podcasts. And one of the ones that I loved for years is one called This Week in Tech with Leo Laporte. Was a big fan of Leo Laporte back in the Screen Saver days back in TechTV days. Loved his opinion, follow his work. And I went to a South by Southwest… three, four years ago where I actually met him.And then from that conversation, he asked me to be on his show. And I've been on the show a handful of times, just talking about tech because I love tech. Tech is my passion, not just doing it, but just experiencing and just being on either side of creating or consuming. When I moved—I moved recently also since, I think, from the last time I was on your show—when I moved here to Wisconsin, the organizer of THAT Conference said that he's been following me for a while, since my first appearance on This Week in Tech, and loved my outlook and my take on things. And he approached me to do a keynote.Since I am now Wisconsin—THAT Conference is been in Wisconsin since inception and it's been going on for ten years—and he wanted me to just basically share my knowledge. Clean slate, have enough time to just say whatever I wanted. I said, “Yes, I can do that.” So, my experience on my end was like sheer excitement and then quickly sheer terror of not having a framework of what I was going to speak on or how I was going to deliver it. And knowing as a keynote, that it would be setting the tone for the whole conference.So, I decided to talk on the thing that I knew the most about, which was myself. Talked about my journey growing up and learning what my strengths, what my weaknesses are, how to navigate life, as well as the corporate jungle, and deciding where I wanted to go. Do I want to be the person that I feel like I need to be in order to be successful, which when we look at structures and examples and the things that we hold on a pedestal, we feel that we have to be perfect, or we have to be knowledgeable, and we have to do everything, well rounded in order to be accepted. Especially being a minority, there's a lot more caveats in terms of being socially acceptable to other people. And then the other path that I could have taken, that I chose to take, was to accept my things that are seen as false, but my own quirkiness, my own uniqueness and putting that front and center about, this is me, this is my person that over the years has formed into this version of myself.I'm going to make sure that is really transparent and so if I go anywhere, they know what they're getting, and they know what they're signing up for by bringing me on board. I have an opinion, I will share my opinion, I will bring my whole self, I won't just be the person that is technical or whimsical, or whatever you're looking for. You have to take the good with the bad, you have to take the I really understand technology, but I have ADHD and I might miss some deadlines. [laugh].Corey: This episode is sponsored in parts by our friend EnterpriseDB. EnterpriseDB has been powering enterprise applications with PostgreSQL for 15 years. And now EnterpriseDB has you covered wherever you deploy PostgreSQL on premises, private cloud, and they just announced a fully managed service on AWS and Azure called BigAnimal, all one word.Don't leave managing your database to your cloud vendor because they're too busy launching another half dozen manage databases to focus on any one of them that they didn't build themselves. Instead, work with the experts over at EnterpriseDB. They can save you time and money, they can even help you migrate legacy applications, including Oracle, to the cloud.To learn more, try BigAnimal for free. Go to biganimal.com/snark, and tell them Corey sent you.Corey: I have a very similar philosophy, and how I approach these things where it's there is no single speaking engagement that I can fathom even being presented to me, let alone me accepting that is going to be worth me losing the reputation I have developed for authenticity. It's you will not get me to turn into a shill for whatever it is that I am speaking in front of this week. Conversely, whether it's a paid speaking engagement or not, I have a standing policy of not using a platform that is being given to me by a company or organization to make them look foolish. In other words, I will not make someone regret inviting me to speak at their events. Full stop.And I have spoken at events for AWS; I have spoken at events for Oracle, et cetera, et cetera, and there's no company out there that I'm not going to be able to get on stage and tell an entertaining and engaging story, but it requires me to dunk on them. And that's fine. Frankly, if there is a company like that where I could not say nice things about them—such as Facebook—I would simply decline to pursue the speaking opportunity. And that is the way that I view it. And very few companies are on that list, to be very honest with you.Now, there are exceptions to this, if you're having a big public keynote, I will do my traditional live-tweet the keynote and make fun of people because that is, A, expected and, B, it's live-streamed anywhere on the planet I want to be sitting at that point in time, and yeah, if you're saying things in public, you can basically expect that to be the way that I approach these things. But it's a nuanced take, and that is something that is not fully understood by an awful lot of folks who run events. I'll be the first to admit that aspects of who and what I am mean that some speaking engagements are not open to me. And I'm okay with that, on some level, I truly am. It's a different philosophy.But I do know that I am done apologizing for who I am and what I'm about. And at some point that required a tremendous amount of privilege and a not insignificant willingness to take a risk that it was going to work out all right. I can't imagine going back anymore. Now, that road is certainly not what I would recommend to everyone, particularly folks earlier in their career, particularly for folks who don't look just like I do and have a failure mode of a board seat and a book deal somewhere, but figuring out where you will and will not compromise is always an important thing to get straight for yourself before you're presented with a situation where you have to make those decisions, but now there's a whole bunch of incentive to decide in one way or another.Wesley: And that's a journey. You can't just skip sections, right? You didn't get to where you are unless you went through the previous experience that you went through. And it's true for everyone. If you see those success books or how-to books written by people who are extremely rich, and, like, how to become successful and, like, okay, well, that journey is your own. It doesn't make it totally, like, inaccessible to everyone else, but you got to realize that not everyone can walk that path. And—Corey: You were in the right place at the right time, an early employee at a company that did phenomenally well and that catapulted you into reach beyond the wildest dreams of avarice territory. Good for you, but fundamentally, when you give talks like that as a result, what it often presents as is, “I won the lottery, and here's how you can too.” It doesn't work that way. The road you walked was unique to you and that opportunity is closed, not open anyone else, so people have to find their own paths.Wesley: Yeah, and lightning doesn't strike in the same place twice. But there are some things where you can understand some fundamentals. And depending on where you go, I think you do need to know yourself, you do need to know—like, be able to access yourself, but being able to share that, of course, you have to be at a point where you feel comfortable. And so, even if you're in a space where you don't feel that you can be your authentic self or be able to share all parts of you, you yourself should at least know yourself and then make that decision. I agree that it's a point of privilege to be able to say, “Take me how I am.”I'm lucky that I've gotten here, not everyone does, and just because you don't doesn't mean that you're a failure. It just means that the world hasn't caught up yet. People who are part of marginalized society, like, if you are, let's say trans, or if you are even gay, you take the same person, the same stance, the same yearning to be accepted, and then transport it to 50 years ago, you're not safe. You will not necessarily be accepted, or you may not even be successful. And if you have a lane where you can do that, all the power to you, but not everyone could be themselves, and you just need to make sure that at least you can know yourself, even if you don't share that with the world.Corey: It takes time to get there, and I think you're right that it's impossible to get there without walking through the various steps. It's one of the reasons I'm somewhat reluctant to talk overly publicly about my side project gig of paid speaking engagements, for instance, is that the way to get those is you start off by building a reputation as a speaker, and that takes an awful lot of time. And speaking at events where there's no budget even to pay you a speaking fee out of anyway. And part of what gets the keynote invitations to, “Hey, we want you to come and give a talk,” is the fact that people have seen you speak elsewhere and know what you're about and what to expect. Here's a keynote presented by someone who's never presented on stage before is a recipe for a terrifying experience, if not for the speaker or the audience, definitely [laugh] for the event organizers because what if they choke.?Easy example of this, even now hundreds of speaking engagements in, the adrenaline hit right before I go on stage means that sometimes my knees shake a bit before I walk out on stage. I make it a point to warn the people who are standing with me backstage, “Oh, this is a normal thing. Don't worry, it is absolutely expected. It happens every time. Don't sweat it.”And, like, “Thank you for letting us know. That is the sort of thing that's useful.” And then they see me shake, and they get a little skeptical. Like, I thought this guy was a professional. What's the story and I walk on stage and do my thing and I come back. Like, “That was incredible. I was worried at the beginning.” “I told you, we all have our rituals before going on stage. Mine is to shake like a leaf.”But the value there is that people know what to generally expect when I get on stage. It's going to have humor, there's going to be a point interwoven throughout what I tend to say, and in the case of paid speaking engagements, I always make sure I know where the boundaries are of things I can make fun of a big company for. Like, I can get on stage and make fun of service naming or I can make fun of their deprecation policy or something like that, but yeah, making fun of the way that they wind up handling worker relations is probably not going to be great and it could get the person who championed me fired or centered internally. So, that is off the table.Like, even on this podcast, for example, I sometimes get feedback from listeners of, “Well, you have someone from company X on and you didn't beat the crap out of them on this particular point.” It's yeah, you do understand that by having people on the show I'm making a tacit agreement not to attack them. I'm not a journalist. I don't pretend to be. But if I beat someone up with questions about their corporate policy, yeah, very rarely do I have someone who is in a position in those companies to change that policy, and they're certainly not authorized to speak on the record about those things.So, I can beat them up on it, they can say, “I can't answer that,” and we're not going to go anywhere. What is the value of that? It looks like it's not just gotcha journalism, but ineffective gotcha journalism. It doesn't work that way. And that's never been what this show is about.But there's that consistent effort behind the scenes of making sure that people will be entertained, will enjoy what they're seeing, but also are not going to deeply regret giving me a microphone, has always been the balancing act, at least for me. And I want to be clear, my style is humor. It is not for everyone. And my style of humor has a failure mode of being a jerk and making people feel bad, so don't think that my path is the only or even a recommended way for folks who want to get more into speaking to proceed.Wesley: You also mention, though, about, like, punching up versus punching down. And if you really tear down a company after you've been invited to speak, what you're doing is you're punching down at the person who booked you. They're not the CEO; they're not the owner of the company; they're the person who's in charge of running an event or booking speakers. And so, putting that person and throwing them under the bus is punching down because now you're threatening their livelihood, and it doesn't make any market difference in terms of changing the corporate's values or how they execute. So yeah, I totally agree with you in that one.And, like you were saying before, if there's a company you really thought was abhorrent, why speak there? Why give them or lend your reputation to this company if you absolutely feel that it's something you don't want to be associated with? You can just choose not to do that. For me, when I look at speaking, it is important for me to really think about why I'm speaking as well. So, not just the company who's hiring me, but the audience that I'll be serving.So, if I'm going to help with inspiring the next generation of developers, or helping along the thought of how to make the world a better place, or how people themselves can be better people so that we can just change the landscape and make it a lot friendlier, that is also its own… form of compensation and not just speaking for a speaker's fee. So, I do agree that you need to not just be super Negative Nancy, and try to fight all fights. You need to embrace some of the good things and try to make more of those experiences good for everyone, not just the people who are inviting you there, but the people who are attending. And when I started speaking, I was not a good speaker as well. I made a lot of mistakes, and still do, but I think speaking is easier than some people think and if someone truly wants to do it, they should go ahead and get started.What is the saying? If there's something is truly important, you'll be bad at it [laugh] and you'll be okay with it. I started speaking because of my role as a developer advocate. And if you just do a Google search for ‘CFPs,' you can start speaking, too. So, those who are not public speakers and want to get into it, just Google ‘CFP' and then start applying.And then you'll get better at your submissions, you'll get better at your slides, and then once you get accepted, then you'll get better at preparing, then you'll get better at actually speaking. There's a lot of steps between starting and stopping and it's okay to get started doing that route. The other thing I wanted to point out is I feel public speaking is the equivalent of lifting your own bodyweight. If you can do it, you're one of the small few of the population that is willing to do so or that can do it. If you start public speaking, that in itself is an accomplishment and an experience that is something that is somewhat enriching. And being bad at it doesn't take the passion away from you. If you just really want to do it, just keep doing it, even if you're a bad speaker.Corey: Yeah. The way to give a great talk because you have a bunch of terrible talks first.Wesley: Yeah. And it's okay to do that.Corey: And it's not the in entirety of community. It's not even a requirement to be involved with the community. If you're one of those people that absolutely dreads the prospect of speaking publicly, fine. I'm not suggesting that, oh, you need to get over that and get on stage. That doesn't help anyone. Don't do the things you dread doing because you know that it's not going to go well for you.That's the reason I don't touch actual databases. I mean, come on, let's be realistic. I will accidentally the data, and then we won't have a company anymore. So, I know what things I'm good at and things I'm not. I also don't do hostage negotiations, for obvious reasons.Wesley: And also, here's a little, like, secret tip. If you really want to do public speaking and you start doing public speaking and you're not so good at it from other peoples' perspective, but you still love doing it and you think you're getting better, doing public speaking is one of those things where you can say that you do it and no one will really question how good you are at it. [laugh]. If you're just in casual conversation, it's like, “Hey, I wrote a book.” People like, “Oh, wow. This person wrote the book on blah, blah, blah.”Corey: It's a self-published book that says the best way to run Kubernetes. It's a single page; it says, “Don't.” In 150-point type. “The end.” But I wrote a book.Wesley: Yeah.Corey: Yeah.Wesley: People won't probe too much and it'll help you with your development. So, go ahead and get started. Don't worry about doing that thing where, like, I have to be the best before I can present it. Call yourself a public speaker. Check, done.Corey: Always. We are the stories we tell, and nowhere is it more true than in the world of public speaking. I really want to thank you for taking the time out of your day to speak with me about this for a second time in a single year. Oh, my goodness. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, where can they find you?Wesley: I'm on Twitter, @wesley83 on Twitter. And you can find me also on PolyWork. So, polywork.com/wesley83. Or just go to wesleyfaulkner.com which redirects you there. I list pretty much everything that I am working on and any upcoming speaking opportunities, hopefully when they release that feature, will also be on that Polywork page.Corey: Excellent. And of course, I started Polywork recently, and I'm at thoughtleader.cloud because of course I am, which is neither here nor there. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak about this side of the industry that we never really get to talk about much, at least not publicly and not very often.Wesley: Well, thank you for having me on the show. And I wanted to take some time to say thank you for the work that you're doing. Not just elevating voices like myself, but talking truth to power, like we mentioned before, but being yourself and being a great representation of how people should be treating others: being honest without being mean, being snarky without being rude. And other companies and other people who've given me a chance, and given me a platform, I wanted to say thank you to you too, and I wouldn't be here unless it was people like you acknowledging the work that I've been doing.Corey: All it takes is just recognizing what you're doing and acknowledging it. People often want to thank me for this stuff, but it's just, what, for keeping my eyes open? I don't know, I feel like it's just the job; it's not something that is above and beyond any expected normal behavior. The only challenge is I look around the industry and I realize just how wrong that impression is, apparently. But here we are. It's about finding people doing interesting work and letting them tell their story. That's all this podcast has ever tried to be.Wesley: Yeah. And you do it. And doing the work is part of the reward, and I really appreciate you just going through the effort. Even having your ears open is something that I'm glad that you're able to at least know who the people are and who are making noises—or making noise to raise their profile up and then in turn, sharing that with the world. And so, that's a great service that you're providing, not just for me, but for everyone.Corey: Well, thank you. And as always, thank you for your time. Wesley Faulkner, Head of Community at SingleStore. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with a rambling comment telling me exactly why DevRel does not need success metrics of any kind.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

    Culture Factor 2.0
    Vladislav Ginzburg: P2: Alpha on Creator to Fan to Creator, what Utility do you Want?

    Culture Factor 2.0

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 39:23


    Vladislav Ginzburg is the Chief Executive Officer at Blockparty.Ginzburg leads Blockparty and the mission to build a blockchain-agnostic platform for collectible NFTs at the intersection of art, music and culture. Blockparty launched their MVP In August 2020 with a number of mainstream oriented drops, including first digital artworks by 3lau Slime Sunday, Adventure Club, Dave Krugman and others.Earlier, Ginzburg was Chief Business Development officer at Blockparty Tickets where he introduced blockchain as an NFT powered ticketing system to music festivals and professional sports teams, including a partnership with the Sacramento Kings of the NBA.Before entering the Blockchain and entertainment spaces, Ginzburg managed a fine art fund where he transacted more than $150 million in blue chip artworks. Ginzburg studied at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio as well as The New School in New York.Let's dig into your art background first, I believe it lays the groundwork for your interest in NFT related art and event?In the art world,  Vladislav Ginzburg has managed several high-value growth funds in the fine art industry where he has executed transactions for iconic canvas works by Pablo Picasso, Andy Warhol, Jean-Michele Basquiat, Salvador Dali, Pierre Auguste Renoir, and hundreds of others for clients., including placing works into museum exhibitions globallyWhat is your relationship with Warner Music and how will it compliment Blockparty goals for the artist?Opensea is the amazon for NFTs; it's the most common and most costly to mint because there's so many people on it. Rarible and a few others are less expensive. By having their own storefront on Blockparty (part Website, Etsy and Shopify?, Is this a solution to the two ends of the spectrum of Opensea and Rarible?Wants to dive into the live event aspect because of Lively partnership. Does Blockparty expect to be more of an event platform in the end? Or are they primarily a storefront/tools provider? What's the endgame?Ginzburg is the co-founder for Moonwalk. No code: there is code that sits behind the NFT. Moonwalk, being a no code platform, allows people who don't have developers in their back pocket to mint NFTs and play in the same arena as people who do have their own developers. Is Moonwalk going to eventually live on Blockparty?Are Ginzburg's platforms working toward democratizing crypto/NFTs for any and all?We are speaking on NFT.NYC in June!!Data to market yourself, your wallet, online habits, or curated social media look?Creators pushing for Blockparty to push further with them, innovating togetherEasy vs. creating smart contracts that work for the artists on the platformDali and Warhol experimented with digital art, NFT artists that were painters, sculptors and photographers using AR and image recognitionToken, receive it into your wallet, send it out of your wallet or stake it.look forward alpha: music NFTs will thrive with UGC (user generated content) selling viral content from fans taking and creating NFTs and sending to the viral TikTok artist.Vladislav Ginsburg on Twitter Holly Shannon's WebsiteZero To Podcast on AmazonHolly Shannon, LinkedinHolly Shannon, InstagramHolly Shannon, Clubhousehttps://youtu.be/PKCND4FqGLc#utility #creator #warner #brands #art #creativetechnologist #music #musician #spinnin'records #integrity #intention #purpose #impact #lockeddiscord #accesskeys #rightsownership #Fortnight #wearables #legacy #warnermusic #indieartist #fans #nfts #nft #nftart #cryptocurrency #blockchain #metaverse #culturefactor #web3 #smartcontracts #bitcoin #nftartist #nftcollectors #eth #ethereum #youtubers #tiktok #instagram #reels #branding #bitcoin #web3 #smartcontracts #bitcoin #nftartist #nftcollectors #community #decentralizedeconomy

    Books on Pod
    #245 - The Kids in the Hall on THE KIDS IN THE HALL: COMEDY PUNKS

    Books on Pod

    Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 13:23


    Four of the five members of The Kids in the Hall chat with Trey Elling, ahead of the South By Southwest premiere of their new Amazon Prime documentary THE KIDS IN THE HALL: COMEDY PUNKS. Amazon is also releasing a brand new season of sketches from the Canadian troupe. Throughout this conversation, you'll hear from: Mark McKinney (0:45) Kevin McDonald (3:40) Dave Foley (6:25) Scott Thompson (10:09)

    The Tim Ferriss Show
    #594: Cal Newport and Tim Ferriss Revisit The 4-Hour Workweek (Plus: The Allure and The Void of Remote Work, Unsustainable Behaviors, Burning Out, The Cult of Productivity, and More)

    The Tim Ferriss Show

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 91:31


    Cal Newport and Tim Ferriss Revisit The 4-Hour Workweek (Plus: The Allure and The Void of Remote Work, Unsustainable Behaviors, Burning Out, The Cult of Productivity, and More) | Brought to you by LinkedIn Jobs recruitment platform with 770M+ users, Vuori comfortable and durable performance apparel, and Athletic Greens all-in-one nutritional supplement. More on all three below.Welcome to another episode of The Tim Ferriss Show, where it is my job to deconstruct world-class performers to tease out the routines, habits, et cetera that you can apply to your own life.In this episode, past podcast guest Cal Newport interviews me for an article he ended up writing for The New Yorker titled “Revisiting ‘The 4-Hour Workweek': How Tim Ferriss's 2007 manifesto anticipated our current moment of professional upheaval.”Who is Cal? Cal Newport (calnewport.com) is an associate professor of computer science at Georgetown University who previously earned his PhD from MIT. His scholarship focuses on the theory of distributed systems, while his general-audience writing explores intersections of culture and technology.Cal is the author of seven books, including, most recently, Deep Work, Digital Minimalism, and A World Without Email. He is also a contributing writer for The New Yorker and the host of the Deep Questions podcast.You can find my interview with Cal at tim.blog/calnewport, and you can find the 2007 talk at SXSW that launched everything at tim.blog/sxsw.Please enjoy!This episode is brought to you by Athletic Greens. I get asked all the time, “If you could use only one supplement, what would it be?” My answer is usually AG1 by Athletic Greens, my all-in-one nutritional insurance. I recommended it in The 4-Hour Body in 2010 and did not get paid to do so. I do my best with nutrient-dense meals, of course, but AG further covers my bases with vitamins, minerals, and whole-food-sourced micronutrients that support gut health and the immune system. Right now, Athletic Greens is offering you their Vitamin D Liquid Formula free with your first subscription purchase—a vital nutrient for a strong immune system and strong bones. Visit AthleticGreens.com/Tim to claim this special offer today and receive the free Vitamin D Liquid Formula (and five free travel packs) with your first subscription purchase! That's up to a one-year supply of Vitamin D as added value when you try their delicious and comprehensive all-in-one daily greens product.*This episode is also brought to you by Vuori clothing! Vuori is a new and fresh perspective on performance apparel, perfect if you are sick and tired of traditional, old workout gear. Everything is designed for maximum comfort and versatility so that you look and feel as good in everyday life as you do working out.Get yourself some of the most comfortable and versatile clothing on the planet at VuoriClothing.com/Tim. Not only will you receive 20% off your first purchase, but you'll also enjoy free shipping on any US orders over $75 and free returns.*This episode is also brought to you by LinkedIn Jobs. Whether you are looking to hire now for a critical role or thinking about needs that you may have in the future, LinkedIn Jobs can help. LinkedIn screens candidates for the hard and soft skills you're looking for and puts your job in front of candidates looking for job opportunities that match what you have to offer.Using LinkedIn's active community of more than 770 million professionals worldwide, LinkedIn Jobs can help you find and hire the right person faster. When your business is ready to make that next hire, find the right person with LinkedIn Jobs. And now, you can post a job for free. Just visit LinkedIn.com/Tim.*For show notes and past guests on The Tim Ferriss Show, please visit tim.blog/podcast.Sign up for Tim's email newsletter (5-Bullet Friday) at tim.blog/friday.For transcripts of episodes, go to tim.blog/transcripts.Discover Tim's books: tim.blog/books.Follow Tim:Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferrissYouTube: youtube.com/timferrissFacebook: facebook.com/timferriss LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/timferrissPast guests on The Tim Ferriss Show include Jerry Seinfeld, Hugh Jackman, Dr. Jane Goodall, LeBron James, Kevin Hart, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Jamie Foxx, Matthew McConaughey, Esther Perel, Elizabeth Gilbert, Terry Crews, Sia, Yuval Noah Harari, Malcolm Gladwell, Madeleine Albright, Cheryl Strayed, Jim Collins, Mary Karr, Maria Popova, Sam Harris, Michael Phelps, Bob Iger, Edward Norton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Neil Strauss, Ken Burns, Maria Sharapova, Marc Andreessen, Neil Gaiman, Neil de Grasse Tyson, Jocko Willink, Daniel Ek, Kelly Slater, Dr. Peter Attia, Seth Godin, Howard Marks, Dr. Brené Brown, Eric Schmidt, Michael Lewis, Joe Gebbia, Michael Pollan, Dr. Jordan Peterson, Vince Vaughn, Brian Koppelman, Ramit Sethi, Dax Shepard, Tony Robbins, Jim Dethmer, Dan Harris, Ray Dalio, Naval Ravikant, Vitalik Buterin, Elizabeth Lesser, Amanda Palmer, Katie Haun, Sir Richard Branson, Chuck Palahniuk, Arianna Huffington, Reid Hoffman, Bill Burr, Whitney Cummings, Rick Rubin, Dr. Vivek Murthy, Darren Aronofsky, and many more.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Sup Doc: A Documentary Podcast
    187 - THE KIDS IN THE HALL: COMEDY PUNKS w Paul Myers, Reg Harkema, Nick McKinney

    Sup Doc: A Documentary Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 36:06


    George is joined by the director and producers behind the brand new career-spanning Kids in the Hall documentary airing on Amazon Prime on May 20th.Amazon Prime launched a brand new season of The Kids In The Hall sketch show.George is joined by the team behind the new Kids in the Hall documentary, director Reg Harkema and executive producers Nick McKinney and Paul Myers. The Kids in the Hall: Comedy Punks premiered at SXSW 2022.Featuring interviews with Fred Armisen, Lauren Ash, Jay Baruchel, Lewis Black, Janeane Garofalo, Eddie Izzard, Mae Martin, Eric McCormack, Lorne Michaels, Mike Myers, Matt Walsh, and Reggie Watts, as well as industry insiders and fans, the documentary explores how the group's comedy inspired their peers and subsequent generations of sketch comedians, and continues to endure today. Follow the filmmakers:Instagram: @KITHcomedypunksTwitter: @pulmyersTwitter: @yabutmckinneyFollow Sup Doc on:Twitter: @supdocpodcastInstagram: @supdocpodcastFacebook: @supdocpodcastsign up for our mailing listAnd you can show your support to Sup Doc by donating on Patreon.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Passage to Profit Show
    Producing Social Impact Entertainment with Tobias Deml, founder of Prodigium Pictures, 05-15-2022

    Passage to Profit Show

    Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 52:46


    This episode of the Passage to Profit Show features Tobias Deml from Prodigium Pictures, Dr. Emily Splichal from Naboso and Allia Mohamed from openigloo. Tobias Deml is a social impact filmmaker from Vienna, Austria and the co-founder of Prodigium Pictures, a social impact entertainment company and cause marketing production company in Manhattan. Prodigium creating cause marketing and corporate social responsibility videos that make an impact as well as product launch videos and 2D and 3D animation. Tobias has most recently directed the HBO Max docu-series Gaming Wall Street, an entertaining look at the 2021 short squeeze of GameStop. Beyond that, he’s shot thirteen feature films and helmed more than 100 projects as cinematographer, director or producer. Tobias’ work has been distributed by the likes of HBO Max and Netflix, and premiered at festivals such as SXSW. He likes to bridge the worlds of independent film and impact research, both being an avid Sundance Film Festival attendee as well as traveling around the globe for impact-focused conferences such as the SBCC Summit in Bali, Indonesia. Read more at: https://prodigium-pictures.com/Visit the Entrepreneur Presenters for May 15, 2022 at their Websites:Dr. Emily Splichal is the founder of the Center for Functional and Regenerative Medicine, a Global Leader in Barefoot Science and Rehabilitation and the founder of Naboso Technology. Dr. Splichal has developed a keen eye for movement dysfunction and neuromuscular control during gait. Naboso Technology is a material science company that develops sensory products that optimize the way people move, feel & live. Naboso manufactures Insoles, Mats & Flooring that are designed to uniquely stimulate the nerves in the bottom of the feet. When stimulated, the nerves in the feet communicate to the brain about the surface terrain, impact forces and help to maintain balance or stability. Everyone from athletes and weekend warriors to people who stand for work or have balance issues, can benefit from our products. Read more at: https://www.dremilysplichal.com/ and at: https://www.naboso.com/ Allia Mohamed is the founder of openigloo, New York City's first review platform for tenants. Users can read and anonymously share rental experiences and get the answers they need before move-in day. The online platforms allows users to read about and rate landlords and rental experiences anonymously and access real-time date on buildings and landlords, such as open violations, bedbug complaints, litigation history and more. Through sharing the pros and cons of buildings with other renters, together users build a more transparent renting space in New York. Read more at: https://www.openigloo.com/ Visit https://passagetoprofitshow.com/ for the latest updates and episodes.