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Type of soda, manufactured by PepsiCo

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Latest podcast episodes about Pepsi

Talking Codswallop
195. Andre Daniels

Talking Codswallop

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 138:23


This week James and Gemma sit down with Andre Daniels who is a comic writer, blogger, video game enthusiast, a breath of fresh air and a geniunely lovely, amazing human being. He is the creator of Brutal Planet Comics, and the mind behind the comic series "TREBLE: THE RHYTHM WITHIN" which is a comic series Gemma will definitely being investing time and money into. Beside the amazing work Dre does with his comics and youtube channel, we discuss who is better Batman or Superman, have an extremely intense conversation about Gemma & Dre's distaste for Pepsi and much much more. It's time to get listening, so polish off those headphones, grab a beverage and allow us to entertain you for the next 2hrs+, you won't want it to end... because we didn't.  Andre's social media:  COMIC SITE: buy your comics here:https://www.spinwhizcomics.com/site/comics/brutal-planet-comics/treble Twitter: https://twitter.com/DaBrute00 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BPCOMICS1 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dabrute00/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/brutalplanetcomics IF this is your first time listening to Talking Codswallop, please can we ask you to follow Talking Codswallop on Facebook, Instagram + Twitter @CodswallopPod. REMEMBER TO CLICK SUBSCRIBE to the podcast to get all of the up to date episodes. We love our current audience, but we are always looking to grow. #IndiePodcastsNeedYourHelp!!!

Action and Ambition
Jared Jones and Russ Hill Help Successful Executives Grow Their Careers Through Strengthening Their Leadership Effectiveness

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 35:56


Welcome to another episode of The Action and Ambition Podcast! Joining us today are Jared Jones and Russ Hill. They are the Co-Founders of Lone Rock Consulting, a company specializing in helping leaders develop people management skills to accelerate results. Both worked together previously at Partners In Leadership, where they led some of that firm's biggest culture transformation projects with companies like Ford, Becton Dickinson, Pepsi, Southwest Airlines, Cigna, and Kohler. Their desire to create new content and expand beyond only culture projects led them to create Lone Rock Consulting. Tune in to learn more on this!

Minnesota Vikings - Wobcast
Vikings Vantage: Ron Johnson Talks Lions, Steelers & Playoff Chances | Week 13

Minnesota Vikings - Wobcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 22:41


Gabe Henderson is joined this week on Vikings Vantage by guest cohost and Detroit native, Ron Johnson. Ron helps breakdown the Vikings versus Lions matchup on Sunday, why Alexander Mattison is the key to the Vikings success, the Steelers coming to town on a short week next Thursday night and the Vikings prospects of making the playoffs over the next 6 games. Head Coach Mike Zimmer joins to give his thoughts for his weekly Friday Press Conference and Gabe finishes the show by asking Ron to answer his final questions of "What's More Likely?" All of this and more is on this week's episode of Vikings Vantage presented by Pepsi.

The Leading Voices in Food
What Food Policy Advocates Can Learn from Tobacco Industry Strategies

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 41:43


This is "The Leading Voices in Food" podcast but today we're speaking with a leading voice in tobacco control. "How come," you might ask, "why?" So I believe for many years that the parallels between the tobacco industry and food industry practices are nothing short of stunning, and that our field would do very well to learn lessons learned from the pioneers in the tobacco wars. Our guest today is Dr. Kenneth Warner, Distinguished Emeritus Professor and former Dean of the School of Public Health at the University of Michigan. Ken's research focuses on the economic and policy aspects of tobacco and health. Interview Summary   So Ken, you and I have a long history, and I thought it might be instructive to mention just a little bit of it because you really helped shape some of the ways I think about addressing food policy. So I first became familiar with your work long before I met you in person, when I was teaching classes at Yale. I was assigning papers you wrote on tobacco control and I was especially interested in work that you'd done on tobacco taxes. It really gave me the idea of pushing ahead with food-related taxes. Then finally I got a chance to meet you in person at a meeting that was hosted by the first President George Bush in Kennebunkport, Maine, on cancer control. You and I got to talking about similarities between the tobacco industry behavior and the way the food industry was behaving. We were both struck by the similarities. That led us to write a paper together that was published in 2009 in "The Milbank Quarterly." And I have to say, of all the papers I've published over my career, this was one of my favorites because I really enjoyed working with you. I learned a ton from it, and it really, I thought, made some very important points. And I'd just like to mention the title of that paper because it pretty much summarizes what it found. So the title was, "The Perils of Ignoring History: Big Tobacco Played Dirty and Millions Died. How Similar Is Big Food?" In my mind, the playbooks are still very similar, and that's why it's really interesting to talk to you today, get a little sense of what's happening more recently, and importantly, think about what lessons are learned from tobacco control. I wanted to bring up one thing from that paper that I always found fascinating, which was the discussion about something called "The Frank Statement to Cigarette Smokers." Could you describe what that was and what role you think it played in history?   Sure. Just to give you some context for it, the first two major papers that implicated smoking in lung cancer were published in major medical journals in 1950. In December of 1952 there was an article in the "Reader's Digest," which incidentally was the only major magazine that did not accept cigarette advertising, that was entitled, "Cancer by the Carton." And this was the American public's first real exposure to the risks associated with smoking, and it led to a two-year decline in cigarette smoking, a very sharp decline, something that was unprecedented in the history of the cigarette. Following that there was some research published on mice and cancer. And needless to say, the tobacco industry was getting pretty nervous about this. So the executives of all the major tobacco firms met in New York City in December of 1953, and they collaborated on what became a public relations strategy, which drove their behavior for many years thereafter. The first thing they did was to publish "A Frank Statement to Cigarette Smokers" in January of 1954. This "Frank Statement" was published in over 400 magazines and newspapers, and it reached an estimated audience of some 80 million Americans, which would be a very good percentage of all Americans in those years. And they talked about the fact that there was this evidence out there, but they said, "We feel it is in the public interest," this is a quote, "to call attention to the fact that eminent doctors and research scientists have publicly questioned the claimed significance of this research." Then they went on to say, and I quote again, "We accept an interest in people's health as a basic responsibility, paramount to every other consideration in our business. We believe the products we make are not injurious to health and," and this is the kicker, "we always have and always will cooperate closely with those whose task it is to safeguard the public health," end quote. They went on to say that they would support research on smoking and health, and, of course, that they would always be the good guys in this story. This was designed as part of a strategy to obfuscate, to deceive the public, basically, to lie about what they already knew about the health hazards associated with smoking. And it was essentially a first very public step in a campaign that, one could argue, in many ways has persisted ever since, although, obviously, now the tobacco companies admit that they're killing their customers and they admit that smoking causes cancer and heart disease and lung disease and so on. But that was kind of the beginning of the strategy that drove their behavior for decades.   You know, that was one of the issues we raised in our paper. How similar were the big food companies in talking about concern for the health of their customers, planting doubt with the science, pledging to make changes that were in the interest of public health, agreeing to collaborate with public health officials? All those things played out in the food arena as well. And that's just one of many places where the food industry behave very, very similar to what the tobacco industry has done. But boy, is it interesting to hear that particular anecdote and to learn of the cynical behavior of the industry. So fast forward from there, and you think about the tobacco industry executives testifying before Congress that nicotine wasn't addictive, and you have that same process playing out many years later. These similarities are really remarkable.   So let's talk about your work and some of the issues that I think apply to the food area, and let's talk about taxes at the beginning. So I worked for years on the issue of soda taxes, and these taxes now exist in more than 50 countries around the world and in a number of major cities in the US, including San Francisco, Philadelphia, Seattle, and Oakland. And these taxes have been shown to have really positive effects, and they seem to be growing around the world. And I'd like to understand what you see as the overall findings from the work on tobacco taxes. But before we do that, you have a very interesting story to tell about how the tobacco control community responded when you first began speaking about taxes. It turns out to be taxes on tobacco have had whopping effects. But what was the initial reaction to people in that field?   Yeah, it is kind of an interesting story. So around 1980, when I first started writing and talking about tobacco taxation as a method of reducing smoking, I used to have public health audiences booing me. If they had rotten tomatoes with them, they would have been throwing them.   You know, Ken, it's hard to imagine because now these taxes are completely routine and accepted.   Yes, they're not only routine and accepted, they are a first principle of tobacco control. They are enshrined in the World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. So they really are kind of the first thing we turn to because we know that they work. We know that they reduce smoking.   But let me give you a story about how I learned that this is not only a phenomenon with people smoking. It's a phenomenon with people using all other drugs, and it turns out it's a trans-species law, the Law of Demand. And that law says, basically, that if you increase price, the demand for the commodity will decrease. Well, in the beginning, the public health audiences believed two things. They believed that smokers were so addicted that they would not be affected by price, so it was ridiculous to even think about it. And they said, you have to have intrinsic motivators to get people to quit smoking. They have to care about their kids. They want to see their kids grow up, their spouses, and so on, and not extrinsic forces like a tax. So those were their two objections. So the story that I think is really kind of fun. I was on a plane flying to a small conference in Kansas City. This is sometime in the early '80s. And I happened to be seated next to Jack Henningfield, who is probably the preeminent psychopharmacologist dealing with nicotine, maybe in the world. And we were talking about price response, the fact that cigarette taxes work. And he said, "You know, I've got something I want to show you here." And he pulled out some what are called response cost curves from the psychology literature. And this is where you take a laboratory animal, in this instance addicted to narcotics or other addictive substances, and you give them a challenge to get their drugs. So first, I should note that these animals are so addicted that if they're given the choice between food and their drug, they will choose their drug, and they will in fact end up dying because they place a preference for the drug over food. But it turns out that when you increase the price of the drug to them, they decrease the amount that they consume. So what do I mean by that? If they have to push a lever, a bar, a certain number of times to get a dose of their drug, and you raise the number of bar pushes per dose, they will dose themselves with fewer doses. I took a look at these curves, and basically, a response cost curve for these lab animals is essentially a demand curve as we economists see it. And I calculated the price elasticity of demand, which is our standard measure of the responsiveness to price. And it turns out that addicted laboratory rats have essentially the same price elasticity of demand, the same price responsiveness that human beings do to cigarettes.   That's an absolutely fascinating story. And, you know, I know Jack, and have admired his work, as you have, and it's amazing to think about that conversation on a plane, and what sort of scientific work it led to, and how that, in turn, found its way into policies that exist around the world. So tell us then about tobacco taxes, and how high do they have to be in order to affect consumption in an appreciable way, and have they worked in reducing tobacco use, and what's your overall take on that?   So we have, quite literally, hundreds of studies in countries around the world, and we know a lot but we don't know everything. So we don't know, for example, if there's a particular price above which, you know, nobody will use the product. We don't have even really good data suggesting of, you know, what's the minimum increase in price that you have to have to have a noticeable impact. Overall, the literature suggests that if you increase the price of cigarettes by 10%, you will decrease the quantity demanded by 3 to 4%. Now, what this means is that roughly half of that decreased demand reflects decreases in the number of cigarettes that continuing smokers use, while the other half represents decreases in smoking, people quitting or kids not starting. So the demand is what we call price inelastic. The price change itself is larger, proportionately, than the decrease in consumption. But that decrease in consumption is still substantial and it's enough to have a large impact.   Now, cigarette prices vary all over the world, and cigarette prices vary primarily because of taxation differences. So if you go to the Scandinavian countries, you'll find that a pack of cigarettes will run $15 or more. If you go to Australia, you're looking at $30 or more a pack. In the US, currently, we're looking at an average price in the range of about 7 to $8. In some jurisdictions, like New York City, it's $10 or more. But the prices in the US are actually relatively low among the more developed nations in the world. Any tax increase will have an impact but obviously the larger tax increases will have larger impacts. And there's some good and bad news in tobacco taxation, particularly in a country like ours, and this is, again, true for most of the developed world. Smoking is now concentrated in marginalized populations. I'm talking about low socioeconomic groups, the LGBTQ community, and racial minorities, in particular. If you think of this as an economic phenomenon, when you raise the price on cigarettes, you're going to hit the worst-off economically segments of the population hard. That's the bad news. The good news is that those people, precisely because they are poor, tend to be much more price responsive than high-income smokers, and more of them will quit. So we have this problem that the tax is regressive, it imposes a larger burden on the poor, but the health effect is progressive. It will reduce the gap between the rich and poor in terms of smoking rates. And of great importance, there's an enormous gap between the rich and poor in this country in life expectancy, and as much as half of that may be differences in smoking rates.   Ken, there's a hundred follow-up questions I could ask, and I find this discussion absolutely fascinating. One thing that came into my mind was that some years ago I looked at the relationship of taxes, state by state in the US, and rates of disease like lung cancer and heart disease. And there was plenty of data because there was a huge range in tobacco taxes. Places like New York and Rhode Island had very high taxes, and the tobacco Southern states, like North Carolina, had very low taxes. But what's the sort of recent take on that, and the relationship between taxes and actual disease?   Well, it's still true. And there are, in fact, what you suggest, the southeastern block of tobacco states have unusually low rates of taxation. And I haven't seen any recent data but one presumes that they are suffering more from smoking-related diseases because their smoking rates are higher. I mean, that has to be true. So I don't know that we have any particularly good data recently, but there have been studies that clearly relate tobacco or cigarette prices to health outcomes associated with smoking.   I'm assuming US scientists have played a prominent role in producing the literature showing the negative health consequences of using cigarettes, and yet you said the United States has relatively low taxes compared to other developed countries. Why, do you think?   I think we're going to get into a very philosophical discussion about the US right here. It has to do with individual responsibility. We know for sure that the initial reason the taxes were so low was that the tobacco block was so influential in the Senate, particularly in the days when Jesse Helms, the senator from North Carolina, was in the Senate. He was the most feared senator by the other senators, and if you wanted to get anything done for your cause, you had to go along with his cause, which was keeping cigarette prices low and doing everything they could to support smoking. So there's clearly been a built-in bias in the Senate, and basically in the Congress as a whole, against tobacco policy. You see a huge variation from state to state in tobacco policies, and it's reflective of basically their political leanings in general.   You brought up this issue of personal responsibility, and boy, does that apply in the food area. You know, the food companies are saying: if you have one sugar beverage every once in a while, it's not going to be harmful. And it's not use of the products but it is overuse of the products. Thereby saying, it's not corporate responsibility we're talking about here, it's personal responsibility. That same argument was made by the tobacco industry, wasn't it?   It was. They would be less inclined to do that today, for a couple of reasons. One is that we know that even low levels of smoking are harmful and indeed cause many of the diseases that we were referring to earlier. And I think all the companies have now admitted publicly that smoking does cause all of these diseases that we've long known it causes. And all of them are claiming that they would like to move away from a society with smoking to one that has alternative products that would give people choices and ways to get their nicotine without exposing themselves to so much risk. I mean, we have to remember, the fact that cigarettes kill their consumers is a real drawback as far as the industry is concerned because they're losing a lot of their consumers, you know, 10, 20 years before they normally would, and they have to deal with all these lawsuits. So it's unfortunate for them. Having said that, cigarettes are the goose that lays the golden egg. They cost very little to manufacture. The industry is sufficiently oligopolistic that the profits are enormous, and their profitability has continued even while smoking has dropped rather precipitously ever since the mid-1960s.   Is that because the markets outside the US have been growing?   They certainly have helped. Although now, and this is only true within the last few years, the aggregate cigarette sales in the world are declining. They've actually started dropping. So we were seeing a relatively stable situation as smoking decreased in the developed world and was rising in the developing world. The only place now where we're seeing increases in smoking are areas in Africa, which, by the way, is the one place in the world where we might be able to forego the tobacco epidemic because smoking rates are still quite low in most of the countries, not all of them, and also parts of the Middle East. But elsewhere we've been seeing smoking declining all over the world. That doesn't mean the profits have to drop because one thing that the companies can do, is, they can raise their prices. Now, if prices go up because of taxes that hurts the companies. But if they raise their own prices because demand is inelastic, what that means is that the percentage increase in the price is larger than the percentage decline in the demand for cigarettes. So they're actually adding to their profitability by doing that. They've always played this very interesting game for years of keeping price below what we would think to be the profit-maximizing price. And I think the reason for that has to do with addiction because they know that they have to have what are called replacement smokers, kids coming in to take the place of the smokers who are dying or quitting. And for years, I think, they kept their prices down because they didn't want to discourage young people from smoking. Now, I think they see the writing on the wall. Smoking is declining very rapidly. Smoking prevalence, which was 45% in the mid, early-1960s, is now a little over 12% in the US, and I think they're raising their prices with the understanding that they want to take as much advantage of the opportunity with the addicted smokers, the adults, as they possibly can, even though smoking among kids is becoming vanishingly small.   I think of so many parallels with the soda taxes that now exists in a number of places, and the companies have responded somewhat differently. And perhaps it's the level of addiction issue that kicks in here, and the need to have replacement customers. Maybe that's another key difference. But with the soda taxes, the companies have not increased prices beyond the level of the tax. You know, to delight of public health experts, the companies have tended to pass along the entire tax so the companies are not eating that difference in order to keep prices the same. Higher tax gets reflected in the ultimate price that they charge, but they're not increasing prices beyond that. Do you think it might be the addiction issue that's different here?   I don't know. I mean, that certainly could be an element of it. The other thing is that they're manufacturing other drinks that are being used in place of some of the sodas. So they've got waters, they've got juices. I mean, obviously these sugary juices are no better, but they do make other products. They make the diet drinks. And to the extent that they can find substitutes for those products within their own companies, it may be that they're content to allow people to make those substitutions.   Interesting comment. The results so far on the soda tax suggest that the most common substitution as people drink less soda, is water, which is of course better than a lot of the alternatives that people might be consuming, so that's a bit of really good news. Even though the companies do sell water, Coke and Pepsi have Aquafina and Dasani, for example, they face a basic problem. Number one is that these companies are the biggest sellers of sugary beverages but not bottled water. That happens to be Nestle. So if people migrate to bottled water, they're likely to migrate from the big companies, like Coke and Pepsi, to Nestle. Also, people tend not to be very brand-loyal to water. They tend to buy whatever is on sale or whatever they find available to them, and that creates a problem for these companies like Coke and Pepsi that do rely on brand loyalty for their marketing. So it's very interesting. And also, I wonder, based on the research on food and addiction, if the companies don't take a hit if people switch from full sugar beverages even to diet beverages that they might sell because there wouldn't be as much addictive potential, and therefore the customers wouldn't have to have as much just to keep the habit going. So it's really interesting to think this through.   That's certainly very plausible. The whole thing would also depend on the price elasticity of demand for sodas, and specifically for the brands that they're concerned about. If there is greater elasticity there than what we observe for cigarettes, then raising those prices aren't necessarily going to help them all that much.   You mentioned that the elasticity estimates for tobacco suggested that a 10% increase in price led to a 3 to 4% reduction in consumption, and the numbers are even more positive in the case of the sugar beverages, where if you get a 10%, 15% increase in price, you end up with 10, 15% reduction in consumption. So that's good news in the food arena.   That's good news but it also means that they can't do as easily what the tobacco industry can do, which is to raise their prices and expect to see profits rise. Because if they're losing as much in sales as they're gaining in price, it's no win.   So Ken, let's talk about product formulation because you mentioned that earlier, and this is a really interesting issue that, again, connects tobacco and food products. So you think about the tobacco companies mainly selling cigarettes, but now there's vaping, there's cigarettes with things like menthol and other flavors, or low-fat foods, or artificial sweeteners. The list of product reformulations in order to attract customers goes on and on and on. So I know a controversial topic in your field has been e-cigarettes. Can you explain what these are?   E-cigarettes have been around now for about a decade, let's say. Basically, they're devices that allow people to inhale nicotine and other substances, but the purpose is to give them their nicotine without combustion. And we know that the major problem associated with smoking is the products of combustion. There's 7,000 chemical compounds in cigarette smoke. 70 of them are known human carcinogens, causes of cancer in humans. Many of them are cardiotoxic. They cause lung disease and so on. The e-cigarettes have about two orders of magnitude fewer toxins in their emissions than do cigarettes. And it turns out that the amount of the comparable toxins, when they are in fact comparable, that you find in the e-cigarette emissions is much lower, usually a 10th to a 400th, of what you find in cigarette smoke.   So logically, and based on a fair body of evidence at this point, vaping, use of e-cigarettes to get nicotine, is substantially less dangerous than is cigarette smoking. However, the controversy here is incredible. This is the most divisive issue that I have witnessed in my 45 years of working in the tobacco control field. It has torn the field asunder. The mainstream of public health, and by that I'm including governmental agencies, the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, the Truth Initiative, the American Cancer Society, heart and lung associations, all of mainstream public health is strongly opposed to e-cigarettes, and for one reason. They're concerned about kids' uptake of e-cigarettes, which has been substantial. It's been decreasing the last couple of years, but it has been substantial. And there are a number of things they're concerned about in that regard, and they're completely ignoring the fact that there's pretty good evidence that e-cigarettes are increasing smoking cessation for a subset of smokers. And a number of us on the science side of this, believe that the net effect of e-cigarettes is beneficial, that it's actually, possibly, a tool to add to the armamentarium of things like cigarette taxation, like smoke-free workplaces, like restrictions on advertising, and that it will help a group of inveterate smokers, those who either can't quit nicotine or don't want to, to move to a less dangerous alternative to smoking. I am not saying that e-cigarettes have no risk associated with them. They almost certainly do. But it is substantially lower.   Now, historically, this is divisive within the field in part because all of the earlier attempts at, quote-unquote, tobacco harm reduction have been produced by the major cigarette companies, and they've been fraudulent. So cigarette filters were manufactured and sold, starting in the 1950s, in response to the scare that I referred to earlier about cancer. And they were sold with a message that the filters block the dangerous stuff but let the flavor through. And people bought this. That decrease in smoking in the early 1950s reversed, smoking went up sharply, as sales of filtered cigarettes went up. By the way, the first successful filtered cigarette was Kent, and it used what it referred to as the miracle Micronite filter. Well, that miracle Micronite filter turns out to have been made of asbestos. And there are lawsuits continuing to the present day by workers in the factories that made the filter tips for Kent cigarettes, who themselves ended up with lung cancer or other diseases due to the asbestos. Then came low-tar and nicotine cigarettes, and we actually have ample evidence from the documents that had been revealed by lawsuits, that the industry knew that this was a public relations device. It was not a harm reduction device. And in fact, because people believed that low-tar and nicotine cigarettes were less dangerous, it's likely that it actually increased the toll of smoking because people who would have quit, switched to low-tar and nicotine cigarettes instead. So there's some pretty awful history here that makes people legitimately concerned about alternative products. A critical element of this story is that the alternative products, in this case, the e-cigarettes were introduced by non-cigarette, non-tobacco companies, and their goal was to replace smoking. Now the major companies are all making their own e-cigarettes as well because they have to do it from a defensive point of view, but basically they don't have any great interest in slowing up the sale of cigarettes. They want to benefit from that as long as they can.   So I should know the answer to this but I don't, but are e-cigarettes taxed? And wouldn't it be optimal to tax e-cigarettes but less than regular cigarettes so you discourage use of both but discourage the use of regular cigarettes more?   That is very insightful. Two colleagues and I actually published a paper saying that in 2015 in "The New England Journal of Medicine," that we should be taxing e-cigarettes modestly, the reason being that we want to discourage kids from using them, and kids are far more price-sensitive than our adults. Kids have a very elastic response to cigarette prices. Adults do not, and in particular, older adults have even lower price responsiveness. So yes, there should be some taxation of e-cigarettes to discourage youth use of it but that taxation should be dramatically lower than the taxation of cigarettes. Some states are now taxing e-cigarettes. Not all of them. The federal government is actually looking into a proposal to double the tax, the federal tax, on cigarettes, which would take it up to $2.01 a pack, and at the same time, to establish an equivalent tax, similar to the $2 tax, on all vaping products. This would be a disaster because it would definitely discourage kids from vaping, but it would also discourage adults from using e-cigarettes as an alternative to smoking, and the most addicted, the inveterate smokers, those are the ones that need these alternatives. So that's a bad policy proposal. A much better one would be to increase the cigarette tax by more than a dollar, raise it to 3 or $4 or something, and impose a modest tax on e-cigarettes. This would discourage people from smoking, both adults and kids, but especially kids. It would discourage kids from using e-cigarettes but it would create a price differential that would encourage the inveterate smokers to switch to e-cigarettes. Now, part of the problem, and this has gotten worse over time, is that the American public believes that e-cigarettes, that vaping, is as dangerous and even maybe more dangerous than cigarette smoking. Nothing could be further from the truth but so far the mainstream of public health has sold that message to the public, and the public, including smokers, believe it.   That's a fascinating story about how the public health field might be getting in its own way with this.   And maybe doing damage to public health.   So let's loop back a little bit to the behavior of the tobacco industry. So in 2017, the Phillip Morris Company funded and launched an organization called Foundation for a Smoke-Free World. So I think, hmm, a tobacco company saying they want less smoking, and one could view this with pretty high cynicism but what do you think about it?   I've always shared your sense of cynicism about it. There's an interesting anecdote related to this. The individual who negotiated the deal by which Phillip Morris offered $1 billion over a 12-year period to establish this foundation, that individual was the main actor in the World Health Organization during the development of the global treaty on tobacco control, the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. He also became director of the organization and served in that capacity until just the other day. He has stepped down from being director. But let me give you a little context for it. Philip Morris International that needs to be distinguished from Altria and Philip Morris Domestic, but Philip Morris International sells the leading brand of what is known as heated tobacco products, HTPs. These are products that actually have tobacco in them. E-cigarettes have no tobacco in them but these products actually have tobacco in them. But instead of burning the tobacco, they heat it. They volatilize it, and the nicotine is inhaled. Like e-cigarettes, they appear to be substantially less dangerous than smoking, although it's not clear that they're as less dangerous as, than, e-cigarettes. But they're produced only by the major cigarette companies. Philip Morris is now selling these products successfully in many countries, many cities around the world. While they actually have the authorization to sell an older version of the product in the US, it's not very popular at this point. But in Japan, over the last four years there's been a drop in cigarettes sold of about a third at the same time that there's been this great increase in the use of these heated tobacco products manufactured by Philip Morris International and by Japan Tobacco. They have a product called Ploom. Philip Morris' product is called IQOS, I-Q-O-S, which, I was told, originally stood for I Quit Ordinary Smoking. So they are the leader of the theme song that the industry is singing these days about how they want a smoke-free world and they want to move toward one. But the only way they're ever going to do that, willingly, is if they can sell other products like these heated tobacco products and make large sums of money on them. Philip Morris has a good start at that. They claim that about a third of their revenue now is coming from IQOS, this heated tobacco product.   So whether that foundation ultimately has beneficial effects or not, forget corporate beneficial effects but on the public good, would pretty much depend on who's choosing to use these e-cigarettes, I'm imagining. That if it's people switching from normal cigarettes to them, or using them instead of normal cigarettes, it's one thing. But if they're recruiting new people who otherwise wouldn't smoke, then it would be a bad thing. So how do you think that'll all play out?   That's actually a critically important question, Kelly. And one of the great concerns that the opposition to e-cigarettes has, is that they're addicting lots of kids to nicotine, and that many of them will go on to smoke, and that that will reverse the progress that we made on smoking. Now, it turns out that there is no evidence to support the latter contention. And in fact, there's evidence to the contrary. I think it's entirely possible that some kids who would not have touched a cigarette otherwise are vaping and then trying cigarettes in the future. Whether they become regular smokers, remains to be seen. But I think there certainly are some kids like that. But what we do know is that the rate of smoking among kids, what we call current smoking, and smoking among kids means that they've had at least one puff on a cigarette in the last 30 days, that number has plummeted over the last quarter century, and, and this is the interesting thing, it has gone down at its fastest rate precisely during the period in which vaping has been popular among kids.   So one theory is that vaping is displacing smoking to some extent. That kids who would've smoked are vaping instead. It's a very complicated area and we don't know the answer. Among adults who vape, and they are relatively few in number except for very young adults, we observe mostly dual use, but the question is how much of this is a transition to vaping only, and then, maybe, a transition to nothing after that. In the UK, where vaping has been advertised by the health organizations as a way to quit smoking, and they have encouraged its use, and they use it in their smoking cessation clinics, and you'll even find it in hospitals, in the UK we have seen that more than half of the people who have quit smoking by using e-cigarettes have also quit vaping. So it is no longer the case in the UK that a majority of the people who vape are also currently smoking.   In the US, the data have been moving in that direction but it's still a majority who are dual users rather than vaping only. But we have evidence of four or five completely different kinds of studies, commercial data, other products in other countries, that all lead to the conclusion that vaping is already increasing the rate of smoking cessation in the US and in the UK by probably 10 to 15%. That's a hard thing to see in the data but it is something that, if you dig into the data, you will see it, and as I say, we see it all over the place. Let me give you one example of the tobacco harm reduction story that's fabulous. 40 to 50 years ago, large numbers of Swedish males started using a smokeless tobacco product called snus, S-N-U-S. It's a relatively low nitrosamine product, nitrosamine being a carcinogenic element, and they substituted it for cigarettes largely because cigarette taxes were going way up and there weren't any significant taxes on snus. So what you observe today, some three, four decades or more later, is that Swedish males have the lowest male smoking rate of any country in Europe, and maybe in the world. They do not have a low tobacco use rate. Their tobacco use rate is pretty typical but it consists mostly of snus. And they also have by far the lowest rate of tobacco-related diseases, like lung cancer, of men in all of the European Union countries, and the second lowest is typically a rate twice or more that of what you see in the Swedish males. Swedish females, who did not quit smoking in large numbers and did not take up snus until fairly recently, have rates of lung cancer and other diseases that are average or above-average for the European Union. So that's a great example of tobacco harm reduction in action, and it's one that's been around now, as I say, for decades.   Ken, this is a remarkable history and you're just bringing it alive beautifully. But let me ask you one final question. So given that you've been working in this field for more than four decades now, and have really been a pioneer, a leader, a warrior, and a hero, all those things could be applied to you and your work, if I asked you to sum up what's been learned from all these decades of work on tobacco, what would you say?   There are a lot of lesson. Certainly, we have learned specific kinds of interventions that really matter. You and I spoke about tax at some length. That's the preeminent one. Smoke-free workplaces, including smoke-free restaurants and bars, have not only themselves had a direct impact on health but have also set the tone for a more smoke-free society. So we have seen quite dramatic changes. I mentioned we're going from a 45% rate of smoking for the nation as a whole down to a little over 12%. That, however, has taken us six to seven decades. So it's kind of a good news, bad news story. It's a very complicated area. Tobacco control was ranked by CDC as one of the 10 most important public health measures of the 20th century, and also the first decade of the 21st century. And I think that's completely legitimate, and it is something about which all of us who care about public health can feel very proud about. The problem still remains. It is an enormous problem, as you alluded earlier, in many parts of the developing world, the low- and middle-income countries, and it's a growing problem in some of those countries, and it's just not going to disappear real fast. The lesson that I've taken most recently has been a discouraging one, and that's how divisive our field has become. We really have a chasm between the people who are opposed to tobacco harm reduction and those who are supportive of it. They're good people on both sides, they believe what they're saying, but they can't talk to each other civilly at this point. I hope that that will not become the case for those of you who are fighting the good fight in dealing with unhealthy foods.   Bio   Kenneth E. Warner is the Avedis Donabedian Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Public Health and Dean Emeritus at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. A member of the faculty from 1972-2017, he served as Dean from 2005-2010. Presented in over 275 professional publications, Dr. Warner's research has focused on economic and policy aspects of tobacco and health. Dr. Warner served as the World Bank's representative to negotiations on the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, WHO's first global health treaty. He also served as the Senior Scientific Editor of the 25th anniversary Surgeon General's report on smoking and health. From 2004-2005 he was President of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco (SRNT). He currently serves on the FDA's Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee. In 1996 Dr. Warner was elected to the National Academy of Medicine. He is a recipient of the Surgeon General's Medallion, the Luther Terry Award for Exemplary Achievement in Tobacco Control, and the Doll-Wynder Award from SRNT. Dr. Warner earned his AB from Dartmouth College and MPhil and PhD in economics from Yale University.  

Maximize Your Influence
Episode 400 - How to Resist Influence and Coercion - Plus Free Gifts

Maximize Your Influence

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 21:44


Join me for this week's podcast for some incredible free gifts.  This is podcast 400 and will deliver some great content and influence gifts to take your skills to the next level.  This podcast will do a 180 from other podcasts.  Instead of helping become more influential, this podcast will reveal the art and science of resisting the persuasive attempts of others. "FROM JERUSALEM TO JERICHO"-A STUDY OF SITUATIONAL AND DISPOSITIONAL VARIABLES IN HELPING BEHAVIOR Help me celebrate podcast 400 on How to Resist Influence and Coercion.

The Retrospectors
On This Day: Concorde - The Future of Flight

The Retrospectors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 9:50


Supersonic aircraft took a giant leap forward when the French and British governments signed a treaty to join forces on designing Concorde on 29th November, 1962. Up until this point, the two countries had been developing their aircraft separately - which had already cost the United Kingdom £150 million.Technologically superior and far more luxurious than any commercial passenger jet that had come before, it was also the fastest - capable of launching its wealthy clientele from London to New York in under three hours.In this episode, Arion, Rebecca and Olly explain how the success of the 747 killed off supersonic flight; consider how Britain blew its chance to create 'the British Airbus'; and reveal why Pepsi's blue paint-job for Air France could have proven truly explosive…Further Reading:• ‘Concorde and supersonic travel: The days when the sun rose in the west' (The Independent, 2013): https://www.independent.co.uk/travel/news-and-advice/concorde-and-supersonic-travel-the-days-when-the-sun-rose-in-the-west-8888836.html• ‘Concorde's first British test flight, 50 years on' (History of government, gov.uk 2019): https://history.blog.gov.uk/2019/04/09/concordes-first-british-test-flight-50-years-on/• ‘Anglo-French Airliner Model Concorde' (British Pathé, 1962): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qfPiPC6O7qsFor bonus material and to support the show, visit Patreon.com/RetrospectorsWe'll be back tomorrow! Follow us wherever you get your podcasts: podfollow.com/RetrospectorsThe Retrospectors are Olly Mann, Rebecca Messina & Arion McNicoll, with Matt Hill.Theme Music: Pass The Peas. Announcer: Bob Ravelli. Graphic Design: Terry Saunders. Edit Producer: Emma Corsham.Copyright: Rethink Audio / Olly Mann 2021. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Local with Laura Ekstrand
Emma Gibson- Theatre is Immediate 

Local with Laura Ekstrand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 28:36


This month on Local, Laura connects with playwright, actor and director Emma Gibbson. Emma is a British playwright now based out of Philadelphia, where she founded the theatre company Tiny Dynamite. Vivid Stage fans can look forward to seeing Emma's writing come to life in the main stage production of her play; Water in My Hands. Emma talks with Laura about her journey and evaluation as an artist — from her founding of a theatre company using Pepsi bottle caps, to the methodical writing process of everything from prose, to poetry to theatre, and sometimes all three at once. Listen in on this fascinating conversation between two theatre aficionados. --   Music by Jeff Ertz & John Todd

Minnesota Vikings - Wobcast
Vikings Vantage: Eric Smith Joins To Talk Niners, Playoff Chances | Week 12

Minnesota Vikings - Wobcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 22:41


Team Reporter Eric Smith joins tonight's Week 12 edition of Vikings Vantage with Gabe Henderson and Tatum Everett. Eric reviews the win over the Packers, look ahead to the matchup versus the Niners and previews what he thinks the Vikings need to do to secure their place in the NFC playoffs. Head Coach Mike Zimmer holds his weekly Friday press conference to give everyone the latest roster info before their game on Sunday. It's all included in this week's episode of Vikings Vantage presented by Pepsi.

Seriously…
Could I Regenerate My Farm To Save The Planet?

Seriously…

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 29:14


Regenerative Farming is gaining traction around the world as a means of increasing biodiversity, improving soil quality, sequestering carbon, restoring watersheds and enhancing the ecosystems of farms. The shepherd James Rebanks, author of English Pastoral, is on a quest to find out if it is possible to adopt these methods on his farm in the Lake District. He meets leading proponents of these methods in the UK, US and Europe and discovers how mimicking natural herd movements, stopping ploughing and adding costly chemicals could make his farm economically sustainable. This is becoming an urgent question as not only is the global population projected to rise to nearly 10 billion by 2050 but according to the UN's Food and Agriculture organisation within 60 years we may literally no longer have enough arable topsoil to feed ourselves. Meanwhile our reliance on meat products is being blamed for increasing CO2 and climate change. But can James,and indeed other farmers, make the switch to these techniques when industrial farming has been the paradigm for so long? When so many people believe turning vegan and shifting to plant-based ecological farming is the way forward, should he continue breeding sheep and cows? And as companies like Nestle, Walmart, Unilever, McCain and Pepsi all pledge to invest in regenerative farming to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, do the claims about carbon sequestration stand up? How can he use his farm to save the planet?

The Productivityist Podcast
Juliet Funt talks about a Minute to Think

The Productivityist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 47:39


Juliet Funt is a renowned keynote speaker and tough-love advisor to the Fortune 500 who is regularly featured in top global media outlets, including Forbes and Fast Company. She is a white-space warrior as the founder and CEO of The Juliet Funt Group, helping business leaders and organizations to unleash their full potential by unburdening talent from busywork. Juliet has earned one of the highest ratings in the largest speaking event in the world, and she has worked with brands such as Spotify, National Geographic, Vans, Costco, Pepsi, Nike, Wells Fargo and ESPN. Juliet shares some key insights from her book ‘A Minute to Think: Reclaim Creativity, Conquer Busyness, and Do Your Best Work'. We also discuss finding your spark, making time for mental space, why we fill time, the humane element of productivity – and increasing the sales of salmon tips.  Talking Points Performative busyness The curse of insatiability How to not confuse activity with productivity What is white space? Time sketching Taking one minute to think Establishing your non-negotiable white spaces Quote "Interlace space throughout the day." Helpful Links ‘A Minute To Think' by Juliet Funt ‘Four Thousand Weeks' by Oliver Burkeman ‘Indistractable' by Nir Eyal ‘The Reinvention of Work' by Matthew Fox Episode 360: A World Without Email with Cal Newport Episode 229: Exploring Digital Minimalism with Cal Newport Episode 93: Deep Work with Cal Newport Episode 238: How to Keep Going with Austin Kleon Why Is My Life So Hard? (Ep. 280) - Freakonomics The Busyness Test JulietFunt.com Want to discover some of the books mentioned on the podcast? Check out Scribd, my reading app of choice.   If you enjoyed the episode, please leave a rating and/or review wherever you listened to the episode. Also don't forget to check out all of our podcast sponsors found on our podcast sponsors page.   If you enjoyed the episode, please leave a rating and/or review wherever you listened to the episode. And if you want to have easy access to the archives of the show and ensure you don't miss the new episodes to come then subscribe to the podcast in the app you're using.

Farming Today
24/11/21 - Pesticide regulation, breeding disease resistance in seeds, regenerative dairy farming

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 13:40


New research questions whether the rules assessing the toxicity of pesticides are doing enough to prevent harm to pollinators. Regulation of pesticides usually focuses on the impact of the active ingredients of a product, but this study found a additional chemical used in commercial fungicides in the UK can damage the health of bumblebees. We visit a seed breeding organisation where they're developing winter wheat that can resist diseases like yellow rust and septoria. And ‘regenerative farming' has been gaining attention around the world as a means of improving soils, increasing biodiversity and mitigating climate change. Big companies like Nestle, Unilever, McCain and Pepsi have announced they'll be investing in the idea, but so far there's little data-driven proof of its impact. We find out about a project run by the dairy co-operative Arla which will gather data from 24 farms across Europe. Presented by Anna Hill Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Heather Simons

Crypto Unstacked
Deep Dive: ChainFlip | How to Design For Frictionless Cryptocurrency Swaps

Crypto Unstacked

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 52:17


Apologies for the Discord alerts throughout our conversation -- Chainflip's Discord was busy!We unstack:- Why is Simon so interested in cryptoeconomics? What lessons can we learn?- Chainflip ELI5: breaking down its use case and benefits- Evolution of AMMs over the past 2 years- Who's the "Pepsi" to Chainflip?- What are Flippy NFTs?+ more!FOLLOW OUR GUESTSimon Harman (Twitter)This episode is presented by our sponsors CoinFLEX and Amber Group.CoinFLEX is the Home of Crypto Yield and committed to providing institutional and retail investors an easily accessible platform to earn and trade crypto. CoinFLEX creates innovative solutions to bring investors and markets together through simple and intuitive products such as flexUSD, the world's first interest-earning stablecoin, and AMM+, the most-capital efficient automated market maker in the world. Visit www.coinflex.com for more information. Amber Group is an integrated crypto finance platform behind Amber App, which allows you to easily earn, swap, trade, and invest in crypto. Right now, new users can earn up to 16% APR on BTC, ETH, and USD-stablecoins Fixed Earn products.  Sign up at www.ambercrypto.comDISCLOSUREThe Crypto Unstacked Podcast is meant for informational purposes only and should not be considered as financial or investment advice. Nothing expressed in this podcast should be construed as a solicitation, recommendation, endorsement or offer to buy or sell any financial products. 

Learnings from Leaders: the P&G Alumni Podcast
Stefan K. James, Nationwide Insurance VP of Marketing

Learnings from Leaders: the P&G Alumni Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 55:39


“How do you change the dynamic - where you have others with diverse thoughts and culture - so you're not alone?” Stefan K. James is Nationwide Insurance's VP of Marketing for Personal Lines B2C Business. Prior to Nationwide, Stefan helped launch and accelerate SwitchedOn Training - a brain training app for athletes and pro coaches. Stefan spent ten years at Pepsi as a Marketing Insights Director on brands like Tropicana and Quaker Oat, and got his start at P&G working in CMK on brands like Herbal Essences, Pantene, Mr Clean and Swiffer, and Febreze. Stefan studied Public Relations at Florida A&M University and received his Masters in International Business from Nova Southeastern University. As a proud husband and father, Stefan's accomplishments go far beyond boy bands and podcast appearances. You'll enjoy this candid, nerdy conversation that frames privilege and perspective alongside career motivations and ownership.

Minnesota Vikings - Wobcast
Vikings Vantage: Karl Scott Discusses NFL Veterans, Game Planning Green Bay | Week 11

Minnesota Vikings - Wobcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 22:41


Tonight's Vikings Vantage guest is Defensive Backs Coach, Karl Scott. Karl talks about his first season in the NFL, the veteran leadership in his position room and game planning against a savvy veteran in Aaron Rodgers. Head Coach Mike Zimmer also speaks at his Friday Press Conference and finally, Gabe Henderson and Tatum Everett discuss what the Vikings need to do to keep the positive momentum going this weekend in Border Battle 122. It's all on this episode of Vikings Vantage presented by Pepsi.

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis
The O'Reilly Update, November 19, 2021

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 12:58


House Republicans move to block Joe Biden's vaccine mandate, drug overdose deaths top 100-thousand for the first time, Thanksgiving staples in short supply at the supermarket, Coke and Pepsi get into the Alcohol Business. Plus, Bill's Message of the Day, listeners sound off! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

B2B Mentors
Why Podcasting is a MUST HAVE for Your Business and How to Get Started - Connor's Curiosities #038

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 48:02


James Carbary is the bestselling author of Content-Based Networking: How to Instantly Connect with Anyone You Want to Know. He's also the founder of Sweet Fish Media, a podcast-first media company. He's been a contributor for the Huffington Post & Business Insider, and he also co-hosts the B2B Growth Show (a top ranked podcast according to Forbes).Follow James on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jamescarbary/Learn more about Sweet Fish Media here: https://sweetfishmedia.com/Did you ever do any podcasts in person at, at any point in time? So we have, but I don't... To me, the benefit of being able to interview somebody from wherever you are in the world, without the limitation of having to be in-person, has always been so much more attractive to me. And the thing about in-person interviews, it accelerates the friendship a lot faster, and I'm big on that. Like using podcasting as a way to generate, or not generate, but like cultivate really genuine relationships with people. So when you're in person, obviously being in person, you can, you just have a different level of intimacy with the person there. But, no, I haven't done a lot of in person interviews. I think maybe a handful. Yeah. And as someone who's done as much as many podcasts as you have, I do, because I have a second podcast called mile high Mentors, which is all local community, Colorado base, Colorado guests, everything. It really brings a different dynamic doing it in person. I just, I can't wait for the day where we can be in virtual reality and literally feel like we're in the same room, do a podcast that way. We're on the the way there, hopefully. You know what I mean? Your local podcast idea, man... I'm convinced that there are people in real estate, people that own like... The people that own marketing agencies that focus on the local market, like there are so many industries that if they just started like the Denver Entrepreneurs Show or like whatever, like going local like that, it would position you so well to build all the right relationships. Dude, the niche show has been so underutilized, because that was my first podcast. B2B Mentors was a little more recent. And when I first wanted it to get into podcasting. I'm like, whoa, there's a lot of podcasts out there, and you know, what do I want to do that's unique? And I know Colorado's got this big ecosystem that in 10 years from now is going to be on the global stage, which are a kind of already is. And so I decided to do it on all local niche. And it's been total trampoline, I think because of the focus that literally when you really start getting in touch with your local community and understanding all the influence that's there... We're only one degree connected from everywhere else in the world. So I can only speak to that. It's been a blessing having that and starting it that way, just out of serendipity. Like, I wanted to do it in person. It was actually going to be a TV show when we first started. Okay. Yeah. The other piece, you can level up your video when you're in person. You can do a video, obviously, digitally like what we're doing right now, but just having a zoom background or whatever the office of the other person that you're talking to, it's a little bit limiting. Where, when you're doing in person interviews, you can have a couple cameras set up and you can do a little bit more stuff in post that, that creates a little bit, I dunno, just a higher level of production and depending on how you're repurposing the content, it can end up going really well for you. In the energy, there's a huge difference in energy doing that stuff in person. Just being able to read each other's social cues a little bit differently. So, it's been a little disheartening going back to zoom all the way, but it's still good. And you're still able to get good convo in everything. You just gotta be extra, extra thoughtful in how you're going about it. Yeah. So what, what was it for you, man, that you had this local podcast. Why then start another one? Why start B2B Mentors? Mile High Mentors, the formatting of the show is a little different and I love sales and marketing and like nerding out about sales and marketing and business development and strategy, more specifically. So, I found a lot of my podcasts- I kind of started inking a lot of these shows. They are kind of started bleeding into Mile High Mentors a bit like. I'm like, I would really like a separate show that's all focused set on leadership, business development. And I can, I can do this more on the global stage and have guests from, you know, Israel, and UK and anywhere in the world. There is a yin and yang to it. There's a yin and yang to having a local Show. I still run it. And it still well, well worth having those separate, but that was why I kind of went in one direction over the other. So this is a good question. Now my question for you, it's not maybe not as good of a question, but why Cherry Coke? Why not Cherry Pepsi? Cherry Pepsi doesn't live up to your standard? Bro, like I just hate Pepsi. I don't know if it tastes too water down to me, but I like, I will legitimately leave a restaurant if they're a Pepsi shop. I was going to be like, sorry, like I have to go next door. I don't know when that happened. I think it was like my late twenties when I started just developing this incredibly bad taste for Pepsi for some reason. And so our team jokes around about it all the time, like one of the questions we ask our new employees: are you Team Coke or are you Team Pepsi?And a it's, it's how I, how I know whether they're going to be on my good side from the get or not. You won't hire them if they're Pepsi? You're just discriminating against people who are Pepsi fans. Oh, I'll end up in, ah, in, in jail at some point for my discrimination toward Pepsi lovers. But for now you're moving, you're shaking. You're doing business. Just for those that are listening, please brag about yourself. Give, but yeah, man, give just a background 60 second synopsis on what lead you to where you're at, in your career today and some of the major wins along the way. Yeah. So, I won a sweepstakes back in 2008, I didn't actually it. My roommate's brother-in-law won this sweepstakes through a phone company called Alltel. And it was one of those deals where you, like, text football to 1-800-ALL-TEL. And you can win an all expense trip to a professional football game of your choice with nine of your friends. And so I was one of the friends that got to go on this trip. Took a private jet to New York city, got to go all around the city in a private, like, limo bus with a police escort. Got to watch the Giants-Cowboys game in a suite right next to Jerry Jones. It was like this is unreal experience. And there's a guy that was leading all of, kind of, the logistics for the trip. His name was Jeff and he was waiting there for us as soon as we got off the private jet that morning. He was in the limo bus with us, coordinating with a police escort. And so he was with us the entire day and I just ended up hitting it off at this guy and didn't really think anything of it. I just thought, "Oh, he's probably some low level employee with Alltel." I didn't really think in any of it. But we talk about faith. We talked about family, business... And by the end of the day, I found out that he's actually the CEO of this global logistics company that Alltel hired. And he just really likes New York. And so he happened to be on the trip himself. And so we ended up swapping contact information. I didn't think anything is going to happen from it. So I'm not really thinking anything at all about this interaction. And about a year and a half later, he calls me and asks me to move across the country. I was living in Oklahoma at the time. He asked me to move to Orlando to help him run the helicopter division of his logistics company. And so, prayed about it and decided to say yes, moved across the country and at helicopter logistics for NASCAR, actually, for three years. And the reason I like telling that part of my story is because it's segued really nicely into what we do now in the world of podcasting. I actually don't care much about podcasting like, I think it's cool. I think it's nice. But what I really care about is relationships and how can you reverse engineer, genuine relationships with the exact people that you want to know? Because the relationship with Jeff that I built in 2008 was completely serendipitous. It happened by accident. There was no strategy or purpose in meeting Jeff. I just happened in to that. And I think so many of us just stumble into these life changing relationships, but what I have found with podcasting or with really any sort of content collaboration, I've built the business around podcasting because I think its the easiest form of content collaboration. But what I loved so much about it, what we helped other companies do, is try to figure out like how, how can I reverse engineer relationships with the exact people that I need to know to move my business forward? And when you have a podcast. So for us, we work with a lot of VPs of marketing at B2B SaaS companies. So, our Show B2B growth. We literally go to VPs of marketing at B2B SaaS companies and ask them to be a guest on our show. And most of the time we don't end up doing business with them. But a lot of times we do. And through that collaborative process of creating an episode with them, we actually get to know them. We build this meaningful relationship with this human on the other end of the Zoom call, and through that collaboration, sometimes they end up referring us to people. Sometimes they end up becoming our customer, but regardless at the end of the day, we've developed a friendship with that person. Listen in for the full episode!

Our Voices Matter Podcast
Walk With Purpose - Toni Harrison

Our Voices Matter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 45:11


Toni Harrison was raised to walk with purpose.  As the Chief Marketing Officer of a new fin tech company, she is doing just that -- on a mission to help solve the racial wealth gap.She's the proud granddaughter of a civil rights activist who helped bring Texas Southern University to Houston.  Her father, Charles "Tex" Harrison, was an OG of the famed Harlem Globetrotters -- his consolation prize for being denied a shot at the NBA.The self-described “creative disruptor” is now making her own mark.  As CMO of Fair Fintech, Toni is using her considerable communication skills to help solve the racial and opportunity wealth gap.An Offer She Couldn't RefuseThe CEO of the new firm, Khalid Parekh,  was well aware of Toni's award-winning PR campaigns and strategies .  He was her client at Etched Communication, the agency she founded, along with global powerhouses Pepsi, Polaris and McDonald's.Toni's expertise in the diversity and multicultural space is exactly what Parekh was looking for to help put the first multilingual neobank on the map.So, when he started Fair, he made Toni an offer she couldn't refuse.Purpose and IntentionFor Toni, it's all about purpose and intention.   It's about bringing her personal perspective to the table, even when it's painful.I'm always grateful when a guest is willing to "go there".   Because that's where growth happens.  And that is what Our Voices Matter podcast is all about.  Sharing the stories that help remind us of our common humanity.So, thank you, Toni, for being open and vulnerable and showing us what it looks like to walk with purpose.www.ourvoicesmatterpodcast.comwww.lorellemedia.comThis podcast is devoted to empowering us all to better understand each other's differences...one story at a time.  Emmy Award-winning journalist, Linda Lorelle, guides guests through insightful, unexpected conversations that reveal our common humanity.  This show is not about politics per se; it is about finding a way to reclaim civility in the context of the contentious times in which we live, by sharing our personal and professional stories, in hopes that others might find a glimpse of themselves.Support the show (http://patreon.com/OurVoicesMatterPodcast)

ARGonauts Podcast
Pepsi Navy Exposed (Andrew and Marn's ARG) feat. Riley Hopkins and Ty Galiz-Rowe

ARGonauts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 212:58


Join Andrew and Marn (and special guests Riley and Ty!) as they dig into the ARG that they ran, Pepsi Navy Exposed! Marn sold a Navy. Andrew runs a forum. Ty learns that Pepsi Spires exist. Riley mines for a bunch of Pepcoins. They all walk out with a commemorative t-shirt. Useful Links: The Orange Groves Network Pepsi Navy Exposed! The Player's Summary Google Doc The Bad Sewing Page Andrew Loves So Much Pepsi Logo Redesign Document Info on Peter Arnell, the Advertiser behind the Pepsi Logo Redesign Riley meets Booster Phillips at C2E2 Booster Phillips Action Figure P.e.p.S.I. Twitter Account, Complete with Memes Recommendations: It's time for ExtraLife!! Contact Us! Our Patreon Our Merch! Email: ARGonautsPodcast@gmail.com @ARGonautsPod

Great Women In Fraud
Episode 56 Mariel Klosterman

Great Women In Fraud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 33:34


Mariel Klosterman is a student at Dakota State University. She is a Cybersecurity Researcher | Speaker | Information Security up and comer.  She recently won the Open Source Rising Star at OSMOSIS 2021.  Learn about her career and the dos and don'ts of sock puppets.  Sock Puppets?  Thinking Muppets.  Nope.  Today we have the pleasure of a rising star in the field of OSINT.  Mariel Klosterman.  She just received the Open Source Rising Star of the Year at OSMOSIS 2021.  That is such an honor.  I truly wish I had been so focused when I was her age.  She is a pleasure to have as a guest.  You will learn a lot not only about her but also the do's and don'ts of sock puppets.  I definitely got some tips.This week I listened to Adam Grant interview Indra Nooyi, the former CEO of Pepsi.  Initially, I was not interested in her book because I saw tweets about her saying Ex Pepsi CEO Indra Nooyi claims she's "never, ever, ever" asked for a pay rise and finds the idea 'cringeworthy'.  I found that to be tone-deaf.  But when I dug further and listened to her talk with Adam Grant I completely changed my mind.  Not about the raise but about her. She is incredibly well-spoken, thoughtful, and is continuing to learn.  She is very interested in data analytics.  I have linked to the interview in the show notes.  Her life story and career path is just so interesting.  https://www.linkedin.com/in/marielklosterman/https://twitter.com/agentsandstonehttps://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/taken-for-granted-indra-nooyi-wants-us-to-reimagine/id1346314086?i=1000539774996https://www.osmosiscon.com/

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis
Musk Explains Stock Sale, Excellent China Production, Semi Updates, Starlink, Toyota (11.15.21)

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 11:22


➤ Elon Musk explains the mechanics of his ongoing sale of Tesla stock ➤ Reported China production numbers ➤ Tesla Semi spotted charging, Musk comments on Pepsi deliveries ➤ Starlink receivers spotted at Tesla locations ➤ Toyota teams up with other companies on engine development ➤ Canada comments of US EV credit structure ➤ Motor Trend selects 2022 car of the year Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/teslapodcast Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/tesladailypodcast Tesla Referral: https://ts.la/robert47283 Plaid producer Who Why Executive producer Jeremy Cooke Executive producer Troy Cherasaro Executive producer Andre/Maria Kent Executive producer Jessie Chimni Executive producer Jeffrey Yu Executive producer Michael Pastrone Executive producer Richard Del Maestro Executive producer John Beans Music by Evan Schaeffer Disclosure: Rob Maurer is long TSLA stock & derivatives

That's Games
97 - Allegedly Pepsiman

That's Games

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 65:49


This week, we make the literal game of our dreams and create a realistic ghost hunting experience!   Our games this week: Don't run out of Soda Desdemona   Index:  00:15 - Intro Banter 09:26 - Evan's Pitch 19:46 - Kenzie's Pitch 27:11 - Evan's Tendo 52:53 - Kenzie's Fix 1:04:43 - Outro   Evan's Etsy: https://www.etsy.com/shop/OfficeAngst    To find more episodes, check out our website: thats.games. If you have comments, questions, or contacts at Pepsi, hit us up on our email thatsgamespod@gmail.com or our Twitter @thatsgamespod. And if you want to become a donor, hit up our Patreon at Patreon.com/ThatsGames

The Tailgate Society
Old Man Strength 2.22 Off the Rails

The Tailgate Society

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 91:00


Tim and Chris sit down and immediately get heated about a number of topics.  What's better, Hostess or Little Debbie, Coke or Pepsi, Chris's terrible times at construction and who has the worst story about being drunk?

Minnesota Vikings - Wobcast
Vikings Vantage: Matthew Coller Joins to Talk Team Identity, Chargers Challenge | Week 10

Minnesota Vikings - Wobcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 22:41


Tonight's Vikings Vantage guest is Purple Insider's Matthew Coller. Matthew joins Gabe Henderson and Tatum Everett to discuss what the identity is of this Vikings team, how this team can look to find more success on Offense, what the Vikings Defense can do to slow down Justin Herbert and the unique situation the 2021 Vikings team finds themselves in during Week 10 of the season.  Head Coach Mike Zimmer holds his Friday Press Conference to talk about combating the Chargers Offense and gives an update on the Vikings current roster situation.  It's all on this edition of Vikings Vantage presented by Pepsi.

The Dave Glover Show
11-10-21 Hour 1 Pepsi Lite

The Dave Glover Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 34:10


Can we survive a 46 year old soda? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Cool Things Entrepreneurs Do
Sustain Your Game with Alan Stein Jr

Cool Things Entrepreneurs Do

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 34:07


Growing your career is one thing, but keeping it going is something else. The guest on episode 687 knows how to not only "Raise Your Game"... but how to "Sustain Your Game". Alan Stein Jr is a speaker, author, and performance expert who has a lot of great advice on how to succeed as an individual and a team. Alan Stein Jr is the hardest working person in the speaking business. He began his keynote career five years ago, and is now one of the busiest speakers in the United States. He has a great attitude and a work ethic that is hard to beat.  About Alan Stein Jr. Alan Stein, Jr. is an experienced keynote speaker and author. At his core, he's a performance coach with a passion for helping others change behaviors. He spent 15+ years working with the highest performing basketball players on the planet (including NBA superstars Kevin Durant, Steph Curry, and Kobe Bryant). Through his customized programs, he transfers his unique expertise to maximize both individual and organizational performance. Alan is a dynamic storyteller who delivers practical, actionable lessons that can be implemented immediately. He teaches proven principles on how to utilize the same approaches in business that elite athletes use to perform at a world-class level. His previous clients include American Express, Pepsi, Sabra, Starbucks, Charles Schwab, and Penn State Football, and many more. The strategies from Alan's book, Raise Your Game: High Performance Secrets from the Best of the Best, are implemented by both corporate and sports teams around world. https://thomsinger.com/podcast/sustain-your-game Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Wellness Force Radio
Solocast | The Sedation of Society: How To Reconnect & Strengthen Your Soul's Connection

Wellness Force Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 32:22


Be aware of how you truly feel and have an emotional inventory process where you understand that your life is on purpose, you understand who you are as a person, you understand your value in the world. If you are not clear on your life's purpose and you are not clear on what you want to create in the world, you are completely left wide open to that fourth phase of sedation. - Josh Trent Are You Stressed Out Lately? Take a deep breath with the M21™ wellness guide: a simple yet powerful 21 minute morning system that melts stress and gives you more energy through 6 science-backed practices and breathwork. Click HERE to download for free. Is Your Energy Low? Get more superfoods to improve your energy, digestion, gut health plus also reduce inflammation and blood sugar. Click HERE to try Paleovalley's Apple Cider Vinegar Complex + Save 15% with the code 'JOSH' *Review The WF Podcast & WIN $150 in wellness prizes! *Join The Facebook Group Wellness Force Radio Episode 421 CURED NUTRITION Save 15% off your CURED Nutrition order with the code WELLNESSFORCE: wellnessforce.com/cured It's taken me over a year to find the right hemp and CBD company to introduce to the Wellness Force Community and I could not be more thrilled that it's CURED Nutrition! CURED Nutrition is a movement inspired by nature and grounded in a shared desire to leave a lasting impression on you, our community, and this world. Together, they're a collective of heart-centered human beings who are inviting you – the conscious creatives, dreamers, and healers – to join their family. Learn how CURED hemp and CBD products can enhance your daily wellness routine. Try Cured's Full Spectrum Raw Hemp Oil Today They're Colorado-based organically grown hemp products that have been engineered to transform your approach toward an elevated life. Tap into your inherent potential – your greatest mind-body alignment – and nourish it with the supplements you were designed to thrive on. A greater existence is waiting. Listen To Episode 421 As Josh Trent Uncovers: [00:00] Our Spiritual Intelligence Hey, it's Josh from Wellness Force. This is a really special Solocast. It's been a long time. And the Solocast is really an art form that I think we all can practice, but today I want to give a different kind of practice to the world, to your consciousness specifically. Many of the concepts we explore on Wellness Force take us between physical and emotional intelligence. But as you know, in the background, there was always the spiritual intelligence that runs all things. This Solocast I actually recorded in a little hand recorder earlier this year, before the birth of my son. I was out at Tim's event, Tim Corcoran, who is the CEO, the founder of Purpose Mountain. Make sure you could listen to that podcast. If you haven't heard it, it is amazing for any men that want to become fathers or father the young man inside of themselves. [00:52] Break Out of the Sedation And what you're about to hear was actually dictated from a hand recorder when I was coming off the hill, when I was getting all these beautiful reflections, purely in the potent medicine of mother nature, and it was about our sedation. One of the things I found in 100 hours of being completely in nature, immersed with no food, only water, no fire, no knife, no protection, no cell phone, no other human beings. Literally my breath, water, a sleeping bag, and a tarp. It was incredible. And I'm going to share this with you. I hope that this medicine reaches you wherever you are, whatever phase you're in, whatever growth potential you're leaning into. My belief is that if you slow down and you breathe and you take in this medicine of really the Solocast for us all, that you can break out of the sedation we're in. Our society is set up to sedate us. [01:52] Society Sedation And so let's begin. In this podcast, you're going to learn about our sedation tools that we all have to fight against and be aware of. We'll talk about food. We'll talk about media. Then we'll talk about your own thoughts. We'll talk about freedom and we'll explore the difference between pure disease and pure health. If you yourself have dealt with addiction of any kind or disassociation or anxiety or depression, this podcast is perfect for you. Solocast society sedation. Our society is set up to sedate us. This is not a conspiracy theory. Everything in the truth is out in plain sight. Look at the food, media, current events, even the general narrative and consensus in most communities is negative. And you'll find that everything is about keeping you safe and playing it nice and cozy, but safe, nice, and cozy does not live on the edge of juiciness. Does not live on the edge of what life really is. [02:52] Sedation in Modern Society Yes, there are times where we do need to be sedated, like if we've had a traumatic event or if we've worked our butt off and gotten super sweaty and we've earned our relaxation. We just need to chill. Yes. Being sedated is okay at times. I'm an advocate for conscious rest, but not as a pulse of life, not as a heartbeat of our existence. Let's explore the factors of sedation in our modern society. As we begin with food, understand that food keeps us sedated by tons of calories with no nutrients, plain simple facts. Sedation occurs when people consume too many calories and they gain too much weight. Now there's a huge backstory that's psychosomatic and emotionally intelligence based that attaches to that. We'll save that for another show, but essentially what happens food is that if we take in too many calories, and those calories are void and empty of any kind of micronutrients, just because something's fat, protein, and carbs, doesn't always mean it's real food. [03:50] The Palette of Human Emotions If you look at the amount of money that is spent literally in the billions, with a big ass B, by behavioral scientists, you actually study the palette of human emotions if you're a behavioral scientist for Kraft foods, for Burger King, for McDonald's, and you get the inflection point of the perfect amount of sweetness. This is how people become addicted. This is the sedation tool that is called soda. It's called the bliss point. Did you know one of the ways that big foods sedates us, if we allow them to, is this bliss point? Did you even know that the bliss point exists? Where if it's one degree sweeter, you won't drink it, but if it's one degree not as sweet, you won't drink it either. There's a perfect Goldilocks point that all chemists for Dr. Pepper, Diet Coke, Coca-Cola, Pepsi, all these big companies with their labels on trucks flying all over America. [04:42] Enslaving the Population They literally pay billions of dollars over the course of decades, and they spend a billion dollars a year on other marketing. But if you add it up with the salary, the research and development, everything that goes into basically being a slave, scientists who know that they're enslaving the population for diabetes, for leptin resistance, for extra ghrelin, they're doing it for money. Can you imagine, can you truly imagine going to bed at night being one of these behavioral psychologists, behavioral scientists, really they're scientists, not psychologists. You're one of these people who literally it's your job to addict people to soda and addict people to junk food. Now, this isn't about judgment, but seriously, can you think about that? Can you imagine going to bed knowing that your work and how you get paid is to find the bliss point that's going to make people fat and die earlier. [05:36] The Global Spread of Bad Habits Whoa. and I really do say that without judgment. It's more just, Hey, what are you doing? So I digress, let's get back to it. Essentially, when we look at the topic of sedation in food and beverage, specifically, whether it's soda or Jimmy Dean sausages, or frozen foods, you ever go into a grocery store and you look down the aisle and you see this absolute Mecca of food. There's angels and junk food playing harps with little Ding Dongs. And you wonder to yourself who is eating this shit? Well, look at the research. A lot of Americans are, and it's even worse in other countries because our habits are bleeding over there. So this is what happens on a mental level. As you are trained from childhood to start eating these foods that are void of nutrients, the brain actually gets starved of calories and nutrients that it needs. [06:26] What Even is Real Food? It doesn't get its healthy fats like avocados. It doesn't get its fish oils like the omega-3s. This is what gets us to where we are, whether it's food or beverage or snacks, all of these for foods, if you flip the panel over and you look at the ingredient list, this is a queue. If it has more than a handful of ingredients or you look at those ingredients and you don't exactly know what it means are the worst one, if you look at the ingredients and it says natural flavors, look the hell out because it is not a real food. This is a food substitute designed by commerce to keep you sedated. Now, this might seem a little jarring if you're hearing it for the first time, but it keeps you sedated. These foods that are in the GRAS list, G-R-A-S. Search on DuckDuckGo for G-R-A-S. [07:13] The GRAS List That's generally regarded as safe. These additives turn your brain power down by adding fat to your body, making you feel sluggish and tired. Well I say, hell no. Hell no. Are you with me? Not for me. Not for you. You can take your sedation tools and put them somewhere else, Pepsi, Coke, Jimmy Dean, KFO, meat and chicken raised with animals and poultry standing in their own feces. The list goes on and on. And so that's the first piece. And there could be an entire discussion on that, but you already know this. If you've listened to the Wellness Force podcast, one or multiple times, you can see that there is a lot of behind the scenes going on with pretty bows and packages that make people purchase products, which is essentially like buying pigs wearing lipstick. [07:58] Sedation by News Media So now that you understand what's really going on with food, you can go to wellnessforce.com and search food or real food. We have a search bar on the homepage. Start learning more about how to protect yourself from the way that society tries to sedate you with food. It's much, much more than just what you're putting in your mouth. Now let's move on to the second piece of how society is designed to sedate men and women. And that is the news media. Now this is huge because the news media has a narrative that works to sedate us 24/7/365. And it does it by the vehicle of fear. And fear is really false evidence appearing real. Think about that. If it's false, if it's evident, the news media can make it appear real. And by they, I mean Rupert Murdoch and the six companies that run the entire media network for the entire United States and the world. You can Wikipedia this. [08:57] Breaking Down the Mainstream Narrative This is not conspiracy theory. Here's what happens. And I'm sure you're already feeling it or maybe you sent this to somebody who's already felt it and that's why you're here with us. But there are people that as soon as they find out, there's a narrative like this, that goes against the mainstream narrative, they like to label you and I, "conspiracy theorists." I say that with huge air quotes, but it's not a conspiracy theory. It's right out there. Do that basic DuckDuckGo search or Brave. And you will see that the media, the global media is run by six oligopolies, six conglomerates who all get paid billions and billions of dollars every single year in advertising fees. And you won't have to guess too far to know who their largest client is. It's big food and big pharma. It doesn't come as a surprise. [09:46] Selling the Solution to All Your Fears I think we all feel this on some level, but when you see what Joe Rogan is posting recently on Instagram, where Pfizer was the main prime sponsor on the majority of MSNBC, CNBC, all the different sporting events brought to you by Pfizer. Can you guys connect the dots? Look, I'm not here to say you should not ever have intervention from pharmacology. Even life insurance, right? I'm not here to say that that insurance is bad or we don't need to demonize entire industries. But I think everything has a time and a place. With your heart and with your intuition, notice that baked into every single commercial and every single piece of media propaganda out there, it is for you to be afraid. But what I have to sell you as a pharmaceutical company or an insurance company, it's the solution to all your fears, isn't it? Look at Viagra. [10:38] Hospitals Are a For-Profit Enterprise Oh, you're going to break up with your wife. No, just take this pill. Look at car insurance. Save a bundle with Geico, the little lizard that tries to make you buy insurance. And then of course, when they get you on the phone, they're actually going to upsell you for insurance that you don't need. But the worst of them all is health insurance. Companies that provide health insurance the way that it's tied into the medical industrial complex and the pharmaceutical and the wards that run hospitals. Just so you know, hospitals are a for-profit enterprise. Hospitals are not non-profit. Think about health insurance. The greatest health insurance we ever have is the belief in our own self, not an exterior company that can somehow provide us a solution. And again, there's a time and a place for medicines. I'm not here to demonize medicine. I think medicine has strayed very far from how it started. [11:29] Our Broken Healthcare System But if you look at the original symbol with the staff and the snakes right on top, it says, do no harm. Do no harm. Well, that is not the case. The majority of medicine out there has its own interest at the forefront and the patient in the backseat. It's a broken system, which is another podcast we can go into. And you can actually look at the podcast with Dr. Zach Bush, which is episode 345 or Dr. William Li, many of the physicians we've had on the show. This major news media, the fear narrative of Rupert Murdoch and the six media companies that basically run the planet, especially in the USA. How do those companies use fear to make us feel small so that we get sedated only when we buy their stuff that we will quote, be safe, or at least that's what they tell us? [12:17] Buying Out of Fear Ponder that question. How many times in your life, if you really tune in, have you bought something out of fear? I know I have. We've all done it. Oh my gosh. I got to get this supplement because it's going to make me live longer. Oh my God, I got to buy this fill-in-the-blank to give me blank because I'm not good enough or I'm not safe enough where I am. I just want you to know that there is truth and honesty in sales. Everything that I sell is honest. I believe in the BREATHE: Breath and Wellness program. From my heart, I believe in the offerings that we have for our community. I believe in the Freedom Accelerator Mentorship, because I do them with clients in groups all day long. And so the people in our community, I believe in our sponsors, Cured and Force of Nature and Paleovalley and Organifi. [13:00] Money is Energy All these amazingly organically grown, organically made products. Here is the key to breaking out of sedation when it comes to buying supplements or buying things that you really don't need. Just know when something's organic and people actually care about the planet, they're giving back to the planet. They're taking care of Mother Earth. We can take care of them with our money, right? Because money is energy. So wrapping a bow on this second category of sedation, the fear news media. You need to check yourself before you wreck yourself. I think it was a rap song by Busta Rhymes or Wreckx-n-Effect. Check yourself before you wreck yourself. So check yourself if you're watching the news media, either on your phone or Instagram or Facebook or television. I'm not here to tell you what to do, but tune in. If you feel stressed, if you feel less love for yourself after you watch the news media, it is truly as simple as putting it down, turning it off, and stop watching the news. [13:58] The Agenda to Keep People Silent It's actually quite that simple. Just stop watching the news. Stop it. Stop it. Now the sedation has already been talked about, so feel into this one a little bit more. We've already talked about how food keeps you sedated. We've talked about how people are easier to divide and control when you're sedated on many podcast, and specifically through the news media, which is number two. Well, when you're in fear, you're much easier to be divided and conquered. I'm not going to get into it now, but if you look at the history of mask-wearing in ancient Egypt and Africa, many continents, mask-wearing was always used to sedate people and to keep people silent. And I believe that is exactly what's going on right now. So this brings us to our third point. If you are watching something, you are consuming something from a media perspective, whether it's Facebook, Instagram, or even a podcast. I advise you to take a deep breath, do a basic search on news media corruption. [14:53] The News Media Corruption Specifically, there is one video that I'm going to link here in the show notes. And all these newscasters across the entire United States at the same time, on the same day that are all owned by the same conglomerates, they all said, "This is a danger to our democracy." It is going to put chills on your neck, my friend. It is going to freak you out. You'll probably never watch the news again and good. Make sure you go to the blog here for this Solocast. After hearing it, this incredibly terrible phrase, this is incredibly dangerous to our democracy. It's like robots. Make up your own choice. Again, I'm not here to tell you what to do. Stop watching the news media immediately. If you care for your health, if you care for your family, if you don't want to be sedated, put down the news media. It is poisoning you. [15:39] How Pornography is Harming Us It is subtly making you sick by keeping you in fear. Now, let's talk about the third face of sedation. We talked about how food makes you sick and the media makes you sick and sedated. And the next one is big for all of us, especially for men and it's pornography. And this is a polarizing topic, but pornography is something that 24/7/365 is available on every device. Available for any 9, 10, 11, 12, 13-year-old boy or girl to watch. And when you're addicted to pornography, and I speak from my own past experience on this, you will sedate the very life force energy that creates life inside of you. Play that back again. You will sedate the very life force energy that creates life inside of you. And this is the greatest tragedy that we are facing right now as a society, as parents. Pornography is not something to be used as a replacement for true sex and life force energy. [16:30] How Pornography Feeds On Our Energy Pornography is something that has been used as a tool to disconnect people from themselves. Same with prostitution. I'm not here to say that prostitution is right or wrong. You can make up your own choice on that, but there is a close neighbor of pornography and prostitution. They feed on the same energy and the energy is that you're not enough. You can't get what you need. You can't get fulfilled and nourished with your own value, so you have to actually pay for it with money or pay for it with your soul. Subtly pornography plants negative mental seeds. You don't have what it takes to get a real partner or to have a true sexual connection. Or maybe you got hooked on this stuff when you were young, just like me, right? It starts with Playboy. Then it turns into Penthouse. Next Hustler. Then it goes to the wavy lines on the cable TV, and then you try to point out a private part or a breast or something. [17:18] How Pornography Hooks into the Limbic System And, oh my God, there it is. So it starts out just like leading lambs to slaughter in Pinocchio. When all the kids went to the island, pornography starts out the same way. Nice and easy, and then it goes real south real fast, whether it's on a tablet or a phone or computer, these sites, once they hook into the limbic system of young men, look out because it's like feeding candy to a child, 24/7/365. Ponder this, sex is one of the most powerful energies known to this planet, gifted to us by great spirit. And it is an absolute atrocity that we allow this pornography to be consumed all day long in every country in every household. I'll tell you what, for all the parents listening, I almost guarantee that your child has most likely, already seen it. Some of the most disgusting things you could ever imagine. [18:07] The Dark, Demonic Energy of the Porn Industry And what does this do to us? How does this normalize gender dysphoria and sexual orientation confusion? How does pornography diminish the flame of life force energy inside of all beings? Well, it's quite simple because it teaches that a false sense of sexuality is real. And you can take that to the bank and cash it because pornography is not real. Porn is mental masturbation that turns into physical masturbation to have some kind of false sexual flame identified as the real thing. And this is a very sinister force, this pornography. If you look at many people that are involved in the industry, most are drug addicts, many commit suicide. There's a dark, demonic energy around the entire adult film industry and in many adult films. By the way, maybe back in the day before it became incredibly corrupted by dark energy and demonic forces, maybe there was some great erotic art and you know what? [18:57] Following Your Heart's Wisdom Maybe now there still is some great, incredible erotic art as well. I'm not here to say that erotic art done in a tasteful way is bad. Actually, I think it can really help people, but that is 1% of 1%, right? The elephant in the room, no one wants to photograph it. No one wants to talk about it, but it's right there on your child's phone. And this is what needs attention. This is what sedates us. And it starts out in childhood. There is a solution to everything that I've talked about today, whether it's food, whether it's news media, whether it's pornography. The last one is the thoughts that you think. This is what needs the most attention. And again, this starts out in childhood. Your heart's wisdom knows to turn off the TV and to turn off the news media. Your heart's wisdom knows to buy foods that are from Mother Earth, unadulterated, unprocessed, unhomogenized. [19:47] The Antidote to Sedation Your heart's wisdom knows that the antidote to sedation is turning into the heart's wisdom. And that is the gift that we all get to receive today. But how do you do this? How do you transform your thoughts from a seed of negativity to a mighty oak tree of positivity? It can almost feel like changing a circle into a square depending on your childhood and what you've been through. Well, this is the fourth phase. Your thoughts become things. So the first part of the transformation with your thoughts starts with the awareness of exactly how much or how far you want to transform. Look, many of us get caught up into zero or 100 where we buy into the manufactured shame economy that tells us we should always want to be a caterpillar that turns into a butterfly and accepting anything less about our desire for transformation means that we're lazy or we don't have ambition. [20:36] What is Success? But what if ambition was not always directly tied to success? What if success was a lot more nuanced and complicated? So many people think of success as this bank account with seven figures or more, but isn't success also a healthy body and a healthy mind that allows you to communicate with family members or friends that you love. What if success was essentially a state of being combined with the honoring of the mystery of life, where we can ascribe to the fact that we choose our parents, therefore we choose our destiny and the recipe for success and transformation can either come from pain or pleasure, from fear or from love. You'll get there from A to B, start to finish, no matter what. We're all going to die. So the most enjoyable and rewarding experience that you know deep down in your heart's intuition should always be the guiding light. [21:25] Building Greater Awareness, Higher Consciousness It should always be the North Star for any kind of achievement or journey discovery. It's the gift that God gave you called life. And what happens is we have this default mode network in our brain and the default mode network is literally what is scanning for danger when we're completing a singular task. And so, depending on what level of awareness you have, if you've done the emotional inventory practice that I've talked about on many shows, I will link that in the show notes here. If you've never really done any self-awareness practice, this is how you escape the negative thoughts, the negativity bias, the negativity force feed that is being stuffed down your throats like you're a duck and they're going to harvest your liver for foie gras. That's how serious it is right now. Yes, you cannot generate the energy that you don't have without consequences, both short-term and long-term to the mental and physical self. [22:17] The Wisdom Inside Us All But you can choose to generate the energy regardless of how you feel using caffeine or supplementation temporarily and infrequently. But the wisdom inside of all of us connected to the intelligence that we are will surely give us loud signals if we're too out of alignment and we're using caffeine, drugs or stimulants or shopping food porn, social media, workaholism, addiction to stress, or any other mechanism that disassociates the head from the heart. The price is going to be paid no matter what we choose to do, but the price that is paid living in alignment with restoring one's energy reserves before putting out maximum energy, that's never going to escape us as human beings. How do we course correct in this fourth phase of understanding how we are sedated? What can we do to adjust? How do we do things in life that actually make us happy? [23:09] Taking an Emotional Inventory Because when we're focused on what makes us happy, everything that's pulling us away from that will bubble up to the surface. And so to be aware of how you truly feel and to have an emotional inventory process where you understand that your life is on purpose, you understand who you are as a person, you understand your value in the world. If you are not clear on your life's purpose and you are not clear on what you want to create in the world, you are completely left wide open to that fourth phase of sedation. And that actually is the negative thoughts, those seeds of negativity, they never ever grow into a tree. They actually turn into weeds and then you start subconsciously gathering the evidence that you're not enough, and that you're not really worthy of your purpose. I want you to know that's not the truth. The truth of who you are, and the antidote to this fourth phase of sedation, was actually perfectly said by Alan Watts. Alan Watts asked his students what makes you itch? [24:09] What Makes You Itch? What was it that if money was no option, you would do, you would love to do? Well, then go do that. Otherwise, if you do something just for money, you will chase it for your whole life, and you'll be hinged upon the next moment where everything might be better or when I can have this much money or when I can just take off this much time, but it's all an empty vacuum begging for closure. And the only thing that nature hates more than a vacuum is a soul that has disconnected from itself. And by hate, I just mean the absence of love. So let me rephrase. I don't think the universe hates anything, but I do think that the universe wants to experience itself with the absence of love. The biggest barometer for all of us when we are not loving or for when we are out of love is when we begin to experience hatred and fear within ourselves. Take a deep breath. [24:59] The Power of Breath Ah, and if you're a student, if you're with us in the community for the BREATHE: Breath and Wellness program, then you know the power of the breath is something that no one can ever take away from you. Once you learn how to breathe properly, how to breathe in a circle, how to breathe in a box, how to do your breath-hold retentions, how to hold your energy locks, how to do your different cyclical and box breathing for your acute stressors, how to pull yourself out of the default mode network. You are not able to be sedated. The opposite of depression is expression. The opposite of anxiety is you here in this current moment. That's where everything's happening anyways. Can you feel it? I'm here with you right now know. We're here together right now. [25:53] Know Thyself You just let that be enough. And so take six more deep breaths as I say goodbye for today. And I'm going to give you an action, an inspired action to take. You now have the biggest barometer to know when you are not loving, when you experience hatred or fear within yourself, which that barometer will immediately light up when you experience one of the four ways that society sedates you, with food, with news media, with pornography, and with the thoughts that you think about yourself. Know thyself. It's written on the temple at the Apollo. Know thyself. Head over to breathwork.io. Use the code PODCAST25. It's my gift to you. This is a three week program. I'm so excited to guide you for the next 21 days, so you can actually use your breath to start being friends with your ego, understanding the parts of yourself that you still are holding onto with shame or judgment or loathing. [26:55] Transform Your Energy Through Breath Those aren't true either, but you must experience them right. Energy that is not transmuted will sit still and no energy can be created. It can only be transformed. Transform this energy because the first part of transformation starts with the awareness of exactly how far you want to transform. I don't care who you are, where you've been. This is an opportunity. And I want to invite you with my open arms. It took me three years to build this program. I traveled around the world. I spent 30 days in Thailand crying and actually throwing up a couple times, doing the most deep practices you can ever imagine. And I brought back the gems. I brought back a three-week process where you can use your own breath to clear your stress. Breathwork.io, the code is PODCAST25. It's 25% off. It's my gift to you. I cannot wait to see you in this program. And that is your inspired action. Whether you are brand new to Wellness Force or whether you are interested in breathwork, or maybe you've tried a lot of things and you're at a turning point in your life where you really need to receive support. This is the call to action for you. Breathwork.io, use the code PODCAST25, and I will see you inside. And until I see you again on another Solocast or another interview, this is Josh Trent saying goodbye for now. Excited to see you at my home's doorstep at breathwork.io. And until I see you again, I'm wishing you love and wellness. Links From Today's Show  GRAS list 345 Dr. Zach Bush 348 Dr. William Li BREATHE: Breath and Wellness program Freedom Accelerator Mentorship Leave Wellness Force a review on iTunes Cured Nutrition – Get 15% off of your order when you visit wellnessforce.com/cured + use the code ‘WELLNESSFORCE' Organifi – Special 20% off to our listeners with the code ‘WELLNESSFORCE' Paleovalley – Save 15% on your ACV Complex with the code ‘JOSH' Drink LMNT – Zero Sugar Hydration: Get your free LMNT Sample Pack, you only cover the cost of shipping Botanic Tonics – Save 20% when you use the code ‘WELLNESS20' Seeking Health - Save 10% with the code 'JOSH' M21 Wellness Guide Wellness Force Community  

Planet 2000's
Britney Spears - Britney (20th Anniversary Special)

Planet 2000's

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 86:25


w/ Special Guest @literaltrash2004By 2001, Britney Spears was three years into her career and had already sold over 40 million albums, had two number one albums, three sold out tours, performed at the Super Bowl, Grammy's and MTV VMA's, and scored three top 10 singles. Oh and she wasn't even 20 years old. But it was in the fall of this year that she would release one of her most personal and introspective albums in her discography “Britney”. From immaculate performances, to the catchiest pop tunes, to some of her most legendary looks, this era was Britney Spears at her peak. On this episode, we are celebrating the 20th anniversary of this album, and I'll be joined later on in the episode with special guest Bridget from @literaltrash2004 on IG for a track-by-track. So sit back, grab a Pepsi and get ready to be immersed into the world of Britney, not a girl not yet a woman. 

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1268: Pepsi: Our Tesla Semi Trucks Arrive This Year | 08 Nov 2021

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 24:20


Show #1271 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Monday 8th November. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. Welcome to three new Patreon Producers!  First up it's ANDREW WHELAN. And also welcome BRIAN D ANDERSON. Plus a new Executive Producer BILL CALHOUN. Thank you so much. NEW LOTUS TYPE 132 SUV PREVIEWED IN OFFICIAL IMAGE - Lotus has given a first look at its maiden SUV, which is codenamed the Type 132 and due to be revealed in full next year. - As first reported by Autocar, the Type 132 has been in development since 2016 and is set to launch with two four-wheel-drive variants, offering between 600bhp and 750bhp. It will be able to accommodate batteries ranging from 92-120kWh in capacity and will offer 800V charging. - The Norfolk firm has released the first in a series of official videos that will build up to the launch of the new Aston Martin DBX rival, which will be a key element of its bold growth strategy under the ownership of Chinese car giant Geely. - The Type 132 will be built at a new £900 million manufacturing facility in Wuhan, China, and will be one of two Chinese-built EVs the firm will launch in the next five years. Original Source : https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/new-cars/new-lotus-type-132-suv-previewed-official-image SAMSUNG SDI AND SK ON TO COMPETE WITH CHINESE MAKERS WITH PRISMATIC BATTERIES - Korea's three major battery makers, which have announced massive investment plans for the United States, are shifting their focus to Europe. They are looking to secure an edge with next-generation batteries in a price war with Chinese battery companies. - The key is competition with Chinese battery companies. China's CATL, the world's largest battery company, is building a battery plant in Germany for commercial operation from 2022. CATL produces prismatic batteries and is expected to focus on expanding orders from Volkswagen. In March, Volkswagen announced that it would increase the proportion of prismatic batteries to 80 percent by 2030. - Samsung SDI and CATL will compete fiercely in the prismatic battery sector. Samsung SDI is betting on Gen. 5, a next-generation prismatic battery to be used for BMW electric vehicles. - Major European automakers such as Daimler, BMW and Volkswagen are placing battery orders worth tens of trillion won to secure batteries for their vehicles to be launched after 2024. Original Source : http://www.businesskorea.co.kr/news/articleView.html BMW I7 REPORTEDLY GETTING THREE ELECTRIC MOTORS SHARED WITH I5 M - It was back in March last year when BMW originally announced there would be a fully electric version of the next-generation 7 Series. - CEO Oliver Zipse revealed during the Annual Accounts Press Conference 2020 the variant without a combustion engine would be the most potent. - Likely to be called i7, the 7 Series sans gasoline/diesel engine is said to have three electric motors in its highest specification. According to Auto Motor und Sport, two of them will be mounted at the back and the third one will be positioned on the front axle. The report mentions the e-motor driving the front wheels will have less power. - the same three-motor setup could be installed in a full-fat M version of the next 5 Series in EV form (i5) with a yet-to-be-confirmed total output of 750 horsepower. - It won't ride on a dedicated electric car platform as it will share its underpinnings and most of the design as well as shape with the combustion-engined models. For a bespoke EV from Bavaria, 2025 will be the year when the Neue Klasse architecture will debut. Original Source : https://www.bmwblog.com/2021/11/08/bmw-i7-electric-sedan-three-motors TESLA'S NEW 12V LI-ION AUXILIARY BATTERY HAS CATL CELLS INSIDE - With the refreshed Model S/Model X, Tesla switched from conventional lead-acid to an all-new lithium-ion 12 V auxiliary battery (Model 3/Model Y still uses a conventional one). Thanks to an outstanding, two-part presentation and teardown conducted by Ingineerix, we can take an in-depth look at this new solution, hinted at in early 2021 by Elon Musk and shown only briefly at the delivery event. - previously Tesla was using in the Model S/Model X a 12 V, 33 Ah lead-acid AGM battery. It stores about 0.4 kWh of energy, but weight is quite substantial: 27 lbs (12 kg). According to Ingineerix, such batteries last in Teslas about 2-4 years, which is pretty low and sometimes causes unexpected problems if the car stops working. - The new,lithium-ion battery is much smaller and much lighter (only about 4 lbs / 1.8 kg). That's because it's much higher energy density, but also has a lower energy content. We assume that with a more reliable and "smart" solution, there is no need for 0.4 kWh. The battery has only a 0.1 kWh of energy (99 Wh to be precise) and a capacity of 6.9 Ah, according to the description. - the new battery consists of a BMS circuit board made by CATL and four prismatic NMC lithium-ion battery cells (6.9 Ah each), connected in series. Original Source : https://insideevs.com/news/546087/tesla-liion-12v-auxiliary-battery PEPSICO CEO SAYS HE EXPECTS DELIVERY OF FIRST TESLA SEMIS THIS QUARTER - PepsiCo CEO Ramon Laguarta said on Monday that the company is expecting its first delivery of Tesla Semi trucks in the fourth quarter. - Laguarta was speaking from the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference, or COP26. During an interview on “Squawk on the Street,” CNBC's Jim Cramer asked about PepsiCo's plans to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. - “Transportation is about 10% of our overall gas emissions so it's important and we're working on different solutions. We replace our fleet regularly, every ten years more or less...and we're already starting to buy electric trucks actually from Tesla. I mean I don't want to promote anybody but that's the brand we're using so far and we're getting our first deliveries this Q4.” - The comments come almost four years after PepsiCo first announced it would purchase 100 Tesla Semi trucks. It was the largest known pre-order of the vehicle at the time. - On the company's Q2 earnings call in July, Tesla said it was pushing the Semi program to 2022 due to supply chain challenges and the limited availability of battery cells. Original Source : https://www.cnbc.com/2021/11/08/pepsico-ceo-says-he-expects-delivery-of-first-tesla-semis-this-quarter.html HOW FORD NEARLY LOST RIVIAN TO GENERAL MOTORS - GM was interested in Rivian at the same time as Ford, and Scaringe had chatted with Mary Barra about a potential investment, and those talks advanced quickly. GM were ready to pull the trigger, and Rivian was ready to take the money. WSJ reports that Rivian's leaders were skeptical of GM - in April of 2019, Ford announced it would be investing $500 million in Rivian. Since then, Ford's investments have reached $1.2 billion. Original Source : https://jalopnik.com/how-ford-nearly-lost-rivian-to-general-motors-1848015138 UK EV SUPERCHARGING COMPANY GRIDSERVE TO EXPAND TO US, ASIA - A U.K. company is in discussions with fuel forecourt operators in Europe, Asia and the U.S. to install vehicle-charging facilities that use electricity generated from renewable sources. - Gridserve Holdings Ltd. is already building a network of fast-charging hubs in Britain and now is planning to expand further afield. The initial international projects will be announced within the next few months, said Toddington Harper, founder and chief executive officer. - The company's backers include Richard Branson's The Rise Fund and Hitachi Capital U.K. Plc. - “Everything we have achieved in the U.K. has required us to overcome massive complexities and challenges -- experience we've spent years developing,” Harper said. “It's now time to share those learnings with partners across the world and accelerate the shift to net zero transport.” Original Source : https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-11-08/u-k-electric-vehicle-supercharging-firm-to-expand-to-u-s-asia E-MOBILITY EVENT ELECTRIFY EXPO SET FOR FRIDAY THROUGH SUNDAY AT COTA - The Electrify Expo, North America's largest e-mobility event, will take place from Friday through Sunday at the Circuit of the Americas - Over a half-million square feet of display space will be filled with electric vehicle and e-mobility brands including BMW, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche, Hyundai, Polestar, Kia, Volvo, Volkswagen, MINI, SUPER73, Rad Power Bikes and Segway. Visitors will be able to test drive electric products on demo courses throughout the weekend. - Admission starts at $20; free for ages 5 and younger. For tickets: electrifyexpo.com/attend. Original Source : https://eu.statesman.com/story/news/2021/11/08/e-mobility-event-electrify-expo-set-friday-through-sunday-cota/6339102001/ UK DEVELOPER HARMONY ENERGY'S IPO RAISES US$251 MILLION FOR TESLA MEGAPACK ROLLOUT Original Source : https://www.energy-storage.news/uk-developer-harmony-energys-ipo-raises-us251-million-for-tesla-megapack-rollout/ E-BIKES ARE ABSOLUTELY CRUSHING ELECTRIC CARS IN SALES Original Source : https://futurism.com/the-byte/ebikes-crushing-electric-cars TRANSPORT BY ELECTRIC SCOOTERS: ARE OUR CITIES READY FOR MICROMOBILITY? Original Source : https://www.archdaily.com/971488/transport-by-electric-scooters-are-our-cities-ready-for-micromobility QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM Returns on Monday 22nd November after my short holiday. Email me a suggestion for a possible question and I might pick yours!  hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM

Friday Night Wine Fight
Round 58 - Eccentric Millionaires

Friday Night Wine Fight

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 86:00


This week the girls take aim at... Eccentric Millionaires Bianca opened the episode with a list of the top 20 richest people right now (thank you, Forbes). We immediately sh*t all over the usual suspects.Then Bianca spoke on the life and experiences of the very eccentric Jocelyn Wildenstein, who is one of the wealthiest divorcees in the world. What makes her legendary is the life she led and the plastic surgery journey she went through.Amy decided to cover the 18th Duchess of Alba, Cayetana Fitz-James Stuart y Silva. The duchess was the most titled aristocrat until her death in 2014 holding over 50 hereditary titles.  Sarah finishes us off with a self-made millionaire by the name of Scott Alexander. This gentleman made his first million in the first year of opening his company that caters to the wealthy who desire to have what they want without any of the waiting time. He also got into the property market and bought himself a town in Bulgaria back in 2006.We say it every week, however, we really want to hear from our listeners. If you have a topic you want us to take aim at, please hit us up at the links below:FacebookTwitterInstagramTumblrOr email us at - fridaynightwinefight@gmail.comHead on over to the blog: https://fridaynightwinefight.blogspot.com/ for accompanying content.Episode edited by BiancaTheme music by Joseph McDade https://josephmcdade.com/musicSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/fnwfpodcast)

Minnesota Vikings - Wobcast
Vikings Vantage: Matt Birk joins to talk High School Football & the Baltimore Ravens | Week 9

Minnesota Vikings - Wobcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 22:41


Gabe Henderson and Tatum Everett review the disappointment from the Cowboys game, Mike Zimmer holds his Friday Press Conference and retired Center Matt Birk calls in to talk about what the Vikings must do to have success against a Lamar Jackson lead Ravens offense. Gabe and Tatum wrap up the show discussing what they want to see this Vikings team focus on to get a Week 9 win at M & T Bank Stadium on Sunday. It's all on this episode of Vikings Vantage presented by Pepsi.

Locked on Women's Basketball
At 23, the WNBPA Lands a New Multi-Year Partnership with Pepsi Stronger Together

Locked on Women's Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 35:39


Host Erica L. Ayala talks about her latest conversation with WNBPA president Nneka Ogwumike and executive director Terri Jackson. Erica also talks about the amazing business moves players like Chelsea Gray, Alana Beard, and Renee Montgomery are undertaking. WNBPA x Pepsi Stronger Together Renee Montgomery joins Atlanta Venture Capital Team Chelsea Gray returns to the ACC Briann January honored by the Sun Devils Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Shopify Go to Shopify.com/lockedonnba for a FREE fourteen-day trial and get full access to Shopify's entire suite of features. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Positively West Virginia
Episode 192 – Ellen and Daniel Lubuguin – Phillipines Best

Positively West Virginia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 33:19


Ellen and Daniel Lubuguin were both born in the Philippines. Daniel’s career started out working for Pepsi where he remained for 10 years, while Ellen worked as a hairdresser. The two of them decided to start Philippines Best as a food truck, dedicated to serving on Saturdays when Daniel was off. However, when Daniel hurt […]

Doughboys
800 Degrees with Betsy Sodaro

Doughboys

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 113:12


Betsy Sodaro (Duncanville, We Love Trash) joins the 'boys to talk about corn, Montreal eats, and their last time touring together before a review of 800 Degrees. Plus, a Pepsi edition of Jingle All The Whey. Sources for this week's intro: https://www.basketball-reference.com/draft/NBA_2003.html https://www.sun-sentinel.com/entertainment/restaurants-and-bars/fl-et-800-degrees-aventura-dwyane-wade-restaurant-review-20190116-story.html https://800degreesaventura.com/2019/09/18/wade-and-haslem-on-1st-year-800/ https://radaronline.com/p/dwyane-wade-eviction-lawsuit-udonis-haslem-restaurant/ https://www.laweekly.com/the-story-behind-800-degrees-ridiculous-pizza-deal/ Commercials featured in the Jingle All The Whey segment: The Choice of a New Generation Have a Pepsi Day You Got The Right One Baby Pepsi Challenge/Pepsi's Got Your Taste Generation Next See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

A Funny Feeling
Pepsi Ba-Dare-So - Listener Stories

A Funny Feeling

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 83:29


Halloween may have come and gone but it's always spooky season here! We have listener stories from Camille who wants to know if a ghost roommate should pay rent. Amyie has some insane video of a haunted. Brady has dream premonitions. Kennedy tells us about the lore of the Melonheads. Gretchen went on an hour tour to Waverly Hills Sanatorium. Sandra experienced a Christmas Ghost. Loretta had a spooky experience with a “bad Ronald.” And Kimbo was haunted by Jack Kerouac's hand. Please send us your own true paranormal experiences in either a voice memo or e-mail to funnyfeelingpod@gmail.com. Advertise on A Funny Feeling via Gumball.fm See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hashmap on Tap
#98 Achieve Creative Excellence with Anastasia Leng, Founder and CEO at CreativeX

Hashmap on Tap

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 50:48


On this episode of Hashmap on Tap, Anastasia Leng joins host Kelly Kohlleffel to talk about some fascinating marketing perspectives. Anastasia is Founder & CEO at CreativeX, which uses data and AI to help customers like Unilever, Heineken, ING, Facebook, and Pepsi achieve creative excellence at scale. Prior to CreativeX, she founded Hatch.io and spent time at Google and Interbrand doing both Product Marketing and Brand Strategy. Show Notes: Learn more about CreativeX: https://www.creativex.com/ Read CreativeX's report on creative quality: https://www.creativex.com/reports/creative-quality-score Connect with Anastasia on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/aleng/ On tap for today's episode: Casablance Tea & Apple Pie Chai Contact Us: https://www.hashmapinc.com/reach-out

Biz Bites N' More
Episode 134! Squid Game Token Scams, Coke Buys Bodyarmor, and Elon Might Feed 42 Million

Biz Bites N' More

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 36:58


Episode 134! The Biz Bites N' More Podcast covers the most recent and maybe quickest Crypto scam is coming from the popularity of Squid Game on Netflix, it all intertwines I swear. Elon might just feed about 42 million after being in *minor* talks with some UN folks. Finally, Coke is going to once again take on Pepsi in the sports drinks space. $KO $SQUID $TSLA #Comedy #Business Blog: bizbitesnmore.com Twitter: @bizbitesnmore Facebook: @bizbitesnmore YouTube: Biz Bites N' More Leave a voice message on anchor or leave a five star review on Apple and we will read it aloud/listen to it on the pod! VM: https://anchor.fm/biz-bites-n-more/message --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/biz-bites-n-more/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/biz-bites-n-more/support

WorkLife with Adam Grant
Taken for Granted: Indra Nooyi Says It's Time for Leaders to Care

WorkLife with Adam Grant

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 40:26


PepsiCo's trailblazing former CEO drove record profits—but did so while investing in employee well-being, consumer health, and environmental sustainability. In their second conversation, she and Adam are on stage for a lively, entertaining dialogue about how to improve our work lives and our workplaces. They talk about striking a balance between fitting in and standing out, winning support for major change up and down the org chart, and rethinking business education. Indra also reveals the name of the only world leader who ever intimidated her and why she doesn't care who wins the battle between Pepsi and Coke.

Awkwardly Social Podcast
Episode 249- Ghost Toast

Awkwardly Social Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 111:42


On this episode, Aerial and Jose welcome Jordan, a colleague of Aerial's to discuss their haunted work. Annoying places to be stuck at as a ghost, Pepsi vs. Coke and […]

Minnesota Vikings - Wobcast
Vikings Vantage: Terence Newman on Coach Zimmer, Randy Moss & the Cowboys

Minnesota Vikings - Wobcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 22:41


On this week's edition of Vikings Vantage, Vikings.com's Gabe Henderson and Tatum Everett talk to NBC 5 Dallas's Newy Scruggs about this weekend's matchup vs the Cowboys. Former Cowboy and Vikings player/coach Terence Newman also calls in to talk about playing against Randy Moss, Coach Zimmer's demeanor over the years and the keys to getting a win against Dallas on Halloween Night. It's all on this episode of Vikings Vantage presented by Pepsi.

The Solarpreneur
Do This Weekly for Success in Sales

The Solarpreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 15:33


Visit Solciety.co now!Speaker 1 (00:03):Welcome to the Solarpreneur podcast, where we teach you to take your solar business to the next level. My name is Taylor Armstrong and I went from $50 in my bank account and struggling for groceries to closing 150 deals in a year and cracking the code on why sales reps fail. I teach you to avoid the mistakes I made and bringing the top solar dogs, the industry to let you in on the secrets of generating more leads, falling up like a pro and closing more deals. What is a Solarpreneur you might ask a Solarpreneur is a new breed of solar pro that is willing to do whatever it takes to achieve mastery and you are about to become one.Speaker 2 (00:41):What's up Solarpreneurs. Today, we're going to be talking about how to plan your week like a boss, how to plan your week, like a Solarpreneur, how the top solar dog has do it. So we're going to jump in and up. But before we get into the topic, I want to invite you to tune in to next Tuesday's episode, because we have a very special announcement. We've been working on a top secret project. I know you guys are gonna love it. So make sure you tune in to next Tuesday's podcast. So let's jump into the topic today. It's going to be a quicker one, but the reason I am thinking so much about planning lately is because as some of you know, I'm in the Knockstar training, which talked about it before highly recommend, then Pepsi came in, Rick, Curphey those guys over there, they do some great training.Speaker 2 (01:33):So go follow them on Instagram if you're not already, but I am in there a coaching group right now, we have calls every week. And this last call, we had the opportunity to listen to someone that's if you've been endured or for any amount of time, you know, this guy he's like the guy, one of the godfathers of door to door sells his name's. Jeff Mendez walked to get him on the podcast here, but he talked about, um, just some keys that he's had to six his success. But one of the biggest takeaways that I got from that call that he and a lot of other top guys are doing is they are planning like insane amounts. They plan their days, very specific. They know what they're doing every 15 minutes. And again, another thing, um, I went to this conference about a month ago and a lot of the top guys there, a lot of the, you know, business leaders, entrepreneurs, um, they were talking about the same thing that if you don't have clarity in, if you're not planning, if you don't know exactly what you should do every 15 minutes, then you're probably not clear enough on your goals on the directions you want to be taking.Speaker 2 (02:45):And I'm not to that level yet. And maybe you're not either, I don't know. I'm not to the level of clarity where I know what I should be doing every 15 minutes, but hopefully I'm going to get there. And that's the goal. But as I was listening to Jeff Mendez, talk about all this stuff. I realized that man, I plan every once in a while, you know, once probably once, twice a month, I'll go and do some planning, but it's not a consistent thing. And as they listened to him, talk about all this, just like, man, I'm letting my days just basically tell me what to do. I'm reacting to events, every phone call that comes in every customer that hits me up. I'm just reacting. So what if I flip the script on that? What if I made it? So the day reacts to what I tell it to do?Speaker 2 (03:32):And this is what Jeff was talking about, how we need to get to that level, where we tell our days, what did you wear? We are the ones being proactive, not reactive. And so I decided to try it out this last Sunday, Mike, all right, Jeff Mendez talked about it. I'm going to get a little deeper in that planning session. Watch some YouTube videos studied some books I had about the topic. And I want to share with you guys a few things I had forgotten about that were really effective for me as I plan my week. And matter of fact, happy to report that as I did this time session, I, that next Monday, I got probably three times as much done as I had the other Mondays. So pretty cool. So if you haven't been planning that I want to invite you to start in the most important thing with this is to do it consistently for me.Speaker 2 (04:29):It's yeah. I just noticed a huge difference. Um, as it's consistent versus not consistent, like I've been doing once a month, isn't really gonna cut it. These things need to be weekly and then daily, right? You need every weekly and daily planning sessions. So I'm talking about weekly today. And then on a future episode, we'll talk about some daily planning tips, but your weekly planning session, couple of things with it here. Um, there's a great video. My guys over at art of Manliness. It's another cool podcast. You don't have to be a man to listen to it, but anyone can go take some cool, um, tips from this it's by Brett McKay, he does just kind of like men's lifestyle, tips, tricks, and secrets, but he put out a YouTube video on this and highly recommend it. In fact, I'm going to link it here on the episode.Speaker 2 (05:22):So go check out the show notes on wherever you're listening to this, but he breaks it down. So I want to give you a few highlights that I took from him. And then you can go watch the video. If you want to get more in depth, another tool and resource with this, I would definitely suggest you go read the book. Seven habits of highly effective people. It's one of the classics of self-development, uh, by my man, Stephen Covey, go read it. But he breaks this down in his book. And if you want to take him to an extreme level, he goes like in depth, I'm not doing it the level he does, but that's how you can really plan out your entire like life direction, where you want to go. Stocks talks about things like that. So I would suggest going first, go check out this video on weekly plan, but then go read seven habits of highly effective people if you haven't already.Speaker 2 (06:15):So here's the weekly planning session, couple things there. Um, first things first, you need to set aside the time to do it. And so whatever you're using, I use Google calendar. Just put a recurring event. That's going to happen every single Sunday I do them on Sundays. So I would suggest Sundays, but you could do it any day. So set a time and make it recurring in your calendar and then make sure you stick to that and then, um, pick your calendar tool. So I like to go digital. Some people use the paper stuff, but, uh, digital is cool. You can have all your obviously customers showing up on there. So if you're not having some sort of calendar sync with your, you know, solar appointments and all that highly suggest that as that's the first two steps. And then the another, another huge thing with this is make sure you're performing what people call a mind dump.Speaker 2 (07:11):So this is where you just take all the things that are on your mind. Just put them on a piece of paper, slap them down, anything that you need to do. So for me, it was like, I didn't get my oil changed. I need to fix one of the lights on my car. That's out. I need to, uh, go. Yeah, well, a lot of stuff on there, but all the things you need to do, just perform a mind, dump all the tasks you need to do. Um, so this podcast, it was on there. Every single thing in the think I've put it down and then this is another place I would suggest doing it, like on your phone or something, maybe in a notes app, because if you're like me, you're going to be probably have add like most salespeople have, okay. That's that's the, uh, curse and the blessing of being a salesman.Speaker 2 (08:00):A lot of us have very short attention spans. If you don't then, then great. I mean, you're one of the lucky ones, but put it in a place you can always access because chances are, you're going to forget to add things to the list. And you're going to think of something now, or, oh, I need to do this too. And then what that does it frees up your mental capacity, your mental space. So you can focus on what you really need to, and this is crucial because then throughout, as you go throughout your week, you're not just, again, reacting to things, you have it all written down and you know, what needs to be done. And then after that, just for you review your goals, review your life plan again, if you want to get more in depth, this is where, um, obviously before even doing all this stuff, if you can have like a life direction, then even more so effective review those goals though, and then review the previous week and then the planner I've been using for this, um, hour, once again, linked to it, but it's called the best self planner.Speaker 2 (09:04):You can go get it@bestself.ceo. I use the one called self journal, a lot of other great ones. And I don't think it's as important. You know, which planner you use. A lot of them are great ones. I've used brilliant cartoons, 10 exponent or in the past. Um, I've used Brendon Burchard is high performance planner. Think you use that one for a little bit. Um, this one I like, I just got off Amazon actually from, um, suggestion from Taylor Turnbull, one of the, uh, regional managers over it, Vivint Solar, I guess Sunrun. Now he actually suggested this one to me. So I picked it up like it a lot. So we can go get this a best self.ceo. It's the self journal, but what's really cool is they have weekly review sections in there where you can review everything, how it went for the week. And then you can track habits.Speaker 2 (09:55):You can set daily targets. So I think it's cool because you can set, you know, your numbers for the week weekend and set yourself goals in there. Put how many contexts you want to make, how many appointments you want to sit down with for the week, how many closes? And like we've talked about on the podcast before, this is how you really make cells. Not so much, I guess, in game, but as science is, you start tracking those numbers. So it set some goals around that, but get some type of planner that you can use. So I'll link to that one. If you guys want to go check it out, that's the best self planner. Hey and so review the previous week makes it easy. If you have a template set some weekly goals, and this is going to be a lot easier when after you've done the mind dump, right?Speaker 2 (10:40):You know, which tasks you want to take from, um, pretty easy usually to recognize what are the most important things, what things are not so important, you can go and put, I don't know, EBC, if you want focus on the most important ones first and the things that are going to actually move the needle. And then, like I mentioned set some cells goals that were solar sales people. So you can set, recruit recruiting goals in sets. Um, how many homeowners you want to talk to every day and maybe you want to talk to 15 homeowners a day, set that goal and then track it to every day. That will be a difference maker for you. And then after you figure it out, all the things you need to accomplish for the week, the non-negotiables put those in the calendar block out the time, as soon as you can.Speaker 2 (11:26):And that's where you can just throw them in your Google Calendar, right? If you know, you need to get your oil change, figuring out what's the day that you can do that. What's the morning you have free and then go ahead and put it in the calendar. And, um, yeah, Stephen Covey, he talks about the concept of big rocks. So if you haven't heard that, um, analogy he talks about, it's just putting in the big rocks, the most important things first, and then you imagine them in a jar, you pour the pebbles around them. You're going to fit room for everything, right? Where if you put in the pebbles first, you're not going to fit the big rocks in there. Okay. So that's really the essentials of this main thing is just get a planner and make it consistent. Hey, it doesn't have to be some complicated, long thing with it.Speaker 2 (12:16):Just be consistent, whatever you do set aside time. Every single week. I remember when I did my, uh, church mission, we had their two year mission in Columbia. I was on their plan and in Spanish had no idea what people were saying, but they made us do this. Every single week. We had to set plans for who we're going to visit, how many people were going to baptize. And then every single week we had to do this two hour long thing where you apply on your entire week. And then you did this thing. We were in companions there. Um, so I was with, you know, Mexicans, uh, you know, Peruvians, all different, all different walks of life down there. They pair off with one of them. And then you have to like say what you liked about that person this week, and then bringing up the stuff that was bugging you, pretty intense sessions.Speaker 2 (13:07):Okay. So, um, if you're married, maybe do that to maybe get your spouse down and, uh, get them to do some planning with you. Hey, but I promise this will pay dividends. If you're not doing that already, I noticed a huge difference. So I'd love to hear what other systems you guys have. What other planners have worked, go and shoot me a message or post it in the Solarpreneur or Facebook group, if you're a part of that. And that's pretty much it guys. So just a crash course on the weekly planning. They'll let me know if you like this kind of stuff and we can go more in depth on the weekly and the daily plans and then get digging some deeper stuff with it. Let me know what you think though. And don't forget next to today. We're going to be dropping the big announcements. So tune in next Tuesday, tell your friends, tell your mom, tell your grandma, listen to the podcast. Next Tuesday. You will not want to miss out. So with that being said, thanks for listening. Appreciate you guys. Love you guys. And we will see you on the next episode.Speaker 3 (14:10):Hey, Solarpreneurs quick question. What if you could surround yourself with the industry's top performing sales pros, marketers, and CEOs, and learn from their experience and wisdom in less than 20 minutes a day. For the last three years, I've been placed in the fortunate position to interview dozens of elite level solar professionals and learn exactly what they do behind closed doors to build their solar careers to an all-star level. That's why I want to make a truly special announcement about the new learning community, exclusively for solar professionals to learn, compete, and win with top performers in the industry. And it's called the Solciety, this learning community with designed from the ground up to level the playing field to give solar pros access to proven members who want to give back to this community and help you or your team to be held accountable by the industry. Brightest minds four, are you ready for it? Less than $3 and 45 cents a day currently Solciety is open, launched, and ready to be enrolled. So go to Solciety.co To learn more and join the learning experience. Now this is exclusively for Solarpreneur listeners. So be sure to go to solciety.co and join. We'll see you on the inside. 

Way of Champions Podcast
#244 Trevor Ragan Returns to Discuss His New Book Learner: How to Get Better at Getting Better

Way of Champions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 63:34


Trevor Ragan is one of my favorite people to speak with. He is the Founder of The Learner Lab (formerly Train Ugly) and host of the Learner Lab Podcast, two of the best resources for all things mindset, performance, and of course, learning and how to get better at getting better. I am most excited about his new book Learner, which he is currently releasing FOR FREE in audiobook form, four chapters at a time, on the Learner Lab Podcast. The book talks explores so many topics that will make you a better coach, a better parent, a better leader, and a better athlete.  Trevor is one of the most sought after corporate and sports team trainers in the US, and has presented these topics for companies such as Pepsi, Microsoft, The Cleveland Indians, and Chipotle. But as you will hear today, he is just an all around great guy, humble, and full of incredible ideas. So buckle in, get ready to take some notes, and when we are done you can check him out at these links: Our first interview with Trevor episode 118: https://changingthegameproject.com/118-trevor-ragan/ The Learner Lab website: https://thelearnerlab.com/ Learner Lab Podcast: https://thelearnerlab.com/podcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/learner_lab Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/learnerlab/ Do you want to access all of our videos from the 2021 Way of Champions Conference? They are now available here: Click Here to Learn More. This includes sessions with Steve Kerr, Brad Stevens, Cindy Timchal, Jenny Levy, George Mumford, Tara VanDerveer, and Quin Snyder along with Anson Dorrance. It is hours of top level coach education on connecting with your athletes, building your culture, and winning the “Inner Game.” This week's podcast is brought to you by our friends at Sports Refund. Many of you probably buy trip insurance, every winter I buy ski pass insurance, to make sure that if I get injured I can get my money back on that expensive investment. Well, many of us spend thousands of dollars on our kids sports club fees, but what if they get hurt? In many cases you cannot get your money back, but now with Sports Refund you can. And it's not just for long term broken bones or torn ligaments. It is only a 14 day waiting period, so you even get a refund if you roll that ankle or pull a hammy! For just pennies on the dollar, you can make sure that if your child gets sick or injured and misses a month or more you can get your money back, or your club can get paid. It's a great product, just go to www.sportsrefund.com/game and get your free quote, and if it sounds good you can either get your club to sign up, or you can purchase on your own.  Become a Podcast Champion! This weeks podcast is also sponsored by our Patreon Podcast Champions. Help Support the Podcast and get FREE access to our most popular online courses, a $300 value. If you love the podcast, we would love for you to become a Podcast Champion, (https://www.patreon.com/wayofchampions) for as little as a cup of coffee per month (OK, its a Venti Mocha), to help us up the ante and provide even better interviews, better sound, and an overall enhanced experience. Plus, as a $10 per month Podcast Super-Champion, you will have access to never before released and bonus material, including: Downloadable transcripts of our best podcasts, so you don't have to crash your car trying to take notes! A code to get free access to our online course called “Coaching Mastery,” usually a $97 course, plus four other courses worth over $100, all yours for free for becoming a patron. Other special bonus opportunities that come up time to time Access to an online community of coaches like you who are dedicated listeners of the podcast, and will be able to answer your questions and share their coaching experiences. Thank you for all your support these past four years, and a special big thank you to all of you who become part of our inner circle, our patrons, who will enable us to take our podcast to the next level. https://www.patreon.com/wayofchampions

NutritionFacts.org Video Podcast
Flashback Friday: Which Has More Caramel Coloring Carcinogens – Coke or Pepsi?

NutritionFacts.org Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021


How many cola cancer cases are estimated to be caused by Coke and Pepsi in New York versus California, where a carcinogen labeling law (Prop 65) exists?

The EdUp Experience
335: Shareability Defines Value - with Anne Olderog, Partner, Vivaldi Group

The EdUp Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 46:16


We welcome YOU back to America's leading higher education podcast, The EdUp Experience! In this episode, YOUR guest is Anne Olderog, Partner at Vivaldi Group, YOUR guest is Dr. Joe Sallustio, & YOUR sponsor is Claremont Lincoln University! Anne discusses her marketing experience working with Fortune 500 companies & how technology will help define the future of learning. What does the technology adoption curve look like today? Anne says that VALUE is defined by SHAREABILITY today, regardless of the quality of the content. If the content is not shared, people won't experience it or believe that it has value. When an industry is going through disruption, it's important to stand for something & communicate what that something is -- effectively. Wow, one of our favorite all-time episodes & one that will bring you INSTANT value. Anne is a Partner at Vivaldi, leading projects on growth/innovation strategy, positioning and brand architecture. Prior to Vivaldi, Anne was a Partner at Horizontia Consulting, leading marketing & branding projects for clients in financial services, technology & consumer goods. Prior to Horizontia, Anne was Head of Strategy at Clark McDowall, where she created new brands & laid out innovation strategy for clients such as Pepsi, Kellogg's, Dannon or Twinings. Her background in branding (at Wolff Olins, part of the Omnicom Group) as well as in strategy (at McKinsey & Co & the Boston Consulting Group) enables her to combine the rigor of an analytical approach with creative insights & out-of-the box thinking. She also brings experience in leading organizations through change gained on the client side, as Senior Director of Strategy & Corporate Development at Bertelsmann, one of the world's largest media companies. She started her career in the mergers & acquisitions/corporate finance group at Goldman Sachs. Thank YOU so much for tuning in. Join us on the next episode for YOUR time to EdUp! Connect with YOUR EdUp Team - Elvin Freytes & Dr. Joe Sallustio ● Learn more about what others are saying about their EdUp experience ● Join YOUR EdUp community at The EdUp Experience! ● YOU can follow us on Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn | Twitter | YouTube Thank YOU for listening! We make education YOUR business!

The Witch Wave
BONUS Episode! Taschen's WITCHCRAFT co-editor Jessica Hundley and designer Nic Taylor

The Witch Wave

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 60:35


Happy Halloween and Blessed Samhain! We've got a special Witch Wave bonus episode to celebrate the release of the bewitching new book that Pam co-edited and co-authored: WITCHCRAFT from Taschen's Library of Esoterica series.On this episode, Pam speaks with Library of Esoterica series editor Jessica Hundleyand series designer Nic Taylor about all of the art, writing, design, and magic that went into WITCHCRAFT.Jessica Hundley is a journalist, editor, and author of numerous books on music, film, counterculture and psychedelia. As series editor of Taschen's Library of Esoterica series, she has overseen and written for all volumes including TAROT, ASTROLOGY, and WITCHCRAFT. Her other books include The New New Age: Crystals, an acclaimed biography on country rock icon Gram Parsons, and an extensive overview of the photography of Dennis Hopper from Taschen to name but a few. Her interviews and articles have appeared in such publications as Vogue, Rolling Stone, NY Times, Mojo, and many others. She is also a creative director and filmmaker, who has collaborated with such artists and brands as John Legend, Pepsi, and Bonobos.Nic Taylor is the head of Thunderwing Studios, an award-winning Los Angeles-based creative studio founded in 2007 by Nic and his partner Jennifer Brandt-Taylor. They specialize visionary work with visionary people via a diverse portfolio of projects in publishing, music, film, fashion, food, interior design and cultural institutions. Some of their projects include design for the recent film adaptation of Emma directed by Autumn de Wilde and for gorgeous brands like Bellocq Tea and Rule of Three.Our sponsor for this special episode is VERAMEAT.

Harmony in the Home
124: Pepsi Parenting

Harmony in the Home

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 14:49


How do we respond when our emotions feel like they're going to explode out, just like a shaken soda can? As adults, we have rough days all the time. Emotions run high; we feel out-of-control. We want to scream or cry or throw things, and we have decades of experience being human! That means that we (usually) have tools to monitor and regulate our own emotions. Small children have no such safeguards! When kids have big or tricky emotions, it is their first time experiencing them! As adults, in parenting or teaching capacities, our responsibility is to help our children navigate their new and frightening experience of feeling very big emotions. I've learned, from my years as a counselor and teacher, that role-playing and other interactive demonstrations serve well for teaching. Role-plays are best suited for times when your child is at their normal calm state rather than when they're in the “red” zone (see episode 89, Red Light Green Light). You can help your child visualize buildup of tricky emotions with this demonstration, then remind them about it in a fun way to help them diffuse when the pressure builds later on. Shake a soda bottle up as you explain to your child that big emotions can build until they explode, then open that soda right up and let the pressurized soda explode out. It's fun, it's kooky, they'll probably laugh at it if they're small. I've titled this episode Pepsi Parenting because as you know I love alliteration — but any kind of soda or carbonated beverage will do. Coke, La Croix, you name it. Later on, if you notice your child approaching the “red” zone, you can avoid demanding that they “calm down” or “grow up.” If either of those worked, I would do them on my own kids, but they don't! Instead, try mentioning, “hey, are you feeling like a shaken-up Pepsi can there?” to keep the atmosphere at a quality I like to call “light and fluffy.” Note that this doesn't mean we steer away from the serious. We can have honest communication about hard things like tricky emotions, but the dialogue doesn't have to be serious. Humans, like other mammals, naturally learn by play. As you practice modeling healthy responses to big emotions, your children will continue to learn and grow. Don't give up; consistency is the key to their learning experience, and yours as well. You've got this! Subscribe on Apple! Subscribe on Android! Join my FREE parenting bootcamp! Let's Connect! Here's where you can find me: Learn more at https://www.coachingkelly.com. Find me on Instagram! Find me on Facebook!

Remarkable Retail
Kara Goldin, Founder & CEO of Hint, is Undaunted, and Our Very Special Guest

Remarkable Retail

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 38:34


This week's special guest is Kara Goldin, CEO and Founder of Hint,  the No.1 non-sweetened beverage company not owned by Coke, Pepsi or Dr.Pepper in America and the bestselling author of Undaunted: Overcoming Doubts & Doubters We learn about Kara's journey from tech executive to food entrepreneur, motivated by her desire to find healthier beverage options. It's a fascinating story of perseverance and pivots, starting with Kara and her husband boot-strapping their way into Whole Foods to triumphantly creating a whole new category and and evolving Hint into a powerful omni-channel brand with strong wholesale, direct-to-consumer distribution and, now, even a store! We also get Kara's perspective on striking the right balance between wholesale and going direct--lessons that all brands can benefit from.But first we open up the episode with our quick takes on recent retail news that caught our attention, including Camp's rather ironic move into a former Toys R Us space. We also learn that Amazon processed more in the value of product returns than Target sold the old fashioned way last year and that the soon to be world's biggest retailer has (as yet) undisclosed plans for a small space in a Texas mall. We wrap up by unpacking Adobe's holiday e-commerce forecast and try to make sense of Crocs continued remarkable success.Kara Goldin is the Founder and CEO of Hint, Inc., best known for its award-winning Hint® water, the leading unsweetened flavored water. She has been named one of InStyle's Badass 50, Fast Company's Most Creative People in Business, Fortune's Most Powerful Women Entrepreneurs, Fortune's Most Innovative Women in Food & Drink and EY Entrepreneur of the Year for Northern California. The Huffington Post listed her as one of six disruptors in business, alongside Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg. Kara has successfully navigated the world of large companies and startups in many industries including media, tech and consumer products. In addition, she understands retail and direct to consumer well. She is an active speaker & writer and hosts the podcast The Kara Goldin Show where she interviews founders, entrepreneurs and other disruptors across various industries. Kara's first book, Undaunted, published by Harper Leadership, was released in October 2020. She lives in the Bay Area. Follow Kara on all social handles @KaraGoldinSteve Dennis is an advisor, keynote speaker and author on strategic growth and business innovation. You can learn more about Steve on his       website.    The expanded and revised edition of his bestselling book  Remarkable Retail: How To Win & Keep Customers in the Age of Disruption is now available at  Amazon or just about anywhere else books are sold. Steve regularly shares his insights in his role as a      Forbes senior contributor and on       Twitter and       LinkedIn. You can also check out his speaker "sizzle" reel      here.Michael LeBlanc  is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice.   He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience, and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career.  Michael is the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts including Canada's top retail industry podcast,       The Voice of Retail, plus        Global E-Commerce Tech Talks  and       The Food Professor  with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois.  You can learn more about Michael       here  or on       LinkedIn.  

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
562: Dr. C. Adam Callery: Post Covid-19, Resetting Business for Continuity

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 37:19


In this episode, Managing Director of Sagesse Lumiere, Dr. C. Adam Callery, talks about small In businesses in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. Today, Dr. Callery talks about the implications of the pandemic on future business strategies, the importance of agility, and understanding cashflow. How often should a business of any size check their financial status? Hear about some emerging trends, three critical activities for success, how Dr. Callery helps other entrepreneurs, and get his valuable advice, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “Never confuse faith that you will prevail in the end.” “If you want to be successful moving forward, you have to be ready for these unexpected changes.” “You can't be afraid to act fast, but you don't want to be reckless.” “You have to take a step back sometimes and attack a problem formally.” “I cannot just assume that because my bank account has money in it that I'm actually in a good position.” “You have to position yourself, or maybe carve out specific time, for you to really learn your industry.” “You have to be close enough to the operations to know what's going on.” “It is extremely important, whether you're an existing business owner or a new business owner, to truly understand what cashflow means.” “You can do it. You can actually be an entrepreneur. Just go out and do it.” “Bring people around you who have the knowledge that you need, because you're not going to know everything, and if you adapt that knowledge, you'll be successful.”   More about Dr. Callery Dr. Callery is an entrepreneur and higher education educator. For the past eleven (11) years, Dr. Callery has worked directly with the start-up and emerging business communities at a national level. For ten of the eleven years, Dr. Callery has held the roles as facilitator and trainer for two (2) nationally recognized small business growth programs, the US Small Business Administration's Streetwise MBA Program in Chicago and the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program. His company, Sagesse Lumiere, a small business coaching and consulting firm, was established seven years ago to complement the work he was doing in these programs. To date, Dr. Callery has advised over one thousand small business founders while participating within the national programs cited above. Dr. Callery, as a coach and consultant, works with small business owners on approaches to effectively build value by deploying new business practices and processes to improve financial performance and operational efficiency. Prior to working with small business owners as a business coach, Dr. Callery worked for several Fortune 1000 companies such as IBM, Dow/Dupont, Pepsi, United Airlines, and First National Bank of Chicago. His broad industry experience has prepared him to be a capable business consultant. Since leaving the corporate arena, he has become a trusted advisor for many small business founders. As a higher education educator, he has served as an Associate Dean for workforce development programs and currently works as a tenured faculty member for Harold Washington College, one of the City Colleges of Chicago. Dr. Callery has earned a Bachelor's in Chemical Engineering from Illinois Institute of Technology; a Master of Business Administration from University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; and a Doctorate in Higher Education from National Louis University, Chicago.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Small Business, COVID-19, Research, Success, Cashflow, Entrepreneurship, Mentorship, Finance   Resources: The Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program WSC1998: AVOIDING THE BLUES FOR AIRLINE TRAVELERS   To learn more, follow Dr. Callery at: Website:          https://sagesselumiere.com Twitter:            @callerysagesse Instagram:       @callery_sagesselumiere LinkedIn:         Dr. C. Adam Callery   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:  00:03 Hi, Dr. Callery. Welcome to the podcast. It's an honor to have you on. So thanks so much for joining me.   00:10 I'm so happy to be here. And so glad you invited me to attend your podcast.   00:14 Oh, this is great. And you know, like I said in the, in the intro, you were our lead instructor for the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Business program. So I owe a lot of my being a therapist and having to be a business owner to now being a business owner who happens to be a therapist to you and the rest of the staff and business advisors. It was really life changing. So thank you so much.   00:40 Well, I think I thank you for being a participant in the program. It's a hard program, we asked a lot of you for an extended period of time. And I have to say, I cannot do it solely by myself. It really is just a good strong team that covers so many different areas of business management that's needed for most small business owners. So I'm just having to have good people around me, that helps make the process very smooth.   01:05 Yeah, absolutely. And today, we are going to talk about sort of small business owners, and the effects of COVID-19, which we have been in for the last 18 months and doesn't look like it's ending anytime soon. But we are back to work. There are mitigation factors in place. But now, how do we position ourselves for the long term in this new world? So my question is, what are some of the lessons you have learned over the past 18 months? And what are the implications for your future business strategies?   01:50 Well, I think that's a great question. Because myself, I'm also a business owner, I am a small business coach. And I would have to say for the last 18 months, that's been a question that's been raised many times, I can think back to March, when we first moved into COVID. Everything shut down. And to be honest, it seemed very dark at that time. And then for the next three to four months, I was working with a lot of small business owners, and we were having those discussions, what are what's next, you know, how do I get out of this. And in fact, if you started to look at the newspaper, you'll see headlines saying this is the worst crisis since the depression or behind closed doors, there's calamity. And when you read those phrases, it actually diminishes your ability to be a leader, and organizer of your business. And so what I had to do as a coach started having different discussions and say, we must look forward. And the way I did that was having a time with individuals to stop and say, Hey, if we take a look at the Great Depression, or the great recession of 2008, those same phrases were being said then, yet, we were still standing in 2020. So we have to believe that we're going to pass through this period as well. And so the discussion became, how do we do that, and in most cases, and then bring back or I should say, shorten your horizon from looking out two to three years, to just make it now bring it down to three months down the six months, make it manageable, it was easier for you to see out three months, it's easier for to see how six months, and then just be very tactical. And so during that last quarter of 2020, through the beginning of the initiation of 2021, many of the conversations with business owners have centered on that, how can we focus on some short tactical goals that keep the lights on, they keep my current employees satisfied, so they stay with me to make sure the customers I do have still like the services are providing or the product that they're buying from us. Therefore, we have to maintain the same level of quality. So just being very tactical that way. And then hopefully, when we're on the other side, we can then return to a posture where we're thinking longer term.   04:06 And all that, to me just sounds like a small business owners that we have to be really agile, and we have to be able to pivot. And so can you speak to a little bit more about agility as a business owner, and how we can foster that if it's something that we're not used to?   04:28 Well, agility, you know, it's a strong word, right? So it means that we're flexible. But again, coming through this COVID period, it didn't seem like flexibility existed. Everywhere I turned, something was shutting down. So I've seen closer to the end, then something that was gonna be an opportunity in the future. And I came across a quote, it came out of the book called Good to Great. That was written in 2001. And I wrote it down someone just read it verbatim because it's a unique quote, but I think it addresses issue. It says never confused. That you will prevail in the end. So that saying this thing of, I have faith that I'm going to win, I have faith that my business is going to win, it's going to be successful, and I'm gonna make a lot of money from it, or I'm going to be fame, I'm going to become famous from it, you have this faith, you got to have this confidence, that's probably a better word, I got to have the confidence that I will make it through. But here's what the rest of the quote says it says, I can never lose that confidence. However, I must have the discipline to confront the most brutal acts of your current reality. So the current reality of 2020 was, everybody's impacted at the same time, my competitors, my peers, people across the ocean, everyone is getting hit with this calamity. So now I have to think out of the box, and I also have to think very practically, so that's where the agility comes in, I didn't have a lot of time to wait six months to see if it's gonna work, because I may not be here. So I may have to take some cost cutting measures that are going to be very draconian, but necessary, I may have to talk to my staff and negotiate with them, and maybe get them to take a cut and pay, letting them know I'm trying to keep everyone alive here, I may have to talk to my customers in a different way and find out, are you still here? You know, are you still viable, because my customer is also impacted by this. So then I can sort of forecast what my sales potential could be. Because many of the customers went out of business for many of my clients. So agility means that you are being sorry, that you're focusing on today. And you're being very practical, very tactical, you're using your experiences, from your I should say, your past experiences as a business leader, and a business owner. But you also are willing, and here's the key, you are willing to take in advice from subject matter experts who are in your industry, and also outside your industry to help you navigate this because this was so unknown, a lot of unknown territory that we were crossing through.   06:55 Absolutely. And I would also think that in that time, I'll use the example of the physical therapy profession, but kind of acknowledge acknowledging emerging trends during this time. So for the physical therapy world, certainly here in New York City, we were close, literally shut down ghost town from March to almost June or July of 2020. So what do you have to do to keep things going? So the emerging trend was telehealth? Yeah, telehealth has been a trend and it has been coming up and coming up. But I think as a PT, if you didn't acknowledge that that trend existed, and didn't hug that trend, like it's your best friend, you you were in trouble, right? So what other kinds of trends Did you see within the small business world that people had to acknowledge and embrace in order to not only bring them through 2020. But I'm sure a lot of those trends have continued well into this year.   07:56 I agree 100%, the hardest trend, and I don't know if I can call it a trend, that's probably more of an action, the action that I may have to return to what I was before. And what I mean by that is, maybe we're a sizable business, you had 50 employees, or maybe employees and contractors working for you that accounted for about 50 people that you're responsible for, had a fairly good customer base that you're working with COVID hits and everything shuts down. Now, you may have to go back to what you were three years earlier, that's when you started the business where you were a smaller company, not as nimble because you were smaller, but you were very focused and very targeted. And that was the trend, I was saying that people say I'm at the roll back to where I was before. And that by rolling back doesn't mean I'm failed, which is another trend element. It doesn't mean I'm failing, it means I had to adjust, you know. So it's realizing that businesses aren't always going to go up with hockey stick and grow, grow, grow, grow without interruption, that there will be these troughs. And if I hit a trough, I may have to back up a little bit. In this case, people have to back up a lot. A great example of that would be the restaurant community. Here in Chicago, I've seen it all over where people physically had to change the menu, they may have 30 items on the menu. And they just took duct tape and started covering over things and reduce the menu down to something that they could manage based on staff based on a cost of the ingredients based on just pure demand, because now they're doing just takeout services, no longer doing to sit in services. why they do that, because I have to still pay the rent, I still have to pay some utilities, I still have to pay something. So I have to have some money coming in. And I want to be here for the next day. So I may have to swallow deeply. And Take another deep breath and say I have to go back to where I was maybe when I started the business so I can survive this period not knowing if you remember not knowing back in April, how long is this going to go? Because the predictions were two months, six months, two years, five years. Nobody knew. So You had to be very specific and very intentional about how far you will go back in time in order to survive and be here for the future.   10:09 Yeah, I mean, gosh, back in March, when New York City shut down, I was like, ah, six or eight weeks, we'll   10:15 be back up and running. Let's see, 18 months later,   10:21 not quite back to where we were. But getting closer. But to your point, yeah, I thought it would just be like six or eight weeks. And this will be a little adjustment that I'd have to make in my business. But it, it actually turned into a long term adjustment that I love. And I'm glad now that it's part of my business. So that ability to pivot quickly actually turned into a big positive for my company, because now I can actually see more people because I don't have to see them in person.   10:51 I agree. I agree. And I stole something else out to you. It's not so much of a trend, but it's probably a revelation. So we know a lot of business owners have different backgrounds, and they come from different walks of life. And so if we put an academic hat on, we have individuals coming out of MBA programs, and they have knowledge around business. The key is what does an MBA program teach? What MBA program teaches is that you need to go out and look at the environment that you're in. So that means you research on what some of these latest trends are. When we have a situation like COVID, I know many business owners typically don't worry about what the trends are, they worry more about what's going on in their daily environment in their community, and their marketplace, and they're just focused on can I sell something tomorrow, I think COVID has opened up a new reality that if you want to be successful moving forward, you have to be ready for these unexpected change as well. How can I reduce the number of unexpected changes, I start to do some research, I start to do some reading in my industry and also outside of my industry. So I can see those trends that you were talking about earlier. So telemarketing has been or tele health rather, has been around for a long time. People talk about it, but it wasn't economically feasible. Then when I need it, those who knew about it jumped on it. So but I had to know about it, I needed to have that information. So this is an important time as business leaders now to say, what else do I need to know? Do I need to join my industry associations? Do I need to go out and and go to conferences, go to particular training programs, where I can start to learn about what is going on around me so I can be better equipped for the next situation may not be a pandemic? Or it could be droughts, if you're out west? Who knows? It's going to be something so how can I be prepared for the next something?   12:39 Yeah, because you know, something that you had brought that you brought up in our kind of communication before we recorded this is and I like this phrase you put in quotations, you can't be afraid to act fast. But you don't want to be reckless. Yes, yeah, right. And so by doing the research, you can act quickly, and not in a reckless manner. Because you know where you are, you know, what the industry is holding, and you've got that research. So you can act quickly with authority. And with some sense of operation.   13:15 I agree. And ask where, you know, we want to say, you want to be intentional. And that's what that word really means. And especially when we're in our programs, we use that word a lot. But it's good to unpack it. So you just mentioned and that reckless, and I'm not trying to be strong willed. So when I'm talking to my employees, I'm trying to hit them over here with a club, but I'm intentional. So I have I know where I want to go, I've taken the time to do some research. So I've set a goal in mind, I've also decided on a path that we can take, but I'm also willing to ask around to see if that's the best path. So that's where I'm not being reckless, I'll go ahead and qualify it by talking to other subject matter experts, talk to other people in the industry and say, This is what I want to do based on my capabilities. What do you guys think? What do you people think? And that can help me then to minimize risk? Because we'll never eliminate it. We're just trying to minimize risk. So we can be successful.   14:10 Absolutely. And so now, we've we've sort of identified research we have we spoke to people, we got advice. Now we want to move forward. So we need some sort of formal operations. So these operations, as you said, they kind of revolve around three critical activities. So can you share with the listeners what those critical activities are, to make that those formal operations successful?   14:38 So I can that'd be beautiful. We've met through the Goldman Sachs program and what I've learned over the last 10 years in that program, is that you have to take a step back sometimes and attack a problem formally. And so we start off with the purpose, what is your business purpose? And what that means, of course, is what do you think? to do in your marketplace, who you're trying to sell to, why you're doing it, why are you actually involved in this work? The second thing we try to do is examine how we actually do the work. And this is the operational piece. So how do we actually do the work? How do we earn our revenues? How do we manage our team? How do we actually produce the product or service? Are we doing it efficiently? And then the last piece I call her reflection, but that's the research piece. I've been doing this for five years, I've been doing it for 10 years, is this the best way to do it now, based on the changes in the business environment, changes in government regulations, changes in social trends, changes in the number of competitors, or the type of competitors that so the three pieces are looking at my purpose? Why did I get into this business? Why do I want to do this or continue to do this kind of work, I look at my model my business model in general, and think about how I currently conduct business and see there's a better way I can do it more efficiently, more effectively. And then last but not least, I have this reflection or research activity that I do continuously continuous learning to make sure I understand my marketplace, understand my industry, understand what's happening with competitors around me also start to probe and find out are my customers still satisfied with what I'm doing? And if not, what do I need to do to reach them?   16:21 Yeah, and I'm glad that you said that you're continuously looking at this, because this isn't something that you do when you start your business, you assess your purpose, your model and solutions and reflect. It's not like you just do it once. Yes. Like how often would you say do you recommend even the business owners that you work with, kind of go through these three critical activities?   16:47 Well, I think we can take the model from the corporates. Now you understand corporations are huge, billion dollar places, but they are billion dollar places for a reason. And that is because they do take the time to annually look at what they do, and assess whether or not is making sense. So if I was any business owner, I don't care what size you are, I would make it a point to say maybe in the fall, that November period, Christmas period, when it's kind of quiet, people focused on vacation or focus on the holidays, you take that time, sit down with your management team and say, hey, let's think about how our last year went. Is there something that we want to do better, right doesn't mean that you did anything wrong? Is there something that I can improve upon? Or are there some new things coming down the pipeline that I need to be aware of, or we'd need to be aware of, that we need to plan for starting in January. So doing an annually isn't a bad practice. And if you do it formally, and you do it every year, it just becomes part of your routine. And you'll start to think about the questions you want to ask each other during those sessions. And you'll be able to flesh out what is happening with the business. In fact, you probably want to go ahead and bring in some of your key employees that sit them around a table, get some insight from them on what they're experiencing, when you're engaging your clients, when they're engaging your suppliers, or if what they see, in general, they may see some things in the market that you have missed. And it's a good time to sit back and get their feedback as well.   18:16 And how often would you say suggest to a business owner small of any size, but let's say a small business owner, to really look at the financials of their business once a quarter every month, every week, every night before you go to bed? Like is there overkill? Or? Or what? What are your thoughts on that?   18:40 That's a tough question is a tough question, right? Because Is there any should you have any limit on when you look at your numbers, because for instance, everybody will tell you, you need to know your numbers. So if I'm sitting in front of an investor, or a banker, they're going to say you need to know your numbers. But I guess the question is, what are they really asking me? They're probably just asking, do you know enough about your numbers to tell me whether or not you're profitable? That's really the question they want to know. And they want you to be able to tell them that, tell them you're profitable in a confident manner. And they can easily see if you're sort of dancing around the question, right? Because you really don't know your numbers today. They can sense that in the way you respond, your eye contact, and so on. So to your direct question, how often should I look, if I put on my accounting hat, we typically look once a month. So every month we take a step back, and we see how the business is performing financially. In order to do that, we probably need to have some type of system in place. That could be a QuickBooks system, or it could be a cell spreadsheet. It depends on the complexity of your business. And that's when we have to define a small business. So small business can be defined as any business with less than 500 employees. That's a big business. But let's say I'm a mom and pop I have less than 10 employees. In fact, I am the key employee and everyone else is a contractor. If I'm that size, once a month is probably still appropriate, I need to take the time to stop. And look, I cannot just assume that because my bank account has money in it, that I'm actually in a good position. So if I take the time, look at it once a month, that's probably enough. The furthest I would like to go out is probably three months, you know, quarterly, but want to go beyond that. Because a lot can happen to a business in two days, let alone in 90 days. And if I'm not keeping track of my numbers, I may find myself in a very dire cashflow position, and maybe find myself going out of business fairly quickly.   20:42 Yeah, excellent advice. Excellent advice. Thank you for that. And you know, as we start to wrap things up, what would be if you could give one or two pieces of advice to let's say, a new small business owner, so their business is less than a year old? What is your best advice for those business owners?   21:04 I think it's extremely important for the person just getting started to do some of the things we're talking about earlier, you have to position yourself or maybe carve out specific time for you to really learn your industry. So that could mean joining an industry association, going to those industry association meetings. So that's gonna take time, read some of their white papers that they generate about your industry. So for instance, I was at one time I was looking at buying a limo service, I love this guy service used to take me to the airport all the time, all his drivers were professional, his cars were clean, well maintained. And all I knew about the business at the time was the fact he took me in a limo to the airport. But that's not knowing the business. So I went ahead, I contacted limo Association, they sent out to me information on the business, you know, on the industry, the cost factors, the maintenance issues, some of the trends in the industry. After reading all those materials, and learning that it was a very highly capitalized business, I realized that it wasn't for me, at that time, still like the business. But I knew I was not in a position where I had enough capital to keep the cars up to spec to meet the requirements of running a limo business. So if I'm starting a business, whatever it is, I need to know as much as possible about that industry and the business model itself. How's the business make money? What are the cost factors? What are the what are the cost influencers, I need to know that like the back of my hand, then when I'm running the business on a day to day, I need to be in the business to see how it really operates. I've met some people that have started a business. And I've started another one that started know when I started another one. And I now ask them I said, Well, how do you possibly run three businesses at the same time? Well, I got people working for me. And what comes to mind is something someone told me many years ago, is that you have to smell the people. And what this is gain from Business School, and the professor was saying, you have to be close enough to the operations to know what's going on. And if you're too far away from it, there's too many things that can happen to the operations that will shut you down. And so if you're just getting started, your focus needs to be in the business and getting the business to a place where it's stable, and is sustainable. That usually means creating cash reserves, that usually means bringing in solid employees, it usually means having a great understanding of your customers so that you know you have returning customers that'll help keep the business afloat.   23:42 Excellent. Thank you so much. I know a lot of people that listen to this podcast or maybe budding entrepreneurs, they've been in business for maybe a year or two. So I think that advice is really great for that group. Now, is there anything have we not covered something that you were like, I want to hit this point during this podcast?   24:02 I think it's important, we haven't used that key phrase. And that's cash flow. It is extremely important whether you are a existing business owner, or a new business owner to truly understand what cash flow means. And so when we talk about cash flow, what it means in general, is that we're talking about the money that's coming in. And that's where most people focus is, Hey, I'm making revenues, things are going well. But you can't just stop there, you got to think about the cash outflow. And people say I write the checks every day, I know how much money is going out. The third piece is timing. You have to think about when the money has to be paid out. When does that liability has to be paid out, and whether or not I'm going to have enough cash on hand to pay it on time. Because once I default on that payment, I'm now in trouble. The bank is knocking at the door. My creditors are knocking at the door, my investors are knocking at the door and I'm going to have problems paying my employees so on and so on. So cash flow is very important. And it's important from the standpoint of you have to truly understand the definition of it. And what it means is inflow is outflow. And it's also timing. When is the money coming in to pay those current debts that I have? Will I run into a situation where I don't have enough coming in to pay those debts? And if I do, what am I going to do about it? Am I going to reach into my personal account and pay it? Am I going to run down to the bank and ask for a line of credit? Do I need to run out and find investors? Who can give me additional cash to help me close that gap? So cash flow is critical?   25:36 Yeah. And I think, as you were saying that the thing that popped into my mind is, ooh, this is why Ponzi schemes ultimately fail.   25:44 Yes, yes. Because the money stops coming in. And their commitments outweigh our Yeah, extend beyond the, the amount of money that's coming in.   25:54 Right. Right. Yeah, that is why a Ponzi scheme fails. And, and I agree that cash flow is so important. And it's something that I didn't really wrap my head around fully until the Goldman Sachs program. You know, I knew like, yeah, money's coming in. But once I started doing cash flow statements, I was like, Ah, okay, yeah. Now I got it. No, I know, I can now I understand this as, as one of the three sisters, you know, your cash flow statement, your balance sheet, and your income statement.   26:32 Exactly, exactly. And it's the cash flow statement, and we never talk about, you talk about it. If you again, be school, we talk about all the time, but most people just stop at the income statement. In particular, they stop at the income side, then when you introduce the balance sheet, I don't see why I really need it. I don't have any assets. But they don't combine the two to come up with the cash flow. And that's what you really want.   26:53 Yeah, yeah. Excellent. All right. Now, where can actually let's talk before we before I asked, Where can people find you? Why don't you talk a little bit more about your business? And how you help other entrepreneurs, your coaching business and what you do to help entrepreneurs?   27:12 Well, what I do is I focus in the business development area, as well as the operations or organizational development area. And what does that mean? So I come in as a business coach, not as a consultant, I sit down with my clients, and we have discussion. So it's like we're doing now and we focus on the issues that are facing them. So in a business development side, for instance, such as a marketing issue, we're not talking about social media, what we're talking about is more around a target market. Have they identified the right persons, or the right audience? When it comes to marketing? Also, you got to think about the delivery of the product and service. Are there some challenges in terms of quality, some challenges in terms of delivery, that they're facing? And then we start to peel back a little bit? And this is where we get into the operations? Why are you having those challenges? Is it a capability issue is a capacity issue, these things have to be fixed, or the marketing, social media really won't matter? So I focus on a business development sort of working backwards? What are you trying to sell? What are you servicing? How are you working with your clients? And what are your business capabilities, what is what is your business capacity, in order to essentially achieve the goals that you've set for the business or to meet your current demand for your customers, those are all very important pieces, because most businesses will suffer or in a trough when they get to that third and fifth year when they try to scale up. And they always find, hey, I have this resource deficit. And I usually think it's money but it's not so much money, it's really capacity and capability, they may not have the right people on hand, they may not have the skill themselves in order to scale up and they need to go back, build up those skills so that they can grow. And that's where the coaching comes in and sort of help the build up those skills.   28:57 Awesome. Now where can people find you?   29:00 Well, they can find me right on the internet. I have a website out there, my, my company has a very unique names, it's called suggests luminaire and will suggest and stores wisdom, and then luminaires light. And so right out there on the internet, I have a web page where you can contact me through that or you can come back contact me through LinkedIn. So I do have a LinkedIn profile out there. That's probably the best way most people will contact me through LinkedIn. And then we'll set up an appointment and we go from there.   29:29 Perfect and we will have direct links to all of that at podcast at healthy wealthy, smart, calm and the Show Notes for this episode, so don't worry if you didn't have a pen you can take it down. totally get it we will have one click direct links to all of that. And now, Dr. calorie for the last question, which is a question I asked everyone, knowing where you are now in your life and in your business, what advice would you give to your younger self   29:57 so what I would tell my younger self I'm fully invested in entrepreneurship, I would tell my younger self is that you can do it, you can actually be an entrepreneur. To be honest, when I came out of school or coming came out of undergraduate, my mind wasn't there, my mind was I had to go through this career track, because that's the only possibility that entrepreneur thing, or that small business thing was just too far out there. You have to literally be born into it. It has to be a legacy relationship in order to start a business. Today, I recognize after meeting so many people in this space, that's really not it is really tied to have any interest. People use the word passion, but I go beyond the same passion, you really have that ambition that you're willing to give all in order to accomplish this. And so I would tell my younger self, that you do have that ability, you do have that ambition, just go out and do it. Bring people around you who have the knowledge that you need, because you're not gonna know everything. And if you adapt that knowledge, you'll be successful.   31:03 And I think that's great advice. And especially for a lot of the physical therapists who listen to this podcast, because so often we graduate, and we think, well, I'll work at a clinic, I'll work at a hospital, I'll do that for 40 years, and then I'll retire. You know, it's like, it's never it. Because in school, we're not really given any entrepreneurial mentorship or classes, you really have to seek it out on your own. And so I think that's great advice for any students listening or newer graduates, who think, Well, my mom wasn't wasn't an entrepreneur, my dad or I don't, I don't have any real role models in my immediate family, but that you can do it if you surround yourself with the right people, and you have the ambition and passion to do it. So I think that is excellent advice. So thank you for that. Well, and thank you again, for coming on the podcast and for being a great instructor in the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Business program, I can put a link up to that too, if people are interested in learning more about the program because it is a life changing program. It was for me and I'm sure as an instructor, it must have been for you as well.   32:13 Oh, it hasn't. It hasn't, I have to say, I never, I never thought I'd have this experience. It's been now going into my 11th year and I've actually set before 1000 business owners never thought that could happen in my wildest dreams and having the ability to have conversations like we're having now. Again, it's opened up my mind to say the The possibilities are limitless in this country when it comes to being able to create something that you want to create. And that's the beauty of it. So it's it's a fantastic opportunity. Fantastic country fantastic. Time, even though it's difficult time, it's a fantastic time to to do something that you want to do.   32:57 Excellent. And on that note, I will wrap things up by saying thank you again and thank you to all of the listeners for tuning in today. Have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.

Fescoe in the Morning
10/20 - Travis Kelce

Fescoe in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 12:48


Chiefs TE Travis Kelce joins the guys to discuss the season & his new project with Pepsi.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Morning Toast
175: The Morning Toast Halftime Show: Thursday, October 14th, 2021

The Morning Toast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 53:07


Kacey Musgraves Responds to the Grammys Excluding Her New Album Star-Crossed from Country Category (PEOPLE) Kim Kardashian Says Daughter North, 8, Tells Her 'Your House Is So Ugly' When Upset with Mom (PEOPLE) NFL taking Super Bowl halftime sponsorship rights to market as deal with Pepsi set to expire (CNBC) 'Desperate Housewives' Alums James Denton & Teri Hatcher Reunite In Hallmark Channel's 'A Kiss Before Christmas' (Deadline) Apple Studying Potential of AirPods as Health Device (The WSJ) Real Housewives of Beverly Hills Recap The Morning Toast with Claudia (@girlwithnojob) and Jackie Oshry (@jackieoshry) Merch: https://shopmorningtoast.com/ The Morning Toast Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/themorningtoast Girl With No Job by Claudia Oshry: https://www.girlwithnojob.com/book

Motley Fool Money
Big Macro, Earnings Season Previews

Motley Fool Money

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 38:37


What does the disappointing September jobs report mean for investors? Which two stocks need a win this earnings season? What trends should investors be watching? Why are Roku and Zoom Video suddenly looking more attractive? And which CEOs are under more scrutiny? Jason Moser and Ron Gross answer those questions and more, analyze the latest with Facebook, Constellation Brands, Pepsi, Levi Strauss, Delta Air Lines, and share two stocks on their radar: Matterport and Voyager Therapeutics.