Podcasts about Associate professor

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Best podcasts about Associate professor

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Latest podcast episodes about Associate professor

LSE Middle East Centre Podcasts
In-between Identities and Cultures: Ms Marvel and the Representation of Young Muslim Women

LSE Middle East Centre Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 59:01


This event was the launch of the paper 'In-between Identities and Cultures: Ms Marvel and the Representation of Young Muslim Women' by Manmit Bhambra and Jennifer Jackson-Preece. You can read the paper here: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/110724/ Can superheroes tell us something important about changing public attitudes towards young Muslim women? To answer this question, the authors compare how young people in different locations in the Middle East and beyond react to the portrayal of the superhero Ms. Marvel as a young Muslim woman. Their findings suggest that a superhero like Ms. Marvel can create a global discourse on gender and Islam that transcends specific cultural contexts. Manmit Bhambra is Research Officer in the Religion and Global Society Unit at LSE and is coordinating its inaugural project, Strengthening Religious Cooperation in Global London. The project is exploring the impact of COVID-19 on interfaith relations and the potential for interfaith collaboration in these circumstances. Her research interests are centred around identity politics and formation, ethnic, religious and national identities as well as the broader themes of race, inclusion and minority rights. She has recently worked on research projects with young people at LSE's European Institute and Middle East Centre. She is also Lecturer in Global Politics at Imperial College London. Jennifer Jackson-Preece is an Associate Professor in Nationalism, with a joint appointment in both the European Institute and the Department of International Relations, LSE. Jennifer's research interests include: normative responses to nationalism, ethnic conflict and religious intolerance; human and minority rights; multiculturalism; minorities and migration in Europe. Since the 1990s, she has had a sustained engagement with problems and practices of minorities and migrants. Dima Issa is a Senior Lecturer of Mass Media and Communication at the University of Balamand in Lebanon. Her research has primarily focused on Arab diaspora and media consumption, looking at ways in which identity is constructed and reconstructed through space and time. In addition, her interests include gender and representation, popular culture and audience studies, new media and technologies and social networking. Before academia, Dima worked in the corporate sector in media relations, publications and website management as well as in broadcast journalism. Polly Withers is a Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow at the LSE Middle East Centre, where she leads the project “Neoliberal Visions: Gendering Consumer Culture and its Resistances in the Levant”. Polly's interdisciplinary work questions and explores how gender, sexuality, race, and class intersect in popular culture and commercial media in the global south. She is particularly interested in examining how different media and cultural modalities frame, produce, and/or challenge dominant subjectivities and social relations in the Middle East and beyond. In her current work she consider how gendered images in neoliberal and commercial media practices reflect and communicate shifts in gender and sexuality norms in post-Oslo Palestine, which will shortly be expanded to incorporate Jordan and Lebanon.

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers
628: Investigating Plant-Based Medicines to Battle Infectious Disease and Antibiotic Resistance - Dr. Cassandra Quave

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 52:17


Dr. Cassandra Quave holds a joint appointment as Associate Professor of Dermatology in the Emory University School of Medicine and Emory Center for the Study of Human Health. She is also Director/Curator of the Emory University Herbarium, CEO of CLQ Botanicals (a company providing consulting services on botanicals for personal care, skin health, and cosmetics), CEO and Chief Scientist of PhytoTEK LLC (a start-up biotech company dedicated to R&D and commercialization of novel anti-infective technologies), host of the Foodie Pharmacology Podcast, and author of the recently released book The Plant Hunter: A Scientist's Quest for Nature's Next Medicines. As a medical ethnobotanist, Cassandra studies how people relate to plants, and how they use plants as medicine. Her research takes her around the world to document traditional medicinal practices and collect plant samples. In her lab, Cassandra and her team analyze plant samples to assess their pharmacological activity against infectious disease targets. When she's not working in the lab or out in the field, Cassandra loves spending time with her husband and their four kids, going to sporting events, hiking, canoeing, swimming, and relaxing with a good book. Cassandra received B.S. degrees in Biology as well as Anthropology and Human Biology from Emory University, and she was awarded her PhD in Biology with a focus in ethnobotany and ethnopharmacology from Florida International University. Next, Cassandra conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship at Emory University. She joined the faculty at Emory University in 2013, and she has been awarded the Emory Williams Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching Award for her excellence in teaching. In our interview, Cassandra shares more about her life and science.

Sports Spectrum Podcast
Former NFL QB David Klingler on breaking records, expectations, seminary and teaching God's word

Sports Spectrum Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 56:49


David Klingler played seven seasons in the NFL with the Cincinnati Bengals, Oakland Raiders and Green Bay Packers. He was selected 6th overall in the 1992 NFL Draft by the Bengals after a stellar college career at the University of Houston that saw him set multiple records and finish as a Heisman Finalist in 1990.  Among the records Klingler set at Houston include him throwing for 11 touchdown passes in one game on November 17, 1990 against Eastern Washington. In December 1990, he set the NCAA D-1 record for most yards gained a single game with 716 (since surpassed in 2014).  After his playing career, David obtained his Masters in Theology in 2004 and a PhD in Old Testament Studies in 2010 from Dallas Theological Seminary, where is currently an Associate Professor of Bible Exposition.  Today on the podcast, we talk to David Klingler about his incredible college football career, getting drafted 6th overall in 1992 by the Bengals and his desire to teach people how to read and understand God's word.  --- Receive our 10-day Sports Spectrum Devotional written by professional athletes for FREE when you sign up for our Sports Spectrum Weekly Email Newsletter. Sign up here.

FreshEd
FreshEd #259 – History of Indentured Students in The USA (Elizabeth Tandy Shermer)

FreshEd

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 35:39


Today we talk about the 45 million people in the USA who owe $1.7 trillion in student debt. My guest is Elizabeth Tandy Shermer, an Associate Professor of History at Loyola University Chicago. Elizabeth shows in her new book that the student debt crisis today can be traced back to the New Deal. She details the changing political fault lines when it comes to federally funding higher education. Elizabeth Tandy Shermer's new book is Indentured Students: How Government-Guaranteed Loans Left Generations Drowning in College Debt. freshedpodcast.com/shermer/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/donate

This Week in Black History, Society, and Culture
Haiti in History and Popular Culture

This Week in Black History, Society, and Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 53:54


In this episode, Dr. Hettie V. Williams is in conversation with Dr. Alyssa Goldstein Sepinwall about Haiti in history and popular culture. Dr. Williams is Associate Professor of African American history at Monmouth University. Dr. Goldstein Sepinwall is Professor and Graduate Studies Coordinator in the Department of History at California State University, San Marcos. Her research specialties include the French and Haitian Revolutions, modern Haitian history, Slavery and Film, and French colonialism as well as French-Jewish history. Dr. Goldstein Sepinwall's latest book is Slave Revolt on Screen: The Haitian Revolution in Film and Video Games (University Press of Mississippi, 2021) and she is also the author of The Abbé Grégoire and the French Revolution: The Making of Modern Universalism (University of California Press, 2005) and Haitian History: New Perspectives (Routledge, 2012).  

DIA-Today: Democracy in America Today
Regimes, part 2: The Rich and the Poor

DIA-Today: Democracy in America Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 32:15


We discuss the most common regimes historically, the rule of the rich (oligarchy) and the rule of the poor (democracy), and the ways that the American regime was designed to prevent conflict between the rich and the poor.      Matt Parks and David Corbin explore the ideas behind today's headlines. Opening and closing music from the beginning and end of “2020 Vision (Worse than Blind)” by Fred Lancia. Used with permission. Opening (0:53) - Fall has arrived with a vengeance in New York while the Red Sox and Braves are looking a little more shaky in their quests for the World Series.   Required Reading (3:58) - We discuss Aristotle's reflections on the rule of the rich (oligarchy) and the rule of the poor (democracy) and the way that this rivalry shows up in American history and contemporary politics.  Link: Aristotle, The Politics; Pew Research Poll; David Harsanyi on income tax shares; Gallup poll on income inequality. Crystal Ball (26:39) - Following the opening night of the new NBA season, we predict the Eastern Conference, Western Conference, and overall NBA champions and the regular season win totals for the Celtics and Lakers.   Email: DemocracyinAmericaToday@gmail.com Matt Parks is the Interim Provost and an Associate Professor of Politics at The King's College in New York City. David Corbin is Head of School at the Geneva School of Boerne, Texas. All views expressed in this podcast are those of the speaker.

New Books in Gender Studies
Nerina Rustomji, "The Beauty of the Houri: Heavenly Virgins and Feminine Ideals" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 50:31


In her scintillating new book, The Beauty of the Houri: Heavenly Virgins, Feminine Ideals (Oxford UP, 2021), Nerina Rustomji presents a fascinating and multilayered intellectual and cultural history of the category of the “Houri” and the multiple ideological projects in which it has been inserted over time and space. Nimbly moving between a vast range of discursive theaters including Western Islamophobic representations of the Houri in the post 9/11 context, early modern and modern French and English Literature, premodern Muslim intellectual traditions, and popular preachers on the internet, Rustomji shows the complexity of this category and its unavailability for a canonical definition. The Beauty of the Houri is intellectual history at its best that combines philological rigor with astute theoretical reflection. And all this Rustomji accomplishes in prose the delightfulness of which competes fiercely with its lucidity. SherAli Tareen is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Franklin and Marshall College. His research focuses on Muslim intellectual traditions and debates in early modern and modern South Asia. His book Defending Muhammad in Modernity (University of Notre Dame Press, 2020) received the American Institute of Pakistan Studies 2020 Book Prize and was selected as a finalist for the 2021 American Academy of Religion Book Award. His other academic publications are available here. He can be reached at sherali.tareen@fandm.edu. Listener feedback is most welcome. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books in Islamic Studies
Nerina Rustomji, "The Beauty of the Houri: Heavenly Virgins and Feminine Ideals" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Islamic Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 50:31


In her scintillating new book, The Beauty of the Houri: Heavenly Virgins, Feminine Ideals (Oxford UP, 2021), Nerina Rustomji presents a fascinating and multilayered intellectual and cultural history of the category of the “Houri” and the multiple ideological projects in which it has been inserted over time and space. Nimbly moving between a vast range of discursive theaters including Western Islamophobic representations of the Houri in the post 9/11 context, early modern and modern French and English Literature, premodern Muslim intellectual traditions, and popular preachers on the internet, Rustomji shows the complexity of this category and its unavailability for a canonical definition. The Beauty of the Houri is intellectual history at its best that combines philological rigor with astute theoretical reflection. And all this Rustomji accomplishes in prose the delightfulness of which competes fiercely with its lucidity. SherAli Tareen is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Franklin and Marshall College. His research focuses on Muslim intellectual traditions and debates in early modern and modern South Asia. His book Defending Muhammad in Modernity (University of Notre Dame Press, 2020) received the American Institute of Pakistan Studies 2020 Book Prize and was selected as a finalist for the 2021 American Academy of Religion Book Award. His other academic publications are available here. He can be reached at sherali.tareen@fandm.edu. Listener feedback is most welcome. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/islamic-studies

New Books in Literary Studies
Nerina Rustomji, "The Beauty of the Houri: Heavenly Virgins and Feminine Ideals" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 50:31


In her scintillating new book, The Beauty of the Houri: Heavenly Virgins, Feminine Ideals (Oxford UP, 2021), Nerina Rustomji presents a fascinating and multilayered intellectual and cultural history of the category of the “Houri” and the multiple ideological projects in which it has been inserted over time and space. Nimbly moving between a vast range of discursive theaters including Western Islamophobic representations of the Houri in the post 9/11 context, early modern and modern French and English Literature, premodern Muslim intellectual traditions, and popular preachers on the internet, Rustomji shows the complexity of this category and its unavailability for a canonical definition. The Beauty of the Houri is intellectual history at its best that combines philological rigor with astute theoretical reflection. And all this Rustomji accomplishes in prose the delightfulness of which competes fiercely with its lucidity. SherAli Tareen is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Franklin and Marshall College. His research focuses on Muslim intellectual traditions and debates in early modern and modern South Asia. His book Defending Muhammad in Modernity (University of Notre Dame Press, 2020) received the American Institute of Pakistan Studies 2020 Book Prize and was selected as a finalist for the 2021 American Academy of Religion Book Award. His other academic publications are available here. He can be reached at sherali.tareen@fandm.edu. Listener feedback is most welcome. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books Network
Nerina Rustomji, "The Beauty of the Houri: Heavenly Virgins and Feminine Ideals" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 50:31


In her scintillating new book, The Beauty of the Houri: Heavenly Virgins, Feminine Ideals (Oxford UP, 2021), Nerina Rustomji presents a fascinating and multilayered intellectual and cultural history of the category of the “Houri” and the multiple ideological projects in which it has been inserted over time and space. Nimbly moving between a vast range of discursive theaters including Western Islamophobic representations of the Houri in the post 9/11 context, early modern and modern French and English Literature, premodern Muslim intellectual traditions, and popular preachers on the internet, Rustomji shows the complexity of this category and its unavailability for a canonical definition. The Beauty of the Houri is intellectual history at its best that combines philological rigor with astute theoretical reflection. And all this Rustomji accomplishes in prose the delightfulness of which competes fiercely with its lucidity. SherAli Tareen is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Franklin and Marshall College. His research focuses on Muslim intellectual traditions and debates in early modern and modern South Asia. His book Defending Muhammad in Modernity (University of Notre Dame Press, 2020) received the American Institute of Pakistan Studies 2020 Book Prize and was selected as a finalist for the 2021 American Academy of Religion Book Award. His other academic publications are available here. He can be reached at sherali.tareen@fandm.edu. Listener feedback is most welcome. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Intellectual History
Nerina Rustomji, "The Beauty of the Houri: Heavenly Virgins and Feminine Ideals" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 50:31


In her scintillating new book, The Beauty of the Houri: Heavenly Virgins, Feminine Ideals (Oxford UP, 2021), Nerina Rustomji presents a fascinating and multilayered intellectual and cultural history of the category of the “Houri” and the multiple ideological projects in which it has been inserted over time and space. Nimbly moving between a vast range of discursive theaters including Western Islamophobic representations of the Houri in the post 9/11 context, early modern and modern French and English Literature, premodern Muslim intellectual traditions, and popular preachers on the internet, Rustomji shows the complexity of this category and its unavailability for a canonical definition. The Beauty of the Houri is intellectual history at its best that combines philological rigor with astute theoretical reflection. And all this Rustomji accomplishes in prose the delightfulness of which competes fiercely with its lucidity. SherAli Tareen is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Franklin and Marshall College. His research focuses on Muslim intellectual traditions and debates in early modern and modern South Asia. His book Defending Muhammad in Modernity (University of Notre Dame Press, 2020) received the American Institute of Pakistan Studies 2020 Book Prize and was selected as a finalist for the 2021 American Academy of Religion Book Award. His other academic publications are available here. He can be reached at sherali.tareen@fandm.edu. Listener feedback is most welcome. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism
2142: Welcome to the Post-Productivity World by Cal Newport on Self-Improvement & Personal Development

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 8:48


Cal Newport of the Study Hacks blog welcomes us to the post-productivity world Episode 2142: Welcome to the Post-Productivity World by Cal Newport on Self-Improvement & Personal Development Cal Newport is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Georgetown University, who specializes in the theory of distributed algorithms. He previously earned his Ph.D. from MIT in 2009 and graduated from Dartmouth College in 2004. In addition to studying the theoretical foundations of our digital age as a professor, Newport also writes about the impact of these technologies on the world of work. His most recent book, Deep Work, argues that focus is the new I.Q. in the knowledge economy, and that individuals who cultivate their ability to concentrate without distraction will thrive. The original post is located here: https://www.calnewport.com/blog/2011/11/05/welcome-to-the-post-productivity-world/  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalLivingDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Loving Liberty Radio Network
10-21-2021 Washington Watch Live with Tony Perkins

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 54:10


Mike Johnson, U.S. Representative for the 4th district of Louisiana, discusses Attorney General Merrick Garland's testimony before the House Judiciary Committee and the DOJ task force targeting parents. Dave Boyer, White House Correspondent for the Washington Times, talks about Merrick Garland's testimony before the House Judiciary Committee. Chip Roy, U.S. Representative for Texas's 21st District, shares what happened during his questioning of Merrick Garland on the sexual assaults in Loudoun County School District bathrooms. Dr. Andrew Bostom, Clinical Trialist and Associate Professor of Family Medicine at Brown University, comments on the White House's initiative to vaccinate children ages 5-11. David Closson, FRC's Director of the Center for Biblical Worldview, responds to the increasing trend of government officials refusing to enforce laws they don't like. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

The Common Good Podcast
Dr. Alan Noble discusses his new book, “You Are Not Your Own: Belonging to God in an Inhuman World,” Brian and guest co-host Steve Coble reflect on heaven, and they share encouragement on dealing with doubt - October 21, 2021

The Common Good Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 50:59


(00:00-9:35): Brian welcomed guest co-host Steve Coble! Steve is the Pastor of Teaching, Discipleship, and Spiritual Formation at Renewal Church of Chicago. Learn more about Steve at renewalchicago.com (9:35-26:54): Dr. Alan Noble, Associate Professor of English at Oklahoma Baptist University, Cofounder of Christ and Pop Culture, and Leadership Council Member for the AND Campaign, joined Brian and Steve to talk about his new book, “You Are Not Your Own: Belonging to God in an Inhuman World” Learn more about Alan and his book at oalannoble.com and connect with him on Twitter at @TheAlanNoble  (26:54-35:35): Brian and Steve reflected on Tish Harrison Warren's New York Times opinion article, “What I Believe About Life After Death.”  (35:35-41:54): How can we be contributors at church instead of consumers? Brian and Steve talked about this and commented on Tyler J. VanderWeele and Brendan Case's Christianity Today article, “Empty Pews Are an American Public Health Crisis.” (41:54-50:58): Brian and Steve shared pastoral encouragement on doubt.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2701 - The Capitalist Roots of Poor Health w/ Rupa Marya

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 68:33


Emma hosts Rupa Marya, Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, to discuss her recent book Inflamed: Deep Medicine and the Anatomy of Injustice that she co-authored with Raj Patel, on the socioeconomic roots of poor health, and the colonial seeds that brought about this issue. Professor Marya begins by defining inflammation for us, looking at it as a response to damage or threat of damage, from response to impact, virus, student debt, or intergenerational trauma, before they dive into the connections between the ideologies of modern medicine and colonization, particularly in the uses of separation and atomization – including the mind-body dichotomy, people versus nature, and white folks versus indigenous peoples – and in how they were set up in union, with medics, missionaries, and militaries leading the charge. Next, they jump into the capitalist nature of our medical system, looking at how the influence of lobbyists, the drive for efficiency, and the leverage of debt are all central to the modern medicine experience. Professor Marya and Emma then move back to the more physical repercussions of the atomization of colonial capitalism, discussing the impossibility of treating COVID at home while letting it run rampant in the Global South, before moving on to the book's blueprint of walking through the inherent interplay between all elements of our anatomy, from our cardiovascular system to brain functioning to the microbiome in our gut. They wrap up the discussion by looking at the exploitation of the environment and workforce as a representation of the clear need for societal restructuring as the diseases of capitalism become worse and worse, and the need for new infrastructures of care become direr and direr. Emma also touches on Tim Kaine's status as majority leader of empathy as he connects with Rahm Emanuel on the pain of governing a police force that murders your constituents, and not doing anything to stop them. And in the Fun Half: Emma, Brandon, and Matt(s) cover a teacher's audition for Bari Weiss's Substack, Chuck from Indiana calls in to ask our celebs about para-social relationships, and Andrew from Greensboro talks about the hypocrisy of elite wellness critique. Kowalski gets his well-deserved celebration as he enters his 28th year of life, Seb Gorka doesn't understand the concept of paternity, Dave Rubin defends comedians as the martyrs of truth and also the reason why Netflix should fire their trans employees, and Katt Williams talks about the importance of boundaries and the failures of comics who can't deal with them, plus, your calls and IMs! Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop

The Signal
Billionaires in space

The Signal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 24:30


More and more billionaires are jumping on rockets to try to reach space. Richard Branson was the first with Virgin Galactica, Jeff Bezos was next with Blue Origin, and they're both competing against Elon Musk's company SpaceX. The question is, what's in it for the rest of humanity? Today on the Signal, the dawn of the new space age and the billionaires funding it. What's it going to achieve, and is it worth the cost? Featured: Dr Bradley Tucker, Astrophysicist and Cosmologist, Australian National University Dr Eloise Marais, Associate Professor in Physical Geography, University College London

Stroke Alert
Stroke Alert October 2021

Stroke Alert

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 33:35


On Episode 9 of the Stroke Alert Podcast, host Dr. Negar Asdaghi highlights two articles from the October 2021 issue of Stroke: “Endovascular Therapy of Anterior Circulation Tandem Occlusions” and “Automated Perfusion-Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Childhood Arterial Ischemic Stroke.” She also interviews Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani about her article “Outcome Following Hemorrhage From Cranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistulae.” Dr. Negar Asdaghi: 1) Should perfusion imaging be incorporated into routine neuroimaging for stroke-like presentation in the pediatric population? 2) Is performing emergent cervical carotid stenting beneficial in patients undergoing endovascular thrombectomy for a tandem occlusion? 3) What are the outcomes of patients with intracranial hemorrhage secondary to dural AV fistula? These are the questions that we will answer in our podcast today. Stay with us. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Welcome back to Stroke Alert Podcast. My name is Negar Asdaghi. I'm an Associate Professor of Neurology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and your host for the monthly Stroke Alert Podcast. For the October 2021 issue of Stroke, we have a comprehensive list of publications, from studying the role of C-reactive protein in outcome prediction after subarachnoid hemorrhage to studying the association of over 81 classes of routinely prescribed drugs with the risk of ischemic stroke, which I encourage you to review in addition to our podcast today. Later in the podcast, I have the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani on her work with outcome prediction in patients with dural AV fistula–related intracranial hemorrhage. But first, with these two articles. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Between 10-20% of patients with an anterior circulation large vessel occlusion have tandem occlusions. That means that they have a concurrent cervical carotid occlusion or significant stenosis in addition to their target intracranial occlusion. Performing endovascular therapy for a tandem occlusion is often difficult, providing technical and access challenges for the operator. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        In practicality, we have two options for carotid treatment in the acute setting. One option is doing nothing, or do carotid angioplasty predominantly to gain access to that target intercranial occlusion. But the second option is to do an emergent carotid stenting. Currently, we have two ongoing clinical trials to assess the very question of whether emergent cervical carotid stenting is an option in tandem occlusions. One is the ongoing TITAN trial out of France, and the second one is a Canadian trial, Endovascular Acute Stroke Intervention - Tandem OCclusion Trial, or EASI-TOC. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        And while we await the completion of these trials, the treatment option for cervical carotid remains a contentious subject. Though performing emergent cervical ICA stenting is feasible, the opponents of the procedure highlight that emergent stenting is associated with higher rates of intracranial hemorrhage, a high risk of in-stent thrombosis, iatrogenic artery-to-artery embolization, and hemodynamic instability during stent deployment. Not to mention that it will increase time to reperfusion if stenting is done prior to the intracranial recanalization. In contrast, the proponents of emergent cervical ICA stenting argue that leaving the carotid alone can lead to an increased risk of infarct recurrence and infarct progression. Of course, it goes without saying that the current practice pattern is widely variable. So, in the current issue of the journal, Dr. Mohammad Anadani, from the Department of Neurology at Washington University School of Medicine, and a group of international collaborators from the TITAN and ETIS registries compared the outcomes of endovascularly treated patients with tandem occlusions in the anterior circulation who received concurrent carotid stenting to those who did not receive stenting of the carotid. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        It is important to note that the no-stent group included those with either no cervical carotid intervention or angioplasty alone. So, the authors identified 760 patients with a tandem occlusion that were included in the pooled analysis of TITAN and ETIS registries. TITAN stands for Thrombectomy in Tandem Lesions and endovascular treatment in ischemic stroke. That included EVT-treated patients; these are endovascularly treated patients with tandem occlusions from 18 comprehensive stroke centers across Europe and United States. And ETIS is an ongoing prospective multicenter registry that enrolls all patients treated with endovascular thrombectomy at six large comprehensive stroke centers in France. In both cohorts, treatment of cervical ICA was left at the discretion of the treating physician. Overall, cervical ICA stenting was performed in 56% of total patients with tandem occlusion. In the adjusted model, they found that the odds of favorable outcome and successful reperfusion were higher in the stent group. In contrast, the risk of any hemorrhage was higher in the stent group, but the rate of symptomatic hemorrhage was not different within the two groups. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Some very important findings from their subgroup analysis include a stronger benefit from emergent carotid stenting, unfavorable outcome in patients with lower NIH Stroke Scale, and in patients in whom the etiology of carotid stenosis or occlusion was deemed to be related to atherosclerosis rather than dissection. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        So, what are the top three things we learned from this paper? Number one, we learned that emergent carotid stenting overall increased the odds of favorable outcome in patients with tandem occlusion. Number two, emergent cervical ICA stenting came with a cost of increased hemorrhage, perhaps related to the necessity of administering antiplatelet therapies in the angiosuite. Number three, benefit from emergent carotid ICA stenting in the setting of endovascular therapy was confined to patients with carotid occlusion or significant stenosis in whom the etiology was deemed to be related to athero and not dissection. And of course, people seem to benefit from emergent cervical ICA stenting in whom the presenting NIH Stroke Scale was mild. So, many things to keep in mind, and most important of all, that these results are from registry-based data, and we still have to wait for the results of the two ongoing trials to confirm these findings. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Diagnosis of stroke in children is often delayed beyond the conventional thrombolytic and endovascular time windows. In 2018, randomized trials in adults showed that patients with an ischemic mismatch, that is the presence of a large ischemic penumbra in a setting of a small ischemic core, can significantly benefit from endovascular therapy. Whether these results can be directly applied to the pediatric population from simply the adult population is, of course, unknown. In this issue of Stroke, Dr. Mark Mackay and Melissa Visser, from the Department of Neurology, Royal Children's Hospital of Melbourne, and colleagues present the results of a retrospective, observational cohort study of 29 children who underwent MRI diffusion and dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion imaging within 72 hours of stroke onset. Perfusion-diffusion mismatch was estimated using the RAPID software with the same criteria used in adults, which was defining ischemic penumbra as regions with a Tmax delay of more than six seconds and core as defined by diffusion positive lesions with corresponding low signal on the apparent diffusion coefficient, or ADC, map with values less than 620. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Favorable mismatch profile was defined the same way that they are defined in the adult population, that is, core volumes less than 70 mL and mismatch volumes of over 15 mL with a mismatch ratio of over 1.8. Now, the primary goal of this paper was to demonstrate feasibility of assessing automated perfusion-diffusion mismatch in childhood stroke. So, among 187 children with confirmed stroke on MR imaging, 58 underwent perfusion imaging in the study and only 29 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Most cases had cryptogenic stroke followed by local cerebral arteriopathy as part of their etiology of stroke. Vessel occlusion was confirmed in 12 cases, two of which involve the posterior circulation. So, RAPID detected an ischemic core in 66% of patients only, remembering that the remaining diffusion positive cases were excluded from this finding simply because either the ADC values were not below the 620 value or they had a smaller infarct core, at which point determining the ADC values becomes very difficult. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Overall, three patients only had favorable mismatch profile as we defined earlier and we use to guide us for thrombectomy in the adult population. Of the three children who met the target mismatch criteria, only one received IV alteplase and none underwent thrombectomy, which makes this difficult to validate the penumbral thresholds that are used in the adults for the pediatric population. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        So, what are the top two points from the study? Number one, in this large cohort of children with confirmed ischemic stroke, only a third had perfusion imaging, and most cases received their neuroimaging more than 72 hours after their symptom onset. Number two, the ischemic mismatch as defined by the adult criteria was present in children even as late as 23 hours from symptom onset. So, in summary, this study and others confirm the feasibility of performing perfusion imaging in the pediatric population, but there remains a necessary reluctance in adoption of perfusion imaging as part of the stroke protocols in pediatric centers. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        There are a number of concerns that we should keep in mind, including contrast-induced nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and gadolinium deposition in the brain, which are major concerns in the pediatric population, especially in those kids with impaired renal function or those requiring multiple scans over time. You have to also consider unfamiliarity with stroke imaging protocols, given that the majority of stroke-like presentations in children are non-ischemic in origin, in which case, perfusion imaging performance is of little or no value. And there should also be technical considerations, including uncertainty regarding the optimal bolus injection dose, rate, and scan duration of kids. Lots to learn, but still, studies like this represent the first step forward to further our understanding of the role of perfusion imaging in pediatric stroke. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Dural arteriovenous fistulas, or dural AVFs, are intracranial vascular malformations defined by abnormal communications within the dural leaf that's between meningeal arteries and dural venous sinuses and/or cortical veins. Dural AV fistulas represent approximately 10-15% of all intracranial vascular malformations and can remain asymptomatic or have a variety of neurological presentations, the most feared of which is intracranial hemorrhage. It is important to remember that much of the research on the topic is focused on high-risk features of dural AV fistulas associated with the risk of either initial or recurrent hemorrhage, things such as the pattern of venous drainage or location of the fistulas. But less is known about the clinical outcomes of these patients after they present with a bleed. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        The CONsortium for Dural arteriovenous fistula Outcomes Research, or CONDOR, Registry is an international multi-institutional database to study the outcomes of dural AV fistulas. In the current issue of the journal, in the study titled “Outcome Following Hemorrhage After Cranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistulae: Analysis of Multicenter CONDOR Registry,” Dr. Matthew Koch, from the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Illinois in Chicago, and colleagues used this registry to determine the morbidity and mortality of dural AV fistula–related intracranial hemorrhage. I'm joined today by the senior author of the study, Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani, to discuss this paper. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Dr. Amin-Hanjani needs no introduction to the Stroke readership. She's a Professor of Neurosurgery and Co-Director of Neurovascular Surgery at the University of Illinois. She's the past Chair of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons Cerebrovascular Section. She serves on multiple national and international cerebrovascular committees, including serving as the Chair of the Neurovascular Intervention Committee for the American Heart Association Stroke Council. Good morning to you, Sepi, and thank you for joining us on the podcast. Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          Good morning, Negar. I really appreciate the opportunity to have time to discuss this paper a little bit with you and the folks listening in today. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Great, Sepi, let's start off with discussing the prevalence of dural AV fistulas. In the current era of increased availability and accessibility of vascular imaging, how often are these malformations found? And importantly, what are the known predictors of so-called bad neurological behavior or intracranial hemorrhage in these fistulas? Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          So, I would say these are rare lesions, which is, I think, what makes it particularly useful sometimes to pay a little bit more attention to them because they're less frequently encountered, and so there's not as much thought about looking for these lesions when a patient presents with neurological symptoms or hemorrhage. And so I think highlighting it here is important. They are rare. They're probably, as you mentioned, only about 10-15% of all vascular malformations. The crude incidence is probably somewhere around 0.5 per 100,000. So, again, infrequently encountered. Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          Because of the nature of the lesion, they're not as easily, I would say, identified incidentally. Unlike AVMs that will show up on routine MRI or aneurysms that'll show up on routine MRA, fistulas may or may not be apparent because of their nature. They're fed by dural arterial feeders; the fistula itself is within the dural leaflets. They can have venous drainage or ectasia associated with them. So, the secondary phenomenon of the venous congestion may show up on MR, but the actual fistula may be hard to identify. And I think, in some ways, that's why we tend to see them a little bit less incidentally, at least in my own practice, in my own experience, than we do when they present with symptoms, either non-hemorrhagic or hemorrhagic symptoms. Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          There are some features of these fistulas that tend to predict if they're going to be bad actors, so to speak, if they're going to have those more aggressive symptoms of neurological dysfunction from venous congestion. Things like seizures, headaches, even dementia as a prolonged effect of venous congestion, or the most dreaded complications, in some ways, hemorrhage, which relates to if there is evidence of significant cortical venous reflux from the fistula itself. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Perfect. So this is a great start to get us now to the topic of the registry. What was the overall purpose of the CONDOR Registry? Please tell us a little bit about the patient population, specifically the population of your interest that you included in your study. Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          So, given the rarity of the condition, you find that in the literature, there's lots of kind of relatively smaller case series, and it's hard to make broader assessments of outcomes and treatments, etc., when you're looking at small retrospective series. So, the idea behind CONDOR, which was really launched by one of my colleagues, neurosurgeon Greg Zipfel at Wash. U. in St. Louis, was the idea of getting together a consortium of centers who have either previously published or have a particular interest in dural AV fistulas to collate our series and get a larger cohort of patients together that could be analyzed for just the kinds of interventions and outcomes that would be of interest in looking at a larger sample size. Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          So, the consortium now is up to, I think, 16 or 17 centers. The data that was collected and analyzed for the purposes of this particular manuscript came from 12 centers and was over a thousand patients. So, really a large cohort that allowed us to do a deeper dive analysis on a number of topics, including looking at folks who had presented with hemorrhage. There's a number of other studies that have come out of this registry, and the collaboration to form the registry has also been published as well. And it's retrospective data, but the hope is that CONDOR will eventually transform into a prospective database that will allow us to get even higher level data for this condition. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        So, perfect. Sepi, I was going to ask this question of whether the registry's ongoing, so thank you for clarifying that, but coming back to your paper. So, you included those patients who have bled. This was data up until 2017. And it's important to look at this number, 25% of patients with dural AV fistulas in the CONDOR Registry up until the time that you looked at the data. That's 1 in 4 patients presented with an intracranial hemorrhage. Is this an overall good estimate of the risk of hemorrhage for this malformation, especially when we're counseling patients on this? Or do you think this number is higher than routine practice and that it's just basically biased because it's a hospital-based registry? Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          I think both things are true in some ways, meaning that because this is a consortium of tertiary care centers, obviously there's a referral bias. Patients who are symptomatic or who have hemorrhage are more likely to be cared for in that setting. So, we are going to tend to see a higher proportion of the patients that are presenting with aggressive symptoms or with hemorrhage within this kind of cohort. Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          But along with that, similarly, if you look at the features of these fistulae, they're the ones that have the cortical venous reflux, the high-risk features. So, in as much as to say, "do 25% of all fistulas hemorrhage?" No, because presumably there's a lot of more benign fistulas, ones that aren't discovered or aren't worked up that are low risk for hemorrhage that don't show up. But within the paradigm of, again, the construct of a consortium where you're looking at centers who are really taking care of patients presumably presenting more actively with neurological symptoms, I think this proportion is fairly representative. And it, again, speaks to the fact that depending on the type of fistula and the features of the fistula, it's going to be more or less likely to present in an aggressive manner, hemorrhage being one of those presentations. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Perfect. So now let's talk about treatment modalities. A majority of patients in your study had undergone surgical intervention of the fistula. What was the most common intervention in this registry? And can you briefly tell us about the current treatment modalities, whether endovascular or surgical, that are available for dural fistulas? Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          So, I think what we found with this registry, and these were centers both within the U.S. and internationally, that the most common treatment paradigm is endovascular, so embolization of AV fistulas. And I think that very much reflects current practice because of the relative, I think, being not an endovascular person, I probably shouldn't comment on the ease or lack thereof, but the ability to access these fistulae endovascularly and use a number of agents, including glue or other embolization materials to obliterate them. So, we certainly found that in the series, embolization, either alone or in combination with other modalities, was the most prevalent. Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          Having said that, surgical intervention still has a significant role. Sometimes these fistulas can be difficult to access, depending on their supply or drainage endovascularly, and then the surgical option for obliterating them becomes important as well. And then, more rarely, lesions that are not amenable to either of those modalities can be treated with radiosurgery, although the concern there always with a hemorrhagic lesion is that the effect is not immediate, as opposed to embolization or surgery, where your goal is to obliterate the fistula and remove the source of hemorrhage, which is really the cortical venous reflux, immediately to make sure that there's not a risk for recurrence. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Thank you. This is a great review of AV fistulas. So, coming back to the paper now to recap, you had a highly selected group of AV fistulas that presented with an intercranial hemorrhage, the majority of which underwent embolization in this cohort. So, what were the outcomes? And let's start with just a brief overview of what outcomes are actually collected in your study, and what did you find? Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          Yeah, so we were interested to see, in kind of the current paradigm of management of these fistulae, when they present with hemorrhage. As you said, the great majority were treated. So, this is not a natural history study in the sense that it's not looking at untreated malformations after hemorrhage. It's looking at patients in the real world who pragmatically are going to present into tertiary centers with hemorrhage. What is their overall outcome with the current state of interventions that are available and with whatever primary injury is caused by the hemorrhage itself? Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          That's really what the study is looking at, is what is morbidity and mortality after hemorrhage from a lesion like this, and current management paradigm for these fistulas. And in that context, we were looking to see if there were predictors of worse or better outcome in that situation following the hemorrhage itself, and defining morbidity as Modified Rankin score of 3 or greater, with the idea of looking at independent versus dependent outcome, and also looking at mortality. Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          In other words, how severe are these patients in terms of their neurological outcomes if they do suffer hemorrhage event? We were able to define and look at a variety of potential predictors of outcome. The hemorrhage from dural AV fistulas can be either intraparenchymal intracranial hemorrhage or it can be subarachnoid, or it can be a combination thereof. There can be intraventricular hemorrhage, all depending on the venous congestion pattern related to the fistula. And the idea was, do any of those hemorrhage subtypes matter? Do the comorbidities of the patient matter? Do the specific angio-architecture or location of the fistula matter as relates to the outcome from the hemorrhage? Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Perfect. So, at 13% morbidity and 3.6% mortality associated with AV fistula hemorrhages in your study, tell us please about some of the independent factors associated with this primary outcome. Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          Yeah. So, after we analyzed the features that were available within the database, really age emerged as a predictor of poor outcome. And I think that's not surprising. That's very true for the full range of cerebrovascular conditions. If we thresholded at age 65, folks older than 65 had a twofold risk of a worse outcome. Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          The other things that we found, really a lot of the other features fell out on multivariate analysis, but the couple that remained strongly associated with poor outcome were folks who were on anticoagulants at the time of the hemorrhage. It was a small number within the cohort, but nonetheless, a very robust effect in that those folks did worse following their hemorrhage and certainly recurrent hemorrhage. Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          Now, a lot of these fistulae were treated, but in the instance where recurrent hemorrhage did occur prior to treatment, or if the patient had not undergone treatment, recurrent hemorrhage certainly had a really significant effect on worsening outcome as well. That age effect, as I said, has been seen in other vascular conditions. Anticoagulant use as a predictor of poor outcome at the time of hemorrhage has also been seen as a predictor of worse outcomes and other conditions like aneurysmal hemorrhage, things of that nature, and, similarly recurrent hemorrhage. So we're finding similar features as have been described for other cerebrovascular conditions as relates to hemorrhagic lesions as being important predictors of poor outcome. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Perfect. Very important features to keep in mind when we are dealing with patients with intracranial hemorrhage that are found to have these fistulas. So, things that you mentioned that I want to repeat just for our listeners were: age; recurrent hemorrhage that occurs if a patient is not treated and presented with a hemorrhage initially and added a recurrent one prior to receiving the appropriate therapy; and obviously, and not surprisingly as you mentioned, being on anticoagulants at the time of presentation with their hemorrhage. So, 1 in 6 patients, in summary, with dural AV fistula–associated hemorrhage in your study is dead or dependent follow-up. How does this morbidity and mortality, Sepi, compare to the outcomes from other vascular malformations, say, for instance, that of AVMs? Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          Yeah, I think that's one of the things we're particularly interested to kind of compare and contrast. Now, one end of the spectrum, you have aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. I think out of all hemorrhagic vascular lesions, that has the worst outcome. We know morbidity and mortality of that far exceeds 50%. For AVMs, it's been pretty well described even from prospective series that you can have 10-15% mortality and about 30% morbidity related to an AVM hemorrhage. Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          And we were interested to see if that was similar profile for fistulas. I think our results show that it's somewhat better than the AVM hemorrhage. The mortality is lower at about 3-4%, like you noted, and the morbidity is around 13% for survivors. But all in all, if you aggregate that, that is, as you say, a 1 in 6 chance of a very poor outcome. So, it's not trivial by any means and certainly much higher than the hemorrhagic consequences of something like cavernous malformations, where hemorrhages from cavernous malformations are rarely fatal. These dural AV fistula hemorrhages can be fatal and can result in long-term morbidity. I think that has implications in terms of how we think about risk-benefit profile of treatment for a malformation, an AV fistula that's discovered and has predictors that would indicate it's at high risk for hemorrhage. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Thank you very much, Sepi. I think you've already eloquently summarized all of this, but I want us to leave our listeners with your top two or three takeaway messages on the topic. Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          Thanks, Negar. So, I think the key takeaways that we took from looking at this analysis is that we now at least have some idea about what the morbidity and mortality related to dural AV fistula hemorrhage is. That 1 in 6 number, as you indicated, really benchmarks what morbidity and mortality for the condition is. Now, what's the relevance of that? I think, by inference, we can take this into practice in a couple of different ways. Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          First would be that if a patient presents with a fistula with high-risk features for hemorrhage, that knowing this morbidity and mortality related to hemorrhage certainly informs that discussion about treatment and certainly favors the idea of treating fistulas at high risk for hemorrhage based on cortical venous drainage early to prevent this morbidity and mortality from occurring. Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          Secondly, I think it argues towards making sure that there's a thorough workup done when a dural AV fistula is suspected, even if it's presenting with more benign symptoms like tinnitus, for example, or is discovered incidentally, and that workup really should be thorough enough to determine if there are high-risk features from this fistula. And that workup really entails catheter angiography because that's truly the way to determine if these cortical venous reflux and other features that are most associated with hemorrhage are present or not. So, I think those two key elements should be kept in mind. Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          And finally, given the rarity of the condition and because these are complex and heterogeneous lesions, I think it makes sense upon discovery or suspicion of a dural fistula to really refer these to tertiary centers that manage these conditions frequently enough to be able to determine those risk features and to offer the appropriate type of treatment for it, whether it be, as we discussed, mostly embolization or surgery. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani, congratulations on this work, a huge collaboration and a great addition to the existing literature of vascular malformation–related intracranial hemorrhage. It was a pleasure having you on the podcast today. Dr. Sepideh Amin-Hanjani:          Thank you so much, Negar, much appreciated. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        And this concludes our podcast for the October 2021 issue of Stroke. Please be sure to check out this month's table of contents for the full list of publications, including two articles published online in September simultaneous with their presentation at the European Stroke Conference, which appear in the October issue of Stroke. The first article is on clinical outcome of thrombolysis with tenecteplase, and the second one discusses the effects of fluoxetine on outcomes after acute stroke, results from EFFECTS randomized controlled trial. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Now, for a second year in a row, the European Stroke Conference was entirely online, bringing a wealth of knowledge and stroke expertise from all over the world to a completely virtual audience. Now, we hope to soon return to our good old times when we traveled for conferences, but let's take a moment and think about the magnitude of this virtual accomplishment, the incredible role that technology plays in our abilities to do research and provide healthcare. And we owe this to the men and women that pioneered the development and the ever-growing fast-paced progress of computer sciences. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Ten years ago in October, the world lost one such pioneer. Steve Jobs, the father of mobile technology and digital revolution, is recognized not just for his technical creations but also for his way of life, his incredible mind that led to the seemingly utopian ideas for how things should be. In a powerful commencement speech he delivered at Stanford University a few years before his death, he talked about his life experiences, the power of mind, and the power that lies in doing every part of one's work with absolute perfection and love. So, in honor of his genius and the legacy he left behind, we end our October podcast with his parting words of wisdom to the graduating class of 2005: "Stay hungry, stay foolish." And, as always, stay alert with Stroke Alert. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2021. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, visit AHAjournals.org.

In Focus by The Hindu
Does the GHI ranking reflect India's hunger and nutrition levels? | In Focus

In Focus by The Hindu

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 26:13


The Global Hunger Index (GHI) 2021, published last week by Concern Worldwide, an Irish aid agency, and Welt Hunger Hilfe, a German non-profit, has ranked India at 101 out of 116 countries, in its assessment of how successful countries have been in combating hunger. Only 15 countries – many of them marked by violent strife – have performed worse than India. The government of India has been quick to dismiss this report as “devoid of ground reality and facts”. It has also questioned the methodology used by the GHI to assess the prevalence of hunger. The GHI researchers have defended their methodology, stating that it follows international norms. What exactly does the GHI report say about India? Are we in the midst of a major hunger crisis? How have the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change impacted hunger and nutrition levels in India? We explore these questions in detail in this episode. Guest: Reetika Khera, Associate Professor of Economics at IIT, Delhi. Host: G. Sampath, Social Affairs Editor, The Hindu

The Physical Performance Show
294: Expert Edition: Assoc. Professor Max Paquette: Running Surface Interactions

The Physical Performance Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 58:57


Max Paquette is an accomplished Academic and Applied Scientist currently serving as an Associate Professor of the Human Performance Centre at the University of Memphis and the Director of the Musculoskeletal Analysis Laboratory. Max's primary research interests have focused on the effects of different footwear, fatigue repetition, altered techniques and training interventions for injury prevention and performance improvement for runners. Alongside Max's academic work he's also a high endurance running coach including the coaching role with his Middle Distance Professional Runner Wife, Lauren. Show Sponsor: POLAR Polar are a sports technology company who build world class heart rate monitors and GPS watches for people who take their health, fitness and sports performance seriously. Polar have an incredible heritage. Headquartered in Finland they have been the global driving force behind scientific wearables for over 40 years. They are the pioneers in and world leaders in heart rate measurement technology. Their products provide you with 24/7 monitoring to enable you to plan better, train smarter, recover fully … so you can be at your physical best. Coming from the heart of the Nordics, they have the experience, insight, and history of quality, design and innovation which is unparalleled. Worn by some of the best athletes on the planet, we're very excited to have Polar as a partner here so you can also access their heart rate monitors, watches and training platform. As a starting bonus, the team at Polar are offering 15% off. If it's time for you to check out a new heart rate monitor or watch to help improve your performance, head across to Polar.com and use the code TPPS on selected products Join the The Physical Performance Show LEARNINGS membership through weekly podcasts | Patreon If you enjoyed this episode of The Physical Performance Show please hit SUBSCRIBE for to ensure you are one of the first to future episodes. Jump over to POGO Physio - www.pogophysio.com.au for more details Follow @Brad_Beer Instagram & Twitter The Physical Performance Show: Facebook, Instagram, & Twitter (@tppshow1) Please direct any questions, comments, and feedback to the above social media handles.

Wharton Business Radio Highlights
Wharton Professor on Why Insider Trading is 'Alive & Well' on Wall Street

Wharton Business Radio Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 10:09


Daniel Taylor, Associate Professor of Accounting at the Wharton School, and Faculty Director of its Forensic Analytics Lab, talks about his new research in insider trading and if the stock market really is rigged. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Tides of History
Interview with Shane Miller and Jessi Halligan on the White Sands footprints

Tides of History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 50:55


The discovery of 21,000-23,000-year-old human footprints at White Sands National Park in New Mexico is one of the most exciting developments in the study of the deep past in recent years. But do these footprints hold up to real scrutiny? And if they're real, how do they change our understanding of the first people in the Americas? I asked two experts on the earliest inhabitants of the Americas what they thought of this incredible new evidence: Dr. Jessi Halligan, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Florida State University, and Dr. Shane Miller, Associate Professor of Anthropology at Mississippi State University. Both have extensive experience on the topic, and help us understand precisely what these footprints tell us about the human past in North and South America.Patrick's book is now available! Get The Verge: Reformation, Renaissance, and Forty Years that Shook the World in hardcopy, ebook, or audiobook (read by Patrick) here.Listen to new episodes 1 week early, to exclusive seasons 1 and 2, and to all episodes ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App https://wondery.app.link/tidesofhistory.Support us by supporting our sponsors!KEEPS - If you're ready to take action and prevent hair loss, go to keeps.com/TIDES to receive your first month of treatment for free. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Curiosity Hour Podcast
Episode 202 - Erin A. Cech, PhD (The Curiosity Hour Podcast by Dan Sterenchuk and Tommy Estlund)

The Curiosity Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 51:04


Episode 202 Professor Erin A. Cech, PhD. Dan Sterenchuk and Tommy Estlund are honored to have as our guest, Professor Erin A. Cech, PhD. Erin A. Cech is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Associate Professor by courtesy in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Cech joined the University of Michigan in 2016. Before coming to UM, she was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University and was on faculty at Rice University. She earned her Ph.D. in Sociology in 2011 from the University of California, San Diego and undergraduate degrees in Electrical Engineering and Sociology from Montana State University. Cech's research examines cultural mechanisms of inequality reproduction--specifically, how inequality is reproduced through processes that are not overtly discriminatory or coercive, but rather those that are built into seemingly innocuous cultural beliefs and practices. She investigates this puzzle through three avenues of research. First, she uses quantitative and qualitative approaches to examine inequality in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) professions--specifically, the recruitment and retention of women, LGBT, and under-represented racial/ethnic minority students and practitioners and the role of professional cultures in this inequality. Second, Cech examines how cultural definitions of “good work” and “good workers” can anchor inequality in the workforce. For example, she examines the role of the “passion principle” in the reproduction of occupational inequalities: how seemingly voluntary and self-expressive career decisions help reproduce processes like occupational sex segregation. Finally, she studies how cultural understandings of the extent and origin of inequality help to uphold unequal social structures. Cech's research is funded by multiple grants from the National Science Foundation. She is a member of the editorial board of the American Journal of Sociology and her research has been cited in The New York Times, Harvard Business Review, Time, The Washington Post, The Guardian, Forbes, Chronicle of Higher Education and the news sections of Science and Nature. Cech's first book, The Trouble with Passion: How Searching for Fulfilment at Work Fosters Inequality (University of California Press) is out Nov 9th, but it is available for preorder at the link below, or through Barnes & Noble, Amazon, etc. https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520303232/the-trouble-with-passion Professor Cech's website: https://erinacech.com has information about her other research and links to talks and presentations. Note: Guests create their own bio description for each episode. Tommy and Dan requested and were provided with a review copy of the book in preparation for interviewing Professor Cech. Thank you to the publisher and Professor Cech for providing us with these review copies! The Curiosity Hour Podcast is hosted and produced by Dan Sterenchuk and Tommy Estlund. The Curiosity Hour Podcast is listener supported! The easiest way to donate is via the Venmo app and you can donate to (at symbol) CuriosityHour (Download app here: venmo.com) The Curiosity Hour Podcast is available free on 13 platforms: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, Audible, Soundcloud, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Stitcher, Podbean, PlayerFM, Castbox, and Pocket Casts. Disclaimers: The Curiosity Hour Podcast may contain content not suitable for all audiences. Listener discretion advised. The views and opinions expressed by the guests on this podcast are solely those of the guest(s). These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of The Curiosity Hour Podcast. This podcast may contain explicit language. The Public Service Announcement near the end of the episode solely represents the views of Tommy and Dan and not our guests or our listeners.

White Coat Story
Dr. Jamie Coleman's White Coat Story

White Coat Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 31:51


Dr. Jamie Coleman is an acute care surgeon, Associate Professor of Surgery and Vice-Chair in the Department of Surgery at the University of Louisville. As an acute care surgeon, she specializes in trauma, emergency general surgery and surgical critical care. She completed her general surgery residency in Chicago at Cook County Hospital and Rush University and her trauma and surgical critical care fellowship in Atlanta at Grady Memorial Hospital with Emory University. Her current clinical research is focused on the physiologic impact of sleep deprivation, stress, and burnout amongst surgeons. She is the PI for the SuPer Trial (Surgeon Performance Trial), the largest study of continuous physiologic monitoring of acute care surgeons. Her groundbreaking work in sleep deprivation and stress in physicians has led to an entire new field of research. She is also a medical media expert, public speaker, avid writer and blogger. She, and her work, have been featured in Forbes, Huffington Post, Glamour magazine, and US News and World Report. In this podcast Dr. Coleman talks about her journey of becoming a surgeon, the importance of decompression and some methods that she herself uses, the influences of her family and background on her current path, waste within the medical industry, and advice to children hoping to join the medical field. White Coat Story is a podcast series for school students to gain first-person insights into teh practice of medicine, and what it takes to get there.

The Fisheries Podcast
145 - Girls Who Fish: Bringing girls and women to fisheries in Canada, Japan and beyond with Dr. Yinji Li

The Fisheries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 29:58


On this new episode of The Fisheries Podcast, co-host Mirella Leis speaks with guest Dr. Yinji Li about the launch of Girls Who Fish Japan, a sister program to Girls Who Fish Canada that aims to bring girls and women into fisheries! Main point: Women's participation is essential for securing small-scale fisheries sustainability. Dr. Yinji Li is a marine social scientist with a Master's in Fisheries Science and a Ph.D. in Marine Science from the Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology in Japan. She is currently an Associate Professor in the School of Marine Science and Technology at Tokai University. Her research interests and expertise lie in small-scale fisheries in Northeast Asian regions centered on Japan. Li is also the Too Big To Ignore (TBTI) Japan Research Network coordinator and the Japan country coordinator of the Vulnerability to Viability Global Partnership (V2V) project and a member of the board of trustees of International Pole and Line Foundation (IPNLF).  To learn more about Dr. Yinji Li's projects and get in touch, check out the Too Big To Ignore Japan website http://toobigtoignore.net/tbti-japan/ and Twitter https://twitter.com/TBTI_Japan ___________________________________________________________________________ Get in touch with us! Want to be on the show? Contact co-host Mirella Leis on Twitter @mirellaleis. The Fisheries Podcast is on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook @FisheriesPod. Support the show Become a Patron of the Fisheries Podcast Buy podcast merch Acknowledgements Thanks as always to Andrew Gialanella for the fantastic music. Disclaimer The Fisheries Podcast is a completely independent podcast, not affiliated with a larger organization or entity. Reference to any specific product or entity does not constitute an endorsement or recommendation by the podcast. The views expressed by guests are their own and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Views and opinions expressed by the hosts are those of that individual and do not necessarily reflect the view of any entity with with those individuals are affiliated in other capacities (such as employers). 

Dare to know! | Philosophy Podcast
Thinking Through Food: A Philosophical Introduction | Alexandra Plakias | EP. 6 Food Series

Dare to know! | Philosophy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 76:20


This conversation is part of the series 'The Philosophy, Science, & Aesthetics of Food' ('Dare to know!' Philosophy Podcast). Today we are joined by Alexandra Plakias. Alexandra Plakias is the Associate Professor of Philosophy at Hamilton College. Her research focuses on metaethics and moral psychology: the role of disgust in moral judgment; moral disagreement and objectivity; the relevance of empirical psychology to metaethics. She also works on food and philosophy, which is the topic of today's discussion.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
Advances In Therapeutic Uses Of Medical Marijuana with Dr. Mikhail Kogan

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 80:19


This episode is sponsored by Even, BiOptimizers, and Athletic GreensThere is a lot of noise around medicinal marijuana; so much so that just the thought of trying it might be overwhelming. There are actually many proven benefits when it's used the right way, some of which I've experienced myself. When I was recovering from mold toxicity combined with C. diff and a slew of other factors that ruined my gut, I was so nauseous that I couldn't eat and was rapidly losing weight. None of the anti-nausea medications I tried were working, but marijuana did. Now, there are a lot of nuances to its use and much more research to be done. To understand what the data currently shows us on medicinal cannabis and where someone might start if they're curious, I'm excited to sit down with an expert on the topic, Dr. Mikhail “Misha” Kogan. Dr. Kogan is the medical director of the George Washington University Center for Integrative Medicine, and Associate Professor of Medicine at the George Washington University School of Medicine. He has recommended medical marijuana to thousands of patients and is a frequent lecturer on medical cannabis to professional audiences across the nation.This episode is brought to you by Even, BiOptimizers, and Athletic Greens.Even provides personalized nutrition for medication users and right now, you can schedule a complimentary consult with an Even expert to figure out the right nutrient companion for you. Plus, you can get 20% off your first order with the code DRMARK20 here.You can try BiOptimizers Magnesium Breakthrough for 10% off by using the code HYMAN10 here. For a limited time, BiOptimizers is also giving away free bottles of their bestselling products P3OM and Masszymes with select purchases. Athletic Greens is offering 10 free travel packs of AG1 with your first purchase here. In this episode (audio version/Apple Subscriber version): My experience using marijuana therapeutically (6:27/2:25)Evidence-based research showing the benefits of medical marijuana (11:43/8:02)How medical marijuana works in the body (14:40/10:56)Using medical marijuana for pain, nausea, Multiple Sclerosis, and insomnia (23:06/19:26)Inconsistencies in regulation and access to cannabis (29:31/25:09)Using cannabis to treat skin issues as well as for digestive issues (34:47/28:44)Considerations for selecting the best type and administration route of cannabis products (46:01/41:04)Recommendations for treating sleep issues and insomnia (56:57/51:26)Cannabis and Covid-19 (1:01:45/56:14)Quality assurance of medical cannabis products (1:11:20/1:05:46)Get a copy of Dr. Kogan's book, Medical Marijuana: Dr. Kogan's Evidence-Based Guide to the Health Benefits of Cannabis and CBD here. Mentioned in this episode: Leafly | Weedmaps | NORML See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

New Books Network
Eunice Blavascunas, "Foresters, Borders, and Bark Beetles: The Future of Europe's Last Primeval Forest" (Indiana UP, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 59:37


In Foresters, Borders, and Bark Beetles: The Future of Europe's Last Primeval Forest (Indiana University Press, 2020), Eunice Blavascunas provides an intimate ethnographic account of Białowieża, Europe's last primeval forest. At Poland's easternmost border with Belarus, the deep past of ancient oaks, woodland bison, and thousands of species of insects and fungi collides with authoritarian and communist histories. Foresters, biologists, environmentalists, and locals project the ancient Białowieża Forest as a series of competing icons in struggles over memory, land, and economy, which are also struggles about whether to log or preserve the woodland; whether and how to celebrate the mixed ethnic Polish/Belarusian peasant past; and whether to align this eastern outpost with ultra-right Polish politics, neighboring Belarus, or the European Union. Drawing on more than twenty years of research, Blavascunas untangles complex conflicts between protection and use by examining which forest pasts are celebrated, which fester, and which have been altered in the tumultuous decades following the collapse of communism. Piotr H. Kosicki is Associate Professor of History at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the author of Catholics on the Barricades (Yale, 2018) and editor, among others, of Political Exile in the Global Twentieth Century (with Wolfram Kaiser). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Eunice Blavascunas, "Foresters, Borders, and Bark Beetles: The Future of Europe's Last Primeval Forest" (Indiana UP, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 59:37


In Foresters, Borders, and Bark Beetles: The Future of Europe's Last Primeval Forest (Indiana University Press, 2020), Eunice Blavascunas provides an intimate ethnographic account of Białowieża, Europe's last primeval forest. At Poland's easternmost border with Belarus, the deep past of ancient oaks, woodland bison, and thousands of species of insects and fungi collides with authoritarian and communist histories. Foresters, biologists, environmentalists, and locals project the ancient Białowieża Forest as a series of competing icons in struggles over memory, land, and economy, which are also struggles about whether to log or preserve the woodland; whether and how to celebrate the mixed ethnic Polish/Belarusian peasant past; and whether to align this eastern outpost with ultra-right Polish politics, neighboring Belarus, or the European Union. Drawing on more than twenty years of research, Blavascunas untangles complex conflicts between protection and use by examining which forest pasts are celebrated, which fester, and which have been altered in the tumultuous decades following the collapse of communism. Piotr H. Kosicki is Associate Professor of History at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the author of Catholics on the Barricades (Yale, 2018) and editor, among others, of Political Exile in the Global Twentieth Century (with Wolfram Kaiser). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Environmental Studies
Eunice Blavascunas, "Foresters, Borders, and Bark Beetles: The Future of Europe's Last Primeval Forest" (Indiana UP, 2020)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 59:37


In Foresters, Borders, and Bark Beetles: The Future of Europe's Last Primeval Forest (Indiana University Press, 2020), Eunice Blavascunas provides an intimate ethnographic account of Białowieża, Europe's last primeval forest. At Poland's easternmost border with Belarus, the deep past of ancient oaks, woodland bison, and thousands of species of insects and fungi collides with authoritarian and communist histories. Foresters, biologists, environmentalists, and locals project the ancient Białowieża Forest as a series of competing icons in struggles over memory, land, and economy, which are also struggles about whether to log or preserve the woodland; whether and how to celebrate the mixed ethnic Polish/Belarusian peasant past; and whether to align this eastern outpost with ultra-right Polish politics, neighboring Belarus, or the European Union. Drawing on more than twenty years of research, Blavascunas untangles complex conflicts between protection and use by examining which forest pasts are celebrated, which fester, and which have been altered in the tumultuous decades following the collapse of communism. Piotr H. Kosicki is Associate Professor of History at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the author of Catholics on the Barricades (Yale, 2018) and editor, among others, of Political Exile in the Global Twentieth Century (with Wolfram Kaiser). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

The Thesis Review
[34] Sasha Rush - Lagrangian Relaxation for Natural Language Decoding

The Thesis Review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 68:12


Sasha Rush is an Associate Professor at Cornell Tech and researcher at Hugging Face. His research focuses on building NLP systems that are safe, fast, and controllable. Sasha's PhD thesis is titled, "Lagrangian Relaxation for Natural Language Decoding", which he completed in 2014 at MIT. We talk about his work in the thesis on decoding in NLP, how it connects with today, and many interesting topics along the way such as the role of engineering in machine learning, breadth vs. depth, and more. - Episode notes: https://cs.nyu.edu/~welleck/episode34.html - Follow the Thesis Review (@thesisreview) and Sean Welleck (@wellecks) on Twitter - Find out more info about the show at https://cs.nyu.edu/~welleck/podcast.html - Support The Thesis Review at www.patreon.com/thesisreview or www.buymeacoffee.com/thesisreview

All About Blockchain
Blockchain and Cryptocurrency Education and Adoption | Ariel Zetlin-Jones

All About Blockchain

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 30:10


How do you engage students to brainstorm ideas about how they might use a cryptocurrency on campus? Ariel Zetlin-Jones, Associate Professor of Economics at the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University, has been teaching courses on blockchain like “Developing Blockchain Use Cases”.  He engages all background of students to discover why a Distributed Ledger Technology might be an improved solution over what currently exists today. In this episode you can learn about leading examples of developing applications for the CMU Coin.

30 Brave Minutes
The Evolution of Comics

30 Brave Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 44:40


We are delighted to share with you our most recent podcast episode, "The Evolution of Comics". This episode has something for everyone from the comic book novice to the connoisseur. We are joined by three UNCP faculty members who each have their own professional connection to the world of comics. Dr. Terence Dollard is a Professor in our Mass Communication department as well as the creator of a show called Comic Culture that is showcased on the UNC-TV North Carolina Channel. Dr. Kevin Freeman is an Associate Professor in the Political Science and Public Administration program and is former president of a publisher called Action Lab Comics. Finally, Dr. Robert Epps is the Martha Beach Endowed Professor in our Art Department, and he also works as a freelance color artist. In today's episode, we cover everything from the process of creating a comic to marvel to cosplay. The first half of the episode serves as an excellent education piece for those who may not be as familiar with the world of comics whereas the second half references content and culture changes that will be especially meaningful to those who are well-versed in the comic world. Enjoy!  

Charting Pediatrics
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in Pediatrics with Shikha Sundaram, MD (S5:E9)

Charting Pediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 32:21


Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the United States, affecting almost 10 percent of all children. Sometimes referred to as "fatty liver disease," it is actually a range of diseases that all begin when excess fat gets deposited in the liver, most significantly impacting our obese patients. In today's episode we are joined by guest Shikha Sundaram, MD to discuss the clinical presentation and treatment of NAFLD, including how primary care providers can provide critical support to families making significant lifestyle changes as part of their treatment. Dr. Sundaram is the Medical Director of the Pediatric Liver Transplant Program at Children's Hospital Colorado and is Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.   Do you have thoughts about today's episode or suggestions for a future topic? Write to us, chartingpediatrics@childrenscolorado.org 

Talks On Psychoanalysis
Patricia O‘Donnell: “Of Flies and Spiders - Gradiva and Louise Bourgeois”.

Talks On Psychoanalysis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 42:57


In this episode we come back to deal with Psychoanalysis and Art, through the work of Louise Bourgeois and a small novel very dear to psychoanalysis: "The Gradiva (a Pompeian fantasy)”, written by W. Jensen in 1903. Patricia O'Donnell presents her paper titled: “Of flies and spiders - Gradiva and Louise Bourgeois" and reports that a particular comment inside the book plus the added role of flies with their multiple meanings in the novel were the triggers for  thinking  about the French artist.  "Maman", for instance, the gigantic sculpture of a spider in steel and marble, is the paradigm of a theme repeatedly evoked in the writings and works of the artist, who gave these attractive and fearsome creatures a variety of interpretations. This presentation, which explores and interweaves some biographical information, such as her mourning, the discovery of the difference between the sexes, her writings, her sculpture "Arch of Hysteria”, is an attempt to give us a glimpse into an artistic universe, which expands like a spider's web. The research into how she constructed the phantasmagoria around the spider constituted a psychoanalytical aesthetic experience with a body of work that invokes a past that travels through time in the face of an unknown future. Perhaps the spider as an apotropaic and talismanic figure is a defence against the fantasies of death and vulnerability that are so poignant in today's world.   Patricia O'Donnell Psychiatrist and Psychoanalyst. Full Member and Training Analyst of the Argentine Psychoanalytic Association (APA). Member of the International Psychoanalytic Association. Coordinator of the APA Culture Commission (2017 - 2020). Associate Professor at the Department of Mental Health at the Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martín  where she created and directed the Free Expression Workshop (2016 - 2020). She has begun psychoanalytic research into naïve art. She started her training in Psychoanalysis and Art with Dr. María Cristina Melgar, who together with Dr. Eugenio López de Gomara, were the pioneers, in 1960, of research into psychotic art in Argentina. She gave lectures and training sessions to the guides for the exhibition: “Louise Bourgeois. The return of the repressed” at the Department of Education in the Proa Foundation (2011). She has presented papers at national and international conferences; and publications, workshops and lectures on psychoanalytic art research in different academic fields. She was shortlisted as a finalist for the Lucian Freud Award, 2014 and is Secretary of the Redes Solidarias Foundation.   She is the co-author of the books: “The New. Lucian Freud. A psychoanalytical reflection on the enigma of the body and the world".   “Psychoanalysis and Art. From the psychoanalytic method to the encounter with the enigmatic in the visual arts”. “Topica. Literature and Cinema. Encounters with Psychoanalysis: Louise Bourgeois and the Arch of Hysteria”. “Women's Forum: Lee Miller”.   Link to the paper https://docs.google.com/document/d/1GOyFfPvc9VEchdeuEcjSBbWWQu-tJuGP/edit?usp=sharing&ouid=112457875385152358388&rtpof=true&sd=true   This episode is available also in Spanish    

Where We Live
With outcry over critical race theory, we hear from Connecticut educators and students

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 49:00


With a General Election just around the corner, the so-called “sleepy” town of Guilford has made national headlines, gripped by a polarizing debate over what's being taught in schools. Guilford High School English Chair George Cooksey and Superintendent Paul Freeman explain that while critical race theory is not itself taught in the K-12 environment in Guilford, “dimension” and diversity of source material is still a priority. Plus, a new Black and Latino Studies elective is rolling out in Connecticut high schools next fall, following the first mandate of its kind in the country. A Windsor High School teacher and student who are piloting the course weigh in. How are educators and curricula adapting to reflect our world? And how can they be caught in the political crossfire? Dr. Paul Freeman - Superintendent, Guilford Public Schools George Cooksey - English Chair, Guilford High School Daisha Brabham - Windsor High School Social Studies Teacher Shakila Campbell - Windsor High School Student Dr. Saran Stewart - Associate Professor of Higher Education and Student Affairs; Director of Global Education at UConn's Neag School of Education Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Innovators
The Challenged Authority of Science: Research, Public Health & Public Policy (with Dr. David Allison, Dean and Provost Professor at the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington)

Innovators

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 48:10


Dr. David Allison – Dean of the School of Public Health at Indiana University Bloomington – joins Innovators to talk about what perceptions and trust are like today in fields like research, public health, and public safety, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Allison became Dean and Provost Professor at the Indiana University-Bloomington School of Public Health in 2017. Prior to assuming his current role as Dean, he served as Distinguished Professor, Quetelet Endowed Professor, and Director of the NIH-funded Nutrition Obesity Research Center (NORC) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Dr. Allison received his Ph.D. from Hofstra University in 1990. He then completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a second post-doctoral fellowship at the NIH-funded New York Obesity Research Center at St. Luke's/Roosevelt Hospital Center. He was a research scientist at the NY Obesity Research Center and Associate Professor of Medical Psychology at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons until 2001.  Innovators is a podcast production of Harris Search.  *The views and opinions shared by the guests on Innovators do not necessarily reflect the views of the interviewee's institution or organization.*

Writ Large
Ulysses

Writ Large

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 33:27


Perhaps more than any other book, Ulysses has the reputation of being difficult—it is dense, allusive, and often hard to follow. But Joyce wasn't trying to be challenging for its own sake, or because he sadistically wanted to punish future students assigned his book. Quite the contrary. With Ulysses, Joyce wanted to explore and convey what it is to be alive. And just like his book, life is difficult and confusing, but also thrilling and joyful.  Catherine Flynn is Associate Professor, Affiliate of the Program in Critical Theory, Director of Berkeley Connect in English, and Director of Irish Studies at the University of California Berkeley. She is the author of James Joyce and the Matter of Paris. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod.

Bring It In
#60: Jamie McCallum — Award-Winning Sociologist, Filmmaker, Activist, and Author of “Worked Over: How Round-the-Clock Work is Killing the American Dream”

Bring It In

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 21:46


The majority of working Americans today have temporary, unstable, low paying jobs. When a monthly job report flaunts how many ‘new jobs' have been created, very often it's these types of jobs. This discrepancy leaves a vast population in a state of constant poverty, stress, and in no exaggeration, life threatening circumstances. This is the crux of our guest, Jamie McCallum's work. After years teaching at the University of New York, Jamie moved into a position at Middlebury College as an Associate Professor on Sociology, focusing on labor, politics, and globalization. His latest book “Worked Over: How Round-the-Clock Work is Killing the American Dream,” hones in on those most overworked, underpaid, and vulnerable, from the Amazon warehouses to Rust Belt factories to California's gig economy. It's the hours of low-wage workers that are the most the most subject to crises. These are the exact people that in the midst of the pandemic, we were calling heroes, and now, many employers are calling them ‘lazy.' How does that make sense? We can't have a healthy society, we can't stand for every worker, unless we take into account the health, safety, and wellbeing of every worker. This is an episode that's essential to listen to, so with that...let's bring it in!

Today with Claire Byrne
Debate: Will Antigen Tests Help Us Reopen?

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 23:18


Ray Walley, North Dublin GP and an Associate Professor in General Practice in UCD, Paul Moyna, Professor of Immunology, Maynooth University, Philip Ryan, Political Editor of the Irish Independent

The Big Story
Why has Covid's fourth wave been so different across Canada?

The Big Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 22:26


Much of the Atlantic bubble is intact, but in New Brunswick, cases are spiking. Ontario has mostly escaped unscathed so far, while Saskatchewan and Alberta grapple with a wave worse than the first three. Is this evidence of the pandemic diverging regionally across Canada, or just a more infectious variant that can better find holes that existed the entire time?What have we learned from previous waves that we're employing now? What are we still finding out? And, most importantly, will this be Covid's last wave in Canada?GUEST: Dr. Raywat Deonandan, Global Health Epidemiologist and Associate Professor with the Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences at the University of Ottawa.

Dan Snow's History Hit
How Alcohol Built the British Empire

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 30:42


During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries as the British Empire expanded across the globe an almost ubiquitous but often underappreciated commodity went with it; alcohol. The distillation, sale and drinking of booze played an essential role in trade, seafaring and colonial societies. But for many indigenous communities this came at a terrible price as, previously unfamiliar, distilled spirits wreaked havoc on their communities and reinforced the racial ideologies that legitimised imperialism. It is a more complicated story than this though and for some indigenous communities, alcohol was not ruinous instead becoming a vital source of income that enabled them to survive and in some instances flourish. For this episode, Dan is joined by Dr Deborah Toner, Associate Professor of History at the University of Leicester and author of Alcohol in the Age of Industry, Empire, and War, to uncover the central role that alcohol played in creating the British Empire. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio
'One word? Horrible.' The pre-pandemic causes of the child care crisis and how it gets fixed

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 38:58


Child care is in crisis in the US. There's not enough of it, it's incredibly expensive, and the ripple effects of this crisis are significant, even extending to keeping parents out of the labor pool. So how bad is the problem really? How much of a factor has the pandemic been in this crisis? And most importantly, how do we start to address and fix the situation? Dr. Tom Conway, Chairperson of the Teacher Education Department and Associate Professor at Cabrini University breaks down the root causes of the problem, why it's so bad in the US, and what can be done to fix it. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Steve Gruber Show
Khalil Habib, National Popular Vote in Michigan.

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 11:00


Khalil Habib is an Associate Professor of Politics at Hillsdale College. NPV in Michigan.

Foodie Pharmacology
Probiotics, Gut Health, and the Microbiome with Dr. Rheinallt Jones

Foodie Pharmacology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 61:12


The science behind how the gut microbiome affects our health rapidly evolving with new tools that enable scientists to not only sequence the complex mixtures of microbes in the gut, but also with new laboratory models that enable the study of single microbes in otherwise sterile systems. This week, I welcome an expert in the field of gut microbiome studies, Dr. Rheinallt Jones, to the show. He's an Associate Professor at the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition of the Department of Pediatrics and founder and director of the Emory Gnotobiotic Core. If you've had deep questions about the science of how probiotics and the gut microbiome influences human health, this is the episode for you!  #probiotics #microbiome #GutHealth #PlantHunter #ThePlantHunter

Managing Leadership Anxiety: Yours and Theirs
S7E9 - Heather Thompson Day

Managing Leadership Anxiety: Yours and Theirs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 50:39


Dr. Heather Thompson Day is an interdenominational speaker and has been a contributor for Religion News Service, Christianity Today, Newsweek and the Barna Group. She is also an Associate Professor of Communication at Andrews University and host of Viral Jesus, a podcast with Christianity Today. She is passionate about supporting women, and runs an online community called I'm That Wife which has over 200k followers.  Heather's writing has been featured on outlets like the Today Show, and the National Communication Association. She has been interviewed by BBC Radio Live and has been featured in Forbes.  She believes her calling is to stand in the gaps of our churches for young people. She is the author of 7 books; including It's Not Your Turn, and Confessions of a Christian Wife. She resides in Michigan, with her husband, Seth Day, and their three children, London, Hudson, and Sawyer Day.

Behind The Knife: The Surgery Podcast
Journal Review in Hepatopancreaticobiliary Surgery: Surgical Outcomes of the SWOG S1505 Trial

Behind The Knife: The Surgery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 62:09


Journal Review in HPB – Surgical Outcomes of the SWOG S1505 Trial Description: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy remains a controversial topic for resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This randomized trial examines surgical and clinical outcomes from peri-operative regimens, mFOLFIRNOX and gem-Abraxane. The HPB Behind the Knife team dives into the specifics of the trial design and findings, as well as sits down with the Principal Investigator Dr. Syed Ahmad himself to ask about the behind-the-scenes decision-making and the investigations yet to come.  Links to Papers Reviewed in this Episode Surgical Outcome Results from SWOG S1505: A Randomized Clinical Trial of mFOLFIRINOX Versus Gemcitabine/Nab-paclitaxel for Perioperative Treatment of Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Ann Surg. 2020 Sep;272(3):481-486 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32740235/ Efficacy of Periopertive Chemotherapy for Resectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A Phase 2 Randomized Clinical Trial JAMA Oncol. 2021 Mar;7(3):421-427 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33475684/  Guest:  Syed Ahmad, MD (@SyedAAhmad5) is a Professor of Surgery and Chief of the Division of Surgical Oncology at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, and the Director of the UC Cancer Center. He is the surgical chair of SWOG, and a co-Principal Investigator of the SWOG S1505 study in addition to numerous other national trials for pancreatic cancer. Hosts: Timothy Vreeland, MD, FACS (@vreelant) is an Assistant Professor of Surgery at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences and Surgical Oncologist at Brooke Army Medical Center Daniel Nelson, DO, FACS (@usarmydoc24) is an Associate Professor of Surgery at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences and Surgical Oncologist at William Beaumont Army Medical Center Connor Chick, MD (@connor_chick) is a PGY-4 General Surgery resident at Brooke Army Medical Center Lexy (Alexandra) Adams, MD, MPH (@lexyadams16) is a PGY-3 General Surgery resident at Brooke Army Medical Center Other References from this Episode FOLFIRINOX or Gemcitabine as Adjuvant Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer N Engl J Med. 2018 Dec 20;379:2395-2406 https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1809775 APACT: phase III, multicenter, international, open-label, randomized trial of adjuvant nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine (nab-P/G) vs gemcitabine (G) for surgically resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma J Clin Oncol. 2019 May 20;37:no. 15 suppl:4000. https://ascopubs.org/doi/10.1200/JCO.2019.37.15_suppl.4000 Operative Standards in Cancer Surgery: Pancreatoduodenectomy: Superior Mesenteric Artery Dissection American College of Surgeons. 2020 Jun 18. https://www.facs.org/quality-programs/cancer/acs-crp/oscs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bs8xlCr5XyE The AHPBA Podcast  The Americas Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-ahpba-podcast/id1501441845   Please visit behindtheknife.org to access other high-yield surgical education podcasts, videos and more.  

Breaking Money Silence®
Look for Frogs When Negotiating | Episode 132

Breaking Money Silence®

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 32:23


Watch for Frogs When Negotiating Episode 132 The sixth episode of the Breaking Money Silence® Podcast Series on Negotiating has just been published. This week I interviewed Julian Portilla, Associate Professor and Director of Mediation & Dialogue Center at Champlain College. He shares his insights into consensus building with large groups around complex issues and gives advice on how to be an effective negotiator.  Here are 5 things you will learn by listening to this episode: How the prisoner's dilemma can be applied to the negotiating process The importance of “frogs” when consensus-building in groups Simple rules for more successful negotiation conversations Three traits every good negotiator must possess The value of flexibility in landing a good deal Want to connect with Julian? Here's how:  Meet Julian Portilla Mediation Center Website Social: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn Here are some resources that were mentioned during the podcast:  The Evolution of Cooperation by Robert Axelrod  The Prisoner's Dilemma on YouTube   A special thank you to our episode sponsor, Plan Well. Be Well. Plan well. Be well is a place that connects your financial well-being to your personal well-being. It's a place to inspire and learn. To define aspirations. To begin articulating what well-being looks like for you. And a place to provide the financial tools needed to achieve your financial goals and live your intended life. Because when you plan well, you can be well. Now and in the future. For more information, visit PlanWellBeWell.com  Apply for the Master Class on Negotiating: Join me for this small group coaching experience and learn how to remove psychological roadblocks to earning your true worth. Space is limited so register today. Click HERE to register! .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_content { background-color: #146a7d !important; } .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_container .et_bloom_form_header { background-color: #146a7d !important; } .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_content button { background-color: #f58023 !important; } .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_content .et_bloom_fields i { color: #f58023 !important; } .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_content .et_bloom_custom_field_radio i:before { background: #f58023 !important; } .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_content button { background-color: #f58023 !important; } .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_container h2, .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_container h2 span, .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_container h2 strong { font-family: "Open Sans", Helvetica, Arial, Lucida, sans-serif; }.et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_container p, .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_container p span, .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_container p strong, .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_container form input, .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_container form button span { font-family: "Open Sans", Helvetica, Arial, Lucida, sans-serif; } Submit your question for the Breaking Money Silence® Podcast! Submit Your question has been submitted! OTHER WAYS TO ENJOY THIS POST:

EM Pulse Podcast™
A Mandate For Health

EM Pulse Podcast™

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 31:37


It's no secret that COVID-19 hit the healthcare world hard, especially those on the frontlines. The best defense we have against this virus are vaccines. As you've heard on previous episodes, studies show the vaccines are safe and effective. Across the country, and especially in California, an overwhelming majority of ED physicians, and most ED nurses and support staff, have chosen to get vaccinated. But that still left many healthcare workers unvaccinated and at risk of getting sick or passing the virus to patients. So, the government stepped in to issue mandates.  In this episode, we explore the recent California state and U.S. federal mandates that require healthcare workers to be vaccinated, or apply for a medical or religious exemption. We hear from nurses with differing opinions on the mandate, get into the details of the mandate with Health Policy and Advocacy Fellow, Dr. Hunter Pattison, and talk with Director of Emergency Services at UC Davis, Rupy Sandhu, about the challenges of implementation and lessons learned from this experience.  How has your hospital or ED responded to the mandate? Share your questions, comments, and feedback with us on social media, @empulsepodcast, or through our website, ucdavisem.com. ***Please rate us and leave us a review on iTunes! It helps us reach more people.*** Hosts: Dr. Julia Magaña, Associate Professor of Pediatric Emergency Medicine at UC Davis Dr. Sarah Medeiros, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at UC Davis Guest: Dr. Hunter Pattison, Emergency Medicine Health Policy Research Fellow at UC Davis and Advocacy Fellow for California ACEP Rupy Sandhu, RN, Executive Director of Emergency Services at UC Davis Resources: White House Path out of the Pandemic Vaccine mandates are working in California. Here's what the numbers show. By Lara Korte. Sacramento Bee, Oct 3, 2021.  Thousands of N.Y. Health Care Workers Get Vaccinated Ahead of Deadline. By Sharon Otterman and Joseph Goldstein. New York Times, Sept 28, 2021. California vaccine mandate: most healthcare workers are complying, hospitals say. By Kristen Hwang. abc10, Sept 29, 2021.  COVID Vaccine Facts for Nurses survey results Year one COVID-19 Impact Assessment Survey by the American Nurses Foundation *** Thank you to the UC Davis Department of Emergency Medicine for supporting this podcast and to Orlando Magaña at OM Audio Productions for audio production services.

Pivot Podcast with Jenny Blake
265: Free Time Crossover — Eliminate Email with Cal Newport

Pivot Podcast with Jenny Blake

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 55:33


Thank you for your patience as I've been in deep work hibernation mode behind the scenes! I launched my new podcast Free Time in March of this year, and I'm really excited to bring you a crossover episode, one of the early listener favorites with Cal Newport on his latest book, A World Without Email. I also *just* sent my next book to the printer, which I was honored to have Cal provide a cover blurb for! Free Time: Lose the Busy Work, Love Your Business launches in March of 2022. Cal is not pulling any punches with his latest treatise on how we can combat Hyperactive Hive Mind with smarter systems for communication. Email has become a source of guilt and stress for so many of us — listen in for strategies to reclaim your peace and focus. About Cal Newport: Cal Newport is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Georgetown University. He is the author of six books, including Deep Work, which argues that focus is the new I.Q. in the modern workplace. His latest, A World Without Email: Reimagining Work in an Age of Communication Overload, is in many ways his magnum opus on the topic of technology and the workplace. Be sure to also check out his podcast, Deep Questions. Key questions: How can you approach email as a process observer (and architect), not a do-er? What people or workflows can you put in place to eliminate email? Where are you still reacting to the Hyperactive Hive Mind? What experiment can you run this week?

Finding Genius Podcast
Cellular Oxygen Deficiency and how the Cellular Microbiome Plays a Role in Cancer Formation with Charley Lineweaver

Finding Genius Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 56:02


What do space and cancer have in common? Using principles found in physical biology, a new understanding of cancer behavior is beginning to be seen. Listen in to learn: How an atavism plays a role in cancer The meaning of the Hayflick limit What sets cancer cells apart Charley Lineweaver, an Associate Professor at The Australian National University, shares his research overlap between the cellular biology of cancer and its development. One of the most fundamental understandings surrounding cancer is its limit of origin at no further than after single cells began to split. Since cancer requires multiple cells to survive and thrive, this means that single cells become part of the mystery in solving the origin of cancer. By targeting new features of cancer, new targets open for researchers to study in an attempt to thwart the cell. This is part of the atavistic model, which relies on the reversion of the cell. Visit https://www.mso.anu.edu.au/~charley/ for more information. Episode also available on Apple Podcast: http://apple.co/30PvU9C