Podcasts about afro latina

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Best podcasts about afro latina

Latest podcast episodes about afro latina

Comadreando
THE SPECTRUM LINGO

Comadreando

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 56:18


Hola Comadres!   Welcome to the 9th episode of Season 3!    Let's talk about occupational therapy uses, social skill training, and avoiding caregiver burnout!   Join your comadre Marcy and special guest  Nia Thomas, CEO of Spectrum Lingo as they discuss everything from the benefits of Occupational Therapy, social skills training, and supporting caregivers to avoid burnout.    Marcy is recording with Riverside-FM and if you'd like to watch instead of listen, head on over to YouTube and check out the video version of the podcast.   If you have any suggestions, opinions, questions, or comments about this or any episode, please send us a Comadre-Gram at marcy@comadreandopod.com or DM me via IG. Let's have a conversation.     If you like the podcast, please share with your family, friends, and significant other. You can support this podcast by finding it across all platforms and rating, liking, and reviewing.   If you chat about us, please use the hashtags #Comadreando, #ComadreTime, or #HolaComadres so that I can see and share you as well.   If you want to help the sustainability of Comadreando, please consider becoming a patron on Patreon. Become a monthly sustaining member or make a one time contribution. Every little bit helps.   You can contribute via $comadreandopod on CashApp and @comadreandopod on Venmo. Merchandise is out now, please visit our BRAND NEW WEBSITE to check out all the Comadre Gear https://www.comadreandopod.com.    NOTES:   Sign Up for Comadre-grams Using this link: http://eepurl.com/h-Gqw9 Nia's IG: @spectrumlingo   Unseen Documentary Trailer: https://youtu.be/I-RgSPtjZd0   Spectrum Lingo Website: https://www.spectrumlingo.com/

Beyond the Therapy Session
Cultural competency & Sensitivity With Olivia Sterling

Beyond the Therapy Session

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 24:11


In this episode, Robin and George chat with Olivia Sterling, one of SohoMD's licensed clinical social workers, about cultural competency and sensitivity.  Olivia describes herself as “an Afro-Latina therapist who specializes in providing culturally-sensitive, holistic therapy across diverse populations.”  She gives her perspective on the roles of cultural competency when working with people of color processing trauma, anxiety, and other concerns.  Having lived in all 5 boroughs of New York City, Olivia is well-versed in navigating intersectionality.  This impacts her practice and the ways she shows up for her clients.  The group discusses the complexities of intersectionality as they come up in therapy. Her view on approaching therapy as a way to protect one's community is a refreshing take on the adage “it takes a village to bring up a child.” George and Olivia talk about breaking the stigma around therapy in BIPOC communities and how Gen Z is evolving the country's views on mental health care.  Robin and Olivia discuss handling trauma triggers in therapy.  Olivia also offers advice for all therapists on exercising curiosity and acknowledging racial dynamics in the therapeutic connection.  Olivia's also provides some advice for patients who need help figuring out whether a new therapist is a good fit. 

Comadreando
UNSEEN NO MORE

Comadreando

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 39:41


Hola Comadres!   Welcome to the 8th episode of Season 3!    Let's talk about supporting special needs parents' to avoid caregiver burnout and why it matters! Join your comadre Marcy and special guests  Tom and Amanda Dyer, directors of the new documentary “Unseen: How We're Failing Parent Caregivers & Why It Matters'' as they discuss the factors that lead to caregiver burnout and how we can support those parents as a community.  Marcy is recording with Riverside-FM and if you'd like to watch instead of listen, head on over to YouTube and check out the video version of the podcast. If you have any suggestions, opinions, questions, or comments about this or any episode, please send us a Comadre-Gram at marcy@comadreandopod.com or DM me via IG. Let's have a conversation.   If you like the podcast, please share with your family, friends, and significant other. You can support this podcast by finding it across all platforms and rating, liking, and reviewing. If you chat about us, please use the hashtags #Comadreando, #ComadreTime, or #HolaComadres so that I can see and share you as well. If you want to help the sustainability of Comadreando, please consider becoming a patron on Patreon. Become a monthly sustaining member or make a one time contribution. Every little bit helps. You can contribute via $comadreandopod on CashApp and @comadreandopod on Venmo. Merchandise is out now, please visit our BRAND NEW WEBSITE to check out all the Comadre Gear https://www.comadreandopod.com.  NOTES: Sign Up for Comadre-grams Using this link: http://eepurl.com/h-Gqw9 Tom & Amanda's IG: @caregiverdoc Unseen Documentary Trailer: https://youtu.be/I-RgSPtjZd0 Unseen Caregiver Documentary Website: https://caregiverdoc.com/

Nerdacity with DuEwa Frazier
Ep. 46 Raina J. León Talks black god mother this body

Nerdacity with DuEwa Frazier

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 59:27


Ep 46 DuEwa interviews poet Raina J. León about her writing life and new book, black god mother this body (Black Freighter Press. 2022). Visit www.rainaleón.com. FOLLOW/FAN/LIKE NERDACITY on IG @nerdacitypodcast on TWITTER @nerdacitypod1 on FACEBOOK @NerdacityPodcast page. SUBSCRIBE & LIKE on ALL podcast platforms (Apple, Anchor, Radio Public, iHeartRadio, Spotify) and YOUTUBE.COM/DuEwaWorld for videos of the podcast and vlogs. Support Anchor.fm/duewafrazier/support or Paypal.me/duewaworld or Cash app $duewaworld BIO Raina J. León, PhD is Black, Afro-Boricua, and from Philadelphia (Lenni Lenape ancestral lands). She is a mother, daughter, sister, madrina, comadre, partner, poet, writer, and teacher educator. She believes in collective action and community work, the profound power of holding space for the telling of our stories, and the liberatory practice of humanizing education. She seeks out communities of care and craft and is a member of the Carolina African American Writers Collective, Cave Canem, CantoMundo, Macondo. She is the author of Canticle of Idols, Boogeyman Dawn, sombra : (dis)locate, and the chapbooks, , profeta without refuge and Areyto to Atabey: Essays on the Mother(ing) Self. She publishes across forms in visual art, poetry, nonfiction, fiction, and scholarly work. She has received fellowships and residencies with the Obsidian Foundation, Community of Writers, Montana Artists Refuge, Macdowell, Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts, Vermont Studio Center, the Tyrone Guthrie Center in Annamaghkerrig, Ireland and Ragdale, among others. She is a founding editor of The Acentos Review, an online quarterly, international journal devoted to the promotion and publication of Latinx arts. She educates our present and future agitators/educators as a full professor of education at Saint Mary's College of California, only the third Black person (all Black women) and the first Afro-Latina to achieve that rank there. She is additionally a digital archivist, emerging visual artist, writing coach, and curriculum developer. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/duewafrazier/support

Comadreando
MY SOUL AMBITION

Comadreando

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 62:08


Hola Comadres! Welcome to the 7th episode of Season 3!  Let's talk about creating inclusive and accepting spaces for special needs parents! Join your comadre Marcy and special guest Chad Youngquist, fellow ausome dad as they discuss and share the importance of community and support for parents of kids with special needs. Marcy is recording with Riverside-FM and if you'd like to watch instead of listen, head on over to YouTube and check out the video version of the podcast. If you have any suggestions, opinions, questions, or comments about this or any episode, please send us a Comadre-Gram at marcy@comadreandopod.com or DM me via IG. Let's have a conversation.   If you like the podcast, please share with your family, friends, and significant other. You can support this podcast by finding it across all platforms and rating, liking, and reviewing. If you chat about us, please use the hashtags #Comadreando, #ComadreTime, or #HolaComadres so that I can see and share you as well. If you want to help the sustainability of Comadreando, please consider becoming a patron on Patreon. Become a monthly sustaining member or make a one time contribution. Every little bit helps.   You can contribute via $comadreandopod on CashApp and @comadreandopod on Venmo. Merchandise is out now, please visit our BRAND NEW WEBSITE to check out all the Comadre Gear https://www.comadreandopod.com.    NOTES: Sign Up for Comadre-grams Using this link: http://eepurl.com/h-Gqw9 Chad's Instagram: @soulambition1   Chad's YouTube Channel: Conversations in Autism https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKOnS1D-VHe7N7lYfbfKZEw Stephen Wiltshire, Artist on the Spectrum Who Drew NYC Skyline: https://youtu.be/FyPqQIHkasI Website: https://www.stephenwiltshire.co.uk/

Thoughtful Wellness Revolution
S3 E5: Olivia Howard — Helping Folks Reclaim their Spiritual Authority

Thoughtful Wellness Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 66:14


We're excited to introduce you to our next guest, the electrifying Olivia Howard! She is a Magdalene priestess and psychic intuitive, located in Northern Virginia, and in our episode we learn what that means and what she does. We get into a religious and spiritual conversation that touches on the foundations of Christianity and how the Catholic and Christian institutions developed. Olivia teaches us a bit more about Mary Magdalene and her work as a Magdalene priestess. We learn more about the imbalance of power in the Church and the impacts of that on modern Christianity. Olivia shares a bit about her work with us, and how she helps others tap into their own spiritual authority. We talk about what it looks like to deconstruct and decolonize Christianity, plus Olivia shares with us some of her own journey. She also gets into what it's like to own a spiritually-based business. Olivia also talks about toxic shame and its relationship to the institutions of Christianity. We discuss the distinctions and complexities of individuals versus institutions, and the interdependence of the two. Zahra and Hien wrap up the episode by further discussing the idea of institutions versus individuals and rave about their conversation with Olivia. Olivia is a Magdalene Priestess and Psychic Intuitive. She queer and Afro Latina, and has spent the past decade of her life devoted to supporting spiritual, mental, and emotional healing of others. She has trained under such mentors as Gieselle Allen, Rebecca Ann, Andee Love, and Marcia Hoffheins, and has served hundreds of women and femmes in their healing journeys. A true Scorpio, Olivia's facilitation is deeply rooted in alchemy -- she helps you make sense of divine + esoteric guidance in your human body. Olivia has a Master's Degree in English Literature from NYU, is an RYT-200, a Reiki energy healer, avid bookworm and general human lover. IG: https://www.instagram.com/_oliviamagdalena/ TikTok: https://tiktok.com/@_oliviamagdalena/ Please rate us 5 stars and leave a review :) For transcripts and bonus content, check out our Substack https://thoughtfulwellnessrevolution.substack.com/ Follow us on social media Twitter: http://twitter.com/ThoughtfulWRPod Instagram: http://instagram.com/ThoughtfulWellnessRevolution Theme song: Katy Pearson

Strategic Momentum
Ep. 120 - The Future of Work, Life, & Inclusion - with Giselle Mota

Strategic Momentum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 43:51


Giselle Mota is a futurist and thought leader focused on enabling inclusion as it relates to product design, the future of work, and all things emerging tech, including web3 and the metaverse. Giselle is the Chief of Product Inclusion at ADP, a role that was created specifically so she could bring her background and perspective to impact the full range of ADP's products. As the Chief of Product Inclusion at ADP, she leads DE&I throughout the 200+ product portfolio, defining strategy and supporting product capabilities to ensure the organization designs with an inclusive mindset. This mission towards greater inclusivity comes from her own experiences and identity. Giselle is Afro-Latina, the child of immigrants, and suffers from dyslexia, so she knows all too well what it's like to be “othered.” Her life experience informs her belief that diversity of thought, experience, and opinion is a powerful driver of innovation that ultimately leads to better outcomes. She channels her passion for inclusivity into projects outside of her role at ADP, such as NFTY Collective, a service that helps ensure that people with disabilities are included and represented in web3 and the metaverse. Learn more and find the complete show notes at https://www.conniewsteele.com/podcastResources:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/imgisellemota/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/gmota/

Friend Forward
"How leaning into activism changed my friendships." A conversation with actor/athlete/ activist Taylor Rae Almonte-Roman

Friend Forward

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 23:15


Taylor Rae Almonte-Roman is a Brooklyn based Afro-Latina actor, athlete and activist who founded ACTIV-ISM, a wellness company dedicated to providing programs and resources to aide in the fight for social justice. But when she really leaned into activism, she noticed it directly impacted some of her friendships. Today she'll share a bit of her story, and it will offer validation to other women of color who sometimes struggle to feel truly seen in their interracial friendships.   Follow Taylor on Instagram. Follow Danielle on Instagram. Book a private coaching session.

New Arrivals: A Socially-Distanced Book Tour
Lyzette Wanzer explores the policing of Afro-Latina and African-American women's natural hair

New Arrivals: A Socially-Distanced Book Tour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 2:05


Bay Area author Lyzette Wanzer reads from her book, "Trauma Tresses and Truth." It's a collection of personal essays and poetry examining a perception, policing and the persecution of Afro-Latina and African-American women's natural hair in American society. It came out on November 8, 2022.

Comadreando
YOU ARE MY SON-SHINE

Comadreando

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 62:53


Hola Comadres! Welcome to the 6th episode of Season 3!  Let's talk about infant loss and grieving! In honor of Infant Loss Awareness and prevention month we have a great guest. Join your comadre Marcy and special guest Jessica Paulino, of the EMA Project,  as they discuss infant loss, grief and mental health. Jessica goes in depth about her non-for-profit and shares her why.   Marcy is recording with Riverside-FM and if you'd like to watch instead of listen, head on over to YouTube and check out the video version of the podcast. If you have any suggestions, opinions, questions, or comments about this or any episode, please send us a Comadre-Gram at marcy@comadreandopod.com or DM me via IG. Let's have a conversation.   If you like the podcast, please share with your family, friends, and significant other. You can support this podcast by finding it across all platforms and rating, liking, and reviewing. If you chat about us, please use the hashtags #Comadreando, #ComadreTime, or #HolaComadres so that I can see and share you as well. If you want to help the sustainability of Comadreando, please consider becoming a patron on Patreon. Become a monthly sustaining member or make a one time contribution. Every little bit helps. You can contribute via $comadreandopod on CashApp and @comadreandopod on Venmo. Merchandise is out now, please visit our BRAND NEW WEBSITE to check out all the Comadre Gear https://www.comadreandopod.com.    NOTES: Sign Up for Comadre-grams Using this link: http://eepurl.com/h-Gqw9 The EMA Project Instagram: @theemaproject “Grief only exists where love lived first.” The EMA Project created with big dreams and tons of love to honor my SONshine, Edward Manuel Arnold (EMA) For the babies we carried who didn't make it earthside, for those that made it earthside and didn't stay, for those grieving and hurting. We say their names with great honor for they existed and they are loved. Jessica, Founder of The EMA Project “And when great souls die, after a period peace blooms, slowly and always irregularly. Spaces fill with a kind of soothing electric vibration. Our senses, restored, never to be the same, whisper to us. They existed. We can be. Be and be better. For they existed.” Maya Angelou #GriefisLove #griefjourney #healingismybirthright #PregnancyLossAwareness #infantandpregnancyloss #neonatalloss #stillborn #miscarriage #embryoloss #infertility #1in4 #faith #hope #GOD #4ema #griefdoula #postpartumdoula #theemaproject #pcco #TeamSimeon #griefsupport   The EMA Project Website: https://arnoldjessica31.wixsite.com/emaproject You can find all the ways in which you can led support here: The EMA Project Linktree: https://linktr.ee/4ema   Brujas of Brooklyn Website: https://www.brujasofbrooklyn.com/  

Grown and Growing Podcast
Breaking Down the Adolescent Mental Crisis with Dr. Jari Santana-Wynn

Grown and Growing Podcast

Play Episode Play 36 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 66:22


After learning about the child and adolescent mental health crisis in the US, I wanted to talk to a clinical expert to learn more and better equip myself with tools for my own children. The conversation is enlightening and helpful. This conversation with Dr. Jari @doctor.jari  gave me hope.About My Guest:Dr. Jari Santana-Wynn is a child and family therapist, parent coach, international speaker, and certified LGBTQI+ trainer with over 20 years of clinical experience. She earned her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Miami University (OH) and has worked in community mental health clinics, hospitals, and schools. Her clinical expertise is focused on child and adolescent mental health, trauma informed care, immigrant mental health, and acculturation stress. Dr. Jari's own experiences as an Afro-Latina immigrant child drive her commitment to culturally competent mental health services for minority communities and make her a tenacious advocate for their social, economic, health care, and educational needs.Special Offer for Listeners:For listeners of Grown and Growing, Dr. Jari is offering 50% off of her video series Decolonizing Parenting, a series where Dr. Jari and her sister discuss non-coercive and non-violent parenting strategies that are consistent with the Afro-indigenous child rearing practices of our ancestors.Visit:  https://doctorjari.com/Use the code:  grown&growingGrown and Growing Podcast: Like. Follow. Share. Connect with me:Website: grownandgrowing.buzzsprout.comFacebook: @GrownandgrowingpodcastInstagram: @GrownandgrowingpodcastEmail: grown.growingpodcast@gmail.com

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Bits, Pits, and Soles

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 160:43


Today on Boston Public Radio: We began the show by opening phone lines, talking with listeners about increasing political violence in the leadup to midterm elections. Trenni Casey talked about Tom Brady and Gisele Bundchen's divorce, and the Patriots' current season. Trenni Casey is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston. Lee Pelton discussed the Supreme Court's affirmative action cases, and The Boston Foundation's recently released report card on housing in Boston. Lee Pelton is the president and CEO of The Boston Foundation. Elvis Jocol Lara and Delmarina Lopez talked about El Mundo's “Latino 30 Under 30,” and the current state of democracy. Elvis Jocol Lara is the creator of El Mundo's “30 Under 30,” now in its 5th year. Delmarina Lopez is an attorney and the first Afro-Latina to be elected to the Chicopee City Council. She's one of the under-30's highlighted in this year's list. Carol Rose shared her thoughts on the legal arguments heard in the Supreme Court's affirmative action cases. She also talked about how the ACLU is shoring up election infrastructure ahead of the midterms. Carol Rose is the executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts. John King updated us on the latest political headlines, focusing on the attack of Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi's husband, Paul Pelosi, in the couple's San Francisco home. John King is CNN's chief national correspondent and the host of “Inside Politics.” We ended the show by asking listeners if they would shorten their showers in the name of climate change, as European leaders urge residents to conserve hot water.

All Black Men Need Therapy
All Black Men Need Therapy | E69: BBL and Men Weaves

All Black Men Need Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 40:30


Chief, Bell and Prentice discuss why individuals are getting work done and whether or not you should tell your partner if you've had a BBL or wear a wig.

La Mujer CEO con la Dra. Marisol Capellán
Soluciones Creativas | Dra. Capellán y Graciela Cabello

La Mujer CEO con la Dra. Marisol Capellán

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 29:06


En este episodio hablamos de como crear soluciones creativas. Adquiere aqui la membresia de La Mujer CEO - Coaching CommunitySigue la Dra. Capellan on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/profcapellan

Comadreando
A MOMENT OF JOY

Comadreando

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 38:39


Hola Comadres!   Welcome to the 4th episode of Season 3!    Let's talk about supporting the needs of special needs parents' mental health!   Join your comadre Marcy and special guest Camille Joy, host of Moments of Joy Podcast and fellow Autism Mom, , as they discuss the importance of mental health, mindful moments, pouring into ourselves, and setting boundaries.    Marcy is recording with Riverside-FM and if you'd like to watch instead of listen, head on over to YouTube and check out the video version of the podcast.   If you have any suggestions, opinions, questions, or comments about this or any episode, please send us a Comadre-Gram at marcy@comadreandopod.com or DM me via IG. Let's have a conversation.     If you like the podcast, please share with your family, friends, and significant other. You can support this podcast by finding it across all platforms and rating, liking, and reviewing.   If you chat about us, please use the hashtags #Comadreando, #ComadreTime, or #HolaComadres so that I can see and share you as well.   If you want to help the sustainability of Comadreando, please consider becoming a patron on Patreon. Become a monthly sustaining member or make a one time contribution. Every little bit helps.   You can contribute via $comadreandopod on CashApp and @comadreandopod on Venmo. Merchandise is out now, please visit our BRAND NEW WEBSITE to check out all the Comadre Gear https://www.comadreandopod.com.    NOTES:   Camille's Instagram: @momentsofjoypodcast    Camille's Links: https://www.mojpodcast.com/instagram   Sign Up for Comadre-grams Using this link: http://eepurl.com/h-Gqw9 GET YOUR TICKETS FOR THE 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY OF THE SHOW ON OCTOBER 27 , 2022 from 6-9PM AT AMORES CAFE NYC 5025 BROADWAY NY, NY https://www.eventbrite.com/e/comadreandos-1st-birthday-tickets-441545513517

All Black Men Need Therapy
All Black Men Need Therapy | E68: Is Intentional Happiness a Trauma Response?

All Black Men Need Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 49:17


Chief, Bell, and Prentice jump into a conversation surrounding silver linings and whether intentional happiness is a form of trauma response or not. The fellas then lean into the topics of validation, finding similar levels of understanding, and how perception can affect your message. The guys agreed that this was another much-needed conversation for them.

¿Quién Tú Eres?
All of Me with Ayanna Kelly

¿Quién Tú Eres?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 48:56


Ayanna is a proud Afro-Latina residing in the DMV area with her family where she earned her masters degree in Human Resource Management after serving 8 years in the military. Ayanna is an advocate for DEIB and mental well-being for people in the workplace. She uses her lived experiences as an Afro-Latina, mother, and disabled veteran to breath life into her HR, DEIB, and advocacy work. She teaches organizations how to create psychologically safe workplaces that foster belonging. Ayanna is an active Poderistas Power Squad member where she helps uplift the Latina community through civic engagement, social justice initiatives, and mental health roundtables. Ayanna is an MTV Mental Health Youth Action Forum leader where she curates mental health campaigns to address the inequities which limit BIPOC youth from accessing mental health services. She has pitched campaigns to the Biden-Harris Administration, mental health non-profit partners, and industry leaders at the White House. “I didn't know I could heal myself until I learned mental health impacts millions and I'm not alone. I'm doing this for the black and brown kids who don't know where they can go or who they can turn to.” ~ Ayanna on mental health advocacy Ayanna truly believes in the inter connectivity of mental health, anti-racist practices, and true belonging in the workplace and in society. In her spare time, you'll catch her at the soccer field with her first born, tending to her quarantine bought houseplants, walking her dogs, and reading as many books as possible. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/quientueres/support

Comadreando
MENTAL HEALTH IS HEALTH

Comadreando

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 43:11


  Hola Comadres!   Welcome to the 3rd episode of Season 3!    Let's talk about the importance of mental health!   Join your comadre Marcy and special guest Jose “Mozo”, of Watch Yo Mouth with Mozo Podcast, as they discuss the importance of mental health, therapy, and counseling in communities of color especially for men.    Marcy is recording with Riverside-FM and if you'd like to watch instead of listen, head on over to YouTube and check out the video version of the podcast.   If you have any suggestions, opinions, questions, or comments about this or any episode, please send us a Comadre-Gram at marcy@comadreandopod.com or DM me via IG. Let's have a conversation.     If you like the podcast, please share with your family, friends, and significant other. You can support this podcast by finding it across all platforms and rating, liking, and reviewing.   If you chat about us, please use the hashtags #Comadreando, #ComadreTime, or #HolaComadres so that I can see and share you as well.   If you want to help the sustainability of Comadreando, please consider becoming a patron on Patreon. Become a monthly sustaining member or make a one time contribution. Every little bit helps.   You can contribute via $comadreandopod on CashApp and @comadreandopod on Venmo. Merchandise is out now, please visit our BRAND NEW WEBSITE to check out all the Comadre Gear https://www.comadreandopod.com.    NOTES:   Mozo's Instagram: @_therealmozo    Mozo's Link Tree: https://linktr.ee/therealmozo   Sign Up for Comadre-grams Using this link: http://eepurl.com/h-Gqw9

All Black Men Need Therapy
All Black Men Need Therapy | E67: Nature vs. Nurture

All Black Men Need Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 56:06


Chief, Bell, and Prentice catch up on Prentice's upcoming wedding, Chief's recent one-man show,  and Bell's revelation on how certain aspects of his childhood have molded his thought process. The fellas have an around-the-world convo and invite you to join them and see what you can take from their learnings.

¿Quién Tú Eres?
Performance vs Personality with Dr. Marisol Capellan

¿Quién Tú Eres?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 47:15


Dr. Marisol Capellan is the Founder and Director of Transformational Coaching Certifications at The Capellan Institute. Dr. Capellan is an internationally recognized and award-winning educator, coach and TEDx speaker. She is a former lecturer at the University of Miami, Miami Herbert Business School, a leadership and Diversity, Equity & Inclusion speaker and trainer, and a certified executive coach. She graduated with a Masters in in Leadership and a doctoral degree in Higher Education Leadership from the University of Miami. Her dissertation focus was on the trajectory of women to leadership positions. As an Afro-Latina, mother, and immigrant she has faced and witnessed many of the institutional and systemic barriers and biases that Black women face in their career trajectory to leadership roles, which sparked her passion in women's empowerment and the need to increase the representation of women in positions of power. She is currently writing a book, Leadership is a Responsibility, about her career journey experience as a Black Hispanic woman in Academia, the stories of Black women in the workplace and the need of responsible leaders to create a more equitable society where minority can belong and thrive. In addition, her personal story of resilience has been featured on CNN where she discussed how her mindset helped her overcome homelessness at 17 years of age while highlighting the systemic inequalities that minorities go through in order to succeed. She is available to conduct trainings, speaking engagements and coaching in both English and Spanish. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/quientueres/support

Comadreando
A SPECIAL KIND OF LOVE

Comadreando

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 47:38


Hola Comadres! Welcome to the 2nd episode of Season 3!  Let's talk about real love on the spectrum! Join your comadre Marcy and special guest Yovy D, of Chombita Chronicles Podcast, as they discuss dating during a pandemic, love on the spectrum, and adjusting to creating a life together as a couple.  Marcy is recording with Riverside-FM and if you'd like to watch instead of listen, head on over to YouTube and check out the video version of the podcast. If you have any suggestions, opinions, questions, or comments about this or any episode, please send us a Comadre-Gram at marcy@comadreandopod.com or DM me via IG. Let's have a conversation.   If you like the podcast, please share with your family, friends, and significant other. You can support this podcast by finding it across all platforms and rating, liking, and reviewing. If you chat about us, please use the hashtags #Comadreando, #ComadreTime, or #HolaComadres so that I can see and share you as well. If you want to help the sustainability of Comadreando, please consider becoming a patron on Patreon. Become a monthly sustaining member or make a one time contribution. Every little bit helps. You can contribute via $comadreandopod on CashApp and @comadreandopod on Venmo. Merchandise is out now, please visit our BRAND NEW WEBSITE to check out all the Comadre Gear https://www.comadreandopod.com.    NOTES: Chombita Chronicle's Instagram: @chombita_chronicles Yovy's Instagram: @yovy_d  Twitter @YWDaniels  Yovy's Linktree for all her featured press articles: https://linktr.ee/yovyd  Sign Up for Comadre-grams Using this link: http://eepurl.com/h-Gqw9

Comadreando
A SPECIAL KIND OF LOVE

Comadreando

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 47:38


Hola Comadres! Welcome to the 2nd episode of Season 3!  Let's talk about real love on the spectrum! Join your comadre Marcy and special guest Yovy D, of Chombita Chronicles Podcast, as they discuss dating during a pandemic, love on the spectrum, and adjusting to creating a life together as a couple.  Marcy is recording with Riverside-FM and if you'd like to watch instead of listen, head on over to YouTube and check out the video version of the podcast. If you have any suggestions, opinions, questions, or comments about this or any episode, please send us a Comadre-Gram at marcy@comadreandopod.com or DM me via IG. Let's have a conversation.   If you like the podcast, please share with your family, friends, and significant other. You can support this podcast by finding it across all platforms and rating, liking, and reviewing. If you chat about us, please use the hashtags #Comadreando, #ComadreTime, or #HolaComadres so that I can see and share you as well. If you want to help the sustainability of Comadreando, please consider becoming a patron on Patreon. Become a monthly sustaining member or make a one time contribution. Every little bit helps. You can contribute via $comadreandopod on CashApp and @comadreandopod on Venmo. Merchandise is out now, please visit our BRAND NEW WEBSITE to check out all the Comadre Gear https://www.comadreandopod.com.    NOTES: Chombita Chronicle's Instagram: @chombita_chronicles Yovy's Instagram: @yovy_d  Twitter @YWDaniels  Yovy's Linktree for all her featured press articles: https://linktr.ee/yovyd  Sign Up for Comadre-grams Using this link: http://eepurl.com/h-Gqw9

All Black Men Need Therapy
All Black Men Need Therapy | E66: All Tricks, No Treat

All Black Men Need Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 46:38


Chief, Bell, and Prentice discuss the lame behavior of super-sensitive, weak-minded men on social media. There's been a recent trend of men online pouting about not getting sex from women they spent money on. The fellas dissect the actions of these men and call out those who dare treat women in such a way.Graced HealthFor women who want simple and grace-filled ways to take care of herself and enjoy a...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

MTR Podcasts
Q&A with Artist Ashley Miah

MTR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 32:54


Ashley Miah known as Lee Lee La Cubana, is an Afro-Latina artist from New York City who focuses on acrylic painting. An Honoree of Crain's 20 in their 20's 2022, Ashley enjoys creating art for urban communities and puts events together through her Art Organization, The Culture Candy, for artists to showcase their work and encourage New Yorkers to invest in urban, minority and undiscovered artists. The Culture Candy is a NYC based arts organization that celebrates urban New York City Culture, the arts, and urban & minority artists by providing upcoming artists with showcase opportunities. In addition to The Culture Candy she is the founder of heART Con, a recurring art convention and NYC's official art week. heART Week, her first citywide NYC art week, took place June 2022 and included businesses throughout the five boroughs including Chelsea Market, ARTECHOUSE and more! She aims to continue to create and spread the love she has for her urban upbringing through art. ​In her early life, Ashley created art independently leading her to attend a performing arts high school. After attending Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art she continued to pursue the field and currently holds a B.F.A. from Hunter College. Although she mainly works in acrylics, she is classically trained in figure drawing, photography, graphic design, fashion design and printmaking. Born and raised in the Lower East Side, Ashley creates large works of contemporary pop art paintings that play on 90's pop culture and urban New York City culture, along with paintings and mixed media combining pop culture references and spirituality. This collaboration of ideas is an ode to her upbringing in the 90's to early millennium in urban New York City, and her family's Afro-Cuban roots of Santeria in Spirituality. Serving as a reminder of internal riches, Ashley's art signature is the diamond and aims to spread reminders of internal wealth with her current collection through collaborations with Comfiart, Artel & more.The Truth In This ArtThe Truth In This Art is a podcast interview series supporting vibrancy and development of Baltimore & beyond's arts and culture.To find more amazing stories from the artist and entrepreneurial scenes in & around Baltimore, check out my episode directory.Stay in TouchNewsletter sign-upSupport my podcastShareable link to episode ★ Support this podcast ★

Grad School Femtoring
158: Carving an Intersectional and Interdisciplinary Path in Grad School with Xochitl Clare

Grad School Femtoring

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 39:53


This week our special guest is Xochitl Clare, who discusses the topic of how to carve and intersectional and interdisciplinary path for yourself. Xochitl is a Afro-Latina Marine Biologist & Performing Artist with Caribbean & Central American heritage. Her Ph.D. research provides valuable insights on how ecosystems and the fisheries they support are coping with ocean warming and how this could impact daily livelihoods. We discuss her work in using the combined power of science and storytelling to empower a new generation of diverse ocean explorers. In this episode we cover: -Xochitl's backstory as an Afro-Latina marine biologist and performer -The benefits and challenges of pursuing interdisciplinary interests in college and in grad school -What to consider when applying to grad school with intersectional and interdisciplinary interests -Approaches to interdisciplinary career planning, and more! You can connect with Xochitl via the following account tags and sites: Instagram Account Tags: @xochitlclare @dancewithxochi Facebook Account Tags: Xochitl Clare LinkedIn Account Tags: Xochitl Clare Website: https://xochitlclare.wixsite.com/dancingbiologist *NEW* Take the Grad School Femtoring Listener Survey to share critical feedback and get a special FREE gift: https://forms.gle/6Qcxf9PG8rjqdkrq9 *NEW* Sign up for my newsletter to receive updates on my GSF Guide book and other resources for first-gen students of color: https://creative-trailblazer-5062.ck.page/gradschoolfemtoring Liked what you heard? Then join my exclusive Grad School Femtee community on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/gradschoolfemtoring Get my free 15-page Grad School Femtoring Resource Kit here: https://gradschoolfemtoring.com/kit/ Want to learn how to work with me? Get started here: https://gradschoolfemtoring.com/services/ For this and more, go to: https://gradschoolfemtoring.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/gradschoolfemtoring/message

Comadreando
THE CHOSEN MOMS

Comadreando

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 57:21


Hola Comadres! Welcome to the 1st episode of Season 3! We are back Baby!! Let's talk about supporting the mental health needs of parents with special needs children! Join your comadre Marcy and special guest Melanie, fellow mom to a special child, as they discuss the importance of supporting the mental health of mothers with special needs. They focus on the importance of community, self-care and setting boundaries.  Marcy is recording with Riverside-FM and if you'd like to watch instead of listen, head on over to YouTube and check out the video version of the podcast. If you have any suggestions, opinions, questions, or comments about this or any episode, please send us a Comadre-Gram at marcy@comadreandopod.com or DM me via IG. Let's have a conversation.   If you like the podcast, please share with your family, friends, and significant other. You can support this podcast by finding it across all platforms and rating, liking, and reviewing. If you chat about us, please use the hashtags #Comadreando, #ComadreTime, or #HolaComadres so that I can see and share you as well. If you want to help the sustainability of Comadreando, please consider becoming a patron on Patreon. Become a monthly sustaining member or make a one time contribution. Every little bit helps. You can contribute via $comadreandopod on CashApp and @comadreandopod on Venmo. Merchandise is out now, please visit our BRAND NEW WEBSITE to check out all the Comadre Gear https://www.comadreandopod.com.    NOTES: Melanie's Instagram: @iknowthatvoice85/   Sign Up for Comadre-grams Using this link: http://eepurl.com/h-Gqw9  

Comadreando
THE CHOSEN MOMS

Comadreando

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 57:21


Hola Comadres! Welcome to the 1st episode of Season 3! We are back Baby!! Let's talk about supporting the mental health needs of parents with special needs children! Join your comadre Marcy and special guest Melanie, fellow mom to a special child, as they discuss the importance of supporting the mental health of mothers with special needs. They focus on the importance of community, self-care and setting boundaries.  Marcy is recording with Riverside-FM and if you'd like to watch instead of listen, head on over to YouTube and check out the video version of the podcast. If you have any suggestions, opinions, questions, or comments about this or any episode, please send us a Comadre-Gram at marcy@comadreandopod.com or DM me via IG. Let's have a conversation.   If you like the podcast, please share with your family, friends, and significant other. You can support this podcast by finding it across all platforms and rating, liking, and reviewing. If you chat about us, please use the hashtags #Comadreando, #ComadreTime, or #HolaComadres so that I can see and share you as well. If you want to help the sustainability of Comadreando, please consider becoming a patron on Patreon. Become a monthly sustaining member or make a one time contribution. Every little bit helps. You can contribute via $comadreandopod on CashApp and @comadreandopod on Venmo. Merchandise is out now, please visit our BRAND NEW WEBSITE to check out all the Comadre Gear https://www.comadreandopod.com.    NOTES: Melanie's Instagram: @iknowthatvoice85/   Sign Up for Comadre-grams Using this link: http://eepurl.com/h-Gqw9  

Body Liberation for All
Not _______ Enough. Finding Confidence in Being You

Body Liberation for All

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 51:09


Yael R Rosenstock Gonzalez (she/her) is a sex educator, sex coach, researcher, author, speaker, curriculum developer, and workshop facilitator. As a queer, polyamorous, white-presenting Nuyorican Jew, Yael has always been interested in understanding the multi-level experiences of individuals. This led her to found Kaleidoscope Vibrations, LLC, a company dedicated to supporting and creating spaces for individuals to explore and find community in their identities. Through her company, she facilitates workshops, develops curriculum, offers Identity Exploration Coaching, and publishes narratives often left out of mainstream publishing.This episode we explore:Honoring boundaries in community spaces and navigating POC spaces as a white presenting personFinding belonging and claiming identity as a multi-ethnic personDiversity in the Jewish diaspora Promoting inclusive representations of human experience in publishing Episode ResourcesDecolonizing Wellness: A QTBIPOC-Centered Guide to Escape the Diet Trap, Heal Your Self-Image, and Achieve Body LiberationBali Retreat March 19-25 2023https://kvibrations.com/https://www.sexpositiveyou.com/https://www.instagram.com/yaelthesexgeek/https://www.tiktok.com/@yaelthesexgeekHello and welcome to another episode of Body Liberation for All. I'm your host, Dalia Kinsey, holistic registered dietitian, and the author of Decolonizing Wellness.My work is centered on amplifying the health and happiness of LGBTQI+ and BIPOC people. And that is also what we do here at Body Liberation for All. I wanna remind you, I am hosting the Decolonizing Wellness Eco-Luxury QTBIPOC retreat in Bali in March. So if you are a person who loves the plan way in advance, like I do. This is when you want to book. This is a great time to give yourself plenty of room to break the trip into payments and to get all of your ducks in a row. If you aren't going to be able to join us, but you know someone who this retreat could be life changing for, please make sure you share it. Substack makes sharing so easy on their platform. So if you visit daliakinsey.substack.com to listen to this episode you'll see it's just a click of a button. Today's guest, the Yael Rosenstock has so much knowledge in different areas that we cover a lot of territory in this conversation. There was still so much more that we could have dug into that hopefully at a later date we'll get to revisit. Today we explore a little bit of the lived experience of being a white presenting person who lives shoulder to shoulder with POC within the family, but out in the world is not having the same experience as the family members that have a darker complexion. Since we already know race is not actually real from a scientific perspective, it's totally a social construct, your skin color itself will to a large extent determine how much lived experience you have as a person of color or as a white person, regardless of what the socialization inside of your house is like because so much of the POC experience, if you're living in a colonized country, if you're living in a country that has its roots in white supremacy, so much of the experience is informed by the anti-Blackness or the anti-POCness that you're going to encounter out in the world.That does not in any way invalidate the cultural uniqueness of people who are in these very blended families and happen to have pale skin or white skin. So it's interesting to me to hear directly from somebody having this experience. It's an interesting concept to look at on an individual level. What does the fact that race is fictional and totally social have? How does that all play out - when you know you are culturally different from the white folks who do not have POC blood relatives that they live with and are close with but at the same time you know that you're not experiencing the same level of marginalization. What is that like? I rarely bother to claim my Latinx heritage. Because the anti-blackness that I have encountered in a lot of Spanish-speaking circles here in the US is so intense it doesn't make any logical sense for me to keep trying to be somewhere that I don't feel welcome.Some of these themes that Yael shares, the feeling of not enoughness when you are more than one thing or when you've only been presented with a narrow definition of what it means to hold a particular identity, is so relatable. I know not just to us, it's so relatable to so many people, because the ways that we define certain identities are so narrow it naturally leaves out a large number of people. The work that Yael is doing to promote the authentic representation of a wide variety of human experience at her publishing company feels like such a natural extension of this lived experience that she has of knowing how difficult it can be to really claim and embody our identities when we haven't seen anything similar reflected back to us. I love this. Entire conversation. I know you will too. Let's jump right into it. Body Liberation for All ThemeYeah. They might try to put you in a box, tell them that you don't accept when the world is tripping out tell them that you love yourself. Hey, Hey, smile on them live your life just like you like it is.It's your party negativity is not invited. For my queer folks, for my trans, people of color, let your voice be heard. Look in the mirror and say that it's time to put me first. You born to win. Head up high with confidence.  This show is for everyone. So, I thank you for tuning in. Let's go.Dalia: I definitely wanted to cover the concept of white passing fragility. But then I want to definitely talk about your other projects and just what you're doing with intersectionality.Yael: Okay. I do want to warn that there's a very good chance that that will not. Some people will really like that idea of the white passing fragility, but others won't because right. The author of that book has become super famous and super rich off of a book around racism as a white woman. And just giving you a fair warning that this may or may not be taken so well.Dalia: And then that's so interesting too, because it seems like people should be compensated for good work or things that they do with good intentions.Dalia: But so often people who are in social justice are on the struggle bus financially, but, and that almost seems to be the expectation. Like you have to be a martyr to break down systems of oppression. But then I also am conflicted because it seems like all the time, white people continue to profit off of pain from people of color and especially Black people in this country. Even when you look at who makes money off of depictions of just Black suffering in general, whether it's another movie about slavery, even if it's a "fun" spin on it, like the Django or something, which I refuse to watch, I just don't understand how we're not seeing how problematic that is, but at least hers originally started out with intentions that seemed more educational.Dalia: Like I think it's a little more sketch to create a film or a piece of entertainment that centered on Black pain. And then all the money goes to somebody who's not Black. I mean, not at all, but the majority, most of it, right. It seems less sketchy, but it is sketchy nonetheless.Dalia: And I've been having a lot of feelings around these white savior complexes that are popping out these days. And people not understanding that, hey, maybe people want to be the hero of their own damn story and guess what, maybe they are ready are.Yael: But you're in the wayDalia: I know. Right? Or like you just exhausting people showing up to the March and explaining to everybody how, you know, you're being white the right way. I don't know if you've seen that play out in real life where people try constantly schooling other white people on how to be more. Down, I guess is the expression, but it doesn't really translate, but it's so rare that people confront people like that because their competition or the people that you have to compare them to you sometimes are so problematic that by comparison, they seem amazing.Yael: Yeah, I like this better.Dalia: So it's like, should I even say anything?Dalia: So I don't know.Yael: Considering that most of my spaces are POC and or Latin. I don't have that many white saviors.Dalia: Smart. Okay. Is that by design or is that coincidental?Yael: Well, I think at first it's coincidental, right? Just like growing up in a mixed neighborhood with a mixed family.Yael: It just is what happened. I was in a school with folks of different groups. And so that just continued. And then when I did reach middle school and there were white people who were just white, not Latin, like, I mean, there were a couple in elementary, but not many. And. I just felt really uncomfortable in the space.Yael: And that was like my assigned group. Cause I wasn't dark enough to be in the Latin group, I think. And also like the Latin group was like ghetto fab. Like I also wore my hair back slicked back. I also had the lip liner, and I had the big hoop earrings as well,Dalia: But like it wasn't enough.Yael: It was a, it was a browner Latin group. And so I felt like I shouldn't be part of it. Like I was friends with them, but I shouldn't be part of it because I didn't look the same. And so I just like ended up, even though I was friends with all the other groups, I ended up in the white girl group and I was just like, this is uncomfortable. Like, I don't agree with the things they say.Yael: I like rebelled a bit and basically got kicked out. And so I think after that, I was just like, I'm going to try and choose. So I don't think I've ever been like, I'm unwilling to be friends with white people because that doesn't seem nice either. But the same reason that folks have affinity groups, right?Yael: The same reason we hang out with queer people as queer people, the same reason you hang out with Latin people if you're Latin or Black and Black is because you don't want to have to explain certain things. And I'm tired. And so I don't go into all white spaces cause I get nervous about why are they all white?Yael: Like what's the intention behind this group. Is there an ulterior motive and I, yeah, I just like, I don't want to have to explain things that I end up becoming that white person, the white savior being like, that's not how. I joined a book club once. And they were talking about how, like, it didn't make sense that this person was referencing their dreams.Yael: Like it's not like a real thing. And I was like, this person is Mexican. And I don't know that much about Mexicans, but in like Caribbean culture dreams can be really important.Dalia: Oh wait. They were saying like a literal dream, not goals that they were struggling with finding meaning in their dream and they thought that was weird?Yael: Yeah. He was writing a memoir and he was referencing how he thought his dream was related to the, like what was happening in his life and that he had seen a Wolf or something. Right. He has indigenous culture roots, right as a Mexican-American. But they were just like, no, that's like, he's just making that up from the memoir.Dalia: But no, because that's extremely common.Yael: Yeah. Like they couldn't fathom it.Dalia: That is fascinating. So this is so interesting, can you share your marginalized identities? Because I think the experience of being white presenting is interesting in that you may be exposed to things that I might never hear, because I didn't even know that, I didn't even notice that white people weren't doing that all the time too.Dalia: Because at work at the moment I'm working in a majority Black office. And people are constantly talking about, you know, oh, I saw this, I wonder if it's a sign and we all have different religious backgrounds too. Somebody even started wearing a hair net because they're afraid somebody might get some of their hair that was shedding and put roots on them. None of us thought that was weird. We were all like, oh, if you feel it's necessary, you do that. You make sure you're not,Yael: You save yourself. It may or may not be real. It may or may not be. I'm always like, I rather be careful then sorry.Dalia: Exactly. Absolutely. Nobody said anything when I came into the room to sage it because I thought that we had some bad mojo in there.Dalia: People said, make sure you get my desk.. Someone came in with holy water. Like we had a very problematic coworker , and we were like, get all the stuff we're clapping in the corners.Yael: I was friends with one of the custodians where I used to work and she's an older woman. She was like the age of maybe like between mother and grandmother.Yael: And she brought me a bracelet because she was. You're very joyful and you're pretty. And I just think that someone's going to send you a curse. made me a bracelet to protect me from maldiciones. She just didn't want me to get hurt.Dalia: And you immediately put it on. You're like, okay, thanks.Yael: I mean, first off, like I appreciate that you're caring about me and no, I don't think it's weird.Yael: I've worn, evil eyes before, you know, like, to me, I think that the bigger thing for us is like whether or not we participate or whether or not we're like, yes, this is real when I talk about ghost stories, I share all the ghost stories. I know. Was I there? No. Was it real? I don't know. Cause I wasn't there, but it could be .Dalia: It's so dismissive to be like, oh, that's so dumb. What? Who says that -only people who are very sheltered and are under the impression that their way is the only way.Yael: This was a group about social justice. The people are lovely and the ones who hosted, I actually adore. They are fantastic.Yael: And they weren't the ones who were having this question, but I remember one person in particular, she was just totally dismissive. And I was just like, I don't understand. And I didn't show up for a couple of years, but then I came back and I was like, okay, my role is going to be giving the perspective of not these people in the case that this comes up again, because they keep reading books by people of color. And like, I don't have the same perspective. Like I said, I'm not Mexican. I don't know what they do. But I have a feeling that this is like something that's shared, like it's a native American thing.Yael: It's a Latin thing. It's a Black thing. Like I just feel, you know, Asian cultures, everyone, actually.Dalia: I know this is whats so bizarre.Yael: There are definitely white people who also have that as a practice and Jews, a lot of us who do pass it are white or pass as white, like that's also part of our culture.Dalia: And that's another thing. So this is one of my big questions. So, you identify as Latin X?Yael: Yes, I'm LatinaDalia: You're Latina and you're Jewish. And so does that mean your mother is your Jewish parent.Yael: That is actually, so...Dalia: does that matter or is that like out of date or…Yael: No, that is an excellent question. My parents tried to enroll me in what's called Yeshiva because they didn't like the local public school.Yael: And so they wanted to put me in a Jewish school and I got rejected because my mother is Catholic and my father is Jewish. And as you like are insinuating, like the religion follows the mother. Now that school accepts muts like me of my form. They no longer discriminate against us, but because my parents couldn't put me in the Jewish school.Yael: I went to an Episcopalian school.Dalia: Oh, wow, you were all over the place.Yael: Yeah. So I got a good Christian education .Dalia: Oh, and how did your dad manage,, was he a little heartbroken? Like, Ooh, not what I had in mind.Yael: Well, it was a small school. There wasn't a religion class, but like every morning we started with prayers and every Wednesday we had mass and I just, I didn't know they wanted me to be Jewish. I thought they were saying, here are our religions. You go to Sunday Jewish school. You go to day school with Christians. Figure out your path. And so I very confidently figured out my path. I was like, I am Jewish. And like, I am now very knowledgeable about Christian stuff. But actually they did want me to be Jewish and they had warned the school that that was what they wanted.Dalia: I was under the impression, and this may not be accurate. Is that like a modern Jewish person may be a little more secular and maybe they know some of the traditions and then maybe they go to synagogue for special events or, but still feel that strong cultural identity.Dalia: And then don't really feel, I feel like they should be dropped into that white American bucket with everybody else because they're separate as an ethnic group. Whereas other white ethnic groups (in America) gave up their separateness for the most part.Yael: Interesting. So I haven't done much study into the question, but I have a friend who sent me, who sends me lots of articles, Catherine.Yael: And she sent me an article about whether or not Jews are white and my coworker, Asia Gray, who does our anti-racism curriculum and what have you. One of the books was, how antisemitism was the original racism. And so that's part of the way that she talks about oppression and like structural oppressions and what have you.Yael: And she starts that story there and it's like Jews became white if you are white, but there are Black Jews. There are like plenty of Middle Eastern Jews that have more color there are Russian Jews, the Sephardic Jews, the Mizrahi in general. So there are plenty of Jews of color and then they're like me Ashkenazi, which are of German roots, right. German and certain parts of Russia, roots and Poland and all that kind of stuff. And so, yeah. Yes, it is a different, I agree. It's different ethnic group. Like you can trace us back when I did that blood test, I literally come out 49% Ashkenazi. I'm from Germany, even though I can, I can trace my roots on a family tree that's physical to the 15 hundreds. It says I'm Ashkenazi. Wasn't mentioned Germany because the Jewish blood is what it picks up. And so, yes, I agree. Like there's like this ethnic thing there and that's why you can be a secular person of a religion.Yael: I mean, there are plenty of secular Christians, right. That celebrate Christmas and what have you. But there's like this certain level of like the foods that you eat and the mannerisms that you have and like certain cultural values. I don't identify it as a secular Jew I identify as reform, which is like a less observant Jew.Dalia: Now, how did you feel your queer identity meshes with Judaism? It's rumored to be an easier mesh. Is that true? Are Christians just being jealous?Yael: I think it is an easier, easier. I mean, I know plenty of Christians that are queer, but my synagogue, I don't remember how old I was, but she bat mitzvah'd me so young enough for that had a lesbian rabbai.Yael: And she got married at our synagogue and we were just a regular reform synagogue. Right. We weren't like, ah, where the most social justice progressive synogauge, we were just a reform synagogue. And we did lose some of the older parishioners and I imagine some other age ones, when she joined as the rabbi, but for the most part, everyone was like, love who you love.Yael: Right? Like that's not an issue. And she was a woman rabbi and my next rabbi was also a woman, right? So like that's super common. It's even starting very slowly in the Orthodox community, which is one of the more observant sects of Judaism to have women rabbis. And so overall I think that shift is, is more common in our space .Dalia: The idea of there being Jewish people of color is interesting to me, because it seems like in the states, people are under the impression that that's not a thing. Can you tell us about the work that you're doing for representation, and as far as intersectionality goes as a very fair skin person of color.Yael: Sure so I think the most thing that the thing that directly relates is that I'm part of the diverse bodies project. The idea is a nude photo interview series, intended to increase representation of who gets seen and photograph naked and how you want to be represented.Yael: So it's not that you had to do a sexy shot or you had to do a serious shot that people get to bring their personalities in through the photographs and show who they are. And that was really important to us and something that we did because it's been taken us forever. But the mini books that we've already released is the Jews flying the rainbow flag mini books.Yael: And so it's got five different Jews and we had plenty of Jews participate but featured five different Jews ranging from like early twenties to, I think, sixties and out of the five of them. Two of them are Black. One of the Black Jews is also Latin, so she's Afro Dominican. And the point of that was to be like folks exist, you know, and it's so common for you to be like, this is what a Jew looks like when.Yael: Yeah, sure a lot of us do look like me. There are Black Jews. There are Latin Jews, there are Asian Jews, there are all the types. And so that was really important to us that we highlight that these are two queer Black Jewish women and they get as much space in this little book as anyone else.Yael: I will say part of my work and that's what we got into the white white passing fragility talk is that I don't identify as a person of color. And who knows, maybe I'll change that at some point. I choose not to identify that way. Cause it feels appropriative. And to be like, just because I have another language or just because my family may have a bunch of people of color and it doesn't mean that I'm existing as a person of color.Yael: And so when I walked through the street, people see me as white and that's just true. But I do enter, and I was asked this question recently, so why do I enter people of color spaces? And it's cause I'm, I'm feel safer there. I feel more connected there. I don't feel blegh there. And so if people are willing to have me, which they generally are, most people of color spaces are open to white presenting Latin folk. Then I just asked permission and I join.Dalia: That's interesting and I knew that, and I forgot that when I said that, because I know I'm very used to- anybody who says they're a person of color. I was just like, okay, like, it's the response? Because especially, you know, Black American, no, actually.Dalia: Latin people even more than Black Americans come in all kinds of shades and colors, and you can't look at somebody and have any clue what even their parents look like. And that a lot of times really informs their experience as far as how they were treated growing up, because it is funny to me how depending on who you're sitting beside, people may perceive your color differently, which just goes to show how arbitrary our understanding of race is..Dalia: Like number one, we know it's not a real biological thing, but like you said, it's the experience that creates the cultural differences. It's the lived experience that matters. So if, when you are out in the world, people treat you as though you are white well then you are having the white experience.Dalia: And that is really the key difference. But I have biracial friends who, if they were with their brown parent, they get treated differently and are even perceived differently versus with the other parent, which I just think is fascinating.Yael: Well, my parents are both white. My dad is white Ashkenazi and my mother is a white presenting Latina.Yael: My uncle, my abuela they would have been identified as POC, but not my mother. And so when I'm with my mother, it was the same thing. People don't realize she speaks Spanish. She's been spoken about by people who were like checking her out.Dalia: Well, it's just interesting to me. And I don't know if this happens everywhere or if it's some of our American brainwashing, but like all the time people act as though Spanish is. Secret language. And I'm like, what is wrong with you? It is so, so common. And the people who speak it look so many different ways and you don't have to only speak English, your heart language, or your first language.Dalia: Like, that's another thing I'm like, you do realize that maybe she can speak Spanish as a second language or not all latin people look the same. I really don't understand the disconnect with that because I've been spoken about in Spanish to my frigging face so many times, and I do speak Spanish. And usually, I mean, unless they're saying something really rude, usually people are trying to guess whether or not the person I'm with is my husband or my what's the male form of mistress.Dalia: I bet there isn't one, right? Oh,Yael: LoverDalia: Yeah, it just goes to show like, if there isn't a word that connotes, not a legitimate partner, because you're not married to them that's some more sexist shenanigans, but yeah, it's just interesting to me that people make that assumption so often. So what has your experience been like trying to stay connected to your Latin roots when so often people are very narrow about what they consider to be Latin?Yael: So it's funny because all of our countries have folks, all the Latin countries have folks that look like me. And like most of the countries have folks that look like you, right? It's not, we're not anomalies in these spaces.Yael: And so I actually, I was convinced I needed to prove myself. Like my mother, I felt counted as real Latina because she was raised in Puerto Rico. Her first language is Spanish. Like that seems to me like check that counts. But me I'm half Ashkenazi. I look, the way that I do my Spanish for awhile was pretty crappy.Yael: And so I, I felt the need to prove myself. All my friends were Latina and I was like, I must be more Latina. I must speak this fluently. And I must eat the food. And I am an incredible salsa dancer at this point. So, but that was all me. Right. And perhaps white people and perhaps Black people who weren't Latin.Yael: Right. And that, if I said I was. The response was always like, oh really? Unless I turned around and then they're like, I see it in your butt now I know that you're Latin because of your butt, like, literally the number of times people have been like, I believe you because of your shape. Otherwise I wouldn't have counted you.Yael: Whereas on the flip side with Latin folks, there's really not much surprise. They don't assume I'm Latina. But if I start speaking Spanish or they see me dancing or whatever, like they ask me, where are you from? They don't ask me, are you at the end of the ask me? Oh, okay. Yeah. Right. Assume that I am. And they're right, because for them, it's not so surprising to see someone who looks like me, but I think, and it's when you think of immigration, you're going to assume that more white Latins are going to migrate because of mean.Yael: Whereas you have browner and Blacker people migrating because of need. And so if you're hanging out with folks from your same social class, which will end up being also your same racial categorization, because those are very linked to whether or not we all want to admit it in the Americas as well.Yael: And all the Americas. So like, I think that that's part of it, right? You're used to hanging out with other brown people. And so even though your country has plenty people who look like me, you never associated with associated with them. Either. They were from a different region or they were from a different social class.Yael: And so they went to different schools and they had different access. And so I think that's more it, but like Latin people never not include me.Dalia: Oh, that's interesting. So it was really more just internal.Yael: Yeah. I was like in TV, none of the Latinas looked like me. All of my friends were darker than me.Yael: And so I was like, I need to be darker. And my abuela ? When I went to go visit her, she was like, no sunscreen. We need to get you more dark.Dalia: That is so interesting to me because that I've seen more often the opposite experience. So first I think when I turn on Univision, everybody's white and the housekeeper looks like she has some indigenous ancestry.Dalia: She doesn't get to say anything, except like, let me get that for you.Yael: They're white almost. They're like what I call exotic white. Like they have, what's considered what I consider the stereotypical, Latin of means look, which is like, they have very heavily European race roots, but they were at some point mixed with other races.Yael: And so they have like olive tone skin, dark hair, like certain whatever. And I don't have. It's like, I'm actually just white passing.Dalia: Yeah. Oh yeah. That makes sense. That distinction. Yeah. I can see that for sure. Like a Sophia Vergara type of, yeah.Dalia: But at the same time I'm sure when she is home, she would be called white, but it's just, when you weave and you come here, then you you've turned into some exotic white.Yael: Yes. And that like that to me is like an interesting thing too. Like if in your own country you are white and then you come here and you're like, I'm a person of color.Yael: What changed? And it's true. Our racial dynamics are very different in each country, but it's interesting to me that, like, I mean, you don't necessarily, people don't identify necessarily as white or Black or what have you. That's not part of, most of the country's ways of self. They just don't do that. And then some countries that like became illegal like you don't put that stuff on the birth certificates, like you just don't name race. But in my head, I'm like you can recognize hopefully that people look different in your country and that you're having different experiences based on that. So when you come to this country, why do you claim this identity?Yael: Or if your family came to this country, why do you claim this identity when you were still white passing?Dalia: Well, yeah, that is really interesting. And what is funny to me, especially for Dominicans, just because I hear this from them more than anybody else, that your race, it feels like it did change during the flight because your treatment was completely different.Dalia: And maybe back home, you were part of the dominant group culturally and power structure wise. And this is the first time people are treating you as though you're an other. And so maybe your identity will shift them because race really is a social construct. So you can make a flight and your race changes.Yael: Yes, totally agree. But also those are Afro Dominican, right? Then being put into a category that is on the lower end of, or possibly the lowest end of our racial categories in the U S. And so they're going from being the norm to going to being the most marginalized population in the country. Whereas if you are a light skinned or white passing Latina you were going from being the highest, probably social class in your country to be not too far down. You might feel like you're all of a sudden, like super oppressed, because you're not used to any form of oppressio nDalia: that see, that really says a lot. And it is the author, speaking of white passing fragility, the writer of white fragility says, you know, like 97% feels like a horrible loss or injustice when you're used to a hundred percent.Yael: Oh, wow. Nice quote.Dalia: And I say that, and I'm like, she probably said some other numbers, but don't look it up. Trust me. I love the idea of that perspective of asking for permission to go into these other spaces because you feel comfortable, but then also not internalizing the rejection. If somebody says, I really, I don't think it's a fit.Dalia: How did you get to that point? And how do you suggest other people who are white presenting, but feel more comfortable in browner spaces? How should they reconcile that?Yael: So I think there's like tying back with like that white savior thing that like, I need to be here.Yael: Don't get me wrong, communities are important. And again, like a lot of my community is POC and that is important to me. And also I recognize that not every space is for me. If you were going to have a men's group, I don't belong in it. When I was helping facilitate a peer sex education group, I was like, we need a leader for the abstinence and virginity group, because I am neither abstinent nor identify as a virgin, but I am a super sexual human being.Yael: And so I don't belong in this space. It does not make the space safe. This is a group led by and for folks with a certain experience. And so when you recognize that that's the point, right? Like women's groups, you don't want men. And normally we don't question that we're not like, oh, how exclusionary what's exclusionary is if you don't allow all women.Yael: All women belong in women's groups, whether they're CIS or trans. But you don't allow men because it's a woman's space. And the point is to create a space that feels safe for that population. So they can be heard, feel seen and not have to explain things that they would have to explain to someone who doesn't understand.Yael: And so to me, that is what often POC spaces are. And there's so much I can understand because I'm surrounded by POC and because my family has POC and there's so much I can't understand because I will never live it.Yael: And so if the space would be safer without my presence, then why would I want to put myself in a spot that will cause others harm when then the intension is for them to have a good space.Yael: Not every space is like that, right? Like if you go to school, if you go somewhere most spaces, unless you're like at historically Black university, right? Like you're going to be surrounded by white folks and like, no, one's questioning that. And so why shouldn't you get to be surrounded by the people you want to be surrounded with for this time period that is yours. It's your time, it's your space. And so I think for me, it's just like thinking about what is your intentions about entering it? Are you trying to contribute in a way that is helpful and wholesome and caring and supportive. Great. Is it wanted? Yes. Enter. Is it not. Go somewhere else. You can still hang out with those same people just not in that particular space that was designated at this time for this purpose.Dalia: And when you say it that way, not at this time and not this space, because I feel like a lot of people who seek out those spaces, that isn't how most of their day is, you know, it's just a little refuge and it certainly isn't that they don't want to have a fully integrated intersectional life.Dalia: Like you said, it's a break from having to explain certain things. And what's interesting is when sometimes you try and make things more and more broad. There's just more potential for issues because I have seen more on reality TV than in real life. Yes. White presenting, Latin people using certain racial slurs saying it's okay for them because they're down or whatever. And I'm like, yeah, but you're not of the group that gets to use that word and they just kept on defending it. I'm just like, okay, we're just, you're canceled. We're moving on. So there are, there can be issues where people who you would expect to not be problematic come in and are.Dalia: And so maybe some people have been burned. A few times, and now they're just, they're exhausted and they don't want to put the energy into fielding out who is safe and who is not safe.Yael: And there's nothing wrong with that. Like it's not necessarily personal, it could be personal if you're one of those people, but even the question, right?Yael: Like I wanted to advertise a job position and so I seek to advertise them first in places of color and queer spaces. And so I contacted several different groups. Oh. And then, sorry, I remember there was a posting for a DEI position at a Jewish organization. And so I started to contact the admin of different POC, Jewish groups, like a Black Jewish group, or what have you.Yael: And I said, listen, I filled out their form to enter, but I was like, I don't actually want to enter. I'm wondering if you can share this link. So folks can see the job. I am a white presenting, a Latino Jew. I ended up getting messaged even by the Black group. And they're like, oh, you can join. I was like, Black is not part of my identity.Yael: Like we, because of the Caribbean, we have those roots as well. But like I don't claim that.Dalia: It's funny. I do feel like Black people in my experience. That's why I was so I've been surprised when people have told me, they were bullied. Black kids in school who are other POC is it's always surprising to me because the town that I was raised in and the part of the south that I'm from, people still were in that space of, if you we're different enough to maybe not be able to get into a whites only area, or if the clain would have targeted you too, cause clan is not down. They're very antisemitic, they're anti everything. But then you were welcome. Like if you wanted to sit at that table, you were always welcome. Just anybody who is being othered the policy was come on in. If you have nowhere else to go, we'll take you.Yael: That's lovely. I definitely know that that's not always true. And again, it's okay. I mean, the bullying is not okay. Deciding who's in your space is, but yeah, exactly. So like I was welcomed and obviously everyone's Jewish because it's a Jewish group.Yael: And so it's, it was specifically a space built for Jews, Black Jews and some Jews of color to have a reprieve from the white Jews. White Jews often mean, well, right? Like we fill up social justice spaces, like hardcores. I've spoken to people about this, that like insofar as percentage of folks who are involved in social justice by group, I imagine that our group is one of the most heavily social justice oriented.Yael: Cause we're so small and people are like you're everywhere, but it doesn't mean that we're doing it well or that we're doing it right. And so it can be exhausting to have white Jews around because we are those white saviory types.Yael: And yeah. So I was, I was surprised and I was like, well, okay. Like I will post it myself then afterwards. And she had, she had posted already and she had written my name and giving me credit. And like I said, this person wanted to let us all know about this job.Dalia: That's very cool. It's nice to find community, but it's also very nice to know that when you're trying to create a safe space around certain parts of our identity, that there are people who understand and support, because I'm sure it's hard for some people to hold that space.Dalia: And to not feel guilty about saying no sometimes. So it's nice to know that even if not everybody understands, some people totally understand and they're not gonna lose any sleep over it. They're just going to move on to the next Facebook group and they'll be fine. And maybe you'll run into each other in another space.Dalia: That's centered around an identity that you have in common.Yael: Yeah. Exactly. And so I think that's just like, it's kinda like building resilience and you might actually be in another POC group together, but not necessarily that one.Yael: And make everybody safe because I would hate to go into a space where I was told, Hey, women are welcome. Like this happens a lot. Well, not now that everybody's at home groups are really growing and there's like a group for everything. But previously it just felt like, like in the nineties, everything that was gay or LGBTQ was CIS male dominated.Dalia: Tell us about your company and what made you want to form a publishing company and what your vision is for that company?Yael: Sure. So my company's name is Kaleidoscope Vibrations, LLC . And for anyone who's an owner, kaleidoscope is it's like this toy that had all these like gems on the bottom and you'd move your hands in opposite directions around this tuby thing. And you'd look inside and it would be create new, pretty color combinations.Yael: And so the idea is that every vibration or event in your life creates a new beautiful you, and that our identities are always forming and they're always developing. And the reason I created this company was because I was this like Jew that wasn't Jewish enough. I was this Latina that I didn't think that I looked enough or counted enough.Yael: I was queer, but not queer enough. You know, like there are all these ways and this, I, I didn't feel like I should count. And that's, that's different, right? Like that's different than choosing whether or not you belong in a space as to whether or not you feel like you matter enough to be in a space or if you, you belong.Yael: And so I created this company to help people find confidence in their identities and find their communities. So maybe. You don't belong to blank community, but you do belong to another one and then you can find the people that you need so you have a supportive, loving environment that understands you.Yael: And so I do workshops, I do identity coaching, curriculum development like inclusivity in the workspace across different identities and what have you. But we also have a publishing sect, and that's the purpose is to uplift different narratives that aren't necessarily heard. And so the first book was mine, which is An Intro Guide to a Sex Positive You.Yael: Sex is not necessarily something you think of and you're like, oh, this is not inclusive, but it really is. And so my book, I know I had someone read it, who was like, I've been looking for a book that validated my experiences as a queer person while reading it that wasn't heteronormative, right. That wasn't geared towards straight people.Yael: And it's not that my book has hetero exclusive. You can be whatever matched you with. I just don't assume what you're going to match. And so I don't add genders into my conversations in the book and that like that in and of itself, apparently at the time was somewhat revolutionary for some folks. And the next book was Luna, Luna Si, Luna.Yael: Yes. Maybe it's that Luna? Yes. Luna Si. And it is a book about two little sisters who are Latino it's in English and in Spanish. And the younger sister has autism. And she is 40% verbal. And so we often see representations of savants, right? So, and they tend to be white males. And so you have these kids who have really incredible abilities to count numbers or to memorize things, or what have you.Yael: And they often do have very good verbal capacities. They have awkward social cues because they have trouble reading it, but that's like the extent to how they represent autism. Whereas in this case, like you see how she, how she is able to communicate the form that her language takes. And you do learn about like the kinds of things that she can do.Yael: You learn about stems. So like ticks that people do to keep themselves calm and well. And that was the intention, right? link that autism comes in all colors, all ethnicities, that there are varying levels of how much people can communicate and what, you know, how much need or help they might require.Yael: And yeah, and it just, that's, it it's a story about sisters and how they love each other and how they communicate and also one of them has autism. And so that intention of bringing those to the surface and yeah, we're working on a bunch of other different possibilities as well. Another one's about anxiety.Yael: So another bilingual book, but a little girl's anxiety and what that's looked like for her.Dalia: That's really helpful. I think that more and more children are experiencing anxiety earlier. So that's definitely needed. And it is interesting how ableism racism, xenophobia, how it all plays together and how you really don't see representation of people living with a diagnosis that aren't white it's. I mean, it's almost always going to be white to the extent that when you meet someone with something as common as down syndrome, who's Asian, you're like, wow. Like, oh, I didn't know. Obviously we can all get whatever we can be born, any kind of way, human diversity, it's just what we choose to feature. That makes it seem like we aren't as diverse as we are.Yael: But then it's also the like racism that exists within the publishing space. And so even when you do have some books that are more representative in that, like the pictures have kids of all different colors, it doesn't necessarily that the author is a person of color.Yael: And so with my company, you have to have either the identities that you are discussing or someone in your like close family, someone in your close life, and you have lived this with them, right. That you are experiencing this with them. So like the author of the book autism, t he person with autism, didn't write this.Yael: She doesn't write. But her sister wrote it. And so she has lived with her sister, her, the younger one's entire life, the one who has autism so entire life. And so that was like the perspective that we were able to take. And so it's very important to me that the people who are writing the stories also have lived experience.Yael: And it's not just about like, oh yeah, we need to mix A and B and with number 3 so that we can count in this diversity world where like, you're supposed to do this. Now it's about like, this is my story, and I want you to hear it.Dalia: And the way that people tell their own story is so different from how it's told by an observer.Dalia: And people can feel that difference. Sometimes it's so subtle, but you definitely, some things just they're very difficult to fake and so right now, a lot of companies. In all sectors, not just publishing people are faking the funk right now, and it's not pretty. So it falls flat. It's all kind of, oh, this just came to me.Dalia: Did you see that woman who has been saying that? She's...Yael: who said that she was Black from the Bronx in the Bronx and is a white Jew from Kansas.Dalia: Yes, she got the hoop earrings, she got the tan and she was like, I'm ready to rock. I do not understand how this has happened more than once in such a widely publicized way in my lifetime.Yael: So I actually, let's, let's break that down a bit. So first off, she's a, she is a white Jew, right? My friend is also a white Jew. Neither of them actually presents white. Like, if you look at them, that's not the identity you're going to give them because they were darker skin tones. Right. And so it's also interesting how whiteness works that like, because they are Jewish, they are given.Yael: Right. It just, that is also so interesting. But I remember someone commented, like how did no one realize like Afro Latinas don't come that light? And I was like, hold up a second way lighter than that woman. Right. There are people who identify as Black. That is their identity. Who are way lighter than this faker.Yael: And so my thing was, you should not fake who you are, but the fact that people believed her makes total sense to me.Dalia: But it seemed like to me, what was the most damning is how. Some of her clothing choices and accessory choices, maybe they speak to her, they were so sterotypical. It just seemed a little performative.Yael: She faked three different identities.Dalia: Oh, I didn't see that part.Yael: Afro Latina was her latest identity. The one before that was Black American, the one before that was north African. Okay. She moved across the globe.Yael: No one tracked this?! Like at one point she was north African and now she's Black and now she's Afro Latina from the Bronx specifically.Dalia: That's interesting too, that extra, that, that was so important for her to feature that what trips me out about it. And I think what really troubles a lot of people about it is to know that.Dalia: Race is not real to the extent that whatever you say could literally change your experience. You just have to keep saying it and buy some hoops and you can be another person. Like, it just, she went overboard with the, just so stereotypical, but you're right. It easily could have been true going off of skin color alone.Dalia: And some people do still dress that way, even though it's not the nineties anymore.Yael: But I love my hoops in the nineties.Dalia: I did too, you know, but they're like more modern with the embellishment. It has that like handcrafted feel. I don't know what happened with the hoops. It went out for me with letting my eyebrows finally try and grow back in, but I did use to be so, so into that. But at one point I also had a Jheri curl.Dalia: So I really shouldn't talk about anybody else's since its style, I've made many mistakes over the years. I really appreciate you sharing your perspective and coming on. Where can people find you? Sure.Yael: So my main thing is that I'm @yaelthesexgeek I'm a sexologist, sex coach, a sex educator.Yael: @yaelthesexgeek on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. My website is sexpositiveyou.com, so pretty easy. And then my company is kvibrations.com. And so you can find most of my things through there.Dalia: Awesome. You are doing so many different things. We didn't even touch on the sex positivity, maybe that's for another day.Dalia: Are you thinking of revisiting that book now that you know, we're kind of all in a different place as a country and as queer people? Or are there things you'd like to add? Are you going to revise that addition or write something new?Yael: Yeah. So the book is only two years old, but things change and shift so much, right? Like now there is so much more language outside of queer spaces around pronouns, but I think even in 2018, like the idea of talking about pronouns outside of queer spaces was still foreign for most, so. Yes, there are definitely, I've looked back and I'm like, oh, overall, I'm like, this is a good book.Yael: Just so you know, like people love my book and I go back, I'm like, oh, this was, this was better than you thought it was. Yes, there are, of course things I want to change, but I I'm looking into doing a teen workbook version of it. Because I wrote it for my 14 year old self, but I don't think parents of 14 year olds would be thrilled to have their kids read this book..Yael: And I think it's more of like a 16 and up kind of book. And I want to be able to reach people when they're younger because sexual trauma and boundary making and self pleasure and all of that is important before you are 18 or 16. And I also started, but I'm not going to have time right now, the nerds guide.Yael: So this is the intro guide and the nerds guide goes into the socio historical and psychological backgrounds. And so when you talk about things, Gender. I want to be able to talk about that are six sexes and genders are present in the Talmud in ancient Jewish text, rich and written 1500 years ago. I want to talk about the hijra in India, and that they have like that as a third gender that's established that how different native American communities have two spirit or don't have two spirit identities.Yael: And like, what does that mean and how do they conceptualize it? And just like, recognizing that there's so much more beyond what we talk about.Dalia: Yeah, that sounds really fascinating.Yael: Yeah. But that's going to take awhile. It's going to take research and I'm doing a PhD right now.Dalia: The list just keeps going.Yael: And that's on the back burner, that's like maybe if someone gives me a book deal, I'll work on that.Dalia: I love it. Oh, excellent. Thank you so much for coming on.Yael: Thank you for having me.Yael: I always, I really enjoy talking with you and Dalia.Dalia: Same here. Same here. You'll have to come back when you finish your nerd book or I'm sure, actually you're doing many things. I'm sure it'll be before then. Sounds good. Get full access to Body Liberation for All at daliakinsey.substack.com/subscribe

The Arise Podcast
Season 4 Episode 1 Dr. Eliza Cortes Bast - Belonging and Latinx Heritage Month 2022

The Arise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 37:42


Dr. Eliza Cortes Bast is a fierce and honest follower of Jesus. She is a pastor and denominational executive, dedicated to helping churches think missionally. She lives into her passion by connecting people, advocating for the community, and helping organizations think strategically so they can be healthy, vibrant, and sustainable. Eliza lives in Michigan with her patient and handsome husband EJ, and their two boys. Her loves include her home country Puerto Rico, her interracial marriage, a good steak, salsa dancing, writing, empowering emerging leaders, making the impossible possible, Diet Coke, and mentoring. She is not a big fan of anger without action, generalizations, basketball, and saying you can't live without coffee. She believes you can because she believes in you.Featured here on RED TENT LIVINGAboutAboutMy greatest joy is helping people & teams lean into what is possible, and develop the processes, metrics, and structure to help get them there! Helping develop the natural talent of teams and optimize outcomes & opportunities to reach strategic goals is my sweet spot. I love interacting with clients and teams, bringing energy and enthusiasm, as well as accountability and quality management, to every setting I serve. I love training and facilitation, creating both consensus and curiosity around your table. I am skilled in intercultural competency, and have worked with diverse teams in multiple contexts to create cohesion and movement. I have built a career and identity that revolves around nurturing organizational vibrancy. Working with rural and urban agencies, I have provided dedicated guidance in curriculum writing, program and process design, and talent development and management. I have served a variety of for-profit and not-for-profit organizations around the country, including academic and religious institutions and parachurch organizations. From the podium to the pulpit, I have enjoyed engaging audiences with stories of impact, leadership development, and my years of nonprofit and ministry experience. I have authored blogs and articles, and have spoken at national and local conferences and workshops around Latina identity, empowering leadership, emerging young leadership, and more. My passions include creating communities of purpose and excellence - where together, people are appropriately empowered in their strengths. I excel at helping teams identify strengths and performance gaps, identifying key issues and strategies quickly, and helping teams discover how to resolve problems and innovate for the future. I am also an adjunct professor, teaching at the intersection of non-profit work, leadership, talent management, and ministry. Gallup Certified Strengths CoachStrengths: Strategic, Maximizer, Command, Activator, and Responsibility.Enneagram: 8w9DiSC: Di (The Seeker: action, results, enthusiasm)MBTI (Myers Briggs): ENTJ Transcript of Podcast:Dr. Bast: I would just wonder, Danielle, and I know you and I talked about this a little bit before, I think there's a part where, um, I think just kind of baked into the American expression of Latin culture is the sense of just like, um, indebtedness, um, and deep gratitude. And so there's always the inclination of just, um, of just that, the weight of that in some ways. Like the container of that, you know, that you're a guest, that you're always a guest in someone else's space. And so I think there's a, there's inside of that, or ingrained inside of that is a, is a sense of just, well, I'm so grateful for what I have that I don't wanna disrupt it for somebody else, or I don't wanna, I don't wanna disrupt the host, you know? And so I still wrestle with that because I think, I think there's a part of it that the older I get the truer that feels   Danielle: Hmm. Which part that you don't wanna disrupt or that you're a guest or  Yeah. That, um, the idea that, you know, what does it look like to not be a guest anymore? That sense of like, yeah. It's like we are guests and, and, and what does ownership, real ownership and agency look like?  Yeah. As you were talking about it, I was thinking about like how like a broader generalization of culture for us, I think is this idea of hospitality. Mm-hmm. and that we're already always welcoming, which, you know, I think probably goes back centuries.   Yep.   Dr. Bast: Centuries. So in that welcoming process, because other cultures may have a different intention, we often welcome to the point where we don't exist anymore, or we're moved out of our own space.   Yeah. Well, and I would say too, you know, I mean that's the part, that's the part where we are distinctly like the east meeting the west, you know, as there's a sense of that we really bring that eastern, um, framing with us forward is that, you know, when we migrated out, we never lost that sense of hospitality and what the indebtedness around the, the hospitality means for us as a community, what I offer others Yeah. And what I expect others to offer me. And so I think there's, uh, you know, but again, that's hard. What do you do when you feel like a perpetual guest?  And I don't like it that you said it like that, cuz it feels true and it feels really annoying. . Yeah. And, and again, you know, we talked about this a little bit before we got rolling, but talk to me about like, why you decided to make the Instagram post with the picture of your legs on the airplane.  Well, the it's for, for my two previous professional roles, I've, I've just spent a lot of time in airplanes and I've spent a lot of time, um, traveling. And there's, there's a part as I wrestled in my own issues about like, body and how much space, you know, I take up or how much space I embody. I just realized that there's probably no place that, that feels more true than being on an airplane. Like, there's this part of just, if I'm, if I'm a good citizen, if I'm sitting next to somebody, I'm making sure I'm only taking my space. You know, and I'm, I'm wrestling out with elbows and the arms and things like that. You know, I just wanna make sure that I'm doing right by the person next to me by, by keeping and holding my own space and not encouraging on theirs.  And then there's just been this interesting shift that I recognize that, um, I tend this experience that more with women, Like when we sit on the plane, we all kind of find ways to instinctively shrink. Or I will even hear women apologize, you know, like, Oh, I'm so sorry. You know, And, and so it's been this sense of like, okay, well, well that's maybe just, maybe it's embodied and gender, you know, that's just a sense of like, let me keep and hold my own space. However, um, it's been interesting for me to watch, um, from an anthropological sense of just some of the, the men that I've encountered sitting, and they're not bound in the same way, or not maybe mindful in the same way, where they feel like they don't have to, um, shrink and be small and to fit in their own space.  But the sense of like, well, I have to spread out and I need to spread out. You know, I need to, And I just, and I laugh in that because, and identifying their own physical need, um, they've been able to justify like, the ability to take my seat and their seat, you know, like . So trying to figure that out, like, ok, well this feels odd. And then in the middle of that saying, Well, what about, you know, I don't wanna show up in the same space. Cause I feel like that's inhospitable. You know, I would never think to take my seat and someone else's seat, you know, as a means of, because I have a need. And I, I feel that my need is unmet, but the sense of feeling like I can't push back either because well, he needs it, the person next to me needs it. And so I have to be smaller. And I'm like, that's so disgusting, . Mm-hmm. There's something that, that's apparently gross.  Danielle: And that also feels like a, that too feels like an easier entry point to talk about, like airplane spacing, then to talk about how that like actively happens as, as a Latina, as a Afro-Latina, as a Puerto Rican woman in spaces of leadership.  Dr. Bast: Yes. Yes. And I would say, and so really walking into that is this is this sense of, um, you know, how do I, how do I feel the space but not be too much? How do I like enter in and be full of myself, but not to defend, you know, all these things where there's like the caveat that cuts underneath it that says that, you know, it's that internal checklist that I feel a lot of us experience, um, because we wanna be invited back. And again, that's the difference between like a guest and a house member, right? Is that a guest is always mindful that the door can always be closed. You know, there's an entry point and exit point. There's a, a clock time in and a clock time out. Um, but ownership of the house means that I belong, you know, the house is mine. And so, um, access to the things will, you know, I have equal access to things with other people.  Danielle: Yeah. So we think about it like perpetual guests then where, like, where do you find rest? Like you specifically?  Dr. Bast: That is a really good question. You know, and I know this is gonna sound weird, but I think that one of the places that I probably find the most rest is on a stage when I'm speaking. And I think because at that point, like the, um, you know, the horses out of the gate, that point, I can, I'm wildly unpredictable to people, you know, But I, I would say I feel the most unfettered. You know, I can move, I can walk, I can, you know, I'm, I'm expressing what's on my mind in the way that makes sense to me, but also translates to other people. And I can, I can take and own and own that space, and there's a part where I think I could, I'm able to sink into who I really am, um, and be able to give a piece of that and to receive a piece of that back from people who are, who are on the stage. I would say that that feels almost like my most authentic space. And in that, because I can, I can fully be myself. I feel like I can best rest there.  Danielle: So when you think about like a broader sense of maybe even family or culture, do you have spaces where you find rest there as well? Or where you belong?  Dr. Bast: Yeah, I would say, uh, you know what, what feels probably the most true for me is, is that my family really provides that for me.  I'm really grateful that the family has given me the most space to be able to do that and to do that completely.  Danielle: now I'm just, I'm thinking about how you talk about the caveats and how, you know, you use the word wild to describe when you're in your, you're in your space or, or belonging. And, you know, wild has so many meanings in our culture. And, and I have one like interpretation of what that might mean. Like from our culture, I'm imagining alive by vivacious, um, able to laugh, able to cry, able to communicate. And yet I know, I also know that there's this other dominant lens that views that wild as also threatening.  Dr. Bast: Yep. I, um, I was sharing also this weekend, you know, that there's a part where I have, um, you know, when I, when I felt like the least my authentic self when I felt like I was, I was, I mean, I'm honestly just living outside of my intended design, you know, and I say that, you know, from a perspective of faith, but I was living outside of the design and I feel like God had designed me. And um, and I remember just praying and just saying like, what is wrong with me? And just feeling like the word domesticated. Like I felt that in my soul and, and that word I'm sure feels so dainty for some people and feels like so proper and appropriate, appropriate for some people. And for me, I felt sick to my stomach. I could feel it in the pit of my stomach, like, oh my gosh.  Like there was a part of me that I had, um, you know, and very similarly I saw it as like running hard and running fast and by, you know, being vivacious and, and you know, running, running with everything inside of me at full speed towards what I wanted. And then at the same time having space and play and, and being with others. And I had like diminished myself into the small tiny pocket of being, um, because all of that had had disrupted and disturbed the system so hard mm-hmm. . And so I remember just feeling that so clearly, like the word domesticated and just feeling like, just crushed because I had allowed people to do that. To me, that was a choice. Mm-hmm. , um, that I had allowed in my own life. And, and just kind of the, that internal vow to never let that happen again.  Yeah. I think of, you know, when I think of perpetual guests and domesticated, I mean, it has like literal meaning for the way, you know, I'm thinking of Latinas are viewed like house like majority housekeepers or cleaning your hotel or like the, the stereotypical roles like down to, I think of events I've gone to at local schools where it's like all the Mexican families, at least in my community are here. Everybody else is over here. And then there's a few black folks over here. So  Yeah. And, and that's so heartbreaking.  Yeah. It's heartbreaking to me. That's heartbreaking. But there's a part where it's like, I think people need, you know, especially going into those spaces and even going into some places where it's dominant culture spaces, like even just the idea being able to show fully as yourself, you know, is I wanna gingerly walk in with my tribe, you know, my squad because it's been so painful to do that on your own or, um, Yeah. The temptation, that code switch is so bad. Or even the sense of, of I've been punished when I've done that before  Danielle: Yeah. So when you cl like there's the bind, right? If you're the guest and you're the domesticated guest, you can fit in. Even at that point though, I think what I hear you saying is the door could slam at any moment and you could be shut out. But if you don't become the domesticated vet guest and you show up as you are, then you're also othered or walled off from access.  Yep. It's really the lose lose of that  Man that is sad.  Dr. Bast: Well, so here it is, it's sad if you don't own the house. Like this is the hard part is that it's, it's the sense of like, it's, you know, and again, I would hope that people coming into my house would understand the house rules. That there's, there are, uh, because of my responsibility to ownership, there are things that I set the ground rules for that not only keep my house in order, but keep, you know, keep it a safe place for other guests. The challenge becomes is, is really who owns the social house, You know, because there's a part where there's a lot of space that can be made. You know, there are behaviors that are allowed in my house because of who we are and how we do life, um, and what our tolerance is for disruption. Um, what our tolerance is for people to show by is their full selves, because we want people to, to feel that way when they come in our house.  And that's the beauty of ownership. When people are robbed of the opportunity, ability for ownership, and you are forever at the indebtedness of the house owner, you are forever at the mercy of the person who sets the, who sets the guest rules. And I think that is the true challenge is that because then there's this, um, this very definitive sense of like a right way to host and wrong way to host. Like, if a house is appropriate, it looks like this, and then the house owner gets to decide. And so what happens when you go into that space and you're like, Well, this isn't, this isn't correct. Like, this is not how my people would show up at a house, but, and then, but the house owner gets to say the house owner is Right. And so it's a very, it's a very tricky space. And, and for me, as I think about the future of what I would see Latinos and Latinas and, and for anybody who sits in a marginalized space, is that there would be more space for them to be house owners instead of just  Danielle: Yeah. And I think there's a sense of, in that space of having your house, then it's, there's a more, um, I don't wanna say pure, but a more authentic way to offer hospitality where there's not the demand or it's not the hospitality isn't a down payment.  Dr. Bast: Exactly. Well then it's transactional. Right? It's right.  Danielle: Right. Where it feels like that sense of hospitality we offer, I'm not saying it's always transactional, but, uh, I even think of like, when we've had certain people over to our house, the, the coaching of the children, , you're gonna need to say, hi, you're gonna need to do this. You need to, you know, X, y, z versus, you know, when we have other friends over, there's still some coaching, Right. Because there's etiquette and, and you know, uh, things we wanna do as ge as hosts, but there's also the freedom to be themselves.  Dr. Bast: Yep. Yep. And that's, I think that is critical because I think for some people the, the pushback is like, well, there's no etiquette and you can't confuse hospitality and etiquette for the same thing. You can't confuse being a guest with etiquette for the same thing. Um, cause it's possible to be very polite and still be horribly unw. And part of the etiquette is, is is not just about how to behave so everybody feels comfortable, but how to behave in such a way where everybody feels welcome.  Danielle: Right. Right. And I mean, that can happen to any of our communities too.  Dr. Bast: Absolutely. Absolutely.  Danielle: I mean, like, we live in dominant culture norms, like you're stating, but any one of us can adjust some of those values and then pass them on to our kids, or sometimes I think it's unconscious and sometimes it's intentional for survival too.  Dr. Bast: Yes, exactly. Well, and we see that a lot, you know, um, you know, I would say in like the maybe some of the more older models of like missionary training, you know, that there'd be a sensibility around like, Okay, this is how you behave. This is how, if you're going into this space, this is the language that they speak. These are the words they use. These are the dishes that they eat. And it's hard because in that same kind of like how to be most effective in those spaces, um, we have, um, willingly put those on our kids and on the next generation, because we do, I mean, there's that sense of urgency. We want you to not only survive here, but thrive here. And so this, this is the language, this is the way you have to do things. And I hope we're on the cusp of, of, of a new day where that's decided by a collective and not necessarily decided by an individual  Danielle: Yeah. It reminds me of the story. We are down in Mexico for a few weeks this summer, and, uh, we hadn't been to Guadalajara for like over eight years and we're down there. And so my daughter's 15, so she hadn't been there since she was like six or seven, and she was running around, and she came up to me and she's like, Mom, she's like, I have a question for her. I was like, Oh, yeah, sure. She's like, Why do I feel like I belong here more than anywhere else I am? And I was like, and she's like, But I've only been here, you know, a couple times in my life. And I was just like, Well, I, you know, like I have this scientific psychological lens, like it's in your DNA and blah, blah, blah. But really it's a sense of belonging, a sense of she could show up as her whole self  And see other people in her culture embodied in a way that felt, I think, resonated with her, although she didn't use that word. But the curiosity of like, why does this feel more like home?  Dr. Bast: Exactly. Exactly. And that, I mean, and again, like that's for people who are just like, well, I mean, you know, the purists, you know, like go back home or go back to your own country. It's, it's not the locale, you know, it's the sense of, it's the sense of who I get to be and the sense of how other people are around me. And there's a part where it's, it's hard work to cultivate that when we're not in those spaces, like when we're in other locations. But I think it's worth fighting for because again, like to have her say that she feels like she can show up for her full self, you know, that that feels like home. You know, what does that mean then for, you know, how do you make home in Washington state? How do you make home and Florida? How do you make home, you know, in all those spaces?  Um, she's in Europe, you know, what does that look like? And so it's just kind of fighting, you know, it's like the ruthless, intentional fighting for home, you know? And especially for a d you know, a d spo of people, you know, there's a sense of like, okay, I would love to say, well, I'm a turtle and so my home is always with me. Right. Um, but I wanna be able to say, you know, I'm a tree that has seeds that drop, and everywhere those seeds drop, they can root and that can also be home.  That's a powerful image because that is what dominant European Americans have been able to do.  Exactly. There's that. It's, it really is, it's a, it's a modern day event. Adventuring, you know, it's, it's that spirit of exploration that says, you know, I can plant my flag here and make space for myself mm-hmm. , you know, and, and claim space for myself. And, um, Yeah. And somewhere that died, you know, somewhere that died .  Danielle: Right. And I also think it's because if you think about our people's, they actually did travel and migrate, and that was part of who they were, and part of like, moving and shifting. And so when you think about like a border that's just kinda set down on land or colonialism, which did all of this border mapping without regards to the tribal people or the immigration patterns. And, and so therefore, you know, we're in the midst of all these conflicts and, you know, shut the border and da, da da. Well, I mean, like, there's centuries of history of people moving  Dr. Bast: Yep, exactly. Well, and again, being able to set the rules based on what you consider their experience to be. So, you know, I can call you, you know, an immigrant, you know, when you're really an refugee, you know, And so then I get to decide again, I own the house, so I get to decide because well, you're this class certification of guest  or you're illegal versus you're an asylum seeker.  They the color of your skin.  Country of origin, wherever the bus drops off.  Danielle: Yeah. I don't know if you saw this, but I think there's a ship that came from Puerto Rico that's stranded at sea. Have you seen the news on that?  No, I have not.  Yeah, I'm pretty sure that was in the news. And, and I think like it's been in a holding pattern to try to land, and I'm not sure, you know, why I didn't get into the article yet, but I'm not sure why this particular ship hasn't landed. I don't know who's on board, like what the politics of it are, but   you figure, you know, would that be acceptable if there were cars that were backed up, you know, and the border to Illinois.  Dr. Bast: And that's the hard part is I think, like, remember that old like, planco game, like from, um, um, what was it, the prices, right? Where you'd like drop the coin in and it would just kind of figure its way and then like clunk it down into a bucket and did a bunch of pegs, you know? And it, I think, you know, part of the conversations have diminished down to that, you know, And just like wherever you land, like that's who you get to be now. And I think we've went a couple steps backwards in like placing people in these very definitive container. I think the chaos of the last two years has reverted us back to, to extreme labels to be able to navigate how we need to show up and navigate our own disappointment in people. And so there's a part where it's like, you know, you know, people are complex, people are people, you know, and the conversations are complex and there's a lot of like, pain and history I think that people are willing to talk about.  But I, we, it's almost like we can't resist the urge to like categorize, because then, then I know how to show up. And there's a part where it's just like, if we just made space, I think it'd be a lot easier for people to say, There's a lot of gray here, and I, there's gray in my own space, and I'm willing to recognize the gray in your space to, to not like, be so quick to put a label on there, but to say, I'd rather have a conversation to get to know you as a human, Um, because that, that's the best deciding factor of whether, you know, you're gonna keep being a guest in my house, or you're gonna keep being a person I wanna like, journey with, or, you know, we share deeper intimacy you in our friendship because of that.  Danielle: When you say like, the chaos of the last two years, and you say like, you feel like we might have gone backwards. Do you have a specific example you're thinking of or a story?  Dr. Bast: Well, I'm actually thinking of just believe it or not, like some systems theory that most people for our brains, like when we're wired, when there's extreme chaos, that having like an enemy or having, even if you can't, if you can't look forward having an enemy, like your brain can, can set on that, right? And so it's easier for your brain to manage the chaos, you know, of what you're experiencing in the system. So a system will actually become less anxious if there's a common enemy. So it's this idea of like, everybody hating the lunch lady, you know, like everybody kind of cool out and there's like one bad guy. And, and so I think about that in, in, as people have navigated out of the chaos and, and there's no big bad guy, you know, the administration changes. And so you can't be, you're not as mad at one person, you know?  And so you need, we have to keep like, elevating villains because it's the only way we can manage our own anxiety. And so there's a part where it, it makes me nervous to see people who, who felt like there were collective things to talk about and, and believed in some of the both. And as we were navigating, um, especially things like quarantine have almost reverted back. You could feel like the rubber band snapped back to just having like smaller demons to, to villainize, um, because there's no like giant one demonn that they feel they can really center on.  Danielle: Whew. So who do you think the current villains are now?  Dr. Bast: Oh, you know, it's, it's, it feels murky. I don't know. And I think, I think that's it. Like the, the anxiety hasn't reached a fever pitch yet. I think we're back on the upswing of anxiety. Um, and so I'm curious, especially with pressures like inflation and, you know, even just our own federal system of like how states decide versus how the nation decides. Like right now, there's almost too many options. And I think, and I think the anxiety, my prediction is, is the closer we get to the next election cycle, we will see a fever pitch of anxiety and we'll see, we will see clear villains emerge.  Danielle: I agree. I think, I think we saw that kind of escalation. And sometimes I think of, I thought of it like as an, like a violent orgasm, a vi, you know, when we had like buffalo and Irvine and Alde, like we had all these things happen and mostly in communities of color, and then, you know, then there's an uprising and an uproar, and then everything just kinda lowers pitch. And I do feel like we're in that. I, I do see, you know, like Rob DeSantis and, um, you know, and Greg Abbott, you know, with their focus on migrants crossing the border and shipping them all over the country, you know, quote unquote shipping them. I do see that our community is a target and likely could be an escalated target in the coming years. I'm not sure how it will play out, I'm praying about that, but just that sense of we don't belong.  If you're the guest. And you know, that's so interesting that you say that because I think like, um, you know, for like the low hum of anxiety, I mean, most of us have that like low hum of anxiety that is generally in our life, you know, and it's, it's hard because it's so easy to exploit when there's a low hum to like, to put an, um, a title of a villain on something that is so nebulous and so big that nobody has enough language for it. Mm-hmm. . And so somebody publicly assigns language to it to say like, Oh, this is the problem. And people are like, Oh, good. Well, for my own anxiety. Yeah, exactly. That is the problem. And you're like, Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa. You know, like we live in complex system with complex people with a complex history, you know, like it's to say one person is a problem is exceptionally uced. And so there's a part of that, but it's like, but if you, if you are experiencing that low hum of anxiety in your system, you're gonna look when somebody gives you the language of a villain, if you're not aware enough, or even if you're just lazy enough to not do the work that resolves the anxiety for you  Like, oh, yep, it's them mm-hmm. , and, and it's whoever the them is, you know, and if this becomes the new them or revisits is the new them, you know, then we'll, we'll see. We'll see people of color, especially brown people being responsible for everything from inflation to gas prices, even though we were just trying to, trying to get away from violence.  Danielle: Right. And I don't think it's a mistake that the last couple election cycles have focused on our communities.  Dr. Bast: Yeah. And I, you know, I'm glad to see like, at least like the overall recognition of, of how important, um, you know, our voter, the strength of our voting constituency is. And I think that's important. What makes me sad, and I don't think any any side is, is exempt from this, is that if all of a sudden the attention is honest, like, Oh, this is the new, you know, this is the new America or the new whatever, you know, and then all of a sudden things start coming out in Spanish, and I always am like, Where were you the other three years? You know, like, that's super fun. You're coming now ,  It's super amazing to see you three years ago or helping us clean up in our communities or helping us like, or listening to our concerns or holding space for us to be able to inform. And so it's, it, um, that always, I mean that just the short answer is that always like, rubs me the wrong way that like always sticks in my cross super bad where I'm like, Oh, look, all of a sudden, you know, whoever, whoever the Spanish speaker is in the camp is like trotted out like a show pony. it's kind of, that comes back to the original thought. We've been noodling on this whole conversation of you're still the guest mm-hmm. kinda like, it's almost like how do you get this guest intoxicated enough they'll listen to you. Right. Like,  That's a great way to put it. Yes, yes. And, and that's it. I mean, that, and that's the part what, when I think about the future and I think about the best way to empower people, it's being able to give them agency and ownership, you know, where they own the house. You know, like what does it look like for you to begin to own your own spaces and to, and to, to give new language for hospitality and to help be part of a community to reimagine hospitality and what that looks like.  Danielle: Yeah. I think one thing that struck me about the Uvalde school shooting was that that community had asked for years for the building to be remodeled and for landscaping. And when none of the funding came through, it was the Latinos right there in that community that went in and landscaped that went in and updated the building. And it was like across town where it was nearly an all white school with plenty of funding, plenty of access to resources. So it, it wasn't lost on me that after all of this and the community investment that this mass shooting happened here. Right.  Dr. Bast: Yep. And I think, you know, there's a part where I, I I agree with you, and then there's a part where I just, I wonder if there's, I, to me that feels, maybe that's the conversation for another day that almost feels like a whole pressure cooker of just, I mean, you see a lot of, like, you see a lot of brilliant and brave things that happen in that day, and you see a lot of like big misses and just mm-hmm. , you know, I mean, I was a gast watching that and watching, you know, the, the horror of some parents and the in activities and law enforcement. It was just a wild, you know, the whole thing just felt so wild. And it was, you know, I I I hope that never happens again, but I would wonder if, if people were able to put their fingers, they were pull back far enough where they could put their fingers on all the things that went wrong to ensure that never happens again.  Danielle: Yeah. And part of it just feels like self hatred.  I don't know. That's how it felt to me.  Dr. Bast: Yeah. Well, and, and you know, I, I remember somebody kind of made the offhand comment, and it wasn't, it wasn't public, but it was like, well, at this point now it's like we're doing this to ourselves, you know, so maybe we, we have normalized. And I was like, I'm like, how ho, you know, how wretched that, that would be like the bright line to say like, well, maybe we have integrated at some point because now we're victimizing our own communities. And, and it just, it broke my heart because, you know, of all the things to be able to identify with or to say that we've arrived, you know, that it would be the marker that we, we own the space enough that we can hate our own people enough to do that.  Disorienting the comment was super disorienting.  Danielle: Yeah. I think I felt like that, like, is this what assimilation looks like? And then, but I'm struck by your guest comment, and it feels like, it also feels like that is not a sign of assimilation because of the guest, the, the desperation, and I'm not justifying anything, but Oh, sure, sure. How violence could be a justification  As a means to achieve something. Right. To achieve something. Right. So I guess this whole conversation just means we have to do a lot of work in our communities.  Dr. Bast: Well, and I, but I think it first starts out, you know, it starts out with a posture, you know? Um, Yeah. I, I've always, I love the body positivity movement because, you know, it, it gives language to say things like no body's a bad body. You know, just like, you're not, you didn't, you're not moving to a, um, a body you can love better because it looks a different way and it appears a different way. And I wish we get to the same place, you know, in, in conversations especially around like multiracial, multiethnic bodies, that it's not like the more it looks like or the more it is something that it's a better body than the one that I've been given. And, you know, and when I, when I own that, when I can live into that, then I can, I can stand in a place of like positivity and like agreement with God.Danielle:  Like I, this, I'm, I am fearfully, wonderfully made. Like I am amazing because, and there's some places I show up as a guest and I'm just like, Okay, I'm discovering and figuring it out, and there's some places I know I'm showing up as a life of the party, You know, I'm like, you're lucky to have me here. Like, I'm awesome, you know, you're awesome, dude. We're about to be awesome together. Right.  But it's that kind of confidence of just saying like, this is, you know, in the time that I have here, this is exactly who I'm supposed to be, and how exciting is that? Instead of being like, Okay, how do I figure out how to make it work?  Danielle: Right. And I think that's in the text, right? Like in our faith and the scripture, just this idea that if we are fearfully and wonderfully made, then of course we are gonna have these combinations. And that's not a mistake.  It isn't like you appeared and God's like, Well, I can work with that  Dr. Bast: Exactly. Exactly. And you know, I'll even say, Danielle, you know, there's a part where, you know, the complexity over the next generation, the next 40 years is gonna be around the fact that we we're not even gonna have the luxury of outlining, of outlining conversations around particular races. I, you know, we're, we're living in a society that's so comfortable with, you know, multiracial experiences and marriages and, and friendships, you know, that I think, um, that's gonna be tricky too. And so being able to just kind of start with that space that, that this is, um, you know, this is this, God saw this and, and intended for this, you know, or hoped for this. And, and me living into that as me partnering, you know, to, to bring good into the world. It's a whole different mindset than just then the idea of just like, well, this happened. And so, you know, somehow that is figuring out like, well, I guess, you know, , we'll figure out what to do with you.  Danielle: Right? I mean, it's that difference of being like, Well, I was born a sin, or I was born on purpose.  Dr. Bast: Yep. Exactly.  Danielle: Yeah. So what are, what are you reading right now? Like, what are you looking to, and who or what is inspiring you?  Dr. Bast: Oh my gosh. So I'm still my dissertation work. So I'm reading, I'm reading book about change in leadership theory. So is that fun? I dunno. Um, and I have to be honest with you, like, I think because my brain is moving all the time, I actually listen to things on the outside to check out. So I'm a documentary person. I'm, I'm curious about people, I'm, I'm curious about the motivations of people. Mm-hmm. . Um, and so for me, it can look like everything from, you know, just regular old documentary to like a crime series, because I'm like, how did this happen? Like, what happened here? So it's, I don't think it's fair to say that was inspired by those things,  Um, and then I've been trying in my downtime to really lean in, um, to more fiction. So I finally got on board and read where The Crowded Sing.  Danielle: And then who are, what's inspiring you?  Dr. Bast: Who are, what is inspiring in this moment? Oh, so I had two boys, and they are night and day. They are salt and pepper, they're oil and water. And I would have to say the youngest in all of his wildness is really challenging me in a deep way. Like both good and bad. Um, and there's a part that's bringing me to the brink of myself, but I'm, it's been like this real testing in time of how do I make space for somebody else? Those big feelings, big thoughts, big emotions, Um, and at the same time like navigate having order and, and making the space safe for everybody. And so it's been a, it's, it really, I mean, I hate to say it, but it's been inspirational for me because I've had to re read more and dig deeper, um, and show up differently and manage my own emotions like in real time. And so it's pushing me in ways that I hadn't anticipated.  Danielle: I like that. I like that. So folks wanna get a hold of you. I wanna follow your work. Where can they find you?  Dr. Bast: You could find me on Instagram, most likely at Elisa Cortez bass. And apparently if you Google me, I'm out there in some places, which I find fascinating and so weird. But yes, ,   

Cafe con Pam Podcast
Pressures, Power, and Afrolatinidad with Analilia Mejia

Cafe con Pam Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 53:58


Listeners, we're back this week with Analilia Mejia.Analilia Mejia is one of the foremost national political leaders in the progressive movement and is the Co-Executive Director of the Center for Popular Democracy, the nation's largest multiracial organizing network on the left. Prior, she served as the U.S. Department of Labor Women's Bureau Deputy Director. Previously, Mejia built on her experience of running victorious issue advocacy campaigns to serve as Political Director on Bernie Sanders' 2020 campaign, which built a massive rank-and-file union support program and galvanized Latino groups across the country. Analilia is a proud Afro-Latina, Jersey girl, and mom of two. During this episode we talked about:04:40 - Growing up working class05:27 - Thrive and not just survive08:46 - A union job changed everything14:56 - Privileges17:28 - Types of organizations and being a power-building org18:15 - All actions are worthy21:45 - Being afrolatina31:08 - Education36:27 - Her work journey38:04 - Pressures and power41:28 - History of violenceY tu abuela dónde está? Poem This episode is brought to you by Cox.com, Gold Peak and First Republic Bank. Follow Analilia on all things social:TwitterWebsiteCPD Action TwitterFollow Cafe con Pam on all things socialInstagramFacebookhttp://cafeconpam.com/Join the FREE Cafe con Pam ChallengeJoin our Discord  space and let's keep the conversation going! If you are a business owner, join us for Aligned Collective MastermindLearn about PowerSisters Subscribe, rate, review, and share this episode with someone you love!And don't ever forget to Stay Shining! 

Couched in Color
S3E9: Mental Health Advocate, Mom, Veteran, Latina: A Hidden Healer Featuring Ayanna Kelly

Couched in Color

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 47:22


In this episode, guest Ayanna Kelly, an Afro-Latina advocate, disabled veteran and mom, shares an inside look at her mental health journey from burnout to standing at the White House as a leader of the Mental Health Youth Action Forum. (​​https://www.mentalhealthishealth.us/youth-action-forum/) That forum, which took place in May 2022, was created in partnership with MTV Entertainment Group and coordination with the Biden-Harris Administration.   In a “surreal” moment, Ayanna found herself standing next to President Joe Biden and U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy, and other highly accomplished people.  She saw herself as a model of “being that one person that other people can see themselves in.”  Before reaching such a significant milestone, Ayanna had been known for speaking of mental health challenges of intergenerational issues and the additional pressures of being an Afro-Latina woman, where sometimes it felt like “there was no space for me.” Topics covered in this interview: –Breaking away from being an enabler to regaining mental health, Ayanna talks of learning to make herself a priority.   –Often asked to speak of dealing with children's mental health, she shares a poignant story of teaching her son to express the range of all his feelings. She talks of “letting the light shine in all the dark places.” –Dr. Alfiee recommends Happy to Be Nappy, a great book for teaching self-concept and self-image to children through the eyes of a young brown child:(https://www.amazon.com/Happy-Be-Nappy-Board-Book/dp/1484788419) –Commended by Dr. Alfiee for her “openness, vulnerability and perseverance,” Ayanna shares challenges with postpartum depression after her daughter was born, when she didn't want to get out of bed or even shower. –The power of learning from others is detailed, including “The Hidden Healers,”  which is a group of advocates dedicated to providing accessible mental health resources for communities of color and other marginalized groups.  Some teach culturally relevant mental health concepts, from praying five times a day, as shared by two Muslim women, to volunteering.  –Ayanna explains the way poderistas (Latinas) help. She is an active Poderistas Power Squad member where she helps uplift the Latina community through civic engagement, social justice initiatives, and mental health roundtables.  –The launch of Ayanna's new podcast, “Sazonycorazan,”is revealed, where people share stories from real life, and what they learned from others, including the Hidden Healers' group.  The title means: “Seasoning in Heart.”  She discloses her wish list of dream guests, the top one being Dr. Brené Brown. About Ayanna Kelly: Ayanna (she/her/ella) is a proud Afro-Latina residing in the DMV area with her family where she earned her master's degree in Human Resource Management after serving eight years in the military.  Ayanna is an advocate for DEIBA (Diversity, Equity, Inclusivity, Belonging, and Accessibility) )and mental well-being for people in the workplace. She uses her lived experiences as an Afro-Latina, mother, and disabled veteran to breathe life into her HR, DEIBA, and advocacy work. She teaches organizations how to create psychologically safe workplaces that foster belonging.  Ayanna is an MTV Mental Health Youth Action Forum leader where she curated mental health campaigns to address the inequities which limit BIPOC youth from accessing mental health services.  Ayanna truly believes in the inter-connectivity of mental health, anti-racist practices, and true belonging in the workplace and in society.  In her spare time, you'll catch her at the soccer field with her first born, tending to her houseplants, walking her dogs, and reading as many books as possible.  Words to live by:  "You can't get to courage without rumbling with vulnerability." -  Dr. Brené Brown  Follow Ayanna Kelly: Website: https://www.ayannaskelly.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ayannakelly/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ayannakelly/ Podcast: “Sazonycorazon” with Ayanna Kelly https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/saz%C3%B3n-y-coraz%C3%B3n/id1630800362 https://open.spotify.com/show/6VCC10D8JyZQjcdXGTPObG Follow Dr. Alfiee: Website:  https://dralfiee.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dralfiee Twitter: https://twitter.com/dralfiee Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dralfiee/ Website: https://dralfiee.com Find out more about the AAKOMA Project here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yvTKmYKi24I Season 3 Produced By: https://socialchameleon.us More Couched in Color: https://dralfiee.com/podcast Music Produced by: Mark “King” Batson (Superproducer of your favorite artists and Grammy award-winner for albums with Eminem and Beyoncé)

Couched in Color with Dr. Alfiee
S3E9: Mental Health Advocate, Mom, Veteran, Latina: A Hidden Healer Featuring Ayanna Kelly

Couched in Color with Dr. Alfiee

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 47:22


In this episode, guest Ayanna Kelly, an Afro-Latina advocate, disabled veteran and mom, shares an inside look at her mental health journey from burnout to standing at the White House as a leader of the Mental Health Youth Action Forum. (​​https://www.mentalhealthishealth.us/youth-action-forum/) That forum, which took place in May 2022, was created in partnership with MTV Entertainment Group and coordination with the Biden-Harris Administration.   In a “surreal” moment, Ayanna found herself standing next to President Joe Biden and U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy, and other highly accomplished people.  She saw herself as a model of “being that one person that other people can see themselves in.”  Before reaching such a significant milestone, Ayanna had been known for speaking of mental health challenges of intergenerational issues and the additional pressures of being an Afro-Latina woman, where sometimes it felt like “there was no space for me.” Topics covered in this interview: –Breaking away from being an enabler to regaining mental health, Ayanna talks of learning to make herself a priority.   –Often asked to speak of dealing with children's mental health, she shares a poignant story of teaching her son to express the range of all his feelings. She talks of “letting the light shine in all the dark places.” –Dr. Alfiee recommends Happy to Be Nappy, a great book for teaching self-concept and self-image to children through the eyes of a young brown child:(https://www.amazon.com/Happy-Be-Nappy-Board-Book/dp/1484788419) –Commended by Dr. Alfiee for her “openness, vulnerability and perseverance,” Ayanna shares challenges with postpartum depression after her daughter was born, when she didn't want to get out of bed or even shower. –The power of learning from others is detailed, including “The Hidden Healers,”  which is a group of advocates dedicated to providing accessible mental health resources for communities of color and other marginalized groups.  Some teach culturally relevant mental health concepts, from praying five times a day, as shared by two Muslim women, to volunteering.  –Ayanna explains the way poderistas (Latinas) help. She is an active Poderistas Power Squad member where she helps uplift the Latina community through civic engagement, social justice initiatives, and mental health roundtables.  –The launch of Ayanna's new podcast, “Sazonycorazan,”is revealed, where people share stories from real life, and what they learned from others, including the Hidden Healers' group.  The title means: “Seasoning in Heart.”  She discloses her wish list of dream guests, the top one being Dr. Brené Brown. About Ayanna Kelly: Ayanna (she/her/ella) is a proud Afro-Latina residing in the DMV area with her family where she earned her master's degree in Human Resource Management after serving eight years in the military.  Ayanna is an advocate for DEIBA (Diversity, Equity, Inclusivity, Belonging, and Accessibility) )and mental well-being for people in the workplace. She uses her lived experiences as an Afro-Latina, mother, and disabled veteran to breathe life into her HR, DEIBA, and advocacy work. She teaches organizations how to create psychologically safe workplaces that foster belonging.  Ayanna is an MTV Mental Health Youth Action Forum leader where she curated mental health campaigns to address the inequities which limit BIPOC youth from accessing mental health services.  Ayanna truly believes in the inter-connectivity of mental health, anti-racist practices, and true belonging in the workplace and in society.  In her spare time, you'll catch her at the soccer field with her first born, tending to her houseplants, walking her dogs, and reading as many books as possible.  Words to live by:  "You can't get to courage without rumbling with vulnerability." -  Dr. Brené Brown  Follow Ayanna Kelly: Website: https://www.ayannaskelly.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ayannakelly/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ayannakelly/ Podcast: “Sazonycorazon” with Ayanna Kelly https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/saz%C3%B3n-y-coraz%C3%B3n/id1630800362 https://open.spotify.com/show/6VCC10D8JyZQjcdXGTPObG Follow Dr. Alfiee: Website:  https://dralfiee.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dralfiee Twitter: https://twitter.com/dralfiee Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dralfiee/ Website: https://dralfiee.com Find out more about the AAKOMA Project here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yvTKmYKi24I Season 3 Produced By: https://socialchameleon.us More Couched in Color: https://dralfiee.com/podcast Music Produced by: Mark “King” Batson (Superproducer of your favorite artists and Grammy award-winner for albums with Eminem and Beyoncé)

Don’t Mix In
Episode 123: Here's Why I Think Being Afrolatina is a Gift

Don’t Mix In

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 13:10


I fully embrace being Afro-Latina despite having to deal with being misunderstood. I find it (and being different) to be gift. Get the show notes for this episode at https://livbyviv.com/heres-why-i-think-being-afro-latina-is-a-gift/ You can always find me on Instagram @livbyviv https://www.instagram.com/livbyviv/ Watch my latest Amazon Live and store here Sign up for my Favorite Finds Newsletter to get links to my favorite finds https://bit.ly/favoritefindssignup --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/dontmixin/message

All Black Men Need Therapy
All Black Men Need Therapy | E65: Why do men want to be challenged?

All Black Men Need Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 48:08


Chief, Bell, and Prentice answer questions from supporters who reached out via email: Why do men want to be challenged? Do men feel threatened in their relationships? Is it the person, the challenge, or how it's delivered? The fellas show love and appreciation to all the followers and answer some difficult questions.

Beyond Black History Month
Soledad O'Brien and her push to hold journalists accountable

Beyond Black History Month

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 19:04


In this episode, we talk to journalist Soledad O'Brien about how she's pushing journalists to tell inclusive stories. From calling out reporters providing problematic coverage, while simultaneously encouraging news consumers to think about how a story is framed, the Afro-Latina news anchor, CEO, and executive producer is demystifying media. We also talk about what makes her news magazine show Matter of Fact different and why her latest documentary The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks tells a story you may not know. 

Siempre Pa'lante! Always Forward
1 - Recipes of inspiration for the soul feat. Bren Herrera

Siempre Pa'lante! Always Forward

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 43:58


Oye mi gente! Welcome to Season 2 of Siempre Pa'lante! Always Forward. I'm your host, Giraldo Luis Alvaré. Thank you for listening. We're back with another season filled with more inspiring stories that contribute to a positive narrative highlighting culture, familia, overcoming adversity and legacy. Setting the tone for the new season is an Afro-Latina who is always representing la cultura. She's an entrepreneur, tv host, author, lifestyle and travel writer, social activist and stylist. It doesn't stop there mi gente. She's a 3x winner of The Taste Awards for her show “The Culture Kitchen” on CleoTV. Please welcome, Bren Herrera. Gracias for listening. Don't forget to rate, review, follow, subscribe, like and share. Check out my Linktree for more info. Pa'lante! https://linktr.ee/sp.alwaysforward SPECIAL GUEST Bren Herrera Entrepreneur, TV host, Chef, Author, Lifestyle & Travel Writer, Social Activist, Stylist Bren Herrera site | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Pinterest | Youtube Bren Herrera site - https://brenherrera.com/ Support Bren & Friends Serve D.C. - https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=QGYX7CZ4ML6GQ Culture Kitchen on MyCleoTV - https://mycleo.tv/show/culture-kitchen/ 13th Taste Awards - http://www.thetasteawards.com/13th-annual-taste-awards-nominees-finalists-and-honorees/ Essence Magazine - https://www.essence.com/lifestyle/how-afro-latina-chef-tv-host-bren-herrera-spreads-love-through-food/ FB - https://www.facebook.com/BrenHerrera IG - https://www.instagram.com/brenherrera/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/BrenHerrera Pinterest - https://www.pinterest.com/BrenHerrera/ YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/user/chellista NOTABLE MENTIONS Culture Kitchen, CleoTV, House of Bren, Hive, Modern Pressure Cooking, Afro-Latina, Cuba, Cuban Girl, Flaca, Radio Martí, La Cantina, La Libreta, Journalist, Cello, Whitney Houston, Virginia Alonso, Gospel, Jazz, Flanboyant Eats, Atlanta, D.C., Spain, Miami, Today Show New York, Carson Daly, Al Roker, Natalie Morales, Good Day Atlanta, Emeril Lagasse, Israel, Akko, Forage, Gaza, Galilean Sea, Sea of Galilee, Cauliflower, Falafel --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/spalwaysforward/support

Comadreando
RUN, RUN AS FAST AS YOU CAN

Comadreando

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 39:34


Hola Comadres! Welcome to the 20th episode of Season 2! Let's talk about extra curricular activities for children with special needs! Join your comadre Marcy and special guest Suzie, director of Fast Feet NYC, as they discuss the importance of extracurricular activities for children with special needs. They focus on the benefits of running for children on the spectrum. Marcy is recording with Riverside-FM and if you'd like to watch instead of listen, head on over to YouTube and check out the video version of the podcast. If you have any suggestions, opinions, questions, or comments about this or any episode, please send us a Comadre-Gram at marcy@comadreandopod.com or DM me via IG. Let's have a conversation. If you like the podcast, please share with your family, friends, and significant other. You can support this podcast by finding it across all platforms and rating, liking, and reviewing. If you chat about us, please use the hashtags #Comadreando, #ComadreTime, or #HolaComadres so that I can see and share you as well. If you want to help the sustainability of Comadreando, please consider becoming a patron on Patreon. Become a monthly sustaining member or make a one time contribution. Every little bit helps. You can contribute via $comadreandopod on CashApp and @comadreandopod on Venmo. Merchandise is out now, please visit our BRAND NEW WEBSITE to check out all the official Comadre Gear. NOTES: Fast Feet NYC Website: https://www.fastfeetnyc.com/ Sign Up for Comadre-grams Using this link: http://eepurl.com/h-Gqw9  

Comadreando
RUN, RUN AS FAST AS YOU CAN

Comadreando

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 39:34


Hola Comadres! Welcome to the 20th episode of Season 2! Let's talk about extra curricular activities for children with special needs! Join your comadre Marcy and special guest Suzie, director of Fast Feet NYC, as they discuss the importance of extracurricular activities for children with special needs. They focus on the benefits of running for children on the spectrum. Marcy is recording with Riverside-FM and if you'd like to watch instead of listen, head on over to YouTube and check out the video version of the podcast. If you have any suggestions, opinions, questions, or comments about this or any episode, please send us a Comadre-Gram at marcy@comadreandopod.com or DM me via IG. Let's have a conversation. If you like the podcast, please share with your family, friends, and significant other. You can support this podcast by finding it across all platforms and rating, liking, and reviewing. If you chat about us, please use the hashtags #Comadreando, #ComadreTime, or #HolaComadres so that I can see and share you as well. If you want to help the sustainability of Comadreando, please consider becoming a patron on Patreon. Become a monthly sustaining member or make a one time contribution. Every little bit helps. You can contribute via $comadreandopod on CashApp and @comadreandopod on Venmo. Merchandise is out now, please visit our BRAND NEW WEBSITE to check out all the official Comadre Gear. NOTES: Fast Feet NYC Website: https://www.fastfeetnyc.com/ Sign Up for Comadre-grams Using this link: http://eepurl.com/h-Gqw9  

Chatbox With Uncle Funky's Daughter
How I Broke Generational Curses By Embracing My Curls

Chatbox With Uncle Funky's Daughter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 9:44


In honor of National Hispanic Heritage month, we are so excited to honor our Hispanic curlistas! Tune into today's episode as we chat with Catherine (@cathyslayzzofficial) about her experience growing up in Peru and how she influenced her family to embrace their natural curls!About the Chatbox:Hey Funky Junky!  Uncle Funky's Daughter has a blog and podcast called ChatBox. The goal of ChatBox is to help you embrace your natural beauty! The conversation is about more than hair! The podcast highlights that we come in many different shapes and sizes, and our hair comes in various textures and curl patterns.  Listen in on candid conversations as our curly guests talk about hair how-tos and real lifestyle tips. Real talk, no jive.About the Host:Melinda Spaulding is an Emmy award-winning journalist, host, and speaker who loves to mentor and cheer on other women.  Whether it's behind the anchor desk or creating media strategies for companies, Melinda understands that the best communications plan begins with a good conversation.  A wife and mother of two, she is constantly investigating and researching the best ways to thrive and enjoy the journey.

Cafe con Pam Podcast
Choosing Yourself with Aurora Archer

Cafe con Pam Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 55:44


Listeners, we're back this week with Aurora Archer. An Afro-Latina, Aurora draws on over 25 years of experience leading success in four distinct industries: retail, technology, health & wellness, content publishing & media. She's built a reputation as a catalyst leader and strategic thinker. Her mission is mighty in execution but simple in philosophy: create a new normal where everyone, of all identities, thrives to their fullest potential and our world includes narratives and solutions that serve all of us. It's this tenacity — fueled by a love for technology, marketing strategy, and DEI — that led to her company, The Opt-In™.During this episode we talked about:02:51 - Growing up in San Antonio with a multicultural upbringing04:38 -Lucky to live in between worlds05:54 - There was an incredible love11:48 - Extremely sensitive to hierarchy13:51 - Pivotal moments that changed her life14:01 - Growing up across borders16:16 - Creating a radical different life27:00 - The product of domestics28:59 - Convert in superpower35:11 - Earn the right to be chosen38:00 - Where she gets the strength41:47 - Her entrepreneurship journey This episode is brought to you by Cox.com and Gold Peak Follow Aurora on all things social:LinkedInInstagramTwitterWebsiteThe Opt-In LikedInThe Opt-In TwitterThe Opt-In Instagram Follow Cafe con Pam on all things socialInstagramFacebookhttp://cafeconpam.com/Join the FREE Cafe con Pam ChallengeJoin our Discord  space and let's keep the conversation going! If you are a business owner, join us for Aligned Collective MastermindLearn about PowerSisters Subscribe, rate, review, and share this episode with someone you love!And don't ever forget to Stay Shining!

The Spoiled Latina Show
Latina Built Brands Panel - Episode 9

The Spoiled Latina Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 46:12


Check out this panel discussion I had at the Spoiled Latina Summit this past July with some of the top Latina and Afro-Latina founders featuring Sherly Tavarez (@hauseofcurls), Kay Lopez (@latinaspoderosas), Karla Dominguez (@mijacuture), and Bianca Kea (yosoyafrolatina) brought to you by Cantu Beauty! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thespoiledlatinashow/support

Comadreando
JUST KEEP SWIMMING

Comadreando

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 55:54


Hola Comadres! Welcome to the 19th episode of Season 2!  Let's talk about extra curricular activities for children with special needs! Join your comadre Marcy and special guest Florencio, director of Reach Swim Academy, as they discuss the importance of extracurricular activities for children with special needs. They also talk about the importance for children on the spectrum to learn to swim.  Marcy is recording with Riverside-FM and if you'd like to watch instead of listen, head on over to YouTube and check out the video version of the podcast. If you have any suggestions, opinions, questions, or comments about this or any episode, please send us a Comadre-Gram at marcy@comadreandopod.com or DM me via IG. Let's have a conversation.   If you like the podcast, please share with your family, friends, and significant other. You can support this podcast by finding it across all platforms and rating, liking, and reviewing. If you chat about us, please use the hashtags #Comadreando, #ComadreTime, or #HolaComadres so that I can see and share you as well. If you want to help the sustainability of Comadreando, please consider becoming a patron on Patreon. Become a monthly sustaining member or make a one time contribution. Every little bit helps. You can contribute via $comadreandopod on CashApp and @comadreandopod on Venmo. Merchandise coming soon in 2022, be on the lookout.  *** SPECIAL OFFER*** As a special offer the first ten listeners who register for the Reach Swim Program that starts at HOSTOS Community College in October will get 25 dollars off the fee using the code COMADRE  

Comadreando
NO, NOT LIKE RAIN MAN

Comadreando

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 48:38


Hola Comadres! Welcome to the 18th episode of Season 2!  Let's talk about autism in the media! Join your comadre Marcy and special guest Jason, movie buff and host of 1st Class 2nd Place Podcast , as they discuss autism as it is presented in the media particularly in movies and shows.  Marcy is recording with Riverside-FM and if you'd like to watch instead of listen, head on over to YouTube and check out the video version of the podcast. If you have any suggestions, opinions, questions, or comments about this or any episode, please send us a Comadre-Gram at marcy@comadreandopod.com or DM me via IG. Let's have a conversation.   If you like the podcast, please share with your family, friends, and significant other. You can support this podcast by finding it across all platforms and rating, liking, and reviewing. If you chat about us, please use the hashtags #Comadreando, #ComadreTime, or #HolaComadres so that I can see and share you as well. If you want to help the sustainability of Comadreando, please consider becoming a patron on Patreon. Become a monthly sustaining member or make a one time contribution. Every little bit helps. You can contribute via $comadreandopod on CashApp and @comadreandopod on Venmo. Merchandise coming soon in 2022, be on the lookout.    NOTES: Article on 5 Autistic Actors You Should Know on The Mighty: https://themighty.com/topic/autism-spectrum-disorder/autistic-actors-to-watch-now Sia's Response to 'Music' Backlash Shows How Autism Myths Cause Harm on the Mighty: https://themighty.com/topic/autism-spectrum-disorder/sia-music-twitter-autism-actors 6 Films and TV Shows about Autism: https://kerrymagro.com/films-about-autism-on-netflix/#:~:text=Some%20of%20our%20personal%20favorite,Incredibly%20Close%20and%20many%20more!

All Black Men Need Therapy
All Black Men Need Therapy | E64: We needed this... Work-Life Balance!

All Black Men Need Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 72:43


Chief, Bell, and Prentice return after an extended break. Prentice and Bell step into more vulnerable spaces as the fellas support one another through life's woes. Prentice taps into his emotions about his upcoming wedding and strained family relationships. Bell releases some tensions caused by a brief bout with depression. And Chief discloses some stresses from a huge project he's been working on. Several honest moments are shared, which allow the fellas to be there for each other in their time of need.

Lets Have This Conversation
Creating an equitable future for Afro Latina and Black Women at Work with: Dr Marisol Capellan

Lets Have This Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 33:45


The experience of Black women at work differs from that of other Americans, even that of Black men and White women. Understanding Black women's double minority status at work is a necessary part of building inclusive and equitable workplaces. A survey conducted by the Gallup Center on Black Voices between Nov. 6 and Dec. 1, 2020, found that Black women are less likely to feel they are treated with respect in the workplace. They are also less likely to feel like a valued member of their team and that their coworkers treat everyone fairly. Dr. Marisol Capellan is the Founder and Director of Transformational Coaching Certifications at The Capellan Institute. Dr. Capellan is an internationally recognized and award-winning educator, coach and TEDx speaker. She is a former lecturer at the University of Miami, Miami Herbert Business School, a leadership and Diversity, Equity & Inclusion speaker and trainer, and a certified executive coach. She graduated with a Masters in in Leadership and a doctoral degree in Higher Education Leadership from the University of Miami. Her dissertation focus was on the trajectory of women to leadership positions. As an Afro-Latina, mother, and immigrant she has faced and witnessed many of the institutional and systemic barriers and biases that Black women face in their career trajectory to leadership roles, which sparked her passion in women's empowerment and the need to increase the representation of women in positions of power. She is currently writing a book, Leadership is a Responsibility, about her career journey experience as a Black Hispanic woman in Academia, the stories of Black women in the workplace and the need of responsible leaders.to create a more equitable society where minority can belong and thrive. In addition, her personal story of resilience has been featured on CNN where she discussed how her mindset helped her overcome homelessness at 17 years of age while highlighting the systemic inequalities that minorities go through in order to succeed. She joined me this week to tell me more. LinkedIn: @Dr.MarisolCapellan Follow: @profcapellan