Podcasts about EBay

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American multinational e-commerce corporation

  • 6,179PODCASTS
  • 14,098EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 6DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 21, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about EBay

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Latest podcast episodes about EBay

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova
Mental Health is Not a Four-Letter Word with Stephanie Tilenius

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 31:05


Welcome to the What's Next! podcast with Tiffani Bova. This week I am thrilled to welcome Stephanie Tilenius to the What's Next! Podcast. Stephanie is a founder and the CEO of Vida Health, Inc., a mobile continuous care platform for preventing, managing, and overcoming chronic and mental health conditions deployed at Fortune 500 companies, large national payers, and healthcare providers since January 2014. She was an Executive in Residence at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, a venture capital firm, and Vice President of Global Commerce and Payments at Google, Inc., where she oversaw digital commerce, product search and payments. Prior to joining Google, she was at eBay Inc., ultimately as Senior Vice President of eBay.com and global products. I am beyond excited to bring you this episode of the What's Next! Podcast with Stephanie Tilenius!     THIS EPISODE IS PERFECT FOR… remote teams, those looking for tech-enabled mental health solutions, and entrepreneurs who want to know what it looks like to identify a true pain point and fill a need in a novel way.    TODAY'S MAIN MESSAGE… How intentional you need to be when building your company's culture, no matter how strong the mission is. Your organization's culture doesn't just happen, at least not in any extraordinary or conducive way, without a clear vision and intentionality.    WHAT  I  LOVE  MOST… How the Vida team is making the conversation about mental health one we all can feel safe discussing and doing something about in a constructive and supportive way.   Running time: 31:04     Subscribe on iTunes     Find Tiffani on social:  Facebook  Twitter  LinkedIn     Find Stephanie online:  LinkedIn  Twitter 

The Retrospectors
On This Day: Madonna's Naked Photos

The Retrospectors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 10:18


Berated by the tabloids as exhibitionist pornography, Madonna's coffee table book, ‘Sex', quickly sold out upon its release on 21st October, 1992.Influenced by artists Robert Mapplethorpe and Cindy Sherman, the book included images of full-frontal nudity, simulated gay sex, mixed race couples, threesomes and trans imagery. Madonna vigorously defended it, in a series of interviews, as a portrayal of female sexuality.In this episode, Arion, Rebecca and Olly ask if Madonna was fighting an uphill battle to be taken seriously; debate whether the book was art, a smutty publicity stunt… or both; and consider whether a particularly sensational spread involving a canine companion was taken out of context... Content Warning: discussion of erotic imagery, including abusive sexual fantasiesFurther Reading:• ‘How Madonna Turned Controversy Into a Best-Selling Book' (Entertainment Tonight, 2020): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILybauhbA00• ‘25 Years Later, Madonna's 'Sex' Book Is Still Pop's Most Radical Moment' (HuffPost, 2017): https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/madonna-sex-book-25th-anniversary_n_59e9f8f1e4b0f9d35bca11e6• ‘Madonna's 'Erotica,' 'Sex': Misunderstood Masterpieces' (Rolling Stone, 2017): https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/madonnas-erotica-sex-why-musical-masterpiece-defiant-book-still-matter-200685/There are FIVE MINUTES MORE - in which the team consider eBay resale value, spontaneous nudie snaps, and the role of Madge's boyfriend of the time, Vanilla Ice - available exclusively to our show's supporters. Join us via Patreon*, or subscribe via Apple Podcasts, to hear it - and more bonus material ever single week!*top two tiers onlyThe Retrospectors are Olly Mann, Rebecca Messina & Arion McNicoll, with Matt Hill.Theme Music: Pass The Peas. Announcer: Bob Ravelli. Graphic Design: Terry Saunders. Edit Producer: Emma Corsham.Copyright: Rethink Audio / Olly Mann 2021. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Comic Book Noise Family
Indie Comic Book Noise Episode 488 – The Gentle Embrace of Bloomin' Fall

Comic Book Noise Family

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021


Phil, Kevin and Andy purportedly travel to some different realms as they are back for more autumnal noise. Andy keeps calling the comic book, Deathrace 2020, by its film name, Deathrace 2000. He is too lazy to correct in editing. State of the current reads and eBay buys Michel Fiffe – Copra other works.http://michelfiffe.com/ Grendel […] The post Indie Comic Book Noise Episode 488 – The Gentle Embrace of Bloomin' Fall first appeared on Indie Comic Book Noise.

Off The Cliff Podcast
Drafted for Violence

Off The Cliff Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021


Jake finally returns to traveling internationally and thankfully he accumulated many new stories. Jake and Pete jump into the beginning of these adventures and discuss a strange amount of minor league hockey, here in Episode 118!

Sports Card Investor
Top 5 HOTTEST Sports Cards

Sports Card Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 14:26


Geoff breaks down the 5 Sports Cards that have gone up in value the most over the past week in this week's Top 5. ** Subscribe to Card Kids: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKguq8o-Q7SDXShUdDkr40Q **Try Market Movers Today: https://www.marketmoversapp.com/ **eBay's New Trading Hub: https://pages.ebay.com/tradinghub/index.html

Selling on eBay
eBay for Business - Ep 161 - Promoted Listings Standard with Julie Klein

Selling on eBay

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 44:16


Give us a call - 888-723-4630 Send us an email - podcast@ebay.com visit us at ebay.com/podcast    Welcome to eBay for Business! This week, eBay Director of Seller Brand and Advertising, Julie Klein visits the podcast to walk us through the details of Promoted Listings; how to use and track them. Griff and Brian answer questions about Promoted Listings, Sent Offer history, reselling printer parts, ePacket service, and withholding shipping costs from a refund.   To have your questions answered on our eBay for Business podcast, call us at 888 723-4630 or email us at podcast@ebay.com.  To give us feedback, please take our podcast listener survey at (https://connect.ebay.com/srv/survey/a/sellerops.podcast)   00:01 - Intro 04:22 - Promoted Listings with Julie Klein 26:52 - Q&A and Outro   New Links for Ep 161: Updates Are Happening Post on Community - https://community.ebay.com/t5/Selling/Updates-are-happening-to-some-item-specifics-and-category/m-p/32377992#M1861964 7 Questions with Ken Gaitano of SimplyBee - https://community.ebay.com/t5/Announcements/7-Questions-with-Ken-Gaitano-of-SimplyBee/ba-p/32352686 Promoted Listings Standard - https://pages.ebay.com/seller-center/listing-and-marketing/promoted-listings.html Advertising Dashboard (Promoted Listings) - https://www.ebay.com/sh/mktg/pl Craig Dawson (of Two Dogs Dig) - https://www.2dogsdigs.com/     Recurring Links / Phone Numbers / Hashtags Mentioned: 888-723-4630 - Call in Line  eBay Seller News Announcements - ebay.com/announcements eBay Community - ebay.com/community eBay Weekly Community Chat - ebay.com/communitychat eBay Help - ebay.com/help/home eBay Meetups - ebay.com/meetups Managed Payments on eBay - ebay.com/payments eBay for Business Podcast - ebay.com/podcast eBay Seller Center - ebay.com/sellercenter eBay Seller Hub - ebay.com/sh eBay System Status - ebay.com/sts explore.ebay.com facebook.com/eBayForBusiness eBay for Business Podcast Listener Survey - https://connect.ebay.com/srv/survey/a/sellerops.podcast #ebaypodcast

Claima Stories with Bimma
Tiffany Tanaka shares story about representing her culture through her food

Claima Stories with Bimma

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 47:31


On today's show, recorded in our mobile podcast studio storytella, I sit down with Tiffany Tanaka, of Petite Peso. A creative entrepreneur that's Passionate about Creating businesses that are true to her experience, culture, and how she views the world. =Born and raised in  Honolulu, Hawaii. Tiffany grew up watching her lawyer parents do things their way. But it was watching her dad leave law to open up a golf shop, which she lovingly calls “a hip pawn shop” that would really influence Tiffany's future entrepreneurial moves. Although she grew up wanting to be a dentist, She moved to SAm Francisco for art school to study design and fashion. =When she returned home, she realized there weren't many fashion careers on the Island so instead she used the internet to her advantage and opened her first business, an eBay store that she'd run for six years. Selling everything from Vintage pennies, breast pumps, cars to nike SBs. About Claima Stories with Bimma:Former Nike Marketer, Bimma Williams interviews leading and emerging BIPOC creatives about how they were able to break into the notoriously guarded creative and sneaker industries. From these stories, listeners will learn how to claim their dream careers. Featuring Melody Ehsani, Jeff Staple, and James Whitner. Listen and Subscribe now.Subscribe: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/claimastories/Twitter: https://twitter.com/claimastories

Gearhunks
Ep. 130 - Shocking

Gearhunks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 89:28


Don't act so surprised; we tend to do things a bit on the nose.This week we're leaning into spooky season and talking about some morbid shiz - musicians being killed by their gear. With Keith Relf from the Yardbirds as perhaps the most famous example, we delve into some shocking territory while providing tips for staying safe when poking around. That said, sometimes you should probably just leave it to the pros.Also discussed: Google's new built-in tuner and song finding feature, new flagship loopers from Boss, digging deep into going direct and the all-in-one guitar amp and monitor from Amonito, Blackstar's new tube-based pedals, native advertising on Reverb, eBay updates, Tony Iommi fossils, Randy Bachman's Gretsch, Rick James' wild life story, a Lego Fender Princeton Reverb, and sick kitties.Volts jolts, mills kills.

Regie Collects
Culturally Relevant Comic Books

Regie Collects

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 72:54


 COMICS TODAY!  TOPIC: Culturally Relevant Comic Books My Slabs: https://www.myslabs.com/ Discord: https://discord.gg/956XFQM8jA Become a COMIC SWOLDIER to get exclusive content and other things! https://www.patreon.com/regiecollects 100K Comic Collection: https://youtu.be/bXCMmVSPL7s Need to send books to CGC or to be graded? Check out this playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Confused by comic terms? Check out this playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Enjoy comic book hunting videos? Check out this playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ
Thuế và bạn: Có phải khai thuế khi có thu nhập ở nước ngoài?

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 22:36


Nếu đi học hoặc làm việc ở nước ngoài thì có phải khai thuế không? Còn những thu nhập khác như làm freelancer, Youtuber hay bán hàng trên eBay thì sao? Và những lưu ý khác khi thời hạn khai thuế sắp gần kề.

Sports Card Investor
Who Won the $25,000 Miami Card Show Trade??

Sports Card Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 14:08


On today's episode we take a look back at the $25k trade Geoff made with Jack at the Miami Card Show and tally up current card values to determine who won the trade. **Try Market Movers Today: https://www.marketmoversapp.com/ **eBay's New Trading Hub: https://pages.ebay.com/tradinghub/index.html

Geeked Out Collecting
Seeing trends, finding the patterns and making educated pickups w/ Joel from @Modern_Card1

Geeked Out Collecting

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 115:30


Here's how you can find Joel: InstagramGet on the waiting list for early access to CardFolio!You can find me here:IG:@geeked_out_collectingTwitch:/feliwankenobiWebsite:www.GeekedOutCollecting.comFree Profit Calculator for eBay: www.profitcalculator.online/profitCalculator.htmlFree BGS Calculator: www.profitcalculator.online/bgscalc.htmlPatreon: www.patreon.com/Geekedoutcollecting

Bags & Boards Podcast
Honorable Mentions Ft. Gem Mint Collectibles 9.21

Bags & Boards Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 8:22


❤️ Mystery Mail Call (our comic book subscription service) https://www.comictom101.com/ (US ONLY) ❤️ Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: https://bit.ly/2PfSSSY

Health Hats, the Podcast
Cost, In Any Other Language #145

Health Hats, the Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 41:17


What does healthcare cost mean? I can't explain it. Listen to Matt Pickering from Nat Quality Forum help us out. Consider serving as a patient rep with NQF. Blog subscribers: Listen to the podcast here. Scroll down through show notes to read the post. Please support my podcast. CONTRIBUTE HERE Episode Notes Prefer to read, experience impaired hearing or deafness? Find FULL TRANSCRIPT at the end of the other show notes or download the printable transcript here Contents with Time-Stamped Headings to listen where you want to listen or read where you want to read (heading. time on podcast xx:xx. page # on the transcript) Proem.. 1 Introducing Matthew Pickering 05:37. 2 Value to whom? 07:48. 3 Moving from volume to value 11:37. 3 Quality and cost measures help choose plans and providers 13:41. 4 Consumer seats at the table 15:06. 4 Cost, is it real? 17:09. 5 Measures inform and inspire, don't they? 22:27. 6 Cost is different. Smoke and mirrors? 25:23. 6 Do consumers use this cost and quality information? 27:45. 7 Who would want to sit on this cost committee? 30:51. 8 Participating 34:33. 9 Reflection 36:40  10 Please comments and ask questions at the comment section at the bottom of the show notes on LinkedIn  via email DM on Instagram or Twitter to @healthhats Credits Music by permission from Joey van Leeuwen, Boston Drummer, Composer, Arranger Web/social media coach, Kayla Nelson Inspiration from John Shaw, Danny Sands, Cynthia Cullen, Ellen Schultz, Janice McCallum, Michael Mittelman, Edwin Lomotan, Lacy Fabian, Michael Millenson, Amy Price, Tania Dutta, Uma Kotagal Sponsored by Abridge Links Matthew Pickering LinkedIn National Quality Forum (NQF) Cost and Efficiency Measure Standing Committee Better Ways to Cut Healthcare Waste What Is Value-Based Healthcare? New England Journal of Medicine PCORI: Patient Engagement CMS: Person and Family Engagement Related podcasts and blogs https://health-hats.com/zen_relationshipcentered_measure/ https://health-hats.com/pod137/ https://health-hats.com/infodemiology-too-much-not-enough/ About the Show Welcome to Health Hats, learning on the journey toward best health. I am Danny van Leeuwen, a two-legged, old, cisgender, white man with privilege, living in a food oasis, who can afford many hats and knows a little about a lot of healthcare and a lot about very little. Most people wear hats one at a time, but I wear them all at once. We will listen and learn about what it takes to adjust to life's realities in the awesome circus of healthcare. Let's make some sense of all this. To subscribe go to https://health-hats.com/ Creative Commons Licensing The material found on this website created by me is Open Source and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution. Anyone may use the material (written, audio, or video) freely at no charge. Please cite the source as: ‘From Danny van Leeuwen, Health Hats. (including the link to my website). I welcome edits and improvements. Please let me know. danny@health-hats.com. The material on this site created by others is theirs and use follows their guidelines. The Show Proem If a grocery store, car dealer, hardware store, eBay, Amazon charges $100 for something, how much does it get paid? $100. If a healthcare provider (doctor, physical therapist, clinic, hospital) charges $100, how much does it get paid?  It depends. It depends on the type of insurance, type of patient, service type. Type of insurance might be Medicare, Medicaid, private, none. Patient type means young, old, tall, short, full head of hair, bald, parent, grandparent, child.  No, that would be too easy.  It has nothing to do with the patient. It's about the relationship with the clinician - acute episode, continuous relationship, referred by another clinician, etc.). Specific types of service (medical, surgical, X-ray, lab, radiation therapy, preadmission testing, more than 200 types).

Bags & Boards Podcast
Top 10 Trending Comics of the Week 10.8.21

Bags & Boards Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 19:40


Mystery Mail Call (our comic book subscription service) https://www.comictom101.com/ (US ONLY) ❤️ Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: https://bit.ly/2PfSSSY ❤️ Need an LCS (Local Comic Shop)? - Make it Mill Geek Comics https://bit.ly/2D04UaW -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ✅ Use code "TOM101" for a free week subscription to Key Collector Comics. Available wherever you get apps. ✅Get Key Collector Comics

Brenzor's Dead
S2: Ep 31 My son provided me with all of the nightmare fuel needed for a lifetime

Brenzor's Dead

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 43:06


Listen up to hear how he unintentionally gave me a heart attack at midnight. Also, Ebay scammers, Steve Bannon still sucks and Tic Toc Vs Parents. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jason-brenner/support

Learning to Deal
Moon show report!

Learning to Deal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 22:15


If you wish to support the show and PFC Irvine's Journey you can find his Ebay store Tap/Click here----> PFC NETWORK  Join the FB Group Students of the Learning to Deal Podcast PFC Network Facebook Page: PFC Network Business page with special sales

Bags & Boards Podcast
Hot10 Back Issues Ft. Gem Mint Collectibles 9.15

Bags & Boards Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 13:25


❤️ Mystery Mail Call (our comic book subscription service) https://www.comictom101.com/ (US ONLY) ❤️ Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: https://bit.ly/2PfSSSY

Kincaid & Dallas
952: My Little Secret - Lost and Found Ring... Part Two!

Kincaid & Dallas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 3:05


Yesterday we spoke to a man who found a ring in a bag he bought from eBay and used it to propose to his girlfriend. Today we spoke to the FIANCE!!! Turns out she knew about the ring and SHE planted it in the bag.

Bags & Boards Podcast
Legendary Creator Todd Mcfarlane Chats Collecting Comics(FULL INTERVIEW)

Bags & Boards Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 78:10


Mystery Mail Call (our comic book subscription service) https://www.comictom101.com/ (US ONLY) ❤️ Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: https://bit.ly/2PfSSSY -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ✅ Use code "TOM101" for a free week subscription to Key Collector Comics. Available wherever you get apps. ✅Get Key Collector Comics

TransMissions Podcast: Transformers News and Reviews! - All Shows Feed
Scream (Transformers Halloween Special 2021 Review)

TransMissions Podcast: Transformers News and Reviews! - All Shows Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 43:58


Mike is back this week as we review IDW Publishing’s spooky Transformers Halloween special in Comics, we have a ton of movie news, and we talk about a special piece of Transformers TV history that's up for grabs on eBay! All this and much, much more on this episode of TransMissions Alt Mode! This episode was edited by Michael Ordway (@minervion).  Please check out his work in 3D modelling and animation and video and audio post-production at www.michaelordway.com!  Huge thanks to Michael for his hard work! Order our TransMissions Exclusive Cover Variant of IDW’s Transformers Till All Are One #1! Want some TransMissions swag? Check out our online shop, powered by TeePublic! Like what we’re doing and want to help make our podcast even better? If you already support us, thank you! Show Notes: Intro [00:28] Merch! – http://transmissionspodcast.com/shop Check out TransMissions Artist KGirl’s TeePublic Store! Check out the uncut version… Continue reading The post Alt Mode 255 – Scream (Transformers Halloween Special 2021 Review) appeared first on TransMissions Podcast Network.

Applying Awareness Podcast
Flexible Living, Impact, and Passive Income with Cam Woodsum

Applying Awareness Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 45:21


Was there ever a point in your life when a traumatic experience changed the trajectory of things and made you focus on creating impact and changing the world? This episode is for you. I talk to Cam Woodsum, a social impact founder, a serial founder, and venture creator who has created eight startups through his studio Nomad Impact Ventures, from beaches all around the world. He shares about making money online, passive income, going abroad to live cheaply and getting hooked on the wandering life in Bali and the island life in Barbados. Further, he talks about how his depression in high school, and feeling invisible, made him hunger for something more in life, despite going to college, and working on startups like Doordash. He also emphasized his awareness that life is short, and what we do in this lifetime matters. In Cam's words, he states, “I do think acting with urgency is one of the most important things in my life where just thinking about how short life is.” Cam also reveals how he made money online by selling Allbirds shoes on eBay, the rise and fall of his Instagram venture when the algorithm changed, and how he was able to have sustainable income in content writing. If you want to learn more about Cam's ventures and how he was able to make money online to be able to pursue his passions and interests, listen to the full episode. Connect with Cam Woodsum on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/camwoodsum Check out Cam's Twitter here: https://twitter.com/camwoodsum Cam's YouTube is found here: https://www.youtube.com/c/CamWoodsum1/about Read more about Freedom Is Everything here: https://www.freedomiseverything.com/start-here-freedom-is-everything/ Thank you so much for listening to the Designing Impact Podcast. If you loved this episode, head over to your favorite podcast player and leave a rating and review. It would absolutely help raise awareness in making this world a better place. Check out my website here: https://emote.design Connect with me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/afreezyfrench Connect with me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/emote.design I'm also on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/adam-french --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/designing-impact/support

Thousand Movie Project
Ehpooky Combersacion! | Scream 5, "Regular" Math, and Fear v. Knowledge

Thousand Movie Project

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 25:13


Wherein the narrator reacts to the SCREAM 5 trailer, and complains that it shouldn't called "SCREAM" (which is the actual title), and then tells a story about a very angry math teacher he had in high school, and how the teachers of "regular" classes were generally pretty shattered, emotionally; by the end of it he's remembering what it was like to buy VHS tapes on eBay, once the technology was obsolete, and then he shares some of novelist Mark Z. Danielewski's wisdom regarding fear and its adversarial/inverse relationship to knowledge.

Land Academy Show
Jack Thursday – We Now Control Most Aspects of Our Own Lives (LA 1611)

Land Academy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 10:50


Jack Thursday - We Now Control Most Aspects of Our Own Lives (LA 1611) Transcript: Steven Jack Butala: Steve and Jill here. Jill DeWit: Hey. Steven Jack Butala: Welcome to the Land Academy Show, entertaining land investment talk. I'm Steven Jack Butala. Jill DeWit: And I'm Jill Dewitt. And we are broadcasting from the Valley of The Sun. Steven Jack Butala: Today is Jack Thursday, and I'm going to talk about how we now control and I mean, all of us, all, almost all aspects of our own lives. And I'll tell what, when we were kids, Jill and I wasn't like that at all. Jill DeWit: Yeah. I'm excited to talk about this. Steven Jack Butala: Before we get into it, let's take a question posted by one of our members on the landinvestors.com online community. It's free. And please don't forget to subscribe on the land academy YouTube channel and comment on the shows you like. Jill DeWit: Jessica wrote, "What points of failure do you think new land investors should be looking out for? As a one person show, I don't want to use my limited energy to create redundancy for the sake of redundancy, but there's bound to be ways we can mitigate the typical points of failure experienced by those at this stage of our careers." Steven Jack Butala: So Jessica and I in Discord, went back and forth on this. And then a lot of people came back in. I'm not in there every day or constantly or anything, but this is a topic that... A single point of failure is a topic that really sings to me because I was on the Brent end of that concept between around 2009 and 2011. Steven Jack Butala: Really until Jill and I had joined forces to get back in it, really get land investing back on track, or there was a recession then. And a lot of it was because of the single point of failure. We had a single point of failure sales channel. All we were doing was buying some property and selling them on eBay. It was great. I made millions and tens of millions of dollars doing it actually. Jill DeWit: It was great until it wasn't. Steven Jack Butala: Yep. Until it turned off. And I looked around and said, "Well, it's off like the electricity. And what can I do about it? Pretty much nothing." And so I never want that to happen again. So Jessica and I were going back and forth on Discord. I said, you can't have a single point of failure in your sales channel. This came up because Facebook and Instagram were down for two days this week. Jill DeWit: Oh yeah, that's true. Steven Jack Butala: That's why she was asking this. Jill DeWit: Oh. Steven Jack Butala: She's, "I don't want to get caught up in this." Jill DeWit: Whatif Facebook marketplace is the only place I seem to sell property? Steven Jack Butala: Yeah. That's where she [crosstalk 00:02:21]. Jill DeWit: Well, then don't let that happen. Steven Jack Butala: Really what she asked. Jill DeWit: Yeah. Steven Jack Butala: Here's another place that I've been burned on a single point of failure, recently, very, very recently. When you rely too heavily on a single important employee, it's going to bite you at some point. Now, Jill and I cross-train everybody. We don't go in there and say, "Hey, we're cross-training you." What ends up happening is somebody makes some time off, another person steps in. They learn how to run some stuff or whatever division it is. They work at 020 for a couple of weeks, they go over to data, the neighbor scoop for a week or whatever. So it ends up being a inadvertent cross-training. Steven Jack Butala: Everybody's in it together kind of thing. You can't do that with everybody. There's a lot of perfect personalities, you just want to do one thing and that's it. And I get that, and that's fine. To some degree, I'm like that. I just want to do one thing. And so you can't put too much stock in one employee, in one area. If you start to do mailers and you concentrate and you only use one way and you never do any type of review. And you bring your head back up from your desk three years...

Sports Card Investor
Sports Card Forecast

Sports Card Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 19:04


Geoff and Amber break down 5 sports cards based on your suggestion and wether you should buy, sell or hold. **Try Market Movers Today: https://www.marketmoversapp.com/ **eBay's New Trading Hub: https://pages.ebay.com/tradinghub/index.html

Bags & Boards Podcast
HOT10 Comic Books Honorable Mentions Ft. Gem Mint 9.14

Bags & Boards Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 9:18


❤️ Mystery Mail Call (our comic book subscription service) https://www.comictom101.com/ (US ONLY) ❤️ Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: https://bit.ly/2PfSSSY

Prison Professors With Michael Santos
187. THE EBAY CYBERSTALKING CRIMINAL CASE: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

Prison Professors With Michael Santos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 13:36


In this podcast, we cover the THE EBAY CYBERSTALKING CRIMINAL CASE and what you need to know about this case that Judge Burroughs called, "Just nuts!" To read the whole blog, click the link below: https://prisonprofessors.com/ebay-cyberstalking-criminal-case/

Kincaid & Dallas
949: My Little Secret - Lost and Found Engagement Ring

Kincaid & Dallas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 3:27


He bought a new laptop bag from eBay and when it arrived, he found a jewelry box with an engagement ring in it! He's not going to tell the original seller he found it, but he did use it to propose to his girlfriend! 

Holtecast - An Aston Villa Podcast
PREVIEW | Aston Villa v Wolves w/ Talking Wolves

Holtecast - An Aston Villa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 25:27


Cole Pettem was joined by David from the Talking Wolves website and podcast to look at Wolves' season thus far, the curious case of Adama Traore, and preview Saturday's game at Villa Park.You can listen for FREE on Acast, Apple Podcasts, and Spotify - Enjoy!WHAT DO WE DISCUSS?What has been made of Wolverhampton's season thus far from David's point of view?How has the appointment of Bruno Lange gone down within the fanbase?What's going on with Adama Traore as of late?Pre-match thoughts and discussion ahead of Saturday.All of this and so much more! Enjoy the podcast and Up The Villa!GUEST - Twitter: @TalkingWolvesSTAY CONNECTED:Email: holtecast@gmail.comTwitter: @7500ToHolteEPISODE NOTES:Thank you to our charity partner, Acorns Children's Hopsice.Get involved with a fantastic cause and organization by checking out their website: https://www.acorns.org.uk/Thank you to our FPL league sponsor, One2ElevenKits.Take advantage of their fantastic inventory of football apparel via Twitter (One2ElevenKits) and on Ebay (https://www.ebay.co.uk/str/one2elevenkits). See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Bags & Boards Podcast
Hot10 Back Issues Ft.GemMintCollectibles 9.9

Bags & Boards Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 14:32


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eBay the Right Way
eBay Chat with Olivia: Treasure Hunting in Tennessee - There's Gold in Them Thar Hills!

eBay the Right Way

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 64:58


Meet Olivia, of the $100 SuperSize Sales threads in my Facebook Group and on YouTube. She shares some specific products she specializes in that you might not be looking for when you are treasure hunting for things to sell on eBay. Email your comments, feedback and constructive criticism to me at Suzanne@SuzanneAWells.comSuzanne's eBay BOLO HandbookJoin my private Facebook group here.Find me on YouTube here.Join my online school for eBay sellers here.Visit my website here.Shop in my eBay store here.Happy Selling!

Raw Data By P3
Imke Feldmann

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 75:37


Imke Feldmann is among the first few to have recognized the incredible value and potential of this thing called Power Pivot in Excel (which was the precursor to Power BI).  And did she ever run with it, launching quite the successful solo consultancy and training service!  She exemplifies the helpful nature of the data community through her blog, The BIccountant, where she shares her amazing Microsoft BI tool knowledge. Her background is in Finance and Accounting, but you'll quickly realize she knows a great deal more than just Finance and Accounting! Contact Imke: The BIccountant Imke's Twitter References in this Episode: Imke's Github MS Power BI Idea - Customizable Ribbon - Please Upvote :) MS Power BI Idea - Speed Up PQ By Breaking Refresh Chain - Please Upvote :) Episode Timeline: 3:00 - The value of outsourcing certain business functions, Imke's path to Power BI starts with Rob's blog, a multi-dimensional cube discussion breaks out! 19:45 - One of Power BI's strengths is collaboration, Imke LOVES her some Power Query and M and loves DAX not so much 33:45 - Imke has a BRILLIANT idea about how to improve Power Query and some other improvements that we'd like to see in PQ 52:30 -  Rob's VS code experience, how COVID has affected the consulting business, Staying solo vs growing a company and how Imke determines which clients she takes on Episode Transcript: Rob Collie (00:00:00): Hello friends. Today's guest is Imke Feldmann. We've been working for a long time, nearly a year to arrange the schedules to get her on the show, and I'm so glad that we finally managed to do it. For a moment, imagine that it's 2010, 2011, that era. During that timeframe, I felt not quite alone, but a member of a very slowly growing and small community of people who had glimpsed what Power Pivot could do. And for those of you who don't know what Power Pivot is, and that was the version of Power BI, the first version that was embedded only in Excel. And at the time, the way the community grew, we'll use a metaphor for this. Imagine that the community was a map of the world and the map is all dark, but slowly, you'd see these little dim lights lighting up like one over here in the UK, one in the Southwest corner of the United States, very faintly. Rob Collie (00:00:51): And these would be people who were just becoming aware of this thing, this Power Pivot thing, and you'd watch them. They'd sort of show up on the radar, very tentatively at first kind of dipping their toe, and then that light would get brighter, and brighter, and brighter over time, as they really leaned in, and they learned more and more, and they became more adept at it. And this was the way things went for a long time. And then in 2011, out of nowhere in Germany on the map, this light comes on at full intensity, brightly declaring itself as super talented and powerful. And that was what it felt like to come across Imke Feldmann. Rob Collie (00:01:27): Like all of our guests, there's a little bit of that accidental path in her career, but also a tremendous sense of being deliberate. When this stuff crossed her radar, she appreciated it immediately. And I didn't know this until this conversation, but she quit her corporate job in 2013, the same year that I founded P3 as a real company, and became a freelancer. So for eight plus years, she has been a full time Power BI professional. There truly aren't that many people who can say that in the world. Our conversation predictably wandered. At one point, we got pretty deep into the notion of M and Power Query and it's screaming need for more buttons on its ribbon. And Imke has some fantastic ideas on how they should be addressing that. Rob Collie (00:02:14): We also, of course, naturally talked about the differences between remaining a solo freelancer as she has, in contrast to the path that I chose, which is scaling up a consulting practice business. Along the way we reprised the old and completely pointless debate of DAX versus M, I even try to get Tom hooked on M as his new obsession. We'll see how well that goes. Most importantly though, it was just a tremendous pleasure to finally get to talk to Imke at length for the first time after all these years, we literally crossed paths 10 years ago. So it was a conversation 10 years in the making compress down to an hour and change. I hope you enjoy it as much as we did, so let's get into it. Announcer (00:02:56): Ladies and gentlemen, may I have your attention, please? Announcer (00:03:00): This is The Raw Data by P3 Adaptive podcast, with your host Rod Collie, and your cohost Thomas LaRock. Find out what the experts at P3 Adaptive can do for your business. Just go to P3adaptive.com. Raw Data by P3 Adaptive is data with the human element. Rob Collie (00:03:24): Welcome to the show Imke Feldmann. How are you today? Imke Feldmann (00:03:27): Thank you, Rob. Great. It's a great day here over in Germany. Rob Collie (00:03:30): We have been talking about doing this for the better part of a year. So I'm glad that we're landing the guest, Imke is here. I really appreciate you doing this. So why don't we start with the basics. What are you up to these days? What do you do for a living? Imke Feldmann (00:03:48): I have people building great Power BI solutions these days. Rob Collie (00:03:55): Ah, yes. Imke Feldmann (00:03:55): That's how I fill my days. Rob Collie (00:03:58): I hear that that's a good business. Imke Feldmann (00:03:58): Yeah, it is. Rob Collie (00:04:03): So, and your website is? Imke Feldmann (00:04:06): Thebiaccountant.com. Rob Collie (00:04:07): Is that what you are on Twitter as well? Imke Feldmann (00:04:08): Yes. That's also my Twitter handle theBIccountant without an A in the middle. I just replaced the A from accountant with a BI. Rob Collie (00:04:17): There you go. Imke Feldmann (00:04:18): Yeah. Rob Collie (00:04:18): That's right. So that means that I'm going to make a tremendous leap here, wait till you see these powers of observation and deduction. You must have an accounting background? Imke Feldmann (00:04:29): I do, yes. Rob Collie (00:04:30): See you look at that. That's why I make the money. Okay, let's start there, was accounting your first career out of school? Imke Feldmann (00:04:39): Yes. I went to university and studied some economics or business stuff there, they'll know it's translated into English. And then I worked as a business controller. After that, I took over a job to lead a bookkeeping departments or to work with an area where the numbers came from basically. And then after that, I worked as the finance director, where I was responsible for a whole bunch of areas, controlling bookkeeping, IT, HR, and production. So that was quite a job with a broad range of responsibilities. Rob Collie (00:05:18): So you mentioned, kind of slipped IT into that list, right? Imke Feldmann (00:05:23): Yeah. Rob Collie (00:05:23): There's all these things in that list of responsibilities that all seemed they belong together, right? Bookkeeping, accounting, control or finance, IT. We've run into this before, with actually a number of people, that a lot of times the accounting or finance function in a company kind of wins the job of IT by default. Imke Feldmann (00:05:45): Yeah. It seems quite common in Germany, at least I would say. Rob Collie (00:05:48): I get multiple examples, but one that I can absolutely point to is Trevor Hardy from the Canadian Football League, he is in accounting, accounting and finance. And just by default, well, that's close to computers. Imke Feldmann (00:06:00): Yes. Rob Collie (00:06:01): And so it just kind of pulls the IT function in. Now is that true at really large organizations in Germany or is it a mid market thing? Imke Feldmann (00:06:09): No I would say a mid market thing. Rob Collie (00:06:12): That's true here too. So when there isn't an IT org yet it ends up being, oftentimes it falls to the finance and accounting function. Hey, that's familiar. It's kind of funny when you think about it, but it's familiar. And isn't finance itself pretty different from accounting? How much of a leap is that? What was that transition like for you taking over the finance function as well? We tend to talk about these things, at least in the US, is like almost like completely separate functions at times. Imke Feldmann (00:06:43): It depends, but at least it had something to do with my former education, which wasn't the case with IT. So, I mean, of course on a certain management level, you are responsible for things that you're not necessarily familiar with in detail. You just have to manage the people that know the details and do the jobs for you. So that was not too big an issue I must admit. Rob Collie (00:07:10): My first job out of school was Microsoft, an organization of that size, I was hyper specialized in terms of what I did. At this company at P, we are nowhere near that scale, and there's a lot more of that multiple hat wearing. I've definitely been getting used to that over the last decade, the first decade plus of my career, not so much. Imke Feldmann (00:07:31): Yeah. That's interesting because I basically went completely the other way around. I see myself now as working as a technical specialist and as a freelancer, I don't have to manage any employees anymore. Rob Collie (00:07:47): Well, so now you wear all the hats? Imke Feldmann (00:07:49): Yes. In a certain way, yes. Rob Collie (00:07:51): Okay. There's no HR department necessarily, right, so it's just you. But marketing, sales, delivery, everything. Imke Feldmann (00:08:01): Yep, that's true. Yep. And when I first started, I tried to do everything by myself, but the test changed as well. So in the past I started to outsource more things, but to external companies, not internal staff. Rob Collie (00:08:17): So you're talking about outsourcing certain functions in your current business, is that correct? Imke Feldmann (00:08:22): Yes, yes. Rob Collie (00:08:22): So it's interesting, right? Even that comes with tremendous risk when you delegate a certain function to an outside party whose incentives and interests they are never going to be 100% aligned with yours. Even we have been taken for a ride multiple times by third-party consulting firms that we've hired to perform certain functions for us. Imke Feldmann (00:08:46): Oh, no I don't outsource and your services that I directly provide to my clients. Rob Collie (00:08:49): Oh, no, no. Imke Feldmann (00:08:50): No. Rob Collie (00:08:50): No, we don't either. But I'm saying for example, our Salesforce implementation for instance- Imke Feldmann (00:08:56): Okay, mm-hmm (affirmative). Rob Collie (00:08:57): ... Has been a tremendous money sink for us over the years. Where we're at is good, but the ROI on that spend has been pretty poor. It's really easy to throw a bunch of money at that and it just grinds and grinds and grinds. And so this contrast that I'm getting around to is really important because that's not what it's like to be a good Power BI consultant, right? You're not that kind of risk for your clients. But if you go out and hire out some sort of IT related services for example, like Salesforce development, we're exposed to that same sort of drag you out into the deep water and drown you business model, that's not how we operate. I'm pretty sure that's not how you operate either. And so anyway, when you start talking about outsourcing, I just thought, oh, we should probably talk about that. Have you outsourced anything for your own sort of back office? Imke Feldmann (00:09:52): Back office stuff, yeah. My blog, WordPress stuff, or computer stuff in the background. So security [inaudible 00:09:59] the stuff and things like that, things that are not my core, I hire consultants to help me out with things that I would formally Google, spend hours Googling with. Rob Collie (00:10:09): Yes. Imke Feldmann (00:10:10): Now I just hire consultants to do that. Or for example, for Power Automate, this is something that I wanted to learn and I saw the big potential for clients. And there I also did private training basically, or coaching, or how you called it, hire specialists. Rob Collie (00:10:27): To kind of getting you going? Imke Feldmann (00:10:29): Exactly, exactly. Rob Collie (00:10:30): And those things that you've outsourced for your back office, have there been any that felt like what I described you end up deep in the spend and deepen the project going, "What's going on here?" Imke Feldmann (00:10:41): I'm usually looking for freelancers on that. And I made quiet good experiences with it, I must say. Rob Collie (00:10:49): Well done. Well done. All right. So let's rewind a bit, we'll get to the point where you're in charge of the finance department, which of course includes IT. Imke Feldmann (00:10:58): Not necessarily so. I felt quite sad for the guys who I had to manage because I said, "Well, I'm really sorry, but you will hear a lot of questions from me, especially at the beginning of our journey," because I had to learn so much in order to be a good manager for them. So that was quite different situation compared to the management roles in finance that I had before, because there I had the impression that I knew something, but IT was basically blank. Rob Collie (00:11:30): I would imagine that that experience turned out to be very important, the good cross pollination, the exposure to the IT function and sort of like seeing it from their side of the table, how valuable is that turned out to be for your career? Imke Feldmann (00:11:45): I think it was a good learning and really interesting experience for me just to feel comfortable with saying that I have no clue and ask the people how things work and just feel relaxed about not being the expert in a certain area and just be open to ask, to get a general understanding of things. Rob Collie (00:12:09): That's definitely the way to do it, is to be honest and transparent and ask all the questions you need to do. It's easier said than done. I think a lot of people feel the need to bluff in those sorts of situations. And that usually comes back to haunt them, not always. Imke Feldmann (00:12:25): No, that's true. Rob Collie (00:12:27): Some people do get away with it, which is a little sad. So at what point did you discover Power BI? Imke Feldmann (00:12:35): I didn't discover Power BI, I discovered Power Pivot, for your blog of course. Rob Collie (00:12:41): Oh, really? Imke Feldmann (00:12:43): Yes, yes, yes, yes. I think it was in, must be 2011, something like that. Rob Collie (00:12:50): Early, yeah. Imke Feldmann (00:12:51): Yeah. Quite early. When I was building a multidimensional cube with a freelancer for our finance department, then I was just searching a bit what is possible, how we should approach this and things like that. So we started with multi-dimensional cube because that was something where I could find literature about and also find experts who could have me building that. But when doing so, I really liked the whole experience and it was a really excellent project that I liked very much. And so I just searched around in the internet and tried to find out what's going on in that area. And this is where I discovered your blog. Rob Collie (00:13:35): I have no idea. First of all, I had no idea that my old blog was where you first crossed paths with this. Imke Feldmann (00:13:42): I think [inaudible 00:13:43]. Rob Collie (00:13:44): And secondly, I had no idea that it was that early. I mean, I remember when you showed up on the radar, Scott [inaudible 00:13:51] had discovered your blog and said, "Hey, Rob, have you seen this? Have you seen what she is doing? She is amazing." That wasn't 2011, that was a little bit later. I don't remember when but... Imke Feldmann (00:14:06): No, I think we've met first. I think we met on the Mr. XR Forum on some crazy stuff I did there. I cannot even remember what that was, but I started blogging in 2015 and we definitely met before. Rob Collie (00:14:21): That's what it was. It was the forums. And Scott was the one that had stumbled upon what you were doing there and brought my attention to it. I was like, whoa. It was like... Imke Feldmann (00:14:34): That last really some crazy stuff. I think I was moving data models from one Excel file to another or something like that. Some crazy stuff with [inaudible 00:14:43] and so on. Rob Collie (00:14:44): You obviously remember a better than I do. But I just remember being jaw dropped, blown away, impressed, by what you were doing. And the thing is the world of Power Pivot interest at that point in time still seems so small. The community still seems so small that for you to emerge on our radar fully formed, already blowing our minds, that was the first thing we ever heard from you. That was a real outlier because usually the way the curve of awareness went with other members of the community is that like, you'd see something modest from them. And you'd sorta like witnessed their upward trajectory as they developed. Of course, you've continued to improve and learn and all of that since then. But as far as our experience of it, it was you just showed up already at the graduate level, just like where did she come from? So cool. So you said that you enjoyed the multi-dimensional cube project? Imke Feldmann (00:15:43): Mm-hmm (affirmative). Yes. I don't know MDX, but I totally enjoyed the project. So being able to build a reporting solution for my own company, basically then for the company I worked for, and doing it live with a consultant with a freelancer on my hand, discussing how things should look like and just seeing the thing form before my eyes and grow. And this was just such an enjoyable experience for me. Rob Collie (00:16:11): So the thing that's striking about that for me is, there's no doubt that the multi-dimensional product from Microsoft was a valuable product. It did good things. But I never have heard someone say that they really enjoyed the implementation process as a client, right? Imke Feldmann (00:16:31): Okay. Rob Collie (00:16:31): You had a freelancer doing the work. So something you said there really jumped out at me, it was, sort of like doing the project live. So the way that this worked traditionally, at least in the US, is the consultant would interview you about your requirements and write a big long requirements document and then disappear and go build a whole bunch of stuff and come back and show it to you, and it's completely not what anyone expected. It's almost like you're on completely different planets. Obviously, if you'd had that experience, you would not be saying that you enjoyed it. So there had to be something different about the way that you and that freelancer interacted. Do you remember what the workflow was like? Imke Feldmann (00:17:16): What we did is that we often met together and just looked at where we're at and what the next steps should be. And we definitely had specific targets in mind. So there were some reports that I had defined as a target, and around these reports I was aware that we needed something that a proper data model, because I also knew that I wanted to have some sort of a general set up that could be carried from Excel as well. So I knew about cube functions, and I knew that on one hand I needed these reports that had formerly been within our ERP system. Also, I wanted them to be in a separate solution that was under my control and independent from the ERP system. And on the other hand, I wanted some more. So I wanted the flexibility to be able to vary this data and for certain other purposes in the controlling department as well. So basically being able to do ad hoc analysis on it. Imke Feldmann (00:18:23): And we met often and I showed a certain interest in how the table logic was created. So I knew that the MDX was over my head at the time, but I showed a very strong interest in which table are created, how they relate to each other, and that was quite unusual. At least this is what the [inaudible 00:18:47] the freelancer told me. Rob Collie (00:18:49): I bet. Imke Feldmann (00:18:50): He said that he doesn't see that very often that clients showed this sort of interest. Rob Collie (00:18:56): Did he say, "Yeah. You really seem to be having fun with this. Most of my clients don't enjoy this." You said that you met very often, so were there times where he was writing MDX while you were in the room? Imke Feldmann (00:19:10): Sometimes yes, because I said, "Well, can we switch this a bit or make some changes?" And sometimes he said, "Well, I can try adjust now." Because he came over for one day or half a day, and then we spoke things through and defined further things. And if we were finishing early, he would just stay and do some coding there. But apart from that, he would work from home and do the big stuff. Rob Collie (00:19:37): OLAP originally it stands for online analytical processing, where online meant not batch, right? It meant you could ask a question and get the answer while you were still sitting there. Imke Feldmann (00:19:51): Okay. Oh, really? Rob Collie (00:19:53): That's what online meant. Imke Feldmann (00:19:54): It's interesting. Rob Collie (00:19:56): It basically meant almost like real time. It's a cousin of real time, that's what online meant at that point, as opposed to offline where you write a query and submit it and come back next week right? So that's what the online and OLAP comes from. Imke Feldmann (00:20:12): Oh, interesting. Rob Collie (00:20:13): We would pick a different terminology of OLAP were it invented today. So something interesting about, it sounds like your experience, and I did not anticipate drilling into your experience with multi-dimensional on this conversation, but I think it's really important is that at least some portion of that project that you sponsored and implemented with the freelancer, at least some portion of the work was similarly performed online. Meaning the two of you were sort of in real time communication as things evolved. And the old model and the vast majority of multidimensional solutions that have ever been built in the world, the MDX powered solutions, were built and an offline model, where the majority of the communication supposedly takes place in the form of a requirements document. Rob Collie (00:21:05): And that was a deeply, deeply, deeply flawed approach to the problem, that just doesn't actually work. So I guess it's not surprising to me that the one time I've ever heard someone say they really enjoyed that multi-dimensional project, that at least a portion of that multidimensional project was sort of almost like real-time collaboratively performed rather than completely asynchronous, right? I guess we want to be really geeky, we could say it was a synchronous model of communication as opposed to an asynchronous one. And Power BI really facilitates that kind of interaction. Imke Feldmann (00:21:41): Absolutely. Rob Collie (00:21:42): The reason why the MDX multi-dimensional model worked the way it did, or there was two reasons, one is a legitimate one on one of them is more cynical. So the legitimate reason is, is that it required reprocessing of the cube for every change, it's just too slow, right? The stakeholder, the business stakeholder doesn't typically have the time or the patience to sit there while the code's being written, because it's so long between even just implementing a formula change sometimes would be, well, we need to wait an hour. And so the attention span of the business person can't be held for good reason there, right? And so that sort of drove it into an asynchronous model. Rob Collie (00:22:23): The other reason is, is that that is asynchronous model turned out to be a really good business model for the consultants, because the fact that it didn't work meant that every project lasted forever. And so that's the cynical reason. But Power BI is not long delays. You change the measure formula, or you add an extra relationship, or heck even bringing in a new table, just a brand new table, bring it in, it wasn't even in the model, now it's in the model. End to end that can sometimes be measured in minutes or even seconds. And so you can retain engaged collaborative interest. Now it's not like you're always doing that, right? There's still room for offline asynchronous work in our business, but really critical portions of it can be performed the other way. And I think that makes a huge difference. Imke Feldmann (00:23:13): Yep. And that's what I like about it. So it's so great to be able to have, as a consultant, to perform really relatively large tasks without any further involvement of other people. Which, I mean, honestly, I don't call myself a team worker, not because I don't love other people also, but teamwork means you have to communicate with other people, make sure that they know what you're working on. So there are so many interfaces that have to be maintained if you're working with other people. And so I really laugh the way I work currently being able to deliver full solutions as a one woman show consultant. That is really a pleasure for me. That's really my preferred way of work, I must say. Because I can really focus on the things that have to be done and I'm able to deliver value in a relatively short time for the clients. Rob Collie (00:24:14): That's a really interesting concept. There are certain kinds of problems in which collaboration, a team collaboration is absolutely necessary. The magic of collaboration sometimes can beat problems that no individual could ever beat. At the same time though, there's this other dynamic, right, where having a team working on a problem is actually a real liability because the communication complexity between the people becomes the majority of the work. Here's a really hyper simplified example. There used to be sort of a three-person committee, if you will, that was running our company P3, me and two other people. Imke Feldmann (00:24:57): Mm-hmm (affirmative). Rob Collie (00:24:58): And so all leadership decisions were essentially handled at that level. Well, things change, people move on, right? And so we went from a three person committee to a two person committee. We didn't anticipate the two of us who stayed, right? We did not anticipate how much simpler that was going to make things. We thought, just do the math, right, it's going to be like, well, it's one less person to get on the same page. So it's going to be a one-third reduction in complexity. It was actually double that because we went from having three pairs of communication, right, the triangle has three sides, to a line that only has one side, right? So there was only one linkage that needed to be maintained as opposed to three geometrically, combinatorially, whatever we're going to say, right? It just became- Imke Feldmann (00:25:45): Exponential. Rob Collie (00:25:45): ... Exponetially simpler. And so for problems that can be soloed, you have this amazing savings in efficiency, in clarity, even, right? Imke Feldmann (00:25:59): Yup. Rob Collie (00:25:59): There's just so many advantages when you can execute as one person, then there's the other examples like our company at our size now, even ignoring the number of consultants that we need to do our business, just the back office alone, we need the difference in skills. We need the difference in talents and interests and everything. We simply could not exist without that kind of collaboration. However, when our consultants were working with a client, usually it's essentially a one-on-one type of thing, right? We don't typically put teams of consultants on the same project. We might have multiple consultants working for the same client and they might be building something that's somehow integrated, but it's still very similar, I think to your model, when you actually watch sort of the work being done, there's this amazing savings and complexities. Imke Feldmann (00:26:50): Yup, that's true. Of course I have a network in the background. So when big problems arise where I need brain input, of course, I have a network, but it's not a former company. Rob Collie (00:27:02): And that's how we work too, right? We have all kinds of internal Slack channels. For some reason we adopted Slack years ago before Teams was really a thing. So Slack is sort of like our internal social network. There's a lot of discussion of problems, and solutions, and a lot of knowledge sharing, and people helping each other out behind the scenes in that same way. Again, we do bring multiple consultants into particularly large projects, but it's not like there's three people working together on the same formula. In Power BI, the things that you do in ETL, the things that you do in power query are intimately interrelated with the data model and the decks that you need to create. And imagine parceling that out to three different people. You have one formula writer, one data modeler, one ETL specialist, you would never ever get anywhere in that kind of approach. Imke Feldmann (00:28:00): Not necessarily. I mean, the tax people are the person responsible for the data model. He could write down his requirements. He could define the tables basically. And then someone could try to get the data from the sources. But of course, then you get some feedback that the data isn't there or that the model has to be shaped in a different way. So it has two sides to it. But that's interesting to see that you have the same experience, that Power BI models or solutions of a certain size that can very well be handled by one person alone. And that really brings speed, and flexibility, and agility to the whole development process I think. Rob Collie (00:28:41): You communicate with yourself at what's above giga? Peta, petabit? you communicate with yourself at petabit speed and you communicate with others through a noisy 2,400 baud modem that's constantly breaking up. It's amazing what that can do for you sometimes. So there comes a point in your journey where you decide to go freelance. Imke Feldmann (00:29:07): Yup. Rob Collie (00:29:08): That's a courageous leap. When did that happen and what led you to that conclusion? Imke Feldmann (00:29:13): I made the decision in 2012 already to do that. Rob Collie (00:29:19): Wow. Imke Feldmann (00:29:20): And I just saw the light. I just saw the light in Power Pivot and then Power Query came along and I saw what Microsoft was after. And as I said, I enjoyed the building of the cube, getting my hands dirty, reading about the technologies behind it and so on. And this was what I felt passionate about. And I also had the idea that I needed some break from company politics. And so I just thought, well, I give it a try. And if it doesn't work, I can find a job after that or find a company where I work for at any time after that. So I just tried it and it worked. Rob Collie (00:30:05): So you decided in 2012, did you make the break in 2012 as well? Imke Feldmann (00:30:12): I prepared it, and then I just in 2013, I started solo. Rob Collie (00:30:18): Okay. 2013 is also when we formally formed our company. For 2010-2013, it was a blog. I had other jobs. I had other clients essentially, but I wasn't really hanging out the shingle so to speak, as you know, we're not an actual business really until 2013. And I guess it's not much accident that we both kind of did the same thing about the same time, it's that demand was finally sufficient I think in 2013 to support going solo. In 2012, there weren't enough clients to even support one consultant. And so, oh, that's great. And I think you really liked Power Query too, does M speak to you? Imke Feldmann (00:31:02): Yes. Yes. Yeah. Rob Collie (00:31:03): It does, doesn't it? Imke Feldmann (00:31:04): I really prefer Power Query or M over DAX, I must admit. It has been much more liable to me than DAX. Rob Collie (00:31:15): Oh, and I liked you so much before you said that. I'm team DAX all the way. Imke Feldmann (00:31:23): I know. I know. I know. I mean, of course I love to use DAX as well, but I really feel very, very strong about Power Query. And I mean, I had such a great journey with it. I mean, it was really [inaudible 00:31:35] work for me personally, that I did with it. And it was just a great journey to understand how things work. I mean, this has been the first coding language for me that I really learned. And it was just a great journey to learn all the things and starting to blog about it. And of course, I started basically helping people in the forum, that's where I basically built my knowledge about it, solving other people's problems. And this was just a great journey. And Polar Query has always been good to me than DAX. Rob Collie (00:32:14): This is really cool, right? So you fell in love with Power Pivot, so DAX and data model, right? There was no Power Query. Imke Feldmann (00:32:21): Mm-hmm (affirmative)-, that's true. Rob Collie (00:32:23): Okay. And because we had no Power Query, there were many, many, many things you couldn't do in Power Pivot unless your data source was a database. Imke Feldmann (00:32:30): Yup. Rob Collie (00:32:31): Because you needed views created that gave you the right shape tables, right? If your original data source didn't have a lookup table, a dimension table, you had to make one. And how are you going to make one without Power Query? It gets crazy, right? At least unbelievable. So try to mentally travel back for a moment to the point in time where you're willing to, and not just, it doesn't sound like you were just willing to, you were eager to go solo to become a freelancer, right, with just DAX and data modeling. And then after that, this thing comes along that you light up when you talk about. You didn't have this thing that you love, but you were already in, that doesn't happen very often. Imke Feldmann (00:33:18): It could be that loved DAX at the beginning, but it just started to disappoint me at sometimes. Rob Collie (00:33:29): Oh, okay. Thomas LaRock (00:33:29): It disappoints everyone. Rob Collie (00:33:29): I'm just devastated. Imke Feldmann (00:33:35): No, I mean, it's amazing what DAX can do, but I mean, we all know it looks easy at the beginning, but then you can really get trapped in certain situations. Rob Collie (00:33:46): Yeah. I described these two things is like the length and width of a rectangle, Power Query and DAX. Take your pick, which one's the width, which one's the length? I don't care. And then we ask which one is more responsible for the area of the rectangle, right? Neither. You can double the length of either of them and it doubles the area of the rectangle. So it's really ironic that I'm so sort of firmly on team DAX for a number of reasons. Number one, is that I'm really not actually that good at it compared to the people who've come along since. Like my book, for instance, I think, I look at it as this is the 100 and maybe the 200 level course at university, maybe the first in the second course, maybe, but it's definitely not the third course. The thing that you take in your third or fourth year of university, that's not covered in my book in terms of DAX. Rob Collie (00:34:44): And basically every one of the consultants at our company is better at DAX than I am. And that's great. That's really good. And the other thing that's ironic about my love of DAX over M, is if these two were in conflict, which they aren't. Imke Feldmann (00:35:00): No they are. Rob Collie (00:35:02): Is that I actually was trying for years to get a Power Query like project started on the Excel team. I knew how much time was being chewed up in the world just transforming data, not analyzing it even, just getting things ready for analysis. It's just ungodly amounts of time. And so I was obsessed with end-user ETL. When I was on the Excel team, it was like a running joke, someone would mention in a meeting, "Well, that's kind of like ETL," and other people would go, "Oh no, no, don't say that in front of Rob, he's going to get started and he won't shut up about it for the next 30 minutes." On the podcast with the Power Query team, I told them I'm really glad that no one ever agreed to fund my project on the Excel team because now that I see what Power Query is like I grossly underestimated how much work needed to go into something like that. And I'm glad that Microsoft isn't saddled with some old and completely inadequate solution to the Power Query space, because now that I've seen what the real thing looks like, I'm like, "Oh my gosh, we would've never been able to pull that off." Rob Collie (00:36:14): So the thing that I was most obsessed with is the thing that now that it's actually been built, for some reason, I just find M to be, I don't know, there's like a reverse gravity there that pushes me away. Imke Feldmann (00:36:26): What I actually would like to see is that there's less need to use M in the Power Query product. So first, the only thing I was dreaming about was finally to have a function library that can easily be shipped from then, or that you can download from internet or wherever, where you can use additional functions in your M code. So this was the first thing that I was really passionate about and thought that we should have such a thing in Power Query to be able to make more cool things, or group steps together. But now what I really think we should actually have and see in Power Query is the ability to build our own ribbons and to the query editor. Rob Collie (00:37:13): Yes. Imke Feldmann (00:37:13): Like we have in an Excel. So this is something that in my eyes would really bring a big push to the product and actually would make so much sense for the people who start using these products. I mean the whole Power platform can have so many benefits for finance department, all departments, but I mean, I'm passionate about finance departments. But have you counted how many low-code languages are in there, if you include Power Apps and Power Automate and all these things? Rob Collie (00:37:50): Low-code. Imke Feldmann (00:37:50): And honestly, in order to come up with any solution that makes sense in a business environment, I would say in all of these solutions, there is no way around the code at the end. I mean, you get quite far with clicky, clicky, but I haven't seen solutions where you get around the languages. And now imagine the typical finance people who really they know the Excel formulas and some of them might know VBA as well. And now their server uses new low-code, no-code word, and just get your head around about five or six new languages that you all have to know and learn in order to get something useful and so on. So I think that's just not feasible for people who have real jobs in the business to learn all that. Rob Collie (00:38:42): Well, that's what you're here for, right? That's what your business is for and that's what P3 is for. Imke Feldmann (00:38:48): We get them started and the products are great. And if there are people in the companies who have a drive to learn things and take the time they get their heads around it, but it could be easier. It could be easier with things like that, where we could provide additional user interfaces and just make it even easier for people to build great solutions for them or adapt solutions that consultants had build initially, but to maintain them by themselves and make adjustments to them if needed. Rob Collie (00:39:19): So [inaudible 00:39:20] has an old joke where he says, when he's doing a presentation or something, he says, "That's a good question. And I define good question as a question I know the answer to, right." And then he says, "But then a great question is a question that is covered by the very next slide." So there's a similar parallel joke to make here, which is that, that idea you just talked about with the ribbons and everything, right? So if I said, it's a smart idea, what I would mean is, again, this is a joke, right? I would mean that that's an idea that I agree with and have kind of already had. But if I say it's a brilliant idea- Imke Feldmann (00:39:55): Okay. Rob Collie (00:39:56): ... Then it's an even better version of an idea that I've already had that has never occurred to me. Your idea is a brilliant idea. Imke Feldmann (00:40:02): Okay. Rob Collie (00:40:06): It goes beyond. So I have been advocating privately behind the scenes with the Power Query team forever telling them that they need about three or four more ribbon tabs. There's just way too many commonly encountered problems for which you can imagine there being a button for, and there's no button. Imke Feldmann (00:40:28): Exactly. Rob Collie (00:40:29): And it's like, I don't understand. I used to be on teams like that, but I don't understand why they haven't gotten to this. Because it seems so low hanging fruit. They've already built the engine, they've built the language, right? The language can already handle this, but you actually had two brilliant ideas in there that had never occurred to me. First of all, I'm used to the idea that the community can't contribute libraries of functions, they can't do that for DAX. Imke Feldmann (00:40:57): Mm-hmm (affirmative). Rob Collie (00:40:58): That's not even like engineering possible for DAX. And the reason for it is, is that the DAX engine is so heavily optimized in so many ways that there'd be no way to plug in some new function that's unpredictable in terms of what it needs to do. All of these things, they're all inherently interrelated and they make changes in the storage and the query engine to make this function work better and vice versa, because it has to take advantage of the index compression scheme and all of that kind of stuff. It's actually not possible, is the wrong word, but it's actually orders of magnitude more difficult, if not impossible to allow DAX to have UDF, user-defined function type of feature. Rob Collie (00:41:42): I don't think Power Query is like that though. Maybe naively, because again, I'm not on the internals team on the Power Query side. But it does seem like a UDF capability is at least much more feasible- Imke Feldmann (00:41:53): Absolutely. Rob Collie (00:41:54): ... For Power Query, which does execute row by row essentially. Other languages have this, right? One of the reasons that R is so popular is not that R is so awesome, is that R has tremendous libraries of commonly solved problems that you can just go grab off the internet or off the shelf and plug into your solution. Imke Feldmann (00:42:14): I have my own library I've created. You can go to my GitHub and you'll see 50, 60 custom M functions. You can package them in a record and [inaudible 00:42:24] them as a library and your M code, or you could even connect live to them and run them with an execute statement. But this is too difficult, although it's just a couple of clicks, but it's too difficult or at least intimidating for the beginners, who really Power Query beginners who start with the products, I think there's so much potential to make their life easier. And that's not through some coding stuff, or I know this function, I know that function, that's really can only come in my eyes through user interface with buttons. Rob Collie (00:42:59): Yeah, I agree. And just as importantly for me, is that I might actually come around and be like, just as much team Power Query as team DAX. Honestly, my frustration is just the M language and just my total lack of desire to learn it. [crosstalk 00:43:16]. It is what it really comes down to. It's not about M, it's not about Power Query, it's about me. Whereas again, I know the need that it fills is massively important. So it's not that I think it's a bad mission, I think it's like the mission in a lot of ways. I was obsessed with it long before I ever crossed paths with business intelligence, I was obsessed with data transformation, end user data transformation. It's just a problem that's about as ubiquitous as it gets. So let's make it happen. We agree, the two of us, that's it, right? It's like we need to go provide a unified front. Imke Feldmann (00:43:52): I think that that's an idea in the idea forum, I might send the link that you can maybe post. Rob Collie (00:43:56): We want that thing up, voted to the moon. I'll even go figure out what my sign in is on the ideas side. Imke Feldmann (00:44:08): Oh, good luck with it. Rob Collie (00:44:09): Which is absolutely impossible. I have no idea which of the 14 counts. And then I'll try to create a new one and it'll go, "Nah, you're not allowed to. We know it's you, but we won't tell you who it is, what your email address is." So I completely agree. So there's so many problems. I always struggle to produce the list. It's like I need to be writing down the list of things that are crucial, but here's an example. Remove duplicates, but control which duplicate you keep. That's a problem that can't be solved in the GUI today. Imke Feldmann (00:44:48): And you need the intimidating type of buffer that you have to write by hand around it, which is just pain. Rob Collie (00:44:56): Remove dups and don't care which one you keep. Okay, fine. That's a great simple button. There should be an advanced section that allows you to specify, oh, but before you keep the dups, sort by this column or sort in the following manner. Imke Feldmann (00:45:10): Exactly. Rob Collie (00:45:10): And then keep the first one of each group. It's easy for us to say outside the team, but apparently that is a, we just make a joke, right? That's apparently a Manhattan project level of software to add that extra button. Anyway, we'll get that. Thomas LaRock (00:45:27): That doesn't make sense to me though. I'm fascinated by all of your conversation and you guys are a hundred miles away from me in a lot of this stuff, but I could listen to it all day. But no, the fact that Excel can't do the remove duplicates, except for like the first of each one of something, that's a simple group by. In my head, I sit there and go that's easily solvable because Excel and DAX does such great stuff that I would never want to do in TSQL, how the hell do we stumble across a thing that's been solved by straight up SQL language that somehow can't get into an Excel? Rob Collie (00:46:01): Well, let's explain the problem very clearly and see if we're on the same page as to what the problem is, but either way it'll be valuable. So let's say you have a whole bunch of orders, a table full of orders. That is a really wide Franken table. It's got things like customer ID, customer address, customer phone number, but also what product they ordered, and how much of it, and how much it cost. Okay, and a date, a date of the order. All right. And you've been given this table because the people that are responsible for this system, they think that what you want is a report and not a data source. And this is incredibly common. Okay. So you need to extract a customer's dimension or lookup table out of this. You need to create a customer's table so that you can build a good star schema model. Okay. And Power Query is right there to help you. Power Query will help you invent a customer's look up table where one wasn't provided, and that's awesome. Rob Collie (00:46:58): Okay. So you say, okay, see customer ID this column. I want to remove duplicates based on that column. Okay, great. But now it's just that the order that the data came in from the report file or the database or whatever that will determine which duplicate is kept. What you really want to do of course is take the most recent customer order of each customer ID because they've probably moved. They may have changed phone numbers, whatever, right? You want their most recent contact information. You don't want their contact information for 15 years ago. And the M language allows you to solve this problem essentially sort by date, and then keep the most recent, but only if you get into the code manually, and as Imke points out, it's not even if you go into the code, the things that you would want to do, if you do a sort, you can add a sort step to the Power Query with the buttons, with the GUI, and then you do the remove duplicates and it ignores the source. Imke Feldmann (00:47:59): Yes. Rob Collie (00:48:02): The GUI almost tries to tell you that it's impossible, but if you know about table dot buffer. Imke Feldmann (00:48:07): So the question is why do we have a sort command in Power Query when it doesn't give the sort order? I mean, that is the question to ask. But that's how it is. Rob Collie (00:48:16): It sorts the results. It sorts the results, it just doesn't sort for the intermediate steps. Imke Feldmann (00:48:20): Why? No, that's quite technical. But would just be great if such a common task could be done with buttons that is reliable at the end. I fully agree. Rob Collie (00:48:35): So Tom, I think this one's really just an example of, again, I truly think that M and Power Query, just like DAX and data modeling, the Power BI data modeling, both of these things belong in the software hall of fame of all time. It is amazing, Power Query, M, is just ridiculously amazing. It's one of the best things ever invented. Remember this is someone who's associated with being a critic of it. Imke Feldmann (00:49:04): Yeah, you're making progress, it's great to see. Rob Collie (00:49:07): And yet I'm telling you that it's one of the top five things ever invented probably. And I think there's a certain tendency when you've done something that amazing to lose track of the last mile. I think it's more of a human thing. Imke Feldmann (00:49:19): Maybe, but I mean, what I see is that they are investing quite a lot in data flows, which makes a lot of sense as well in my eyes. Rob Collie (00:49:27): All that really does though, as far as you and I are concerned, Imke, is it makes it even more important that they solve this problem. Because it's now exposed in two different usage scenarios. Imke Feldmann (00:49:37): Yeah, you're right. Rob Collie (00:49:39): And I want my data flow to be able to control which duplicates are kept too. So that's what I'm saying. There's all these big sort of infrastructural technical challenges that do tend to draw resources. And it's not a neglect thing. Imke Feldmann (00:49:54): No, no. Rob Collie (00:49:54): It isn't like a willful failure or anything like that, I don't want to paint that kind of negative of a picture. Imke Feldmann (00:49:59): No. Rob Collie (00:50:00): It's just that out here in reality, the inability to do, even if we just identified the top 10 things like this, addressing those top 10 things with GUI, with buttons, what have I think in the world, maybe even a bigger impact than the entire data flows project, right? Because you would expand the footprint of human beings that are advocates of this stuff and then you go build data flows. You don't have to think of it as either or, right? They should do both. It's just that I think it's hard to appreciate the impact of those 10 buttons when you're on the software team. It's easier to appreciate the impact of data flows, which is massive. I don't mean to denigrate that. I think it's crazy good. It's just that this other thing is of a similar magnitude in terms of benefit, but it's harder to appreciate when you're on the software team. It's easier to appreciate when you're out here in the trenches, living it every single day. And every time I run into a problem like this, I have to put my hand up and say to my own team, I have to say, " Help." Thomas LaRock (00:51:02): So a casual observation I have is that you wish for there to exist one tool that will handle all of your data janitorial needs. And that tool doesn't necessarily exist because life is dirty, so is your data and you're never going to anticipate everything possible. Now, should that sorting functionality exist in that duplicates, the scenario gave me? Yeah, probably. But there's always going to be something next. And that's why I go to you and I say, the thing that you've described to me is you need your data to be tidy so that it can be consumed and used by a lot of these features that we've talked about today. And in order to get to tidy data, there's no necessarily one tool. Thomas LaRock (00:51:48): You're a big fan of the ETL, Rob. You know that, hey, maybe I need to take the source data and run it through some Python scripts, or some M, or something first before it goes to this next thing. And that's the reality that we really have. What you're wishing for is the one tool, the one button to rule it all. And that's going to take a while before that ever comes around. Rob Collie (00:52:09): The thing is though, is that M is ridiculously complete. Imke Feldmann (00:52:14): Yeah. Rob Collie (00:52:15): You can do anything with it. And it's a language that's optimized for data transformation. So I know you can do anything with C++ too, right? But this is a data crunching, data transformation, specialized language that is really complete. And its UI is woefully under serving the capabilities of the engine. And so I suppose we could imagine and deliberately design a data transformation scenario that maybe M couldn't do it. Imke Feldmann (00:52:45): No. Rob Collie (00:52:46): I think that'd be a very difficult challenge considering how good M is. Imke Feldmann (00:52:49): I think in terms of logic, M can do anything, but in terms of performance, there is some room for improvements. So because there's a streaming semantic running in the background, and as long as the stream runs through all the steps, if you have complex queries, this can really slow things down. And currently there is no button or command in the M language to cut the stream and say, well, stop it here and buffer what you have calculated until here, and then continue from there. So if you have really complex stuff that would benefit from an intermediate buffer, then you can store that in an Azure blob or CSV, or whatever. Specifically if you're working with data flows, you can create some automatic processes that would enable this kind of buffering. Imke Feldmann (00:53:45): And then you will see that the speed of the whole process that can really increase dramatically because in some situations, the speed in M drops exponentially. And these are occasions where a buffer would really helped things, but we don't have it yet in the engine of Power Query. So this was what really be something else that would be fairly beneficial if we wouldn't have to make these work-arounds through things. Rob Collie (00:54:14): Tom, that just occurred to me, I can't believe this is the first time that this thought has crossed my mind. But I think that you might fall into an abyss of love with M. Thomas LaRock (00:54:28): Well, I'm a huge James Bond fan, but... Rob Collie (00:54:30): Oh, no. I think you would really, really just dig it. Thomas LaRock (00:54:38): I don't think I have time to take on a new relationship at this point. I'm still with Python and R, so I mean, I don't know. I'm not going to disagree, I'm just, please don't start a new addiction for me. Rob Collie (00:54:51): Think of the content though, that you could produce over time. The M versus SQL versus Python treatises. Thomas LaRock (00:54:59): Cookbook. Rob Collie (00:55:00): You were made for this mission Tom. Thomas LaRock (00:55:03): Okay. So we'll have to talk later about it. You can sweet talk me. You know I've let you sweet talk me into any [inaudible 00:55:08]. Rob Collie (00:55:08): That's right, that's right. Come on, Tom. Get into M, you know that thing that I have nothing but praise for, that I just love to death, you need to do that. Thomas LaRock (00:55:18): For you. That's what you want to do, is you want to learn it but [inaudible 00:55:21] through me. Rob Collie (00:55:22): Oh, that wouldn't work. I would be, "Oh yeah, well this is still M." Thomas LaRock (00:55:29): You're going to be like, "Tom, where's your latest blog post on M so I can read it and hate upon it even more?" Rob Collie (00:55:37): No, I would not read. Just as the first step. Thomas LaRock (00:55:42): I'm going to read it, but not leave a comment about how much I hate it. Rob Collie (00:55:45): Let's go back to talking about how we did a bunch of big fat Fisher-Price buttons for me to mash my thumbs in the UI. That's what I need. Thomas LaRock (00:55:54): You know what? I'll do that. I'll open up VS code and I'll just build this one big button, it's Rob's button. Rob Collie (00:56:00): Hey, you won't believe this, but I recently installed VS code. Thomas LaRock (00:56:03): I don't believe it, why? Rob Collie (00:56:05): Well, because I needed to edit, not even write, because I'm not capable of it. I needed to edit an interface, add on customization for World of Warcraft. And the only purpose of this World of Warcraft add on interface modification was to allow me to drop snarky comments into a particular channel of the conversation based on the button that I press. I needed a menu of snarky comments to drop at particular points in time. It's hard to type them out all the time, right? So it's just like, now here we go. I dropped one of those. I dropped one of those. Thomas LaRock (00:56:37): We got to get you a real job or something. You got way too much time on your hands. Rob Collie (00:56:42): That was my number one contribution to the World of Warcraft Guild. For a couple of months, there was the snarky rogue chat. Thomas LaRock (00:56:48): You know that is on brand. Rob Collie (00:56:56): It prefixed every comment in the chat with a prefix, you came from rogue chat 9,000. So that people who aren't on the joke were like, "Why is this guy, he's usually very quiet, become so obnoxious. Look at the things he's saying." Anyway. So VS code. And that also involved GitHub. Because my friend who wrote the stub, the shell of this add on for me is a vice president at GitHub. So of course he puts the code in GitHub and points me to it and then points me to VS code, and I'm like, "Oh, you're making me work now? Okay. But you wrote the shell for me, so okay. All right. I'll play ball." So it doesn't sound like you regret your decision to go solo. Imke Feldmann (00:57:40): Absolutely. Rob Collie (00:57:41): You're not looking to go back to corporate life. Imke Feldmann (00:57:43): Absolutely not. Rob Collie (00:57:44): Not missing that. So what can you tell us about the last year or two? What impact, if any, did COVID have on your business? Imke Feldmann (00:57:52): Business has grown especially the last year. So people needed more reports than ever and solutions. So it really, I don't know whether it was COVID effect or just the fact that Power BI is growing and growing. Rob Collie (00:58:07): I'm sure it's both. So the dynamic we saw during 2020. So 2020 would be the, if you're going to have a year that was negatively impacted by COVID, it would have been 2020. And what we saw in 2020 was that we were definitely not acquiring new clients. We weren't making new relationships at nearly the rate we had been people weren't taking risks on meeting a new BI firm. That wasn't something that there was as much appetite for as there had been. However, amongst the clients where we already had a good relationship, we'd already been working with them for a while, their needs for data work expanded as a result of COVID because it did, it created all kinds of new problems and it invalidated so many existing blueprints of tribal knowledge of how we run the business. When reality changes, you need new maps, you need new campuses. Rob Collie (00:59:04): And so on net, we ended up our overall business still grew modestly over the course of 2020, year over year compared to 2019. But then when the new clients started to become viable again, people started looking, we're interested in making new relationships, 2021 has been a very, very strong year of growth, not moderate, really kind of crazy. How do you keep up with increased demand as a one person shop? Imke Feldmann (00:59:35): Saying no. Rob Collie (00:59:36): You have to make your peace with saying no. At one point in my history, I faced sort of the same thing and I decided not to say no, and instead decided to grow the company. That brought an enormous amount of risk and stress- Imke Feldmann (00:59:55): I can imagine. Rob Collie (00:59:55): ... Into my life that I did not anticipate its magnitude. I'm sure I anticipated it, but I didn't anticipate the magnitude of it. I'm very grateful that I'd made that decision though, because where we are today is incredible. That's a rocky transition. So today everything runs like clockwork basically. We have a lot of growth ahead of us that seems almost like it's just going to happen, we're just going to keep growing for a long time. But we had to set the table we had to build our organism as a company into a very different form than what it had been when it was just me. And that molting process it was very painful. I don't pretend that the scaling decision is the right decision, it's very much a personal one. I've certainly lived that. If the version of me that made the decision to scale the company knew everything that was coming, it would have been a much harder decision to make. You kind of have to have a little bit of naive optimism even to make that leap. Imke Feldmann (01:00:57): I can imagine that once you get these things figured out and with the dynamic that the product has, that has a good chance to get it going into a very successful business, I believe. Rob Collie (01:01:10): Well, with your profile and with the growing demand for these sorts of services, the percentage of no that you have to say is just going to keep going up. Imke Feldmann (01:01:20): Yeah. But I made my decision and that's just fine. Rob Collie (01:01:25): I'm very supportive of that decision. I don't have any criticism of it, again, especially knowing what I know now. But if there's going to be come a point where you're going to be saying yes 1% of the time, and the answer to that is ultimately, well, you just raise your rates, which is also very difficult to do. In the end, it's almost like an auction for your services. You need to run yourself like Google. There's a 40 hour block of Imke time coming up for availability. We'll just put it on eBay. Imke Feldmann (01:01:59): I mean, it's just nice to be able to choose with whom you work with. That's just nice. And I earned enough money, so that's fine. So I'm happy with that. Rob Collie (01:02:12): How do you choose who you work with? Is it mostly based on industry? Is it mostly based on job function that you're helping? Or is it more about the specific people? There's all kinds of things that could... Let's say if I came to your website today, I filled out your contact form, what are the things that I could say in that contact for a message that would lead you to say no, versus leads you to say maybe? Imke Feldmann (01:02:37): What I really like to do is to work with finance directors. So basically not people exactly like me, but I like to see that the managers approached me and they have an interest in the product itself and also therefore an interest to push it into their departments. So this is for me, a very, very good starting point because it's an area I'm familiar with. I know that there's enough critical support to get the decisions that have to be made and maybe also push IT to help with certain things. This is really one of my favorite set ups, I would say. Rob Collie (01:03:19): Yeah, we do a lot of work with finance departments as well. How long does sort of your average relationship run with a client? How long do you end up working with the same organization on average? Imke Feldmann (01:03:31): That's hard to say, that's really completely different. It can be the initial five days kickoff where we set up a PNL statement connect all the finance data and they go along with that. And basically, never hear again, or just occasionally hear again, "Can you help me with this problem or that problem?" And it could also be going on for years, basically with breaks in between of course, but some customers, they come every now and then when they want to expand things. Now I have a customer that I'm working on some hours or even days ever week since over a year by now. Rob Collie (01:04:15): That sounds similar to my experience as a freelancer, when it was just me, less similar to our business today, a little bit less. I mean, I think it's still more similar than not. It's just that the dial has moved a little bit. Imke Feldmann (01:04:32): So how long are your engagements then, usually? Rob Collie (01:04:35): Most of our engagements are, if we start out doing kind of that kickoff you're talking about, we started like a project with people, that tends to not be the end. We don't typically have people just immediately vanish after that because that's usually the point at which, I mean, they've got something working already, very often after the first week or so of working with a client, they've usually got some really amazing things built already at that point. But at the same time, that's really just at the beginning of the appetite. Usually there are things that are

Dreamers & Doers Podcast by Loveworks Leadership
Biz Boot Up Ep 22: Being Open to Opportunities to Learn with Liz Barfield and Connor Davis

Dreamers & Doers Podcast by Loveworks Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 23:28


Liz, a native of Albany, Georgia, moved to Norman in May 2012 with her husband's job. She acclimated quickly into Norman community life by joining Norman Next and graduating from the Norman Chamber of Commerce's Leadership Norman Class of 2015, as well as serving on Norman Arts Council, and Sooner Rotary in both members and board leadership positions. She also helped start Moore Involved, patterned after Norman Next. She was raised in a cooking and entertaining family and those southern hospitality roots run deep through Liz's favorite family recipes today. Liz has spent over 15 years in the hospitality and catering industry. She brings a love of food and connecting food with people to social butterfly catering. Whether it's a fun theme or helping to nourish and comfort, Liz is passionate about connecting people and having fun with food! Wristworld began as an experiential learning project in collaboration with Loveworks Leadership, a non-profit youth leadership organization that teaches leadership, character development and entrepreneurial skills to middle school students and Trifecta Communications, a tech and ad agency based in Oklahoma City. By using augmented reality technology, for months the students worked hard to develop the interactive game world, plot and characters and introduced Wrist World, an AR video game on 4 slap band bracelets in 2018. In 2020, they struck a licensing deal with Hatsune Miku, a popular Japanese vocaloid which opened up international sales. Their product is now available in 100 stores in Oklahoma at Oncue and Love's Country Stores and also online on Amazon, Walmart.com, Newegg.com, Ebay, and their own website. Connor, now in 10th grade, joined the team as an 8th grade student and is now the CPO of Wrist World.

Hacker Public Radio
HPR3443: Neuton battery replacement

Hacker Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


Audio Notes During the audio I repeatedly called it the Neutron mower instead of the Neuton mower. I was too lazy edit those mispronunciations. Introduction After recently reclaiming my Neuton EM 4.1 electric lawn mower from my parents, I needed to replace the battery to make it operational. This mower was purchased in the early 2000s, and replacement batteries for it are no longer available from the manufacturer. Thankfully replacement 12V 10A batteries are available through third parties. Replacing Parts I faced two issues with finding replacement parts. The Neuton mowers run at 24V and need batteries that can provide 10 amps of current. They come with a battery case that holds two 12V 10A batteries connected in series. The case holds the batteries and provides a connector and circuitry for a 24V DC charger. When I received the mower back from my parents, it didn't have a battery case with it. While the Neuton website is still online, and looks like you can order some accessories still, they no longer carry replacement battery cases or batteries. I was able to find just the case on EBay. I then found replacement batteries on Amazon. Installing the batteries in the case is simple. One side of the case has a lid. The lid is held in place by plastic notches on the bottom and two screws at the top. The screws have size 10 star heads. The batteries sit side by side in the case, with their terminals facing the lid. I connected the inner terminals (negative of one battery to positive of the other) with the jumper wire that came with the case. I then connected the outer terminals to the battery case terminal wires, slid the batteries all the way into case, closed, and fastened the lid. Conclusion The batteries are currently charging. The red charging light did come on when I plugged in the 24V DC charger, and nothing has exploded yet, so I am optimistic I will be able to use the mower again shortly. References Neuton CE5.4 24 volt rechargeable battery CASE ONLY - EBay item Mighty Max Battery 12V 10AH Replaces HE12V127 HGL1012 LCRB1210P NEUTON CE5 POWPS12100 Battery - 2 Pack Brand Product - Amazon item Attribution The transition sound used between audio clips is found on freesound.org: Name: Harp Transition Music Cue Author: DanJFilms License: Creative Commons Zero

Sports Card Investor
Top 5 HOTTEST Trending Cards

Sports Card Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 12:53


In this week's Top 5 Hottest Trending Cards, Geoff brings us through NFL, NBA and MLB and shows us the Top 5 cards that have gone up the most in the last week. **Try Market Movers Today: https://www.marketmoversapp.com/ **eBay's New Trading Hub: https://pages.ebay.com/tradinghub/index.html

No Limits Selling
Rick Barrera on Becoming Essential To Your Clients

No Limits Selling

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 26:51


Rick Barrera is known as the Revenue Accelerator for the work he does with entrepreneurs, small businesses and enterprise organizations to smooth the on-ramp and make them easier to do business with. He believes that you can generate any level of revenue you choose, whenever you choose to generate it.     Rick worked with Dave Zerfoss, CEO at Husqvarna to take the company from 29 million dollars to half a billion in just over 10 years. Rick is frequently called upon to turn around troubled companies, returning them to robust profitability. He has personally started many companies including a seed company, newspaper delivery, babysitting, landscaping, photo studio, restaurant, vitamin company, sales and customer service training, concierge services, financial services, real estate, an online training company and a professional speaking firm. He is currently engaged with two M&A companies doing consolidations in two different industries. His current passion project is PartnerHere.com, an online marketplace enabling entrepreneurs to find business partners and resources...without cash. His goal is to build the world's largest online community for entrepreneurs of every stripe. As you will soon learn, he believes that entrepreneurship is the solution to many of the issues that we face as individuals, families and as a global community.   Rick is also the Head of Faculty for the Center for Heart Led Leadership in Denver, Colorado where he works with SEAL Team leaders, world class mountain climbers, Fortune 500 CEO's, journalists, actors and astronauts to teach We Before Me, relationship focused leadership, to the next generation of leaders. His client list numbers in the thousands and includes Abbott Labs, American Airlines, Ameriprise, AT&T, AutoCrib, AutoZone, Bayer, Black and Decker, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Caterpillar, Chevron, Cigna, Conoco, Dairy Queen, eBay, EMC, Fidelity, Ford Motor Company, Four Seasons Hotels, GE, GlaxoSmithKline, Hallmark Cards, Harley-Davidson, Hilton, Honda, Honeywell, HP, Husqvarna, IBM, Intel, Intuit, John Hancock, Johnson Controls, Kaiser, Lenovo, Les Schwab Tires, Lexus, Marriott, Merrill Lynch, Monsanto, Nissan, REMAX, Ritz-Carlton, Time Warner, Verizon, Volvo, Weyerhaeuser and Wells Fargo. Rick is a well-known business thought leader having written 8 books on leadership, branding, customer service, sales, and personal development including two best-sellers, Non-Manipulative Selling & Overpromise and Overdeliver.   Contact Rick: Website Company Website LinkedIn YouTube Instagram

Selling on eBay
eBay for Business - Ep 160 - Creating A Social Media Campaign Part 3: Tracking Your Social Campaign

Selling on eBay

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 54:13


Give us a call - 888-723-4630 Send us an email - podcast@ebay.com visit us at ebay.com/podcast    Welcome to eBay for Business! This week, Audrey Tracy rejoins us as we wrap up our three-part series, Creating A Social Media Campaign. Part 3 focuses on how to measure the results of your campaign. We also talk with sellers Rob and Melissa Stephenson to learn how they use social for their business. Rebecca and Griff answer questions on shipping and the unusual case of the confiscated GSP shipment.  To have your questions answered on our eBay for Business podcast, call us at 888 723-4630 or email us at podcast@ebay.com.  To give us feedback, please take our podcast listener survey at (https://connect.ebay.com/srv/survey/a/sellerops.podcast)   00:01 - Intro 06:36 - Creating a Social Media Marketing Campaign with Audrey Tracy - Part 3 24:24 - Seller Conversation: Rob & Melissa Stephenson 42:44 - Q&A and Outro   New Links for Ep 160: USPS suspends services to New Zealand effective immediately - https://community.ebay.com/t5/Announcements/USPS-suspends-services-to-New-Zealand-effective-immediately/ba-p/32329898 New requirements for refurbished cell phones and smartphones - https://community.ebay.com/t5/Announcements/New-requirements-for-refurbished-cell-phones-and-smartphones/ba-p/32332311 USPS and FedEx Temporary Peak Rate Increase and Service Delays - https://community.ebay.com/t5/Announcements/Shipping-carrier-peak-season-rate-and-surcharge-update/ba-p/32303386 eBay Standard Envelope - https://pages.ebay.com/seller-center/shipping/ebay-standard-envelope.html USPS Holiday Shipping Deadlines - https://www.usps.com/holiday/holiday-shipping-dates.htm Flea Market Flipper - https://fleamarketflipper.com/ Flea Market Flipper on YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/c/FleaMarketFlipper   eBay Sellers Stores mentioned: Rob and Melissa's eBay Store “Amazing Views Orlando” - https://www.ebay.com/str/amazingviewsorlando   Recurring Links / Phone Numbers / Hashtags Mentioned: 888-723-4630 - Call in Line  eBay Seller News Announcements - ebay.com/announcements eBay Community - ebay.com/community eBay Weekly Community Chat - ebay.com/communitychat eBay Help - ebay.com/help/home eBay Meetups - ebay.com/meetups Managed Payments on eBay - ebay.com/payments eBay for Business Podcast - ebay.com/podcast eBay Seller Center - ebay.com/sellercenter eBay Seller Hub - ebay.com/sh eBay System Status - ebay.com/sts explore.ebay.com facebook.com/eBayForBusiness eBay for Business Podcast Listener Survey - https://connect.ebay.com/srv/survey/a/sellerops.podcast #ebaypodcast

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast
Packy McCormick - Founder of Not Boring Ep #49

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 44:03


Anatoly (00:09):Hey, folks. This is Anatoly and you're listening to The Solana Podcast, and today, I have with me, Packy McCormick, author of Not Boring. Hey, man. Good to have you.Packy McCormick (17:27):Good to be here. Thanks for having me on.Anatoly (00:21):So, You're an author and you're also an investor. How did you get into crypto?Packy McCormick (00:26):Yeah. So, I got into crypto back in 2013. I read Fred Wilson's blog post on investing in Coinbase, bought a bunch of Bitcoin, I think 38 Bitcoin, and then I went on a trip to Oktoberfest, and I felt bad about it, I had just quit my job, so I was like, "You know what, instead of spending money when I'm unemployed, let me just sell this stupid Bitcoin and I will pay for the trip."So, because of that, because of the pain of selling then, I avoided it until earlier this year, later last year, and really, really got back into it as I was talking to a couple companies that I was thinking about investing in and thinking about the intersection of crypto and the metaverse and how an open economy just fits so much better with that vision, since then, I've just gotten deeper, and deeper, and deeper down the rabbit hole.Anatoly (01:18):So, you held Bitcoin because you can sell it? That's just too big of a pain in the ass.Packy McCormick (01:24):I felt so bad about selling it and missing out. I think at the peak, it was like a two million dollar plus mistake, and so I was like, "You know what? I'm out of this for a little while."Anatoly (01:34):That's funny. What do you guys invest in?Packy McCormick (01:39):Yeah. So, I run a small 10 million dollar fund called Not Boring Capital, and we really invest across stages, across geographies, across verticals. For the first, I'd say, half of the fund, it was really traditional investments, I'd say for the second five million in the fund, it's been pushing up against the 20% non qualifying limit. I'm actually investing in my first Solana based project this week, which is yet to be announced, so can't talk about it, but something in the real estate space and something I'm super excited about. But doing as much crypto as I can in there, but I still think some use cases are perfectly well suited to crypto and some are really not. There's plenty of things in Web 2.0 that I'm super excited about as well, so really trying to balance investing across both.Anatoly (02:27):So, by traditional businesses, you mean like software internet based ones?Packy McCormick (02:32):Exactly.Anatoly (02:33):Cool. I mean, I've been in crypto for like the last... I can't remember... it feels like a decade, and I can't imagine what the world is like. So, what are people building?Packy McCormick (02:48):It's a good question. So, today, I talked to a company, for example, that is making it a lot easier for a restaurant to order the food that they need. So, right now, if you're a restaurant and you're ordering food, you're getting a bunch of PDFs from suppliers every week that aren't even searchable, and then you're going through the 6,000 items on there and picking something. So, there are still a bunch of these huge unsexy categories that are completely ripe.There's some security stuff that bridges into crypto, but there's one, again, stealth right now, but is also dealing with some Solana projects on the security side that I'm really, really excited in, but they're also securing Web 2.0 projects. There's some FinTech stuff I wrote about a company called Uni, yesterday. There's definitely a little bit of mental gymnastics that I have to do to be super bullish on FinTech and super bullish on crypto, but I really think adoption cycles are going to be super long and there are some really huge opportunities on that side too. I think everybody is trying to make the existing system that doesn't work, make it work better for people, and so I'm all for things, on either the Web 2.0 Side or in crypto, that make finance better for people.Anatoly (04:01):The mental gymnastics are curious about. I always thought that crypto is just part of this general story of software eating the world. Is that your take on it too?Packy McCormick (04:12):Totally. I mean, I wrote about Solana and I wrote this in the piece, but then I'm a maximalist-minimalist, and that's cross chain, but that's also I don't think crypto is going to eat everything yet or maybe ever. Just like on the internet, Web 3.0 is really about the dynamic interfaces where you could interact with each other. While there are companies like Facebook and Twitter and all of this social media companies that were more interactive, there were a ton of huge companies built during the Web 2.0 Era that weren't social media, that weren't real-time interactive at all, and I think the same thing will play out. I think you need to pick the best stack for whatever you're building at the time. And so I think we'll see a world where a lot of stuff moves to Web 3.0, And hopefully, even things that don't incorporate crypto become a little bit more liquid, a little bit more decentralized, a little bit better for people, but I don't think that crypto is the answer to every problem that the world has.Anatoly (05:05):So, when you look at a company that is building out the basic, "Let's convert PDFs to a searchable interface," that feels like something that should have happened 10 years ago, right, in your mind, at least?Packy McCormick (05:23):Totally. I mean, I think there have been attempts in that space actually, and some of them haven't worked. There have been different approaches. People have tried to do marketplaces and different things like that. I think what changed in that particular case is that over the past year, one, restaurants are super cognizant of cutting costs and getting profitability to the best possible spot, and so they're more willing to try new things. These people are taking an interesting approach without actually changing the interface that the restaurants interact with at all, they're just making everything behind it more powerful. So, things have been tried... there's people that are trying new approaches every day. I mean, I'd say 80%, because that is the literal max that I'm allowed to do is 20% crypto out of my fund, so 80% of my investments are non-crypto, and there's a bunch of stuff that's growing fast and is really exciting.I think the other interesting thing is that there are a bunch of companies that aren't going fully decentralized but are incorporating maybe a DAO in one aspect, where they have members who might be running something and want to vote on what that thing is coming up, or will incorporate NFTs in a particular part of the business where it makes sense. So, I think we'll see that blur a little bit more, but even within companies, they'll be doing some Web 2.0 Stuff and some Web 3.0 Stuff.Anatoly (06:32):So, I guess, in a way, you're bullish on non-crypto on the rest of the world as an investor?Packy McCormick (06:41):Yeah, my worldview is bullish tech and innovation, and I think if you're talking on the... I have a medical device company in the portfolio and a machine learning company that helps make sense of medical documents, and all that kind of stuff, I don't see a need yet for crypto, and maybe there's better decentralized storage of that information in the future, so it's not a centralized entity. And so over time, I think more, and more, and more of it will potentially become decentralized as the tools catch up, but for right now, that's just stuff that needs to improve.There's a company called NexHealth that I invested in that has really complex long term plan to first, sell SAAS into doctor's offices, use that to connect the EHRs, use that to build out APIs, use that to build out a platform, to ultimately try to make it easier for people to just hack on medical products, because right now it's such a pain in the ass to do anything in the medical space. I am super bullish on that kind of innovation because if you ask me what doctor I went to two years ago, I'd have no idea, if you asked me what my stats were, I'd have no idea. So, anybody fixing any of those kinds of things, I'm super bullish on.Anatoly (07:52):Man, I mean, the internet is basically 30 years old, right, at this point, and it's wild to think that we're still connecting just data...Packy McCormick (08:00):Totally.Anatoly (08:02):... data to format.Packy McCormick (08:03):It's why I'm going to be bullish on all of this. The internet is still early in terms of penetration, and then crypto is a tiny, tiny, tiny percentage of that, so there's just a lot of room for all of this to run.Anatoly (08:13):It feels then like everything is happening at the same time, we're still onboarding the world to the internet or now, part of the internet is being on boarded to crypto. Is that something that you first saw? What do you think about that?Packy McCormick (08:29):Yeah. I mean, I think most of the world... I think well over 50% nowadays is internet connected. I think it's just more and more things that were not internet connected are being tackled. I think a lot of the big obvious opportunities get taken and then people realize like, "Oh, shoot." I think I've seen, in the past week, a couple of companies that are making it easier for truckers to pay for gas and track those expenses. There's just all these big things that touch the physical world, where primitives needed to be built first, you needed banking as a service type things to make it really easy for companies to issue cards, to build it for specific use cases, so I think it's all just a matter of what primitives have been built and then what you can do on top of that. That's one of the reasons I'm so excited about crypto is because you and other folks in the space are building such interesting things for other people to build on top of.Anatoly (09:15):Since you have, I think, a more maybe practical or realistic view, since you're dealing with non-crypto projects that are trying to get revenue, right? That's generally the pitch to an investor.Packy McCormick (09:33):Yes. Over a long enough time horizon, some of them need to get revenue.Anatoly (09:36):What do you see in crypto itself as promising to use crypto in a way that actually increases revenue for that business? What are those things?Packy McCormick (09:48):Yeah. I don't know. One of the fun things about exploring both sides is that I really try, when I look at any crypto project, to understand what business physics laws it's enhancing. Businesses are businesses because people buy things the same way all over the place or people like to make money. People are the same, and I think all of this comes down to people, obviously. Solana comes down to how many developers build on top of it and how many people use that. And so obviously, I think one of the big important things is the ability to build network effects by giving people ownership. And I think the idea of using ownership in crypto to even have negative customer acquisition costs, to be able to essentially make the price of something negative to be able to get adoption, to use crypto tools for retention and network effects I think is one of the big things that excites me.I think it's also just moving way, way, way faster. I mean, look at Ethereum and Solana, right? Ethereum, strong network effects, people building on top of it, and then Solana comes in and looks like the same chart but faster. And so you can get these network effects, but then somebody else will come in with network effects that are even faster, and I think it's going to be interesting to see how those types of things play out.Anatoly (11:05):Negative acquisition cost is a really interesting topic because that's basically yield farming, right, like DeFi? The foundation of DeFi, how I get users is, a lot of these projects give away their coin. Do you think those patterns is something that you're going to start seeing in traditional businesses, like AMC popcorn, if you buy AMC stock is some form of liquidity mining, right?Packy McCormick (11:39):I think the challenging part, right, is that people want either money pretty immediately or they want ownership in something, and it's really hard for Web 2.0 Companies to give away ownership, there's a ton of paperwork involved. There are platforms that are trying to make that a little bit easier, but it's still really hard for them to give away ownership the way that, if you're a DeFi protocol, you can give away your token to attract users in the beginning.So, maybe there will be some things that Web 2.0 Companies steal and bring over from crypto, but I do think that's one of the uniquely beautiful things about it, is that it's this... I mean, we'll see. It's still so early, right? But that it's this beautiful thing where because you're early, you're able to earn more, and then because you were there, you actually support the network and make the network more secure and all that. So, there's actual justification for it, but it's just that shift in who gets the ownership of things, which I think is kind of beautiful.Anatoly (12:35):Do you think that the Web 2.0 properties, or like Facebook, Twitter, that those are at risk for being disintermediated by crypto?Packy McCormick (12:44):Yes. On a long enough time horizon, absolutely. I don't know what it looks like, and I think the early attempts to do it have been a bit skeuomorphic, and that's one of the things that interest me here is that BitClout was, I guess, interesting, but it was Twitter with coins, and I don't think that the next social network will look like Twitter with coins, I think it will look like something that is maybe wallet first, or maybe in the 3D world, or something that looks different but then achieves a very similar end. And so I think, yes, 100% they're at risk, but I don't think that they're at risk from something that looks like a clone but adds a token.Anatoly (13:23):Man, I love that word, skeuomorphic, because that's how I started thinking about it as I'm talking to a bunch of projects that are trying to shove crypto into what is a Web 2.0 thing, a Web 2.0 product. Do you as an investor see that as a red flag or like, "Okay, maybe this might work and you should try it, but clearly, you're going to have to iterate away from it"?Packy McCormick (13:46):I think it comes down to what you're trying to do. I talked to an investor who is way smarter than I am about this the other day, and she was like, "You know what, actually for me, because I invested in the series A and beyond, if one of my portfolio companies came to me and said that they're going to incorporate crypto at this point, that would be a red flag because that means that they don't have product-market fit and they're trying to figure out how to get product-market fit by doing something else shiny." There are other projects, like there was something that I was talking to her that was totally Web 2.0 Based but that asked people for feedback, they were having challenges with retention, they were asking users to submit information, they were thinking about how to reward them, and for something like that, particularly when it's so early, I do think that adding crypto into the project makes a ton of sense.If you're trying to incentivize contribution and improve retention, crypto is an amazing tool for that for the right type of community. So, I really think it depends on what type of product it is, and some things I think skeuomorphic might work in some cases where you're ripping out an internal reward point and replacing it with crypto, I think that can make sense, but when you're trying to just shove money into something to see if you can attract more users, that's when I feel like there's a bit of a problem.Anatoly (14:59):So, Reddit Coins, do you think that's going to work?Packy McCormick (15:02):I mean, they're at least early and I feel like they're such an interesting community of people, and the idea of karma has existed in Reddit for a while, so maybe making that a little bit more fungible and exchangeable is interesting. I mean, there's a bunch of behavioral economics on the idea that if you just pay people for stuff, you actually fuck up incentives in a bunch of different ways that are hard to predict, so it could be tough. When you actually assign a dollar value to something, you make people think about it in terms of the dollar value, and they're like, "Wait, I just spent a day moderating the subreddit for $1? Are you kidding me?" So, I think you need to get that part right, right? Where you can give them a million karma points and it doesn't matter, but then it becomes $1 then there's an issue? So, I think people need to be wary of that, but certainly where there are internal scoreboards, giving people a way to actually monetize that I think is interesting.Anatoly (15:56):Have you looked into play-to-earn stuff?Packy McCormick (16:00):Yeah.Anatoly (20:39):Okay.Packy McCormick (16 :02):I wrote a piece on Axie. I think it's so fascinating.Anatoly (16:05):I'm terrified of a world where everything we do is like, "You got to do this to get your 20 extra cents on your dollar." Right? It just sounds like a nightmare.Packy McCormick (16:15):I know. I mean, I am of the mind that dystopia is probably overstated because people have to opt in at every gate, and so I've had conversations with people where they're like, "Isn't it wild that we'd be spending time in the metaverse? Isn't that dystopian?" And then you think about how we spend a lot of our time right now, we're in a two dimensional screen. Wouldn't it be more fun if there was an immersive environment that we were interacting with here, and would we just continue to choose to do the 2D version until the 3D version got realistic and fun enough that we made the shift? And so there's going to be those gates at all times where people can opt in or not.A lot of the people playing Axie right now are in the Philippines, were unemployed, thanks in large part due to COVID, and so their options were, "Don't do this and figure out some other way to make money or start playing this game, that you might be playing anyway, and actually make money while doing it." So, that's an incredible option that people have, but you also don't see a ton of people in the West flocking to Axie to make a couple of bucks because the trade-off doesn't make sense for them. And so I think the trade-offs have to make sense for people but everybody has agency, to some extent, and will opt in to the things that make sense for them.Anatoly (17:29):When I played Ultima Online, I bought digital items in that game on eBay with a cashier's check. So, I get this idea that you can get really into a game.Packy McCormick (17:41):Totally. And then you stop playing Ultima Online and that money is just wasted, right? And so the idea that you could easily transfer that item to the next generation or person that wants to go all in on the game is nice, it means that you're accumulating something while you play. I think, over time, those experiences will fade more and more into the background and it will feel less like play-to-earn and will probably just be play-and-earn, but there's going to be a transition period where you have to just be bold about it and the play-to-earn piece has to be front and center, but I don't know.We can go to deep down the philosophical rabbit hole on all of this, but there is a point at which, at some point in the future... and I know this is debatable... but at some point in the future, we're not going to have to actually work to eat, to shelter ourselves, to have clothes, all of that, and so what do you do that provides meaning, right? I don't think we're going to evolve into a world where we feel comfortable not having to work for anything, and so people will find new ways to make meaning.Anatoly (18:47):We're going to be NPCs in each other's games.Packy McCormick (18:51):Seriously.Anatoly (18:53):How much do you pay attention to the regulatory side of it? Do you think World of Warcraft is going to have to file W-2s?Packy McCormick (19:06):Man, I do not envy the IRS or the SEC trying to keep up with... I do this all day, every day. I'm fascinated by it and I can't keep up with everything. There's going to, obviously, need to be a total paradigm shift in the way that this stuff is tracked and managed, even taxes. I am going to figure out, at the end of the year, whatever the best tax software that I should use to make sense of everything that I've done all across Web 3.0 This year, but if I didn't, the chances that somebody sitting in the IRS for my small potatoes amount of money is actually going to be able to go and figure out what I did is minuscule. So, I don't know how they're going to do it, but there needs to be a common sense way that doesn't end up in just this constant clash.Anatoly (19:54):Yeah. All my Degen Ape trades.Packy McCormick (24:36):Seriously. I mean, there's a thread that went viral on Twitter a couple weeks ago that was someone being like, "Hey, by the way, did you know essentially that when you buy an NFT, you're also selling your coins at a game and you're going to have to pay taxes on that?" There's going to be a lot of people who get hit pretty hard at the end of the year.Anatoly (20:15):Yeah. I'm curious how that's going to play out. That's wild. I mean, like one of the investments should be like, "Here's tax software for all your crypto shit." That seems obvious one.Packy McCormick (20:28):Yeah, there are a few people working on that. I mean, the other one that I really want to see... I had mentioned this 20% limit. So, if you're not an RAA, if you're not a registered investment advisor and you manage over X dollars, you can only buy 20% non qualifying, and crypto is included in that. I really want to see someone build RAA in a box, and RAA means that you need a chief compliance officer and you need all this stuff. And so somebody who makes that easier to do and easier to set up crypto funds I think is going to make a killing as well.Anatoly (20:58):I mean, that seems like something that the smart contracts should be doing, right? If you're investing purely... Most of that compliance is just transparency, right? It's like, "Am I doing the thing that I said I was going to do?"Packy McCormick (21:10):Totally. But some of it is, "Is there a person here looking over what I'm doing?" The rules are written for a world in which it makes sense for a person to look over something instead of computers talking to each other. So, there's going to be a transition period there, but over time, yes, it makes a lot more sense as a smart contract, and I'm interested to see.Are you familiar with Syndicate protocol?Anatoly (21:33):I'm not.Packy McCormick (21:34):So, Syndicate protocol is I think mostly on Ethereum at this point, but it makes it easy to set up investment clubs, SPVs, a bunch of other things, and so brings a lot of the group investing activities on chain. Is there anything similar on the Solana side?Anatoly (21:50):I don't know yet. The network exploded in terms of people building on it to the point that I can't track.Packy McCormick (21:57):That's awesome. That's a milestone.Anatoly (22:00):Yeah, that's a milestone. It's just like, "Pooh," so now I'm like, "Okay, go back into the weeds, back into optimizations."Packy McCormick (22:08):Yeah. Sorry to turn the mic on you, but I'm very curious. How do you balance your time right now?Anatoly (22:14):Poorly, I would say. I think there was an effort to get the word out to as many developers out there that this is how you build stuff and these are the reference implementations, and now that that's moving on its own, I almost feel like me putting energy there is going to have such a small amount of gain. So, I think of it in value against replacement terms, which is a very dumb engineer perspective, or maybe that's a pretty good one. I don't know.Packy McCormick (22:48):No. I mean, if you can view yourself from a remove like that. I mean, that's the goal of running a company or an organization or a protocol is, "How can I replace myself in as many different spots as possible?" But are you in the Discords? Are you getting Degen on some of these projects and stuff?Anatoly (23:07):I used to be more Discord just telling devs, "This is where the doc started, this is how you unblock that compiler error or whatever." I was in there, and now there's enough people doing that, I'm like, "Okay, I'm useless here." So, in the early days of Metaplex, helping out people set up their Heroku servers or whatever, I spent a little bit of time doing that, but then all of a sudden, our engineers took off with it.I'm curious how you think about DAOs? Are these truly amorphous blobs where nobody knows anyone else and there's some voting mechanism that you trust, or as normal people actually that do this stuff, it feels to me that they are humans that are all know each other and they're coordinating with software?Packy McCormick (23:54):Yeah. There's been a meme going around, I feel like this week, again, on Twitter, where people have been talking about like, "Oh, it's impossible to get fired by a DAO. Why not just get hired by a DAO and then don't do anything because who's going to fire you?" I love the idea, and I love the fact that crypto makes it possible to organize and incentivize huge groups of people across the world and get them to work in the same direction, I also think there's going to be a ton of challenges.People are very used, for the past at least couple 100 years since the dawn of the corporation, people are very used to working in hierarchical structures where there's somebody making a decision. And so I think there will be a balance that gets struck in a lot of cases, like delegation I think will get more, and more, and more popular. And ideally, there's some projects being worked on that I'm excited about where people's on-chain contribution and activity and resume is almost tracked, and maybe you give more power to the people who've contributed the most and proven expertise in a certain area, and all of that. So, I think a lot of things need to be worked out there.I think that we're in the stage now, frankly, where a lot of DAOs will not do as well as a centralized thing would have done, but then some DAOs will just do this crazy emergent stuff that never would have been possible in a normal structure that was a little bit more hierarchical. So, I think we're in the, let 1,000 flowers bloom, phase of DAOs right now where emergence will produce some really interesting stuff, and then emergence will also produce some total failures, and we'll see where it all shakes out.Anatoly (25:25):Corporations have politics, right? There's definitely politics in large corpse, and I feel like small DAOs have politics, and that's typically not true of a startup.Packy McCormick (25:39):Yeah, I think that's true. Although it can happen faster to startup, but the interesting thing that happens at a startup is, if the CEO allows it to be political, it can get political really quickly. And so it's interesting, in the DAO structure, when you don't have a "CEO," that either the community ethos will be away from politics and you'll get shunned and banned or whatever for politicking, or there's no one to say, "Don't do that," in which case, it can get out of hand really quickly. So, if you have a bad CEO, it's probably better to be a DAO, and if you have a really good CEO, there are advantages to having somebody making the decisions.I'm also fascinated to see... and I don't know if you've seen anything on this side yet... but can a DAO build products that are as good as something with a little bit more centralized control? Like products are traditionally made by a visionary, and then a team, who has a clear roadmap and all of those types of things, and is it possible to do that in a more decentralized way?I mean, even Solana itself, one of the things that attracts me about the project, and again, not a decentralization maxi by any stretch of the imagination, is that you were involved, right? And when there were code errors, you were getting in there, you were telling people how to fix them and all of that. And I've talked to a bunch of people, since I read that piece, who were building things on Solana, who site that as one of the reasons that they like building on Solana, is that the team is there to help when there are errors and help direct them towards best practices. So, I don't know. I think something like that model is probably going to succeed.Anatoly (27:18):I can only get blamed myself.Packy McCormick (27:21):Exactly.Anatoly (27:23):At the end of the day, yeah. Balaji had this quote that I've used it a bunch of times, that decentralization is not the absence of leadership but it's the abundance of leadership, and I love it. I also feel like that because of Bitcoin and it's like history. People started assuming that disorganization also was required for decentralization, which I think is bullshit too.Packy McCormick (27:52):Yeah. How do you view DAO versus social token, or I guess more just governance versus upside sharing?Anatoly (27:59):I think tokens are social networks, almost first, and then anything else later, because any community, it's all contracts. All this open source software is reusable. I can take Uniswap, fork it, and then stick some random token on it, and it's as good as Uniswap. You cannot tell me that it's worse in any way, right? It's the same thing, right?Packy McCormick (28:27):Someone should do that.Anatoly (28:29):Yeah. And then that community takes it in a different product direction, right, for whatever reason. I think that really fast fail is probably the most important part of decentralization. Anybody can fork you and then just take it in a different direction and form a community around it.Packy McCormick (28:50):I agree. Which project was it that Justin Sun tried to take over and then everybody just stopped using it?Anatoly (28:50):Steem.Packy McCormick (28:55):Yeah.Anatoly (28:57):And that is, I think, part of the beauty of the space, right, is you can only be a benevolent dictator. As soon as you lose the benevolent part, they're like, "Well, everything's open. F off."Packy McCormick (29:12):It's amazing.Anatoly (29:13):Yeah. Did you follow the SUSHI saga?Packy McCormick (29:19):I didn't follow in real-time. I went back and looked at it after the fact, but I would not consider myself a SUSHI expert.Anatoly (29:26):Do you think that we're going to see these communities stick around for the long haul, like Uniswap, etc?Packy McCormick (29:33):I think that is the billion dollar, trillion dollar, whatever number you want to put on it, question. I mean, I was alluding to it before with these network effects being replaced by things that pick up network effects even faster and faster. I think that's the blessing and the curse that I was talking about. You could remove every single person working on Facebook except for the person who made sure that the servers were up, and people would keep using it for a long, long time. If the people disappeared from Sushiswap or Uniswap or wherever, it just fades away and they move on to the next thing, and that takes off. So, I think virality in crypto has been proven. You can get viral really, really quick. Defensibility over a very long time horizon I think is still TBD.Anatoly (30:19):Where does defensibility come from in Facebook, in your mind?Packy McCormick (30:24):In Facebook, Facebook has a clear network effects, one where I guess if the people on the network decided to stop using it, it would go away, but there's not a clear place that you would all go when you have... Maybe there's switching costs too because you have your whole network mapped, and they won't actually let it be portable. To your point, you can fork anything... you should be able to fork the relationship graph and all of that over time as people build new mechanics to make that happen, and when you can just bring your whole relationship graph with you across Web3, then maybe you just all go to the next place, or maybe there's not even a place, and it is just that your wallet, at some point, keeps track of all the connections that you have, so maybe the wallet is the central point where a lot of the value accrues and the thing that makes everything portable, but I'm not exactly sure. What do you think?Anatoly (31:22):When I first saw Facebook, I thought, "This is a shitty news group. I can run my own mail server and ask my friends." And then you realize that normal people don't want to run their own mail servers or news groups, but you centralize around convenience. Where things centralize around convenience in crypto has, for me, been really tough to pin down. NFTs especially are a really good example of people jumping from one set to another but still maintaining both, right? They're able to be in multiple places at the same time.Anatoly (36:44):I can be a Degen Ape and like a Monkey MBS member at the same time.Packy McCormick (32:12):Where do you think that ends up? Where do you think people end up centralizing, or do they not?Anatoly (32:18):I'm not sure. This is like, again, a trillion dollar question. I feel like if we get to, three, 400 million people self custody with wallets that are doing stuff, we'll start seeing those patterns of like, "Okay, this is like the Facebook, it's a social graph or the... I don't know... the super connected now," something.Packy McCormick (32:42):Yeah. I wrote about this a couple weeks ago, I wrote a piece called the Interface Phase, and it was a little bit like a high kid post where I was like, "What are the interfaces going to be?" But just the fact that the first internet needed Netscape and needed a graphical interface, Web 2.0 needed things like Digg and Facebook that were interactive for that kind of capability, the read-write interface to really be there, and I don't think Web3 has gotten there yet. I do think that either a wallet based thing, and I don't know what that looks like, and I'm not smart enough to figure out what that looks like, or the kind of metaverse. And I think it's such an interesting mistake of history or just a coincidence of history that the tech for the metaverse and Web 3.0 Are peaking at the same time, but a world in which...One of the things I think crypto does well is give physical-ish characteristics to digital things, and so I think a interface that makes that clear will have a lot of value in just making a lot of the stuff that feels a little more ethereal feel more real and tangible, and actually, there will be physical places that people meet up and all that.Anatoly (38:28):So, I think what's interesting about crypto is that it's more like Ultima Online. When I was playing the game, I got a mental model of the map and the ownership of those items because it was persistent. I would go to the thing and I would change something and then come back and it was still there, and your brain, I think, just rapidly just plugs it into the rest of the stuff that it interacts with. If you got a lot of humans all doing this together, I think they'll start forgetting that it's nothing more than a bunch of computers.Packy McCormick (34:23):Totally. I mean it's interesting. I forget the name of the book, but there's a book about the memory competitions and the world memory championships, and the way that they memorize things is by putting different objects throughout a house and then walking through that house, So, we are, I think, a lot better at memorizing things and grokking things spatially than we are... and maybe this is just me talking as a non technical person, but just picturing computer networks without some physical reference point.Anatoly (34:54):I don't have as good of a mental model of space crypto Twitter or like social networks. It's not a map to me in my mind. But with something like experiments like DeFi land and stuff, I think that actually might bridge that because of this ownership thing. And I don't still think it's the fact that I can modify stuff and come back and see it and feel that I'm doing it.Packy McCormick (35:20):Totally. Yeah, people like building, and showing progress, and all of that. I'm going to turn the mic again. How do you view Solana at this point in terms of DeFi versus the cultural side of things or the metaverse side of things?Anatoly (35:37):We don't. I think, to us, DeFi was always I thought was an important part because you look at any kind of markets, NASDAQ, those are the obvious ones, "Oh, yeah, that's probably going to be on some blockchain," but advertisement, right? It's like Google Search shows you a page, they take your data, sell it on an Ad Exchange, and that to market, that's centralized right now, how do you disintermediate it? Oh, you can do that with cryptography, right? And a replicated censorship resistant database. That's it.You can break those things down into marketplaces and remove the middleman. And that, I think, is how we think about it, is like, where does that make sense? And culture NFTs are I feel like that non skeuomorphic social networks. It's not somebody that stuck Twitter with coins, these organically sprung up, right? It's like lodges in the whatever, 1700s, like I'm part of this Masonic Lodge or this club or whatever, right? Now, I'm Degen Ape or whatever.Packy McCormick (36:57):Totally. And right now, I guess, that often manifests itself in Discord where people are hanging out. I've had this conversation with people before in this debate. Do you think there needs to be a decentralized Discord where this lives or where do you think all of this ends up living?Anatoly (37:12):I don't think so. Like a year ago, I thought somebody needs to build a decentralized Twitter, a decentralized Instant Messaging, and the working mechanics of it, being decentralized or on chain, don't change the social impact of it. You're still talking to people. Why does it matter where you talk to them, right? Who cares?Packy McCormick (37:34):Totally.Anatoly (37:37):It's like, I think, stuff where you can start making connected modifications of the same state, that mental model of like, "Hey, we're all doing this thing over here." That becomes a place and that's where people actually do things, but here's where they talk about it.Packy McCormick (37:56):Yeah. And I don't think you can find a more minimally extractive corporation than Discord, and they make less dollars per user than anybody.Anatoly (38:06):Yeah, they're pretty awesome. Also, yeah, the high fidelity audio and stuff like that I think is pretty cool. I think they built it for gamers.Packy McCormick (38:19):Yeah. It's so interesting, and I'm probably going to write about Discord at some point here too, but I've written something called The Great Online Game before, which is essentially we're all just playing this big video game across the internet. And so it's really funny that Discord, which was built for gamers, is where all of this activity is... If you're playing a big video game and the chat app designed for video games, it makes sense as the place that people go.Anatoly (38:43):Yeah. Crypto and the internet is... at least the internet part of crypto is very much a big video game.Packy McCormick (38:49):Exactly.Anatoly (38:50):Are you investing mostly in the US, US companies or all over the place?Packy McCormick (38:54):I'm investing mostly in the US but have done a few in India, I've done Sweden, I've done Canada, very open to doing anywhere on the world.Anatoly (39:06):Do you feel like there's been a shift towards everything becoming Silicon Valley, that it doesn't really matter anymore at this point?Packy McCormick (39:13):The internet is Silicon Valley. A more amorphous idea is Silicon Valley at this point, but I'm in New York, I'm probably 30 minutes away. I'm in Park Slope and the crypto hub has become Williamsburg, and I talk to all those people all the time, and I never take the 30 minute trip over to Williamsburg because I have Twitter, and I have Discord, and I'm pretty much right there with them. So, I don't think physical place matters nearly as much. Gathering in physical places is awesome. I think the idea of conferences, and quarterly team meetups, and all of that kind of stuff is absolutely going to explode. There's a really fun thing about only knowing somebody on the internet and then meeting them in person and feeling like you've known each other for a long time, but I don't think the physical place where you all live all the time matters that much.Anatoly (40:03):Yeah. I think what's weird is like I have a sneaking suspicion that the remote work worlds, everybody's working remote is actually going to mean more people travel and get together.Packy McCormick (40:17):And it's not just going to be like FaceTime and waiting around the office and sitting. When you're together, you're together, and then when you're working, you're heads down working, and I kind of like that.Anatoly (40:26):Do you think people are more efficient that way or is that the natural state?Packy McCormick (40:30):It depends how many Discords. Before this call, I was supposed to be writing and I've gotten obsessed with the Wanderers NFT projects, so I just bought another Wanderer and then was trying to figure out how to display it in my cyber gallery. So, I think there's not somebody looking over my shoulder, so in that sense, maybe it allows you to get a little bit more distracted. But I also think a lot of things coming together at the same time, more and more people are responsible for themselves, and so if I don't work now, then I'm working all weekend, and I have to get the same stuff done anyway. And so I do think that's, hopefully, the natural state of things, is that people are allowed to get their shit done when they want to.Anatoly (41:12):Are NFTs what you're looking at mostly in crypto? Is that the most exciting part?Packy McCormick (41:16):NFTs are, I think, very exciting to me. My first internship was on an energy trading desk. I should want to get into DeFi and I feel like I'm going to get wrecked unless I can spend all of my time getting into DeFi, so I've largely steered clear. I do think that NFTs are super interesting for the reasons that you suggested, and I think that they are a little bit like a social network. I think it's going to be really fascinating to see how these things evolve and the worlds that get built around them. And they're the most tangible crypto thing out there, right? You have an item. I like these Wanderers because there's audio, and they're these eight second clips, and so the richer that you can make them, I think the better, and over time, more, and more, and more things will just be ownable digitally, and I think that's very cool.Anatoly (42:09):I love the trend of like 2DR first, like really low res, because it's like a forcing function in creativity, right? It's actually hard to make something look good with that low fidelity.Packy McCormick (42:22):Totally.Anatoly (42:25):So, I'm a fan of watching the space self, almost evolve, right? This is definitely going to get better, right? You're going to have full scale renders with 3D models and high production stuff in a few years, but it's exciting to see what it is now, right?Packy McCormick (42:42):Totally. I have another portfolio company called Arco that's doing... essentially, it's trying to replace the design software that companies use. So, Autodesk has Revit to do 3D modeling, they're doing the Figma version of that, but then could you just take this physical building that somebody's designed for the real world, turn it into an NFT and let somebody bring it into the digital world? I would love to own the Chrysler Building and then bring it into my world.Anatoly (43:10):Skeuomorphism.Packy McCormick (43:14):I thought about that too when I was trying to write about the interfaces, I was like, "Why are we even thinking about buildings and worlds at all? If you don't have to follow the rules of physics, then why do you?" But I do think, through our conversation earlier about maps, reference points are also important, so you need to, one step at a time, go away from things that people are familiar with.Anatoly (43:34):Yeah. Cool, man. So, this is a really awesome conversation. Thank you so much for being on the show and really getting into it.Packy McCormick (43:43):100%. This was fun. Thank you.

Golden Age of Cardboard | A vintage sports card podcast
On The Fly w/Mike & Ty | Buying Large Collections | eBay Viewer Decline | More...

Golden Age of Cardboard | A vintage sports card podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 43:14


Special Episode -- ON THE FLY WATCH ON YOUTUBE: https://youtu.be/PNlMEWReY20 Bench Clear Media Network --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/goldenageofcardboard/support

BreakerCulture Podcast
On The Fly w/Mike & Ty | Buying Large Collections | eBay Viewer Decline | More...

BreakerCulture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 43:14


]SHOW LESS** Sorry for the crappy audio quality. We were having a hard time with connection today ** Welcome to ON THE FLY with Mike & Ty. Enjoy our second episode and PLEASE leave us comments/feedback for future episodes. SPONSORED BY The Card Hedge: http://www.benchclear.us/cardhedge Bench Clear Media Production Check out Bench Clear at: http://www.benchclear.us

The Untrained Eye
#175 - Lumbersexual

The Untrained Eye

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 88:37


Check out our sponsors! www.sleepterrorclothing.com Use promo code 'untrained' for 15% off your first order! www.ohfishl.com Use promo code 'untrained' to get 25% off your first order! - This week, should you be exiled because of your opinion, That 90s Show is destine for failure(but hopefully not), DJ is not good at quickly running down the IC shows or reading the word dynasty, some late 2000s trivia, and MORE! Thank you for listening to the show! We love you! -Beth and DJ - Our recommendations this week: Sheldrick Wildlife Trust: Haven for Elephants & Rhinos Shiloh Dynasty [1 Hour Mix] - Small business we support: @brickbodykids you can DM on Instagram to buy direct or find them on Ebay dot com the website https://www.ebay.com/usr/brickbodykids - DJ also does a solo podcast called Dragging The Table - We are a proud part of the ⭕Inner Circle Podcast Network⭕ Visit www.innercirclepn.com to subscribe, follow, and listen to all the shows! - Follow the link to these shows to check out our appearances on them! The All Bro's #NoOffense Married AF Drinks With Larry The Inner Circle Presents: The Winners Circle NE Podcast - Wanna send us something? Now you can! Our mailing address is: The Untrained Eye P.O. Box 6225 Sun City Center, FL 33571 - If you love our intro and outro music, please visit Cullah.com Don't forget to follow us on Instagram and Twitter We have stickers and buttons! DM our socials or send an email to untrainedeyepod@gmail.com and we'll send you some

Manage 2 Win
#140 – Hype Trumps Marketing

Manage 2 Win

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 38:08


Michael F. Schein teaches that hype is more ethical and effective than traditional or digital marketing.  Really? David, our host, discusses Michael's conclusions on this episode of the Manage 2 Win podcast as we resume our show after a three-month break. It's FUN to be back!  Michael is a great guest.  He shares tips from his new book, The Hype Handbook: 12 Indispensable Success Secrets From the World's Greatest Propagandists, Self-Promoters, Cult Leaders, Mischief Makers, and Boundary Breakers, which is published by McGraw Hill.  Find it at your favorite bookseller. Michael is also the founder and president of MicroFame Media, a company that specializes in making consultants and coaches famous in their fields. Some of his clients have included eBay, Magento, The Medici Group, University of Pennsylvania, Gordon College, University of California Irvine, United Methodist Publishing House, Ricoh, LinkedIn, and Citrix. His writing has appeared in Fortune, Forbes, Inc., Psychology Today, and Huffington Post, and he is a speaker for international audiences spanning from the northeastern United States to the southeastern coast of China.  Did China learn hype from Michael?  No comment… Don't miss this discussion to learn how you can get new clients by promoting yourself and/or your company differently.

Bags & Boards Podcast
Hot10 Honorable Mentions Ft. GemMintCollectibles 9.7

Bags & Boards Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 8:27


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Regie Collects
Are ULTRA RICH Buying Up Collectibles

Regie Collects

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 63:06


COMICS TODAY!  TOPIC: In this live stream we will explore the possibility that ultra-high net worth investors are buying up collectibles. Is it happening? And, if so, what might the impact be? Motley Fool: https://www.fool.com/research/high-ne...  Become a COMIC SWOLDIER to get exclusive content and other things! https://www.patreon.com/regiecollects 100K Comic Collection: https://youtu.be/bXCMmVSPL7s Need to send books to CGC or to be graded? Check out this playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Confused by comic terms? Check out this playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Enjoy comic book hunting videos? Check out this playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

Bags & Boards Podcast
HOT10 Back Issue Countdown Ft. Gem Mint Collectibles 9.2

Bags & Boards Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 15:05


❤️ Mystery Mail Call (our comic book subscription service) https://www.comictom101.com/ (US ONLY) ❤️ Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: https://bit.ly/2PfSSSY

Bags & Boards Podcast
HOT10 Honorable Mentions List Ft. GemMintCollectibles 8.31

Bags & Boards Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 8:40


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Geeked Out Collecting
(Part 2) Talking Pokenomics and the State of the Hobby w/ Jake

Geeked Out Collecting

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 69:52


Get on the waiting list for early access to CardFolio!You can find me here:IG:@geeked_out_collectingTwitch:/feliwankenobiWebsite:www.GeekedOutCollecting.comFree Profit Calculator for eBay: www.profitcalculator.online/profitCalculator.htmlFree BGS Calculator: www.profitcalculator.online/bgscalc.htmlPatreon: www.patreon.com/Geekedoutcollecting

Bags & Boards Podcast
T10 10.1 2 1

Bags & Boards Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 17:11


Mystery Mail Call (our comic book subscription service) https://www.comictom101.com/ (US ONLY) Follow Shattered Comic's

The Tim Ferriss Show
#535: General Stanley McChrystal — Mastering Risk: A User's Guide

The Tim Ferriss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 90:13


General Stanley McChrystal — Mastering Risk: A User's Guide | Brought to you by Kettle & Fire high quality, tasty, and conveniently packaged bone broths; Eight Sleep's Pod Pro Cover sleeping solution for dynamic cooling and heating; and ShipStation shipping software. More on all three below.General Stanley McChrystal (@stanmcchrystal) was called “one of America's greatest warriors” by Secretary of Defense Robert Gates. Having held leadership and staff positions in the Army Special Forces, Army Rangers, 82nd Airborne Division, the XVIII Army Airborne Corp, and the Joint Staff, McChrystal became commander of JSOC in 2003, responsible for leading the nation's deployed military counterterrorism efforts around the globe. His leadership is credited with the 2003 capture of Saddam Hussein and the 2006 locating and killing of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, the leader of al-Qaeda in Iraq. In June 2009, McChrystal received his fourth star and assumed command of all international forces in Afghanistan.General McChrystal founded the McChrystal Group in January 2011, an advisory services firm that helps businesses challenge the hierarchical “command and control” approach to organizational management.He is a senior fellow at Yale University's Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, where he teaches a course on leadership, and he is the author of the bestselling leadership books My Share of the Task: A Memoir; Team of Teams: New Rules of Engagement for a Complex World; and Leaders: Myth and Reality. His new book is Risk: A User's Guide. He is also the co-host (with former Navy SEAL Chris Fussell) of the No Turning Back podcast, where they explore the future of leadership and teams with the world's most consequential leaders.Please enjoy!This episode is brought to you by Kettle & Fire! Kettle & Fire makes one of the highest quality, tastiest, and most conveniently packaged bone broths on the market, and I have a huge collection of their broths on my kitchen counter for easy access. I've been a fan ever since 2015, when podcast guest and ketogenesis expert Dr. Dominic D'Agostino introduced me to the company. Their products fit me and my lifestyle extremely well: bone broth is a great ‘one-stop shop' for low-carb, high-protein nutrition, and bone broth makes an excellent lower-calorie breakfast that requires no prep.It's one of the simplest ways to get many of the nutrients I need, and I simply feel better when broth is a regular part of my diet. You can save 25% off your order by going to KettleAndFire.com/Tim and using code TIM at checkout.*This episode is also brought to you by ShipStation. Do you sell stuff online? Then you know what a pain the shipping process is. ShipStation was created to make your life easier. Whether you're selling on eBay, Amazon, Shopify, or over 100 other popular selling channels, ShipStation lets you access all of your orders from one simple dashboard, and it works with all of the major shipping carriers, locally and globally, including FedEx, UPS, and USPS. Tim Ferriss Show listeners get to try ShipStation free for 60 days by using promo code TIM. There's no risk, and you can start your free trial without even entering your credit card info. Just visit ShipStation.com, click on the microphone at the top of the homepage, and type in TIM!*This episode is also brought to you by Eight Sleep! Eight Sleep's Pod Pro Cover is the easiest and fastest way to sleep at the perfect temperature. It pairs dynamic cooling and heating with biometric tracking to offer the most advanced (and user-friendly) solution on the market. Simply add the Pod Pro Cover to your current mattress and start sleeping as cool as 55°F or as hot as 110°F. It also splits your bed in half, so your partner can choose a totally different temperature.And now, my dear listeners—that's you—can get $250 off the Pod Pro Cover. Simply go to EightSleep.com/Tim or use code TIM. *If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests. I also love reading the reviews!For show notes and past guests, please visit tim.blog/podcast.Sign up for Tim's email newsletter (“5-Bullet Friday”) at tim.blog/friday.For transcripts of episodes, go to tim.blog/transcripts.Discover Tim's books: tim.blog/books.Follow Tim:Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferrissFacebook: facebook.com/timferriss YouTube: youtube.com/timferrissPast guests on The Tim Ferriss Show include Jerry Seinfeld, Hugh Jackman, Dr. Jane Goodall, LeBron James, Kevin Hart, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Jamie Foxx, Matthew McConaughey, Esther Perel, Elizabeth Gilbert, Terry Crews, Sia, Yuval Noah Harari, Malcolm Gladwell, Madeleine Albright, Cheryl Strayed, Jim Collins, Mary Karr, Maria Popova, Sam Harris, Michael Phelps, Bob Iger, Edward Norton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Neil Strauss, Ken Burns, Maria Sharapova, Marc Andreessen, Neil Gaiman, Neil de Grasse Tyson, Jocko Willink, Daniel Ek, Kelly Slater, Dr. Peter Attia, Seth Godin, Howard Marks, Dr. Brené Brown, Eric Schmidt, Michael Lewis, Joe Gebbia, Michael Pollan, Dr. Jordan Peterson, Vince Vaughn, Brian Koppelman, Ramit Sethi, Dax Shepard, Tony Robbins, Jim Dethmer, Dan Harris, Ray Dalio, Naval Ravikant, Vitalik Buterin, Elizabeth Lesser, Amanda Palmer, Katie Haun, Sir Richard Branson, Chuck Palahniuk, Arianna Huffington, Reid Hoffman, Bill Burr, Whitney Cummings, Rick Rubin, Dr. Vivek Murthy, Darren Aronofsky, and many more.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

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