The Integrated Schools Podcast

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Hard conversations about race, parenting, segregation, and inequities in our schools.

Courtney Mykytyn, Andrew Lefkowits


    • May 25, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
    • every other week NEW EPISODES
    • 45m AVG DURATION
    • 90 EPISODES

    Listeners of The Integrated Schools Podcast that love the show mention: school choice, integrated schools, conversations around, hoarding, integrating, preschool, important conversations, thoughtful conversations, privilege, courtney, racist, important topics, anti, engage, recording, choices, white, education, race, parents.



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    Latest episodes from The Integrated Schools Podcast

    Reflections on Season 7

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 37:43

    As Season 7 comes to close, Val and Andrew reflect on 17 episodes and share our most valuable takeaways and thoughts from this season, then we get into some juicy listener questions, as well as some announcements! Spoiler alert! Val has agreed to return for Season 8!! As we reflect on the season, we have to take a moment to say thank you to a bunch of people who have made this season possible. First of all, all of our guests, who have shared their research, their stories, and their personal reflections. We are humbled to be in conversation with you all: Sarah and Anna Stefan Lallinger Tomàs Monarrez Sarah Soonling-Blackburn Zoe and Kara Chrissy Colón Bradt Heather McGhee Susan Faircloth Brittany Brazzel Carol Anderson Chantal Hailey Tricia and Daniella James Haslam Additionally, the podcast staff collective at Integrated Schools, for brainstorming guests and stories, for working on transcript, and promotional graphics, and social media posts, and, most importantly, for being great thought partners in this important work: Darci Craghead Courtney Epton Anna Lodder Emily Moores Jennifer Patton Alex Stevens Ali Takata Stay tuned this summer - we have a couple of bonus episodes planned, and we are re-releasing the Between We and They series from 2019 with some new reflections. We'll also be hard at work recording conversations for next season. If you'd like to support this work, we'd be grateful if you went to our Patreon and became a supporter. Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us podcast@integratedschools.org. The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits. Music by Kevin Casey.    

    Anti-CRT, Book Bans, and A Call to HEAL

    Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 59:24

     When the backlash against "CRT" started, we thought it would blow over. It felt as though the attacks were in such bad faith that they didn't even deserve a response. With nearly 35 states at least considering some type of classroom censorship bill, clearly, we were wrong. And yet, the question of what to do about it felt daunting to take on. And then, we found HEAL Together, an initiative from Race Forward.  H.E.A.L. (Honest Education Action & Leadership) Together, is building a movement of students, educators, and parents in school districts across the United States who believe that an honest, accurate and fully funded public education is the foundation for a just, multiracial democracy. In addition to serving as a hub to connect organizations across the country already engaged in the fight for educational justice, they also provide tools and trainings so that anyone can become an organizer and lend their voice to this effort.  We are joined today by James Haslam (he/him/his), who serves as Senior Fellow at Race Forward leading the HEAL Together Initiative. He shares about his organizing work, and what caregivers can do to push back against bad-faith narratives and act to support a fully funded, honest, accurate public education for all kids. LINKS:  HEAL Together's Website Sign the HEAL Together Pledge Register for the HEAL Together Training Series James and Cathy Albisa - OpEd in TruthOut Rights And Democracy - The organization James founded in New Hampshire Southlake Podcast White Rage - Dr. Carol Anderson Dr. Anderson on our show Mother's of Massive Resistance - Dr. Elizabeth McRae Use these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us. Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further. Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us podcast@integratedschools.org. The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits. Music by Kevin Casey.

    Examining Anti-Blackness: A Multiracial Parent Roundtable

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 63:55

    Some of the most meaningful episodes we record for this show are the conversations we have with parents and caregivers reflecting on the choices they make for their kids and their own learning journeys. Our last episode with Dr. Chantal Hailey examined the role of anti-Black racism in school preferences across racial identities. One of the themes was the many ways that anti-Blackness shows up in White communities, but also in communities of color. We deeply believe in the power of multiracial dialog and so thought we would pair that episode with a conversation with a multiracial group of parents reflecting on Dr. Hailey's research. We're joined by Dr. Daniela Boyd, a Latina daughter of Ecuadorian immigrants, and Tricia Ebarvia, an Asian American daughter of Filipino immigrants. Through love and a commitment to knowing better and doing better, we explore many of the ways that anti-Blackness shows up for each of us, and in our respective communities.  Content warning, particularly for Black listeners, there is discussion of anti-Black racism that can be difficult to hear. This conversation is grounded in love and community, but please take care of yourself.  LINKS: Dr. Chantal Hailey Dr. Hailey's recent research on racial preferences in school choices Teaching Hard History - podcast from Learning for Justice Just Mercy - Brian Stevenson Use these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us. Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further. Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org. The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits. Music by Kevin Casey.

    Unpacking the Racial Hierarchy in School Choices

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 67:55

      Dr. Chantal A. Hailey is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at The University of Texas at Austin. Her research is at the intersections of race and ethnicity, stratification, urban sociology, education, and criminology. She is particularly interested in how micro decision-making contributes to larger macro segregation and stratification patterns and how racism creates, sustains, and exacerbates racial, educational, and socioeconomic inequality. Her recent paper, Racial Preferences for Schools: Evidence from an Experiment with White, Black, Latinx, and Asian Parents and Students uses the New York City High School Admissions Process as a case study to understand how individual choices are shaped by race and racism. Employing experimental and quantitative methods, her study reveals the various ways that the racial demographics of a school influence the perceived desirability of that school across racial identities, as well as for students and their parents. She joins Val and Andrew this week to discuss her research and expand the conversation beyond the Black/White binary. LINKS: Racial Preferences for Schools - Dr. Hailey A NY Daily News OpEd about her research No Choice is The Right Choice - Dr. Linn Posey-Maddox Original research from Chase Billingham and Mathew Hunt on White parents' preferences for schools Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further. Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org. The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits. Music by Kevin Casey.

    The Debrief: Carol Anderson on White Rage

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 31:24

    Last episode, Carol Anderson on White Rage, was a lot, so we're taking today's episode to discuss. LINKS: White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Nation's Divide We Are Not Yet Equal – a young readers version of White Rage One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression is Destroying Our Democracy The Second: Race and Guns in a Fatally Unequal America. Eye's Off The Prize – Dr. Anderson's 2003 book on the shift from a fight for human rights to civil rights at the NAACP Use these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us. Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further. Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org. The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits. Music by Kevin Casey.

    Carol Anderson on White Rage

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 67:03

    "Since the days of enslavement, African Americans have fought to gain access to quality education. Education can be transformative. It reshapes the health outcomes of a people; it breaks the cycle of poverty; it improves housing conditions; it raises the standard of living. Perhaps, most meaningfully, educational attainment significantly increases voter participation. In short, education strengthens a democracy." Dr. Carol Anderson is the Charles Howard Candler Professor of African American Studies at Emory University and author of White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Nation's Divide, One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression is Destroying Our Democracy, and The Second: Race and Guns in a Fatally Unequal America. At the core of her research agenda is how policy is made and unmade, how racial inequality and racism affect that process and outcome, and how those who have taken the brunt of those laws, executive orders, and directives have worked to shape, counter, undermine, reframe, and, when necessary, dismantle the legal and political edifice used to limit their rights and their humanity. She joins us to discuss her work, in particular, chapter 3 from White Rage - "Burning Brown to the Ground", which looks at the White rage backlash to the Brown v. Board decision, and all of the ways that the progress promised in the decision were undermined both in the immediate aftermath of the decision, and continuing through to today. With a gift for making the illegible legible, Dr. Anderson provides us with a clear eyed look at the history that has led to the widely inequitable education system we have today. And while the topic is heavy, she brings joy and laughter to the conversation in a way that can only leave you smiling through the pain. LINKS: White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Nation's Divide We Are Not Yet Equal - a young readers version of White Rage One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression is Destroying Our Democracy The Second: Race and Guns in a Fatally Unequal America. Eye's Off The Prize - Dr. Anderson's 2003 book on the shift from a fight for human rights to civil rights at the NAACP Charles Hamilton Houston - The first general counsel of NAACP Plessy v Ferguson (also, listen to our episode about the Plessy case 125 years later). Brown II - The implementation decision - "All deliberate speed . . ." Dr. Vanessa Siddle Walker - listen to her episode on our podcast. Voting Rights Act of 1965 Shelby County v. Holder Mothers of Massive Resistance - Dr. Elizabeth McRea Gabriel's Revolt The Sum Of Us - Heather McGhee (also, hear her episode on our podcast) My Grandmother's Hands - Resmaa Menakem The Fisk Jubilee Singers Maceo Snipes Use these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further. Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org. We are a proud member of The Connectd Podcast Network. The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits. Music by Kevin Casey.

    A Framework for Antiracist Education

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 55:11

    Founded in 2021, the Center for Antiracist Education's (CARE) mission is to equip antiracist educators with the knowledge and curriculum to create schools and classrooms that push back on the destructive legacy of racism. Our co-host Val, serves as their academic director in her day job. They recently released a framework for antiracist education that provides teachers and school leaders with concrete, actionable steps to take in their journey towards being antiracist. These steps are organized by the five CARE Principles- the core areas that CARE believes require attention in order to move towards antiracism. They are: Affirm the dignity and humanity of all people. Embrace historical truths. Develop a critical consciousness. Recognize race and confront racism. Create just systems.  The framework presents actionable steps related to each principle, with indicators that specify the associated knowledge, skills and behaviors required. And while this framework is designed for teachers and school leaders, the lessons are more broadly applicable, and really serve as a guide to living an antiracist life.  We're joined by CARE Professional Development Specialist, Brittany Brazzel, who contributed to the framework to discuss.  LINKS: The Framework Center for Anti-Racist Education (CARE) Clear the Air (twitter) Walter Reuther's March on Washington Speech Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further. Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org. We are a proud member of The Connectd Podcast Network. The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits. Music by Kevin Casey.

    An Overdue Reckoning on Indigenous Education

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 16, 2022 64:07

    We keep a running list of ideas for episodes - topics to cover, guests we'd like to interview, conversations with parents we'd like to have - and near the top of that list, for far longer than we'd care to admit, has been a conversation about Native and Indigenous education. Finding the right voices to tell the right stories is always a challenge, but, if we're being honest, it felt somehow acceptable that we hadn't gotten to it yet. The conversation we haver to share today completely changed that for us, and is a great opportunity to recommit ourselves to knowing better and doing better. Dr. Susan C. Faircloth is an enrolled member of the Coharie Tribe, and a professor of education at Colorado State University. She has spent her career working on Native issues, and brings a wealth of historical knowledge, as well as family history that brings to light the challenges facing Native people, especially students, today. From Native boarding schools to her own struggles finding a school for her Native daughter, she shares deeply personal stories that force us to reckon with the repairs that are needed to begin the healing process for the sovereign Native tribes and nations on whose land we currently reside. LINKS: We Had a Little Real Estate Problem: The Unheralded Story of Native Americans & Comedy - Kliph Nesteroff An Afro-Indigenous History of the United States - Kyle T Mays Richard Henry Pratt The Coharie Tribe Native Land Finder List of Federally Recognized Tribes The East Carolina Indian School American Indian Leadership Program John Tippeconnic The Trail of Tears Use these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further. Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org. We are a proud member of The Connectd Podcast Network. The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits. Music by Kevin Casey.

    Revisiting Heather McGhee on How Racism Hurts Us All

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2022 66:04

    Heather McGhee has been in public policy for the past 20 years, largely focused on economics. After nearly 16 years at Demos, a "think-and-do" tank, including four years as president, she realized that despite incredibly compelling economic research, at times, decision makers made decisions counter to what the best evidence showed. She took a leave of absence as president, and embarked on a journey to try to answer a simple question - Why can't we have nice things? We, being all Americans, and nice things being things that most developed nations have managed to provide for their people - health care, parental leave, a social safety net, and, of course, a good school in every neighborhood.   Her journey took her across the country for conversations with all sorts of people, and led to the new book, The Sum of Us, which was released on paperback today, Feb 8th, 2022, and includes a new afterword. We revisit the episode with new commentary from Andrew and Val. If you heard the interview already, the new commentary starts around the 50 minute mark. LINKS: The Sum Of Us Our Bookshop.org Storefront Demos - Public Policy "Think-and-Do" Tank Ta-Nehesi Coats - The Case for Reparations Dr. Gail Christopher HealOurCommunities.org Adrian Piper - Conceptual Artist Sherrilyn Ifill NAACP Legal Defense Fund Black Doll Test Debra Holoien Chase Bellingham and Matthew Hunt Kellogg Foundation The New Jim Crow - Michelle Alexander The Color of Law - Richard Rothstein Bryan Stevenson of Equal Justice Initiative Use these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further. Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org. We are a proud member of The Connectd Podcast Network. The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits. Music by Kevin Casey.

    Parenting for Racial Justice

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2022 56:14

    The Root Social Justice Center was founded in 2013 to serve as a hub for social justice organizing in Vermont. From food insecurity, to youth empowerment, they have been focused on racial justice organizing, community advocacy, and relationship building for nearly a decade. Several years ago, one of the programs they offered was series of workshops focused on parenting for social justice. Created by Angela Berkfield, the workshops focused on issues of racial justice, economic justice, disability justice, gender justice, and collective liberation. The workshops were a success and led Angela to write a book called Parenting 4 Social Justice. With co-authors for each chapter, Angela digs into the concepts covered in the workshops, providing parents and caregivers with tips, tools, and inspiration for conversations with kids. Tragically, in September of 2021, Angela died from breast cancer. While the community in Vermont, and across the country reeled from her loss, the Parenting 4 Social Justice team wanted to continue to share her message. Chrissy Colón Bradt is the co-author of the chapter on parenting for racial justice, and agreed to come on the podcast to share a bit of Angela's spirit with us. As an Afro-Latina and mother of two, she has thought long and hard about how to instill a positive racial identity in her own kids, and shared much of that ongoing journey in book. LINKS: Parenting 4 Social Justice from Bookshop.org The Parenting for Social Justice website The Root Social Justice Center Angela Berkfield Tributes JPB Gerald - Checklists and Merit Badges I'm Your Peanut Butter Big Brother - by Selina Alko Use these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further. Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org. We are a proud member of The Connectd Podcast Network. The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits. Music by Kevin Casey.

    Year End: Listener Questions

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 54:19

    Listeners regularly reach out with questions - things that they are seeing in their own neighborhoods, things that we haven't addressed, but should, etc. For the final episode of 2021, we thought we'd answer as many as we could. Thank you to everyone who sent in questions. If we didn't get to your question, or if there is something else on your mind, let us know so we can include it in a future "mailbag" episode - hello@integratedschools.org. As we enter the holiday season and folks are thinking about year-end giving, we'd like to ask for your support of this work. If this podcast brought value to your life, made you think in a new way, helped you have conversations in a different way, or just brought you some joy, we'd be grateful for your support. You can join our Patreon - Patreon.com/integratedschools. Thank you for your support and we look forward to more great conversations in 2022. LINKS: Teaching Hard History Podcast Learning For Justice White Awake's - Before We Were White course Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org. We are a proud member of The Connectd Podcast Network. The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits. Music by Kevin Casey.

    Teacher Check-In Revisited

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 49:38

    Back in April of 2020 we had a conversation with two teachers, Kara in the Minneapolis area, and Zoe in Philadelphia. They shared their struggles with shifting to remote school, trying to reach their students to provide devices, hot spots, and food, and the challenge of supporting the students with the greatest needs through the early days of the COVID crisis. Today, it's easy for parents to feel like things are almost back to normal in schools. However, in many ways, teachers are feeling the cost of the crisis more acutely now than at any point in the past two years. From staffing shortages to second hand trauma, teachers are under increasing stress and pressure to the point that many are considering leaving the profession. We revisit some of the conversation from back in April, and then talk about the current realities and what parents and caregivers might do to support public education in these trying times. LINKS: The original episode with Kara and Zoe National Education Association survey of teachers Guest Column in the Atlanta Journal Constitution about the crisis in teaching Gadfly On The Wall blog post about Vicarious Trauma Special thanks to Erin Pier for helping open Andrew's eyes to the crisis in teaching. Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further. Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org. We are a proud member of The Connectd Podcast Network. The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits. Music by Kevin Casey.

    Not Your Model Minority

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 56:56

    Dr. Sarah-Soonling Blackburn is an educator, speaker, and professional development specialist. Growing up in a mixed race, Asian and White family, and spending most of her childhood in various countries in Asia, ideas of belonging have always had salience for her. From the classroom to Learning for Justice, her work has focused on the things that help students feel seen and included. She joins us to discuss the myth of the Model Minority and helps contextualize the role of Asian American identities in our collective understanding and education about race and America.  With a bit of a history lesson, Dr. Blackburn gives us a greater understanding of how this myth is not only harmful to Asian Americans, but to all people of color, and how it is directly tied to anti-Black racism in our country. She also offers deep reflection about what solidarity building can really mean and what we all have to offer in the fight to dismantle White supremacy culture. LINKS: Time cover - "Those Asian-American Whiz Kids"  Learning for Justice Paula Yoo - From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry: The Killing of Vincent Chin and the Trial that Galvanized the Asian American Movement Cathy Park Hong - Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning Erika Lee - The Making of Asian American Elizabeth McRea - Mothers of Massive Resistance Dr. McRea on our podcast - White Women and the Politics of White Supremacy Jeff Chan - We Gon' Be Alright Other resources that have shaped our learning: The Asian American Justice and Innovation Lab See Us Unite  The PBS Series - Asian Americans Code Switch Post - The Model Minority Myth  Angry Asian Man  Bianca Mabute-Louie Dr. Connie Wun Use these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.  Register for our upcoming bookclub in early December. We're reading Mia Birdsong's How We Show Up.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further. Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org. We are a proud member of The Connectd Podcast Network. The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits. Music by Kevin Casey.

    Redrawing the Lines: Undoing the History of Segregation

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 58:16

    If you think about a "segregated school", what image comes to mind? Quite often, the cultural narrative says that that is a school with almost exclusively students of color. What about a school with 98% White students? Is that a "segregated school"? While we don't often think of it that way, it is clearly segregated. Tomás Monarrez is an economist by training. As he was studying the question of school and housing segregation at the Urban Institute, he was struck by the ways that the field of economics falls into the same traps that we fall into as a culture - segregation means concentrations of Black, Brown and Indigenous students. This seemed wrong to Tomás, and he and his colleagues set out to define segregation, using the tools of economics. Their definition takes the district average demographics and holds that as the baseline to which other schools should be compared. In this framing, in a district with 70% students of color, a school with 90% students of color is segregating, but so is a school with 50% students of color. What he quickly found was that the schools that often contribute the most to segregation within a district are not the schools we often focus on - are not the schools with 95% students of color, but rather, the schools with 75%, %85, even 90% White students. His hope is that this shift in framing can focus the efforts of local policy makers who care about decreasing segregation.  He joins to talk about his work, why he does it, and what sort of social good he hopes his economics focus can achieve.  LINKS: Segregation Contribution Index Dividing Lines: How School Districts Draw Attendance Boundaries to Perpetuate School Segregation A Vox explainer highlighting the work of Tomás Monarrez and the Urban Institute on school boundaries Home Owners Loan Corporation - 1930s entity that drew redlining maps Look up redlining maps for your city Michelle Adams on our podcast - traces the history of desegregation law in this country The Parents Involved Case Harry Belafonte on King saying "I fear we are integrating into a burning house" Dr. Elizabeth McRea on our podcast - White Woman and the Politics of White Supremacy Dr. McRea's Mother's of Massive Resistance Richard Rothstein Color of Law SFUSD's new student assignment policy Tree Equity Use these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further. Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org. We are a proud member of The Connectd Podcast Network. The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits. Music by Kevin Casey.

    Generational Work: Stefan Lallinger on Integration

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 59:03

    We're thrilled to be joining Connectd Podcasts, a network dedicated to helping shows like ours grow and thrive. For more info, or to check out their other amazing shows, head over to their website.  ----------------------------------------------------- In 1954, Louis Redding, Delaware's first Black attorney, joined the legal team at the NAACP to argue the Brown v Board case. Having agued two of the lower court cases that were incorporated into the Brown case, he was a key member of the team, along with Thurgood Marshall, who won perhaps the mostly widely known and celebrated court case ever. Sixty years later, his grandson, Stefan Lallinger, found himself teaching at school in New Orleans with over 90% students of color. This segregation wasn't caused by explicit, legal requirements for segregated schools, and yet it still happened. Lallinger's curiosity led him to get a doctorate and eventually to leading The Bridges Collaborative, a hub for school and housing practitioners to work together to advance the cause of integration.  Lallinger joins us to discuss his family legacy, how it shapes his current work, and what legacy he hopes to leave for his kids.  LINKS: Lallinger on the importance of the Bridges Collaborative work Martin Luther King, Jr on the difference between desegregation and integration  A Vox explainer highlighting the work of Tomàs Monarrez and the Urban Institute on school boundaries The Bridges Collaborative IntegrateNYC, the 5 Rs of Real Integration The National Coalition of School Diversity Maya Angelou Still I Rise Langston Hughes Mother to Son Dr. Vanessa Siddle Walker - The Lost Education of Horace Tate Dr. Siddle Walker on our podcast MLK - Where Do We Go From Here MLK - A Testament of Hope W.E.B. DuBois on the fear of integrating Black students into hostile spaces Use these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further. Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org. We are a proud member of The Connectd Podcast Network. The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits. Music by Kevin Casey.

    Moving and Choosing A School

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 59:21

    The very first episode of the Integrated Schools Podcast featured a conversation between our late founder, Courtney Mykytyn, and two mothers who were early in their journeys toward anti-racist school integration.  Since then, Anna and Sarah have continued to be influential members of the Integrated Schools community, and both found themselves moving over the past 18 months.  While both of their families had moved and purchased homes in the past, this was the first time they engaged in that process with a deep commitment to anti-racist school integration.  They discovered that living into their values wasn't always easy.  They share their process, and the challenges they faced, as they grappled with what it means to be White, and what it means to have racial and economic privilege in a world where they want to show up better and create a more just place. LINKS:Maggie Hagerman -White Kids: Growing Up with Privilege in a Racially Divided America Richard Rothstein - Color of Law The Intro to the Integrated Schools PodcastUse these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown.  It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey. 

    New Season, New Perspectives . . . New Co-Host!!

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 32:22

    In 2016, Val Brown recognized a silence in the education community regarding issues of race, and a gap in learning opportunities for educators. In response she founded #ClearTheAir, a platform for educators to learn about the intersections of history, racism, and education.  In 2019, she reached out to Integrated Schools to see if we might walk this road towards anti-racist school integration together.  However, she had a question - as a Black mom, she asked, "do I belong at Integrated Schools?  Is there a place for me?" This is a question we have been wrestling with internally for some time.  Leadership team member, Ali Takata recently published a blog post highlighting the gap she has felt in our ability to address a multiracial audience and announcing our intentions to grow  from a primarily White organization into a truly multiracial organization.  While we know that this process needs to be slow and deliberate, we are also deeply committed to seeing it through.  With that in mind, and given that the podcast has been lacking a regular co-host, we felt it was time to bring someone new on board, and we are so grateful that Val agreed.  She will be with us at least though May of 2022 to co-host, lend her insights, and help model what a truly multiracial coalition could be.  In this first episode, we get to know her backstory, why she cares, and what we hope this season will achieve.  LINKS:Val Brown on TwitterAli's Blog PostWhite Lips to White Ears by IS Advisory Board Member, Matt Gonzales#ClearTheAirDr. Mica PollockJoin our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown.  It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    Learning In Public with Courtney Martin

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 70:48

    From the time Courtney Martin strapped her daughter, Maya, to her chest for walks around her neighborhood, she was curious about Emerson Elementary, a public school down the street from her Oakland home. She learned that White families in their gentrifying neighborhood largely avoided the majority-Black, poorly-rated school. As she began asking why, a journey of a thousand moral miles began.Courtney journey led her to Integrated Schools and our founder, Courtney Everts Mykytyn, who told her: "people like you do things like this." Integrated Schools, and a friendship between the two Courtneys, became a support system as Martin decided to enroll her daughter at Emerson - and discovered that her public school, the foundation of our fragile democracy, is a powerful place to dig deeper - to go beyond hashtags and yard signs to be a part of transforming herself, her community, and ultimately, the country.She chronicled this choice and then the complexities of living into it in her new book, Learning in Public. More than a memoir, Learning in Public is an exercise in doing the best you can, owning your mistakes, and committing to knowing better and doing better. She joins us to talk about the book along with one of the key characters from the book, Mrs. Minor. After teaching Courtney's daughter, Mrs. Minor left the public school system to start her own private preschool, The Learning Forest. Courtney and Amha (as Mrs. Minor's new students call her) developed a friendship over the course of monthly conversations about integration, public education, race and more. Ahma brings a critical eye and nuanced perspective to the topic of integration, and pushes us to constantly reconsider if we are doing the right thing. To support The Learning Forest, you can sponsor a family through GoFundMe, or donate directly CashApp $TheLearningForest. LINKS:The Learning Forest PreschoolCourtney's new book - Learning In Public On Being Column by CourtneyMansa MusaCourtney's last appearance on the podcastRucker C Johnson on our podcast talking about his book, Children of The DreamUse these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    Reckoning with Plessy: 125 Years of Separate But Equal

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2021 54:11

    One hundred and twenty five years ago this week, The Supreme Court announced its decision in the case of Plessy v Ferguson. The case infamously declared that separate but equal was constitutional. The setting for the case was a train car, but the ramifications on society were profound. And while the Brown v Board decision 63 years later did away with some of those ramifications, in many ways, Plessy remains with us today. Coming in the wake of the civil war, the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments make up what are known as the Reconstruction Amendments, the Amendments intended to guarantee the freedom of formerly enslaved people. In many ways, the promise of these Amendments remains unfulfilled. In their immediate aftermath, many state legislatures took steps to undermine them, often upheld by federal courts. The Plessy case came in response to just such a law. In 1890 Louisiana State Legislature passed the Separate Car Act requiring equal, but separate train cars for White and Black passengers. Two years later, Homer Plessy agreed to participate in a challenge to the law, by boarding a train and refusing to ride in the Black car. He was arrested and challenged his case all the way to The Supreme Court. This decision, regularly making top 10 lists of worst Supreme Court decisions of all time, enshrined segregation in law, allowing for Jim Crow, Black codes, and undoing much of the gains made for Black people during the short-lived years of Reconstruction. However, the decision wasn't unanimous, there was one lone dissenting opinion by Justice John Marshall Harlan. Justice Harlan earned the nickname, The Great Dissenter, for a number of dissenting opinions in favor of civil rights during his tenure on the Court at the end of the 19th century. And his dissent in the Plessy case served as a statement of what our values as a country could and should be. It was also a prescient warning of where the social caste system, enshrined by the majority opinion, would lead us. Paula Forbes has been at the intersection of law and education for many years. As the first in-house counsel for the Minneapolis Public School district, she saw the ways that the caste system enshrined by the Plessy decision, and never fully repaired, continues to act as a barrier to educational justice. She joins us to discuss the importance of reckoning with and repairing our past in order to create the future we desire.  LINKS:Paula Forbes websiteThe Chaordic Path Plessy v FergusonNYTimes Guest Essay on Justice Harlan by Peter CanellosPre-order Mr. Canellos's forthcoming book The Great DissenterThe Reconstruction AmendmentsJustice John Marshall HarlanMalvina Harlan (Justice Harlan's Wife)A story about Justice Harlan and his half-brotherRegister for the Integrated Schools Book Club in July.  We'll be reading Heather McGhee's The Sum of UsUse these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    BvB@67- Greg and Carol Revisited

    Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2021 53:40

    In the fifth episode in our Brown v. Board at 67: The Stories We Tell Ourselves series, we step away from scholarship to take a moment to listen. I Hope They Hear it in Our Voices is a conversation with two Black parents who live in different parts of the U.S. and who have had very different -- yet very similar -- school experiences. Greg and Carol tell us a lot about how far we have come since Brown v. Board, about how much work we still have to do, and the very real costs of “access to resources”. With deep gratitude for their willingness to share their stories, we listen.Email your appreciation to Greg and Carol at hello@integratedschools.org, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, or IntegratedSchools on Facebook.Register for the Integrated Schools Book Club in July.  We'll be reading Heather McGhee's The Sum of UsJoin our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. Edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    BvB@67 - David Hinojosa Revisted

    Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 43:44

    For the fourth episode in our Brown v. Board at 67: The Stories We Tell Ourselves series, we talk with Civil Rights attorney David Hinojosa. School segregation is too often painted as binary issue between Black and White people; learning other histories shows that this is far from true. Complicating the picture of what preceded and came as a result of Brown v. Board, Mr. Hinojosa shares a history lesson on the segregation of Latinx communities across the US since the late 1800s. We discuss the politics of race and language, the importance of shared experiences and the deep fights for educational justice that continue to this day.LINKS:-San Antonio Independent School District v. Rodriguez-Richard Valencia-The Lemon Grove Incident-Mendez v. Westminster-Hernandez v. Texas-Santamaria v. Dallas ISD-Patricia Gandara on the triple segregation of Latinx people Register for the Integrated Schools Book Club in July.  We'll be reading Heather McGhee's The Sum of UsUse these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. Edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    BvB@67 - Amanda Lewis Revisited

    Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2021 45:24

    Dr. Amanda Lewis (Despite the Best Intentions: How Racial Inequality Thrives in Good Schools, co-authored with John Diamond) joins us for this third episode of our Brown v. Board at 67: The Stories We Tell Ourselves series. Dr. Lewis’s research takes her to a school that is desegregated on paper but segregated within the building. It is a school, like many, with “race neutral” policies that hide the very real racialized practices in the building. Add to that a dose of opportunity hoarding, and equitable policies become very difficult to institute. Brown v. Board focused on desegregating schools rather than integrating classrooms, but the story we tell about it is that it ended our racist school policies. While that may feel good, our “good intentions” do not absolve us from the impact of our actions.LINKS:Amanda Lewis Race In The Schoolyard Karolyn Tyson Integration InterruptedCharles Tilley on Opportunity HoardingRegister for the Integrated Schools Book Club in July.  We'll be reading Heather McGhee's The Sum of UsUse these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. Edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    BvB@67 - Noliwe Rooks Revisited

    Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021 37:40

    For the second episode in our Brown v. Board at 67: The Stories We Tell Ourselves series, we talk with Dr. Noliwe Rooks (Cornell). Her book, Cutting School: Privatization, Segregation, and the End of Public Education, as well as some of her more recent research around the pushback to school desegregation from communities of color and the decimation of the Black teaching corps following Brown v. Board, provide context in which to understand the full range of outcomes from the court decision. While Dr. Rucker Johnson, in part 1, showed us some of the many benefits of desegregation, Dr. Rooks reminds us of many of the costs, especially to the Black community. She asks us to engage with these stories in order to understand the very real intent behind where we find ourselves today. It is only through changing the stories we tell, that we might envision a different, more equitable future for school integration.Register for the Integrated Schools Book Club in July.  We'll be reading Heather McGhee's The Sum of UsUse these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. Edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    BvB@67 - Rucker Johnson Revisited

    Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2021 35:16

    As we approach the 67th anniversary of the landmark Supreme Court case, Brown v. Board of Education (1954), we are revisiting our series looking at the stories we tell ourselves about Brown v. Board. The way we understand this case and its legacies do the work of making sense of our past and mapping out our future. In this first episode, we are joined by Dr. Rucker Johnson (UC Berkeley). Dr. Johnson shares some of the research and findings in his book, Children of the Dream: Why School Integration Works. Using a longitudinal study of the children and grandchildren of Brown v. Board, Dr. Johnson shows us that desegregation did have profoundly important effects on individuals and communities even while we gave up on it too quickly.Register for the Integrated Schools Book Club in July.  We'll be reading Heather McGhee's The Sum of UsUse these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. Edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    Better Schools Through Parent Empowerment

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2021 52:24

    Aurelio Montemayor has been organizing parents for decades.  His work at the Intercultural Research Development Association, or IDRA, as a family engagement coordinator has focused on a specific type of parent engagement, known as parent empowerment.  He defines the four ways parents are typically engaged in schools as:As free labor and fundraisers.Through education programs designed to help improve parentingThrough education programs designed for self improvementThrough meaningful parent / caregiver empowermentThis fourth form of parent engagement - parent empowerment, is the only form that he believes leads to school wide improvement for all kids.  When done well, it can serve as an important tool for equity, but it requires that all parents feel empowered.I'm joined by parent board member, Sarah Becker, to discuss what this looks like in practice, and how people with racial or economic privilege, who often enter schools with outsized empowerment, can act as allies.LINKS:Intercultural Research Development AssociationChicano MovementNo Child Left BehindWhen Middle-Class Parents Choose Urban Schools: Class, Race, and the Challenge of Equity in Public Education by Lynn Posey-MaddoxDespite The Best Intentions: How Racial Inequality Thrives in Good Schools by John B. Diamond and Amanda E. LewisRegister for the Integrated Schools Book Club in July.  We'll be reading Heather McGhee's The Sum of UsUse these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    Where We Begin - An Integrated Schools Webinar

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2021 48:00

    Please join us for How We Show Up (part 1) on April 19th, 5pm PDT / 8pm EDT. Registration is free!Our country has, at times, and in fits and starts, worked toward desegregation, but never meaningfully worked toward real integration. Desegregation is about the moving of bodies, the demographic percentages in a school building. Integration is about, in the words of David Kirkland, "fundamentally working to organize our society in a different way, where our differences are seen as spaces that we not only celebrate but LET BE, where this forms the vibrancy of our being as a society." It is about decentering Whiteness, it is about creating new forms of shared power, and it is about recognizing the full humanity of every kid.Historically, the ways White &/or privileged people talk about “good” vs. “bad” schools, the choices we make, both individually and collectively, about where to educate our children, and the ways we show up when we do enroll in global-majority schools have served to maintain our advantages and in turn, continue to oppress others. This didn’t happen by accident.Todays episode is an edit of our first ever webinar- The Integrated Schools Movement: Where We Begin.  In it, we explore how our schools got to where they are now, and what role we play in either maintaining or disrupting this system. Members of our all-volunteer crew share personal stories of enrolling our kids in global-majority schools, and the joys and missteps we experience while showing up as parents and community members. LINKS:A video of the webinarSlides shared during the webinarThe original resource list shared after the webinar:Native Land FinderEpisode: White Supremacy and Black Educational Excellence: Hidden Stories of the Integration Movement – Integrated Schools podcast featuring a conversation with Dr. Vanessa Siddle Walker and Dr. Elizabeth McRae facilitated by Dani McClainVanessa Siddle Walker: The Lost Education of Horace TateElizabeth McRae: Mothers of Massive ResistanceEpisode: White Women and the Politics of White SupremacyThe current levels of segregation in our schools.The wealth gap – from Brookings, and The Washington PostRichard Rothstein – The Color of LawMichelle Alexander – The New Jim CrowEdBuild on the $23 billion funding gap between districts serving predominantly students of color vs White students.David KirklandEpisode: Kirkland on IntegrationRucker JohnsonThe Children of the DreamEpisode – Rucker Johnson and the Grandchildren of DesegregationDr Kfir MordechayEpisode: GentrificationDr. Amanda LewisDespite the Best Intentions: How Racial Inequality Thrives in Good Schools with John DiamondEpisode: Desegregation without IntegrationEngage with Integrated SchoolsFind your local chapterSign up for our Parent-to-Parent programListen to the podcastJoin our PatreonJoin our Facebook groupCheck out our full resource listSign up for Book ClubUse these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey

    Zero-Sum Politics: Heather McGhee on How Racism Hurts Us All

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2021 56:32

    Heather McGhee has been in public policy for the past 20 years, largely focused on economics.  After nearly 16 years at Demos, a "think-and-do" tank, including four years as president, she realized that despite incredibly compelling economic research, at times, decision makers made decisions counter to what the best evidence showed.  She took a leave of absence as president, and embarked on a journey to try to answer a simple question - Why can't we have nice things?  We, being all Americans, and nice things being things that most developed nations have managed to provide for their people - health care, parental leave, a social safety net, and, of course, a good school in every neighborhood.   Her journey took her across the country for conversations with all sorts of people, and led to the new book, The Sum of Us, which has been on the New York Times Bestseller's list since was released.  We are incredibly grateful to Heather McGhee for agreeing to come on the show in the midst of a serious promotional schedule.  We are also honored that Integrated Schools makes an appearance in the book.  LINKS:The Sum Of UsOur Bookshop.org StorefrontDemos - Public Policy "Think-and-Do" TankTa-Nehesi Coats - The Case for ReparationsDr. Gail ChristopherHealOurCommunities.orgAdrian Piper - Conceptual ArtistSherrilyn IfillNAACP Legal Defense FundBlack Doll TestDebra HoloienChase Bellingham and Matthew HuntKellogg FoundationThe New Jim Crow - Michelle AlexanderThe Color of Law - Richard RothsteinBryan Stevenson of Equal Justice InitiativeDon't forget to register for our next webinar: How We Show Up,  April 19th 5pm PDT / 8pm EDT.  This free, 90 minute webinar will feature parents from Integrated Schools. We'll be sharing personal stories of how we, as parents and caregivers with racial or economic privilege, work to center anti-racist integration when we arrive in integrating schools.The Sum of Us is our next Book Club selection.  Dates are in July, and you can register here.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey

    In Full View of Race: Elise Boddie on Integration

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2021 50:07

    Martin Luther King Jr.'s Letter From a Birmingham Jail is well known for its reflections on justice.  Quotes such as “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere” and “Justice too long delayed is justice denied”, are well known and celebrated, but there's another section of the letter focused on King's disappointment with the White moderate.  He says,"I must confess that over the last few years I have been gravely disappointed with the White moderate. I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro's great stumbling block in the stride toward freedom is not the White Citizen's Council-er or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the White moderate who is more devoted to "order" than to justice; who prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a positive peace which is the presence of justice."Formerly the director of litigation for the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, and currently a law professor at Rutgers Law School, where she runs The Inclusion Project, Elise Boddie combines the expertise of a lawyer with the heart of a community organizer to advance educational justice.  Focusing on the original promise of integration, the version hoped for by the Brown family in 1954, laid out in the Green Factors from Green v. School Board of New Kent County in 1968, and updated recently by IntegrateNYC and the 5Rs of Real Integration, her vision of integration aspires to create spaces where children can all live into their full humanity, not ignoring race, not defined by race, but in full view of race. LINKS:Five Myths About School Segregation - Elise Boddie in The Washington PostLinda Brown and the Unfinished Work of School Integration - Elise Boddie in The New York TimesOrdinariness as Equality - Elise Boddie on the harm of "Colorblindness"The Inclusion ProjectGreen v. School Board of New Kent CountyNAACP Legal Defense and Education FundElizabeth Anderson, U of MichiganThe Imperative of Integration - Dr. Elizabeth AndersonCutting School - Dr. Noliwe RooksMother's of Massive Resistance - Dr. Elizabeth McReaBirthright Citizens - Dr. Martha Jones Use these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.   

    The Power of Privilege: WPLN's The Promise

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2021 63:25

    Season 2 of WPLN's The Promise takes on one of the most contentious topics in America, what has been deemed the "Great Equalizer", but more and more feels like the Great Divider: Public Education.In May of 1963, President Kennedy addressed the graduates of Vanderbilt University (a full year before they would admit their first Black student), and said, "I speak to you ... not of your rights as Americans, but of your responsibilities... They do not rest with equal weight upon the shoulders of all. For, of those to whom much is given, much is required."More than 55 years later, reporter Meribah Knight, found a community just 3 miles away grappling with this very question with regards to the schools in the neighborhood. In particular, Warner Elementary (90% Black and 96% economically disadvantaged), and Lockeland Elementary (90% White and 3% economically disadvantaged). These two schools, 1.2 miles apart, were starkly different, yet representative of so many schools and communities across the country.Meribah joins us to discuss the series, why she felt compelled to tell this story, and how it has impacted her of life. Additionally, she shares an edit of the forth episode from the season.LINKSThe full series - The PromiseMeribah KnightBull Connor and the fire hosesMLK's Letter From a Birmingham JailJohn F. Kennedy's Vanderbilt Convocation AddressNashville's Desegregation Case - Kelly v. Board of EducationDenver's Desegregation Case - Keyes v School District No 1, DenverA detailed timeline of the Keyes caseJoin our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchoolson Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    EPIC's "Nothing About Us": Youth Theater on Integration

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2021 65:47

    The Epic NEXT Program tasks 15-20 high school students with researching, writing, and performing a play about a social issue, usually related to educational justice. The idea, is that those most impacted by the system, are those most likely to come up with meaningful solutions, and that theater can be used as tool for social change. Back in 2018, New York Appleseed, an advocacy organization fighting for integrated schools and communities, commissioned EPIC to create a show about school segregation. The result was Nothing About Us, a 30 minute stage play written and performed by high school students. The process begins with interviews of roughly 40 people about the topic. Ranging from researchers, to parents, to administrators, the goal is to hear from a wide range of stake holders. Those interviews are then transcribed and pieced together, along with some original writing, to create the show. Students recite the words spoken in the interviews, sing and rap, and create scenes from the stories told by the interviewees. The final show, featuring 5 students, with one prop and a handful of folding chairs can then be performed just about anywhere to a wide variety of audiences. We're incredibly fortunate to be able to share some clips from a film adaptation of that show today, as well as a conversation with one of the artistic directors of EPIC and two of the students who wrote and performed the piece. If you have ever doubted the importance of youth voice, this show declares, unequivocally, that nothing about students done without their input, will be for them.Don't forget to register for the Fifty State Conversation.  Once registered, you'll receive links to free screenings of Nothing About Us on:Wednesday February 17 at 8pm (Eastern Standard Time)Wednesday March 17 at 7pm (Eastern Standard Time)Saturday April 17 at 3pm (Eastern Standard Time) Monday May 17 at 7:15pm (Eastern Standard Time)If you can't make one of those,  you can rent it on demand.LINKS:EPIC Theatre EnsembleThe Fifty State Conversation - Sign up today!Intetgrated Schools Advisory BoardMatt GonzalesMatt Gonzales's White Lips to White EarsIntegrateNYC's 5Rs of Real IntegrationThe Promise from Nashville Public Radio Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchoolson Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey. 

    Third Wave School Desegregation: A Call for Real Integration

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2021 34:49

    We’re back! Kicking off season 6 with a webinar hosted by The Black Educators Initiative (BEI), and a chance to share a bit of our thinking about why we do the work we do at Integrated Schools.BEI, as a project of Urban Teachers, is working to grow the Black teaching corps. When executive director, Dr. Robert Simmons, invited us to participate in their speaker series, we were honored, and slightly terrified. Thinking about presenting the work we do to the BEI audience pushed us to stop and consider our focus at Integrated Schools, and why we do the work we do. Between the pandemic and losing our founder a year ago, it was a much needed pause to take the 30,000 ft view of our work and how we view it fitting in to the broader movement for educational justice.A framing that we have been thinking about, internally, is Third Wave School Desegregation. The idea that we have tried desegregation in the past, and, while it has had benefits, it has also had real costs. In order to move towards a true, multiracial demorcracy, we believe we need something new, something that hasn't been tried before, and something that pushes us towards real integration.We're thrilled to be joined by Karla and Rachel from IntegrateNYC for this panel, as their 5Rs of Real Integration provide a powerful framework for thinking about real integration.We're including lots of links in an attempt to give credit to the origin of much of the ideas shared, but special thanks as well to the entire Integrated Schools team for helping to think through this question.And of course, don't forget to register for our next Book Club! LINKS:Black Educators InitiativeUrban TeachersDr. Robert SimmonsIntegrate NYCIntegrateNYC on the Integrated Schools Podcast5 Rs of Real IntegrationDr. David KirklandJustice Thurgood Marshall, Milliken v. Bradley, 1974 dissentCharles Hamilton HoustonDr. Vanessa Siddle WalkerWhite Supremacy and Black Educational Excellence: Hidden Stories of the Integration MovementDr. Noliwe RooksSegrenomics, Black Teachers, and Noliwe RooksHorace TateRucker Johnson - Children of The DreamEdBuild report, 23 Billion:Nikole Hannah-Jones - on "curated diversity"METCOBillingham and Hunt on White parent preferences for racial school makeupRemember, any book bought through a link here or by starting at our affiliate page on IndieBound supports local bookstores, and Integrated Schools. Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchoolson Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    Saying Goodbye to Season 5

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2020 10:28

    On November 13th, 2019, we started Season 5 of this podcast.  Our definition of "season" has pretty much always just meant as many episodes as we can make before we need a break, and we haven't really taken a break since last November.  This episode, the 23rd of the season is admittedly a bit of self-referential navel gazing, but I wanted to take just a bit of your time to wrap up the season before we, finally, take a break.  It is an all-volunteer team that helps put these episodes together. From Molly, who makes our transcripts, to Courtney Epton, who has done all the visuals to promote these episodes, to Ali, Bridget, Anna, Susan and others, who provide feedback, and help me think through these topics, this podcast wouldn't be what it is without the entire team.  And that team deserves a break.  If you are able, we'd be eternally grateful for your financial support, by joining our Patreon, or going to the Integrated Schools website and clicking "donate."While we're away, please check out past episodes, if you haven't yet, and stay in touch on social media or by sending us an email.  And please, VOTE!!  LINKS: Past episodes Register for Book ClubBuy An Indigenous People's History of the United States for Young PeopleThe first episode of the Brown v Board series, The Stories We Tell OurselvesThe trailer for our series, Between We and TheyRemember, any book bought through a link here or by starting at our affiliate page on IndieBound supports local bookstores, and Integrated Schools. Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchoolson Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey. 

    Family Engagement and Equity

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2020 59:11

    We were just in your feeds a week ago with Congressman Bobby Scott, but we couldn't wait to get this episode out.  Dr. Ann Ishimaru is a professor at the University of Washington in Seattle, where her work focuses on the intersection of leadership, school - community relationships, and education equity.  With a focus on both formal power structures, and on the more informal power that can come from community, she believes that leadership can play a vital role in creating equitable learning environments for all kids, particularly those who have been historically marginalized in education.  Through her research, which she has documented in a new book, Just Schools: Building Equitable Collaborations with Family and Communities, Dr. Ishimaru highlights four key principals for empowering family and community to drive positive change in schools: Begin with Parents and Community; Transform Power; Build Reciprocity; and Undertake Change as Collective Inquiry.  She joins us to discuss these themes and more.  LINKS: Dr. Ishimaru's book - Just Schools: Building Equitable Collaborations with Family and CommunitiesTips for Collaborating with Other Families from Embrace RaceAnnette Lareau - on Racialized ScriptsNice White Parents - from SerialJohn Diamond and Amanda Lewis - Despite the Best IntentionsAmanda Lewis on our podcastErica Turner's guide on Equity in Pandemic SchoolingRemember, any book bought through a link here or by starting at our affiliate page on IndieBound supports local bookstores, and Integrated Schools. Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.   

    Congressman Bobby Scott on Strength in Diversity

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2020 26:21

    The Strength in Diversity Act passed the House of Representatives on Sept 15th, 2020.  Coming out of The Committee on Education and Labor, chaired by Congressman Bobby Scott, the bill aims to assist localities that want to attempt voluntary desegregation plans, do that constitutionally.  Since the Supreme Court's decision in the Parents Involved case from 2007, many districts have avoided desegregation plans for fear of running afoul of that ruling.  The Strength in Diversity Act provides grants to states to plan programs that can decrease segregation, while also remaining legal.  We're joined by Chairman Scott do discuss the bill, and why it took congress 30 years to address growing school segregation. LINKS:Congressman Scott's WebsiteStrength in Diversity Act on Congress.govStrength in Diversity Fact SheetThe Equity and Inclusion Enforcement Act on Congress.govThe Equity and Inclusion Enforcement Act Fact SheetTribute to Courtney Everts Mykytyn from the Official Congressional RecordMilliken v Bradley from Integrated SchoolsThe floor debate on the Strength in Diversity Act - 4h18m to 5h08mJoin our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    Equity According to Angela Glover Blackwell

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2020 58:21

    For Angela Glover Blackwell, a brief stint at the Rockefeller Foundation brought to light a fundamental difference in how we think about driving positive change, and fighting for justice abroad versus here at home.  The international focus was on equity - what are the outcomes we hope to achieve, and how do we back into the inputs required?  The national focus was on equality - how do we make sure that everyone gets the same inputs to start with.  Through the work of her organization, PolicyLink, she has spent the past 20 years pushing for equity to be our North Star.  Calling for us to recognize equity as moral imperative, equity as a potent antidote to inequality, and equity as the superior growth model for our country.  She joins us to talk about the power of an equity mindset, not just in education, but in our entire society.   LINKS:PolicyLinkThe Equity ManifestoThe Radical Imagination PodcastMs. Glover Blackwell on The Curb-Cut EffectJoin our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey. 

    ICYMI: School Colors

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2020 62:46

    Brooklyn Deep is the media arm of The Brooklyn Movement Center, a Black-led, membership-based organization of primarily low-to-moderate income Central Brooklyn residents. They work to build power and pursue self-determination in Bedford-Stuyvesant & Crown Heights by nurturing local leadership, waging campaigns and winning concrete improvements in people’s lives.In 2019, Brooklyn Deep released an 8-part podcast documentary called School Colors.  Spanning 150 years of history, it looks at race, class and power through the schools of Bedford-Stuyvesant.  It features well researched history, compelling story telling, and provides a nuanced look at many of the educational debates happening in cities today (particular credit to Ep 6, Mo' Charters, Mo' Problems, for tackling one of the most heated topics with a nuance that is often lacking).  Hosts Mark Winston Griffith and Max Freedman join us to discuss the project, and share an edit of Ep 7, New Kids on the Block.  We talk about gentrification, colonization, rallying, and impact versus intent.  If you've been listening to Nice White Parents, you'll recognize many of the same themes.   LINKS:School Colors PodcastBrooklyn DeepThe Brooklyn Movement CenterJoin our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    Checklists and Merit Badges: JPB Gerald on Whiteness

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2020 49:29

    JPB Gerald began his career as an English language teacher.  Bothered by the inherent racism he saw in the field, and reflecting on his own upbringing in predominantly White, "good" schools, he broadened his academic interests to race and Whiteness.  Currently a doctoral student at CUNY — Hunter College, JPB has been writing and doing interviews for many outlets in the midst of conversations about school in the fall.  While he has great insights into the challenges to equity presented by COVID, he also brings a deep understanding of many of the issues we address at Integrated Schools.  This conversation was going to be about "Pandemic Pods" and equity, but we quickly found ourselves zoomed out to a broader conversation about meritocracy, "THE SYSTEM", and Black Lives Matter signs in gated communities.  With insight, humor, and authenticity, JPB helps us think about what it means to take care of our kids in a way that doesn't harm other kids.  LINKS: Unstandardized English - JPB Gerald's Podcast (and you can support his work on Patreon)The Ezel Project - JPB Gerald's course on whitenessJPB on TwitterCombatting the Altruistic Shield - JPB Gerald's article describing the conceptJPB Gerald and Mira Debs on Pandemic Pods in The Washington PostCheryl I. Harris - Whiteness as Property (1993)JPB was inspired by Nelson Flores and Jonathan Rosa who have written several pieces together, including Undoing Appropriateness, and Unsettling Race and LanguageJoin our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    Reopening Schools and Equity

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2020 54:35

    Dr. Shayla Reese Griffin is the co-founder of The Justice Leaders Collaborative, an author, educator, and mother.  As the challenges of school for the fall have come into focus, finding solutions based in equity has been a struggle.  Dr. Griffin has written about it, calling for space in buildings to be prioritized to those with the highest needs, for us to consider where our time and energy might best be spent in this moment of crisis, and for parents to be paid to stay home to take care of their kids.   She joins us for a conversation about the fall, but also about justice and race in schools more broadly.  Her 2015 book, Those Kids, Our Schools: Race and Reform in an American High School is an inside look at a racially and socioeconomically diverse high school in America.  It explores the way students recreate existing racial hierarchies when not giving the time, space, and instruction for how to have productive conversations about race.  This work led her to co-author Race Dialogues: A Facilitator's Guide to Tackling the Elephant in the Classroom which aims to give teachers (and others) the tools to facilitate more helpful and hopeful conversations.   LINKS:Dr. Griffin on Medium - including the three posts about COVIDDr. Griffin's Those Kids, Our Schools: Race and Reform in an American High SchoolDr. Griffin's Race Dialogues: A Facilitator's Guide to Tackling the Elephant in the ClassroomRace: The Power of an Illusion - documentaryClara Totenberg Green's Op-Ed in the NYTJPB Gerald and Mira Debs's Op-Ed in the Washington PostL'Heureux Lewis-McCoy's thread on TwitterCourtney Martin and Garrett Bucks wrote letters to each other about podsErica Turner created this guide to Equity in Pandemic SchoolingOur own blog post about podsThe newly updated resources page from our websiteThe recording and resources from our first ever webinarAnd, in proof that everyone is talking about pods . . . this excellent piece from Good HousekeepingRemember, any book bought through a link here or by starting at our affiliate page on IndieBound supports local bookstores, and Integrated Schools. Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    Revisiting Not In My Suburbs: Milliken v Bradley @46

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2020 47:47

    July 25th will mark the 46th anniversary of the SCOTUS ruling on the Milliken v. Bradley case. Today, we revisit our episode from a year ago about this important and under-appreciated case.  Joined by Michelle Adams, Constitutional Law Professor at Cardozo School of Law, who is writing Soul Force: Detroit, The Supreme Court, and the Epic Battle for Racial Justice in America, we discuss the case and its implications for today.Based in Detroit, the Milliken decision functionally halted the promise of Brown v Board of Education at the city limits, allowing all-white suburbs (created through policies like redlining) to maintain all-white schools. The implications for ideas about what is possible regarding desegregation today, and how we fund schools are profound.  LINKS: Parents Involved v Seattle SchoolsMilliken v BradleyKeyes v Denver School District 1Swann v Mecklenburg Brown v Board of EdEdBuild report on the $23 Billon funding gapComplete audio from the opinion, including the entirety of Justice Marshall's dissent.Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further. We are an all volunteer organization and your support would mean the world to us.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast is produced by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. Audio editing and mixing by Andrew Lefkowits. Music by Kevin Casey.

    IntegrateNYC: Youth Voice for Real Integration

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2020 39:05

    We're joined by Karla and Jedidah - two high school students in New York City who are leaders at IntegrateNYC.  This youth led organization fights for integration and equity in all NYC schools.  From protest to policy, they center student voice  because students are the ones most directly impacted by the segregation, and the ones with the most at stake.  Recognizing that desegregation alone isn't enough to solve for equity, IntegrateNYC developed the 5 Rs of real integration.  They are:Race and EnrollmentResourcesRelationshipsRestorative JusticeRepresentation of teachers and staffThey argue that schools need to address all 5 Rs to achieve real integration, and work with the Department of Education (DOE) to enact policies that work towards that goal.  Karla and Jedidah walk us through all 5 Rs, while also sharing their own experiences being impacted by segregation. These youth leaders are passionate and inspiring, and remind us of the power of youth voice.LINKS: The 5Rs of Real IntegrationGreen v. County School Board of New Kent CountyWill Stancil on the Green Case from The Atlantic INTEGRATED SCHOOLS WEBINAR:Please join us for our first ever webinar - The Integrated Schools Movement: Where We Begin, on July 13th, 5pm PDT / 8pm EDT.  It will feature 5 members of the Integrated Schools parent advisory board sharing stories of choosing global-majority schools for our kids, and what we've learned along the way.  We'll discuss how our schools got to where they are, and what we can do to push back.  It's free to register and will last roughly 60 minutes, with some time for Q&A afterwards.  Please share widely, and we hope to see you there.  NOTE: If you missed the webinar, registering will get you a link to the recording.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey. 

    White Supremacy and Black Educational Excellence: Hidden Stories of the Integration Movement

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2020 60:26

    The National Coalition for School Diversity serves as the hub of the school integration movement.  While their annual conference was postponed due to COVID, the keynote panel was held virtually. A conversation conceived in honor of Integrated Schools founder and former podcast co-host, Courtney, it offers a chance to better understand the history of desegregation so that we might better conceive of how to move forward.  A chance to know better, so that we might do better.  Through a conversation facilitated by journalist Dani McClain, Dr. Vanessa Siddle-Walker tells the story of the excellent, robust, and holistic Black schools and educators that our country consciously eliminated in its desegregation efforts. While Dr. Elizabeth McRae recounts the steady work of White supremacist educational politics, most often led by White women, to ensure that Black educational excellence was eroded and replaced by White supremacist policies and pedagogy.  Not only did real integration never happen, but the costs of its failure were enormous and last to today. Courtney was on the NCSD steering committee, and this panel was conceived in her honor.  Author Courtney Martin kicks off the conversation by conjuring the memory of Courtney Mykytyn, and Andrew closes things out with a tribute to Courtney and the importance of this work, in this moment.  It's an important conversation, and we are deeply grateful to everyone involved for allowing us to share it.  LINKS: Elizabeth McRea - Mother's of Massive ResistanceVanessa Siddle-Walker - Their Highest Potential, The Lost Education of Horace TateDani McClain - We Live for the WeCourtney Martin - The New Better OffThe National Coalition for School DiversityVideo of the full keynote is available here.Eula Biss - White DebtThe NEAThe Fort Pillow MassacreThe United Daughters of the ConfederacyGreen v County Board of New Kent CountyRemember, any book bought through a link here or by starting at our affiliate page on IndieBound supports local bookstores, and Integrated Schools. Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    Raising White Kids with Jennifer Harvey

    Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2020 58:30

    The Reverend, Dr. Jennifer Harvey is a parent, a writer, an educator, and an activist.  Her 2018 book Raising White Kids: Bringing Up Children in a Racially Unjust America offers age-appropriate insights for teaching children how to address racism when they encounter it and tackles tough questions about how to help white kids be mindful of racial relations while understanding their own identity and the role they can play for justice. We discuss the book, but also her personal journey from elementary school, where she was bussed under a court ordered desegregation plan to a predominately Black school, to her time at Union Seminary in New York, studying with the late, great Dr. James Cone.  From the power of finding our shared humanity, to liberation we can all find in anti-racism, the importance of moving from thought to action, Dr. Harvey's insights feel incredibly important in this moment.   LINKS:Raising White Kids - Dr. Jennifer Harvey A Black Theology of Liberation - Dr. James ConeThe Cross and the Lynching Tree - Dr. James ConeRace Traitor - Noel Ignatiev and John Garvey (a book of essays from the journal of the same name)Raising Anti-Racist Kids - ebook by Rebekah GienappAn article about the event hosted in Denver, in 2018Video of a workshop led by Dr. HarveyConnect with Dr. Harvey on Twitter or Facebook Remember, any book bought through a link here or by starting at our affiliate page on IndieBound supports local bookstores, and Integrated Schools. Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.  

    Brown v Board at 66 (BONUS)

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2020 3:48

    Last year, leading up the 65th anniversary, we put together a 6 part mini-series called "The Stories We Tell Ourselves - Moving From Desegregation to Integration".  It is in no way a comprehensive history, but hopefully it complicates the stories we tell about Brown v Board.  These stories and others about our past desegregation efforts have a huge impact on how we interact with school today, Our hope is that a more honest assessment of the history can be a first step towards real integration. LINKS: Part 1 - With Rucker Johnson, author of Children Of The Dream: Why School Integration WorksPart 2 - With Noliwe Rooks, author of Cutting School: Privatization, Segregation, and the End of Public EducationPart 3 - With Amanda Lewis, co-author of Despite The Best Intentions: How Racial Inequality Thrives in Good SchoolsPart 4 - With Civil Rights Attorney, David HinojosaPart 5 - With Greg and CarolPart 6 - Grappling with what we've learned with Anna.Remember, any book bought through a link here or by starting at our affiliate page on IndieBound supports local bookstores, and Integrated Schools. Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchoolson Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    COVID-19: Matt Gonzales on Equity

    Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2020 51:16

    Matt Gonzales is an educational justice advocate and Director of the Integration and Innovation Initiative at the NYU Metro Center. We are incredibly fortunate to have him as a member of the Integrated Schools Advisory Board. We had a chance to sit down with Matt this week and talk to him about the implications of COVID-19, what building equity could look like now and in the future, and why anti-racist integration matters now more than ever.Please join us for the NCSD Virtual Keynote on May 14th at 2pm EDT.  Free registration is available here.  LINKS:Grading for Equity Recommendations - inspired by Joe Feldman and his bookIntegrateNYC with the 5Rs of Real IntegrationPaulo Friere - Author of Pedagogy of the OppressedDjango Paris- Author of Culturally Sustaining PedagogiesRichard Gray- "Segregation is a generational problem that requires intergenerational solutions"This American Life - The Problem We All Live WithNYC Alliance for School Integration and DesegregationAngela Glover Blackwell on the Curb Curt EffectRemember, any book bought through a link here or by starting at our affiliate page on IndieBound supports local bookstores, and Integrated Schools. Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey. 

    COVID-19: Teacher Check-In

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2020 54:56

    Teaching with an equity mindset is a challenge in the best of times, but this crisis has added another layer of challenge to an already daunting task.  We're joined by two high school teachers - Zoe from Philadelphia, and Kara from Minneapolis.  They discuss the challenges of moving to online learning while trying to keep equity at the forefront.  We discuss the ways that White and/or privileged parents can be helpful in this moment, and how we might think about what comes when this is all over. LINKS: For more on Zoe's school - check out this article.To read some of Kara's reflections on teaching and education, check out EdAllies.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    COVID-19: Finding Community in Isolation

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2020 50:30

    Given the reality of social distancing, how do we reconcile a desire for educational justice, a drive for anti-racist education, with the fact that we're stuck at home trying, or maybe not, to educate our kids in vastly inequitable circumstances.  This is not a How-To guide, but a conversation about trying to live our values in challenging times.  Garrett Bucks joins us, along with Anna, to talk through how we are thinking about this moment, for ourselves, our kids, and our communities.  What do we want our kids to remember from this time, and how can we focus our attention, our compassion, and our love outwards, when we are being asked to draw inwards?    LINKS:Garrett's piece -What I hope my (white, economically secure) kids are learning right nowGarrett's piece on Courtney's death - A few thoughts about Courtney Everts MykytynGarrett's blog - The White PagesIf you are able to give in these times, please consider local organizations helping in your communities.  Here's a place to start, if you need it - Grassroots organizations around the country who are helping from Colorlines Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey. 

    Choosing a School: Values, Privilege, and Responsibility

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2020 53:40

    If you listened to The Impacts of Testing Our Kids and Measuring Our Schools (Parts 1 and 2), you heard about some of the issues with using test scores or data aggregators to judge the quality of a school.  But if not test scores, then what?  Making a choice about school is a privilege, and with that privilege, comes a responsibility.  How do you bring your values to that decision, when the information available is so problematic?  We're joined by two mothers, Dana from Brooklyn and Meredith from Minneapolis, who both have kids entering elementary school next year.  They talk about how they are thinking about this choice, given the options available, their values around social and racial justice, and the pressures from their White and/or privileged peers.  Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced edited and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    The Impacts of Testing Our Kids and Ranking Our Schools (Part 2)

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2020 56:07

    Many local communities are engaged in conversations about how school quality should be determined and how that information should be shared.  Those conversations take place in the shadow of GreatSchools.org - who provides a 1-10 rating for nearly every public school in the country.  These ratings have a major impact on everything from curriculum to housing prices.  Matt Barnum (Chalkbeat) wrote about the ways GreatSchools ratings can nudge families towards schools with fewer Black and Brown students.  He joins us to discuss his reporting as well as what current education research can tell us about just how malleable people are when it comes to making choices about schools.  We're also joined by Ali, the leader of the Seattle Chapter of Integrated Schools, and the author of our most widely read blog post, The Problem with GreatSchools. We grapple with the source of the data provided by GreatSchools, but also with how we use it, and, especially what our obligations are, as White and/or privileged people, when we interact with this data.Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.LINKS:Matt's article on Great SchoolsPeter Bergman (Columbia University) - Study on the impacts of providing GreatSchools ratings to people searching for homes with housing vouchers (Section 8)Vernā Myers's TED Talk- Researcher of bias who worked with Next DoorEdWeek interview with Bill Jackson, the founder of GreatSchools, about the original vision for the organization. Three takes on how Next Door has tried to address racial bias:Harvard Business ReviewWiredThe RootLet us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Ali McKay.Audio editing and mixing by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    The Impacts of Testing Our Kids and Ranking Our Schools (Part 1)

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2020 39:47

    In the first of two parts looking at how we measure and communicate school quality, and how that impacts our educational system, we’re joined by Professor Jack Schneider. He has been thinking about school ratings, and school quality for many years. He started the Massachusetts Consortium for Innovative Educational Assessment, a coalition of school and district leaders working to reimagine school assessment and accountability by including multiple measures of student engagement, student achievement, and school environment, and emphasizing performance assessments in the classroom to measure students' deeper mastery of content and skills.We dig into what we are measuring, and, perhaps more importantly, what we aren’t. We also discuss the tension between a real need for transparent accountability, and the issues with the metrics we are currently using.Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.LINKS:The Massachusetts Consortium for Innovative Educational AssessmentProfessor Schneider’s 2017 book - Beyond Test ScoresProfessor Schneider’ podcast - Have You HeardPre-order Professor Schneider’s new book - A Wolf at The Schoolhouse DoorA primer on No Child Left Behind (NCLB)Professor Wayne Au on the links between testing and white supremacyRemember, any book bought through a link here or by starting at our affiliate page on IndieBound supports local bookstores, and Integrated Schools.  Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast is produced by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.Audio editing and mixing by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.

    Educational Justice Through Reparations with Justin Hansford

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2020 38:53

    Howard University Law School is often called the launching pad for Brown v Board. Thurgood Marshall taught there, Charles Hamilton Houston, who was, in many ways, the architect of the multi-year legal strategy that led to BvB, was a dean. Yet here, in 2019, the work that Howard launched is still incomplete. By many measures, our schools are as segregated, if not more, than they were before the unanimous Brown v Board decision. The historical and ongoing segregation is core to educational and racial injustice, and constitutes a breach that our guest, Professor Justin Hansford, argues is in need of repair - a human rights violation that require reparations.Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.LINKS:Houston Institue Panel on the 65th Anniversary of Brown v BoardProfessor Hansford's Op-Ed for the ACLUCallie House - One of the leaders of the first organization to call for reparations in the late 1800s.Ta-Nehisi Coates - The Case for ReparationsIbram X. Kendi - How To Be An Anti-RacistMichelle Alexander - The New Jim CrowEdBuild's Report on the $23 billon funding gapAn example of reparations being paid in the US, from the Washington Post Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.The Integrated Schools Podcast is produced by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.Audio editing and mixing by Andrew Lefkowits.Music by Kevin Casey.   

    Tragedy Strikes the Integrated Schools Family

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2020 5:43

    It is with the saddest possible hearts that we share the devastating news that our beloved Executive Director and Founder, Courtney Everts Mykytyn, passed away on Monday afternoon. She was struck by a car in front of her house and was killed instantly. The driver was sober and stayed on the scene. It is being treated as an accident.Courtney started Integrated Schools and was the driving force behind it, but always insisted that it be about more than just her. While we will feel this loss everyday, the organization will move forward, working toward a more just, more equitable, society. It was her vision alone that inspired a grass roots, nationwide organization, and that vision will continue to guide us. We will share details on a memorial service as they are confirmed. LINKS: Details about the accident from The EastsiderOne of many touching tributes to Courtney from Garrett Bucks 

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