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Best podcasts about Associate professor

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Latest podcast episodes about Associate professor

New Books Network
Olga Bertelsen, "In the Labyrinth of the KGB: Ukraine's Intelligentsia in the 1960s–1970s" (Rowman and Littlefield, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 78:44


Olga Bertelsen's timely book, In the Labyrinth of the KGB: Ukraine's Intelligentsia in the 1960s-1970s (Lexington Books, 2022), focuses on the generation of the sixties and seventies in Kharkiv, Soviet Ukraine—a milieu of writers who lived through the Thaw and the processes of de-Stalinization and re-Stalinization. Special attention is paid to KGB “active measures” against what came to be known as the dissident milieu, and the interaction of Ukrainians, Jews, and Russians in the movement, their personal friendships, formal and informal interactions, and how they dealt with repression and arrests. Her book demonstrates that the KGB unintentionally facilitated the transnational and intercultural links among the multi-ethnic community of writers and their mutual enrichment. Post-Khrushchev Kharkiv is analyzed as a political space and a place of state violence aimed at combating Ukrainian nationalism and Zionism, two major targets in the 1960s–1970s. Bertelsen shows that, in the face of intense KGB operations, Kharkivite writers and intellectuals attempted to survive in the state's “labyrinth” with their integrity, creativity, and human relationships intact. This book sheds light on the history of Soviet intelligence tactics and the creative intelligentsia, and helps explain the legacies of Soviet/Russian state violence that are erupting once more in Ukraine. Olga Bertelsen is an Associate Professor of Global Security and Intelligence at Tiffin University's School of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences in Ohio, USA. Anna Bisikalo is a PhD candidate in history at Harvard University. She is writing a dissertation on the social history of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church in Western Ukraine from 1945 to the early post-Soviet period. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Eastern European Studies
Olga Bertelsen, "In the Labyrinth of the KGB: Ukraine's Intelligentsia in the 1960s–1970s" (Rowman and Littlefield, 2022)

New Books in Eastern European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 78:44


Olga Bertelsen's timely book, In the Labyrinth of the KGB: Ukraine's Intelligentsia in the 1960s-1970s (Lexington Books, 2022), focuses on the generation of the sixties and seventies in Kharkiv, Soviet Ukraine—a milieu of writers who lived through the Thaw and the processes of de-Stalinization and re-Stalinization. Special attention is paid to KGB “active measures” against what came to be known as the dissident milieu, and the interaction of Ukrainians, Jews, and Russians in the movement, their personal friendships, formal and informal interactions, and how they dealt with repression and arrests. Her book demonstrates that the KGB unintentionally facilitated the transnational and intercultural links among the multi-ethnic community of writers and their mutual enrichment. Post-Khrushchev Kharkiv is analyzed as a political space and a place of state violence aimed at combating Ukrainian nationalism and Zionism, two major targets in the 1960s–1970s. Bertelsen shows that, in the face of intense KGB operations, Kharkivite writers and intellectuals attempted to survive in the state's “labyrinth” with their integrity, creativity, and human relationships intact. This book sheds light on the history of Soviet intelligence tactics and the creative intelligentsia, and helps explain the legacies of Soviet/Russian state violence that are erupting once more in Ukraine. Olga Bertelsen is an Associate Professor of Global Security and Intelligence at Tiffin University's School of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences in Ohio, USA. Anna Bisikalo is a PhD candidate in history at Harvard University. She is writing a dissertation on the social history of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church in Western Ukraine from 1945 to the early post-Soviet period. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/eastern-european-studies

New Books in History
Olga Bertelsen, "In the Labyrinth of the KGB: Ukraine's Intelligentsia in the 1960s–1970s" (Rowman and Littlefield, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 78:44


Olga Bertelsen's timely book, In the Labyrinth of the KGB: Ukraine's Intelligentsia in the 1960s-1970s (Lexington Books, 2022), focuses on the generation of the sixties and seventies in Kharkiv, Soviet Ukraine—a milieu of writers who lived through the Thaw and the processes of de-Stalinization and re-Stalinization. Special attention is paid to KGB “active measures” against what came to be known as the dissident milieu, and the interaction of Ukrainians, Jews, and Russians in the movement, their personal friendships, formal and informal interactions, and how they dealt with repression and arrests. Her book demonstrates that the KGB unintentionally facilitated the transnational and intercultural links among the multi-ethnic community of writers and their mutual enrichment. Post-Khrushchev Kharkiv is analyzed as a political space and a place of state violence aimed at combating Ukrainian nationalism and Zionism, two major targets in the 1960s–1970s. Bertelsen shows that, in the face of intense KGB operations, Kharkivite writers and intellectuals attempted to survive in the state's “labyrinth” with their integrity, creativity, and human relationships intact. This book sheds light on the history of Soviet intelligence tactics and the creative intelligentsia, and helps explain the legacies of Soviet/Russian state violence that are erupting once more in Ukraine. Olga Bertelsen is an Associate Professor of Global Security and Intelligence at Tiffin University's School of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences in Ohio, USA. Anna Bisikalo is a PhD candidate in history at Harvard University. She is writing a dissertation on the social history of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church in Western Ukraine from 1945 to the early post-Soviet period. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Military Industrial Complex

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 14:47


Kim talks to Patrick Deer about the Military Industrial Complex, a term used by US President Dwight D. Eisenhower in a 1961 speech to describe a permanent war economy, and the political, economic, and cultural matrix that sustains it. References are made to James Ledbetter's book Unwarranted Influence and Seymour Melman's book The Permanent War Economy. Patrick Deer is Associate Professor at the Department of English, New York University. He focuses on war culture and war literature, modernism, and contemporary British and American literature and culture, and Anglophone literature and human rights. His book Culture in Camouflage explores the emergence of modern war culture in the first half of the 20th century. Image: Scene from the film Doctor Strangelove Music used in promotional material: “Grim Desert Aftermath” by Kevin Bryce. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies
Olga Bertelsen, "In the Labyrinth of the KGB: Ukraine's Intelligentsia in the 1960s–1970s" (Rowman and Littlefield, 2022)

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 78:44


Olga Bertelsen's timely book, In the Labyrinth of the KGB: Ukraine's Intelligentsia in the 1960s-1970s (Lexington Books, 2022), focuses on the generation of the sixties and seventies in Kharkiv, Soviet Ukraine—a milieu of writers who lived through the Thaw and the processes of de-Stalinization and re-Stalinization. Special attention is paid to KGB “active measures” against what came to be known as the dissident milieu, and the interaction of Ukrainians, Jews, and Russians in the movement, their personal friendships, formal and informal interactions, and how they dealt with repression and arrests. Her book demonstrates that the KGB unintentionally facilitated the transnational and intercultural links among the multi-ethnic community of writers and their mutual enrichment. Post-Khrushchev Kharkiv is analyzed as a political space and a place of state violence aimed at combating Ukrainian nationalism and Zionism, two major targets in the 1960s–1970s. Bertelsen shows that, in the face of intense KGB operations, Kharkivite writers and intellectuals attempted to survive in the state's “labyrinth” with their integrity, creativity, and human relationships intact. This book sheds light on the history of Soviet intelligence tactics and the creative intelligentsia, and helps explain the legacies of Soviet/Russian state violence that are erupting once more in Ukraine. Olga Bertelsen is an Associate Professor of Global Security and Intelligence at Tiffin University's School of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences in Ohio, USA. Anna Bisikalo is a PhD candidate in history at Harvard University. She is writing a dissertation on the social history of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church in Western Ukraine from 1945 to the early post-Soviet period. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/russian-studies

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism
2352: Dangerous Ideas: What If Everything We Thought Was True About Productivity Was Wrong By Cal Newport

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 10:05


Cal Newport of the Study Hacks blog puts into question everything we thought we knew about productivity Episode 2352: Dangerous Ideas: What If Everything We Thought Was True About Productivity Was Wrong By Cal Newport Cal Newport is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Georgetown University, who specializes in the theory of distributed algorithms. He previously earned his Ph.D. from MIT in 2009 and graduated from Dartmouth College in 2004. In addition to studying the theoretical foundations of our digital age as a professor, Newport also writes about the impact of these technologies on the world of work. His most recent book, Deep Work, argues that focus is the new I.Q. in the knowledge economy, and that individuals who cultivate their ability to concentrate without distraction will thrive. The original post is located here: https://www.calnewport.com/blog/2007/09/26/dangerous-ideas-what-if-everything-we-thought-was-true-about-productivity-was-wrong/  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalLivingDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jim Bohannon
Jim Bohannon 05-19-22

Jim Bohannon

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 118:32


John Trout fills in for Jim Bohannon. He speaks with: Allan Saxe, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Texas Arlington, on to discuss Democratic polling numbers for midterms. Walter Olson, Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute's Robert A. Levy Center for Constitutional Studies, On to discuss compulsory voting.  Jay McDonald, Entrepreneur, On to discuss layoffs  Dr. Gregory Jantz, Psychologist and Author, On to discuss mental health profiles of mass shooters. James Taylor, President of The Heartland Institute, On to discuss the strategic petroleum reserve, gas prices, and oil and gas leases and the Biden Administration.  Jotham S. Stein, Author, On to discuss his book "Negotiate Like a CEO." See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio
An actually terrifying artificial intelligence storyline: Doomsday Scenarios, ep. 6

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 21:53


Artificial Intelligence is becoming more and more prevalent every day. From self driving cars to machines that solve logic puzzles, AI can be a very good thing for society. But there is always that nagging worry of disaster scenarios we see depicted in books and movies where computers and machines overtake humanity. Is something like that really possible? What is the current state of AI? And what keeps people who actually study artificial intelligence up at night? We asked Dr. Edward Kim, an artificial intelligence researcher and Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Drexel University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

MONEY FM 89.3 - The Breakfast Huddle with Elliott Danker, Manisha Tank and Finance Presenter Ryan Huang
Weekly Wrap Up: Schooling calls for 'national dialogue' on NS, what good can it do?

MONEY FM 89.3 - The Breakfast Huddle with Elliott Danker, Manisha Tank and Finance Presenter Ryan Huang

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 8:34


MINDEF has been making efforts over the years to support athletes who compete at the highest level. Joseph schooling's long term deferment is an example of that. This type of measure is very rare and was unheard of 20 years ago. However, can more be done?  We speak to Eugene Tan, Associate Professor of Law, Singapore Management University who gives us his opinions and insights into the situation. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jeff McArthur
Confirmed monkeypox case in man who travelled to Canada

Jeff McArthur

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 6:36


Dr Zain Chagla, Infectious Diseases Physician at St. Joe's Hamilton, Associate Professor at McMaster University talks about the U.S. confirming monkeypox case in man who recently travelled to Canada. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Alan Carter
Political Panel: Alberta Premier Jason Kenney announces resignation after leadership review

Alan Carter

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 7:32


Alan speaks with Dr. Lori Turnbull, Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of the School of Public Administration at Dalhousie University and Alex Boutilier, Senior National Politics Reporter for Global News. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Afternoons with Rob Breakenridge
Inflation still running hot; "Son of Elsewhere"; US energy policy; Royal visit

Afternoons with Rob Breakenridge

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 57:15


Today's guests: Trevor Tombe, Associate Professor, Department of Economics, University of Calgary / Research Fellow - School of Public Policy  Elamin Abdelmahmoud, Author - "Son of Elsewhere: A Memoir in Pieces" James Coleman, Professor - SMU Dedman School of Law Nathan Tidridge, vice-president of the Institute for the Study of the Crown in Canada See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

BBC Inside Science
Building Better Engagement

BBC Inside Science

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 34:05


Victoria Gill and guests ask why does scientific communication matters in society and how it might be done better, with Sam Illingworth, Berry Billingsley and Ozmala Ismail. The climate crisis and Covid-19 have shown over the recent years the importance of reliable, relatable, transparent and trusted science communication. But just like science itself, it comes in different forms and takes different approaches. Always keen to keep you up to date, BBC Inside Science takes a moment to discuss good practice and how it might be done better. Dr Oz Ismail is a dementia researcher who also finds time to do stand-up, public engagement and a podcast called Why Aren't You A Doctor Yet? Sam Illingworth is an Associate Professor at Edinburgh Napier University who investigates science and communication between disciplines. He is also a poet and writer, and has a podcast called The Poetry of Science. And Berry Billingsley is Professor in Science Education at Canterbury Christchurch University. Erstwhile science broadcaster, she looks at ways science education could be enhanced through building what her team call Epistemic Insight - transforming the nature of science education in society's younger members. Presented by Victoria Gill Produced by Alex Mansfield and Samara Linton

Converging Dialogues
#138 - Complacency and Efficiency of the Economic Style: A Dialogue with Elizabeth Popp Berman

Converging Dialogues

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 120:00


In this episode, Xavier Bonilla had a dialogue with Elizabeth Popp Berman about the economic style and how it has permeated American economics over the 20th Century. They start the conversation by giving an example of the economic style limiting the Obama Administration. They define and explain what the economic style is and how it will emphasize efficiency. They discuss the history of the economic style, how it became institutionalized, along with an overview of Macro and Micro economics. They also talk about the shift to public policy and how we got things like the Congressional Budget Office (CBO). They discuss how the economic style was used in the Reagan and Clinton administrations and what are other alternatives besides the economic style.  Elizabeth Popp Berman is a sociologist and Associate Professor of Organizational Studies at the University of Michigan. She has her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley and studies economic sociology and the sociology of science and knowledge. She is the author of the most recent book, Thinking Like An Economist. You can find her work here and here. Twitter: @epopppp

RTÉ - News at One Podcast
Tailored measures could help reduce dementia risk - study

RTÉ - News at One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 4:11


We speak to Professor Emer McGrath, Associate Professor at the College of Medicine Nursing and Health Sciences at NUI Galway and Consultant Neurologist at Saolta University Hospitals.

Maghrib in Past & Present | Podcasts
The ”Lush Garden” of Andalusian Music

Maghrib in Past & Present | Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 19:52


Episode 143: The "Lush Garden" of Andalusian Music   In this podcast, Dr. Carl Davila explores the Andalusian music tradition of Morocco, known as al-ala, through the written song collections, such as the famous Kunnash al-Ha'ik. By examining the literary record, embodied in around 40 handwritten manuscripts found in libraries across Europe and North Africa, we can come to understand the evolution of the repertoire over the past two and a half centuries. Of special interest here is a little-known work called al-Rawdat al-Ghanna' fi Usul al-Ghina' ("The Lush Garden for the Principles of Song'') of which there are just three surviving copies — including one in the Bibliothèque Nationale in Rabat. In this podcast we will explore such questions as: Who wrote this work, and when? What is actually in it? And perhaps most significant: Where does it fit in the history of the written repertoire of Andalusian music?   Dr. Carl Davila holds a PhD in Arabic Studies from Yale University (2006). He lived in Fez off and on for nearly three years in the early 2000s and has visited Morocco frequently since then. Being the first scholar to write extensively in English on the Andalusian music in Morocco, he has published two monographs and numerous articles on the cultural, historical and literary aspects of this grand musical tradition. At the moment, he is developing a book series with E.J. Brill that will present English translations and commentary for all eleven nubas in the modern and historical repertoires. He is currently Associate Professor of History at the State University of New York in Brockport.   This episode was recorded on April 21st, 2022 at the Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM).  To see related slides, please visit our website : www.themaghribpodcast.com Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

Village SquareCast
Intellectual Humility in a Polarized World

Village SquareCast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 87:20


Dr. Kurt Gray of UNC Chapel Hill joins us for this timely and intriguing discussion about intellectual humility. Simply put, we'll be exploring the importance of knowing you might be wrong (gasp! yes, even you), why this is so important, and what we can do about it to help build human connections and bridge our divides. At a time when complex technology of all sorts is exploding and voluminous information about the world is at our literal fingertips, one commodity in oddly short supply is intellectual humility. And in these polarized times, we've become shockingly convinced that somehow our political allies can decipher reality with utter clarity and it's only our ideological foes who are thoroughly, utterly and so very dangerously WRONG. Kurt says our brains are designed to notice patterns and make generalizations to keep us safe, not so much to find truth with accuracy, and this design quirk leads to us overgeneralizing what we think we know in unproductive ways. He brings a strong argument that this describes you too, sorry (you'll actually be as entertained as you can be when you're learning just how deluded you are). We'll imagine what we might achieve together if we remember to restore intellectual humility to our politics, to our planet, and to our lives. Kurt is an Associate Professor in Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he directs both the Deepest Beliefs Lab, which studies beliefs around morality and religion, and the Center for the Science of Moral Understanding. With Harvard's Dr. Daniel Wegner he is the co-author of the book "The Mind Club: Who Thinks, What Feels, and Why It Matters." Discussion facilitated by Christine White, Executive Director of The Village Square.

New Books in Sports
Shannon L. Walsh, "Eugenics and Physical Culture Performance in the Progressive Era: Watch Whiteness Workout" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020)

New Books in Sports

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 71:50


Today we are joined by Dr. Shannon Walsh, Associate Professor of Theatre History, and author of Eugenics and Physical Culture Performance in the Progressive Era: Watch Whiteness Workout (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020). In our conversation, we discussed the origins of women's physical culture in the United States, the role that physical culture reformers played in producing femininity and whiteness, and the possibilities for anti-racist and anti-sexist sport to reconceptualize the white supremist roots of American athleticism. In Eugenics and Physical Culture Performance in the Progressive Era, Walsh traces the beginnings of reform era physical culture, paying special attention to the way that physical culturists attempted to shape women's bodies. She argues that their efforts hinged on using exercise to produce femininity and whiteness and that they prefigured the larger eugenic movements aimed at perpetuating the white race later in the 20th century. In each chapter she looks at different physical culturists or physical cultural movement. Her second chapter looks at Steele MacKaye and Americanised Delsarte, a physical cultural practice that combined acting, dance and exercise. Her third chapter focuses on Dudley Allen Sargent and mimetic workouts that introduced working class motions – for example wood chopping - to middle and upper-middle class men and women at Ivy League colleges. The fourth and fifth chapter work together to unpack the complicated position of women's physical culture, femininity and motherhood. In chapter four, Walsh shows how Abby Shaw Mayhew and the YWCA articulated a genre of motherhood, which Walsh calls “social motherhood,” that reframed women's exercise as domestic and maternal rather than grotesque and masculine. In the fifth chapter, Walsh examines Bernarr MacFadden – the Barnum of physical culture – to showcases the places where advertising, motherhood, and women's exercise came into explicit contact. Relying on a close reading of physical culture through critical theory, these main chapters trace the intersections between exercise, femininity, motherhood, race and social class, to illustrate how debates over these issues helped to produce whiteness. Whether they were in elite educational institutions in the Northeast, Midwestern metropolises like Minneapolis, or travelling around the country these experts helped to code physical culture as specifically as womanly, middle class, white, and ultimately as unremarkable. He final body chapter, chapter six, looks at physical culture for indigenous women in three sites: the Odanah Mission School, the Model Indian School at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis, and the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. Unlike their white counterparts, indigenous women were not offered significant opportunities for physical exercise and if they were it was only for the purpose of assimilation. Unsurprisingly, many indigenous girls and women challenged those expectations and were successful athletes. Keith Rathbone is a Senior Lecturer at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. He researches twentieth-century French social and cultural history. His book, entitled Sport and physical culture in Occupied France: Authoritarianism, agency, and everyday life, (Manchester University Press, 2022) examines physical education and sports in order to better understand civic life under the dual authoritarian systems of the German Occupation and the Vichy Regime. If you have a title to suggest for this podcast, please contact him at keith.rathbone@mq.edu.au and follow him at @keithrathbone on twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sports

New Books in History
Shannon L. Walsh, "Eugenics and Physical Culture Performance in the Progressive Era: Watch Whiteness Workout" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 71:50


Today we are joined by Dr. Shannon Walsh, Associate Professor of Theatre History, and author of Eugenics and Physical Culture Performance in the Progressive Era: Watch Whiteness Workout (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020). In our conversation, we discussed the origins of women's physical culture in the United States, the role that physical culture reformers played in producing femininity and whiteness, and the possibilities for anti-racist and anti-sexist sport to reconceptualize the white supremist roots of American athleticism. In Eugenics and Physical Culture Performance in the Progressive Era, Walsh traces the beginnings of reform era physical culture, paying special attention to the way that physical culturists attempted to shape women's bodies. She argues that their efforts hinged on using exercise to produce femininity and whiteness and that they prefigured the larger eugenic movements aimed at perpetuating the white race later in the 20th century. In each chapter she looks at different physical culturists or physical cultural movement. Her second chapter looks at Steele MacKaye and Americanised Delsarte, a physical cultural practice that combined acting, dance and exercise. Her third chapter focuses on Dudley Allen Sargent and mimetic workouts that introduced working class motions – for example wood chopping - to middle and upper-middle class men and women at Ivy League colleges. The fourth and fifth chapter work together to unpack the complicated position of women's physical culture, femininity and motherhood. In chapter four, Walsh shows how Abby Shaw Mayhew and the YWCA articulated a genre of motherhood, which Walsh calls “social motherhood,” that reframed women's exercise as domestic and maternal rather than grotesque and masculine. In the fifth chapter, Walsh examines Bernarr MacFadden – the Barnum of physical culture – to showcases the places where advertising, motherhood, and women's exercise came into explicit contact. Relying on a close reading of physical culture through critical theory, these main chapters trace the intersections between exercise, femininity, motherhood, race and social class, to illustrate how debates over these issues helped to produce whiteness. Whether they were in elite educational institutions in the Northeast, Midwestern metropolises like Minneapolis, or travelling around the country these experts helped to code physical culture as specifically as womanly, middle class, white, and ultimately as unremarkable. He final body chapter, chapter six, looks at physical culture for indigenous women in three sites: the Odanah Mission School, the Model Indian School at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis, and the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. Unlike their white counterparts, indigenous women were not offered significant opportunities for physical exercise and if they were it was only for the purpose of assimilation. Unsurprisingly, many indigenous girls and women challenged those expectations and were successful athletes. Keith Rathbone is a Senior Lecturer at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. He researches twentieth-century French social and cultural history. His book, entitled Sport and physical culture in Occupied France: Authoritarianism, agency, and everyday life, (Manchester University Press, 2022) examines physical education and sports in order to better understand civic life under the dual authoritarian systems of the German Occupation and the Vichy Regime. If you have a title to suggest for this podcast, please contact him at keith.rathbone@mq.edu.au and follow him at @keithrathbone on twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in East Asian Studies
Glynne Walley, "Eight Dogs, or 'Hakkenden': Part One―An Ill-Considered Jest" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 36:40


Hakkenden is a classic work of Japanese literature: the story of the eight warriors, born from Princess Fuse and the dog Yatsufusa, has been adapted to manga, movies and anime. And its tropes continue to pop up in Japanese popular culture today. But there's so much story in Hakkenden that Eight Dogs, or "Hakkenden": Part One―An Ill-Considered Jest (Cornell University Press: 2021), a new translation by Glynne Walley, doesn't even get to the eight warriors before it's end! Glynne's translation sets the scene for the emergence of the eight dog warriors, translating everything in the book–including the medicine ads the author included to help pay the bills. In this interview, Glynne and I talk about what makes Hakkenden so special, Glynne's translation choices, and how its themes and tropes persist to the present day. Glynne Walley is an Associate Professor of Japanese Literature at the University of Oregon and author ofGood Dogs: Edification, Entertainment & Kyokutei Bakin's Nansō Satomi hakkenden (Cornell East Asia Series, 2018), the first monograph-length study of Hakkenden, a landmark of premodern Japanese fiction. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Hakkenden. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at @nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books in American Studies
Shannon L. Walsh, "Eugenics and Physical Culture Performance in the Progressive Era: Watch Whiteness Workout" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 71:50


Today we are joined by Dr. Shannon Walsh, Associate Professor of Theatre History, and author of Eugenics and Physical Culture Performance in the Progressive Era: Watch Whiteness Workout (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020). In our conversation, we discussed the origins of women's physical culture in the United States, the role that physical culture reformers played in producing femininity and whiteness, and the possibilities for anti-racist and anti-sexist sport to reconceptualize the white supremist roots of American athleticism. In Eugenics and Physical Culture Performance in the Progressive Era, Walsh traces the beginnings of reform era physical culture, paying special attention to the way that physical culturists attempted to shape women's bodies. She argues that their efforts hinged on using exercise to produce femininity and whiteness and that they prefigured the larger eugenic movements aimed at perpetuating the white race later in the 20th century. In each chapter she looks at different physical culturists or physical cultural movement. Her second chapter looks at Steele MacKaye and Americanised Delsarte, a physical cultural practice that combined acting, dance and exercise. Her third chapter focuses on Dudley Allen Sargent and mimetic workouts that introduced working class motions – for example wood chopping - to middle and upper-middle class men and women at Ivy League colleges. The fourth and fifth chapter work together to unpack the complicated position of women's physical culture, femininity and motherhood. In chapter four, Walsh shows how Abby Shaw Mayhew and the YWCA articulated a genre of motherhood, which Walsh calls “social motherhood,” that reframed women's exercise as domestic and maternal rather than grotesque and masculine. In the fifth chapter, Walsh examines Bernarr MacFadden – the Barnum of physical culture – to showcases the places where advertising, motherhood, and women's exercise came into explicit contact. Relying on a close reading of physical culture through critical theory, these main chapters trace the intersections between exercise, femininity, motherhood, race and social class, to illustrate how debates over these issues helped to produce whiteness. Whether they were in elite educational institutions in the Northeast, Midwestern metropolises like Minneapolis, or travelling around the country these experts helped to code physical culture as specifically as womanly, middle class, white, and ultimately as unremarkable. He final body chapter, chapter six, looks at physical culture for indigenous women in three sites: the Odanah Mission School, the Model Indian School at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis, and the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. Unlike their white counterparts, indigenous women were not offered significant opportunities for physical exercise and if they were it was only for the purpose of assimilation. Unsurprisingly, many indigenous girls and women challenged those expectations and were successful athletes. Keith Rathbone is a Senior Lecturer at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. He researches twentieth-century French social and cultural history. His book, entitled Sport and physical culture in Occupied France: Authoritarianism, agency, and everyday life, (Manchester University Press, 2022) examines physical education and sports in order to better understand civic life under the dual authoritarian systems of the German Occupation and the Vichy Regime. If you have a title to suggest for this podcast, please contact him at keith.rathbone@mq.edu.au and follow him at @keithrathbone on twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Shannon L. Walsh, "Eugenics and Physical Culture Performance in the Progressive Era: Watch Whiteness Workout" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 71:50


Today we are joined by Dr. Shannon Walsh, Associate Professor of Theatre History, and author of Eugenics and Physical Culture Performance in the Progressive Era: Watch Whiteness Workout (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020). In our conversation, we discussed the origins of women's physical culture in the United States, the role that physical culture reformers played in producing femininity and whiteness, and the possibilities for anti-racist and anti-sexist sport to reconceptualize the white supremist roots of American athleticism. In Eugenics and Physical Culture Performance in the Progressive Era, Walsh traces the beginnings of reform era physical culture, paying special attention to the way that physical culturists attempted to shape women's bodies. She argues that their efforts hinged on using exercise to produce femininity and whiteness and that they prefigured the larger eugenic movements aimed at perpetuating the white race later in the 20th century. In each chapter she looks at different physical culturists or physical cultural movement. Her second chapter looks at Steele MacKaye and Americanised Delsarte, a physical cultural practice that combined acting, dance and exercise. Her third chapter focuses on Dudley Allen Sargent and mimetic workouts that introduced working class motions – for example wood chopping - to middle and upper-middle class men and women at Ivy League colleges. The fourth and fifth chapter work together to unpack the complicated position of women's physical culture, femininity and motherhood. In chapter four, Walsh shows how Abby Shaw Mayhew and the YWCA articulated a genre of motherhood, which Walsh calls “social motherhood,” that reframed women's exercise as domestic and maternal rather than grotesque and masculine. In the fifth chapter, Walsh examines Bernarr MacFadden – the Barnum of physical culture – to showcases the places where advertising, motherhood, and women's exercise came into explicit contact. Relying on a close reading of physical culture through critical theory, these main chapters trace the intersections between exercise, femininity, motherhood, race and social class, to illustrate how debates over these issues helped to produce whiteness. Whether they were in elite educational institutions in the Northeast, Midwestern metropolises like Minneapolis, or travelling around the country these experts helped to code physical culture as specifically as womanly, middle class, white, and ultimately as unremarkable. He final body chapter, chapter six, looks at physical culture for indigenous women in three sites: the Odanah Mission School, the Model Indian School at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis, and the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. Unlike their white counterparts, indigenous women were not offered significant opportunities for physical exercise and if they were it was only for the purpose of assimilation. Unsurprisingly, many indigenous girls and women challenged those expectations and were successful athletes. Keith Rathbone is a Senior Lecturer at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. He researches twentieth-century French social and cultural history. His book, entitled Sport and physical culture in Occupied France: Authoritarianism, agency, and everyday life, (Manchester University Press, 2022) examines physical education and sports in order to better understand civic life under the dual authoritarian systems of the German Occupation and the Vichy Regime. If you have a title to suggest for this podcast, please contact him at keith.rathbone@mq.edu.au and follow him at @keithrathbone on twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Jim Bohannon
Jim Bohannon 05-18-22

Jim Bohannon

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 116:41


John Trout fills in for Jim Bohannon tonight. He speaks with: Alain Sanders, Associate Professor of Political Science at Saint Peter's College, On to discuss yesterday's primaries. Harlan Ullman, Senior Advisor at the Atlantic Council, On to discuss Finland's bid to join NATO. Brandon Weichert, Geopolitical Analyst, On to discuss the congressional hearings on UFOs. Will Rinehart, Senior Research Fellow at the Center for Growth and Opportunity, On to discuss the latest with Elon Musk and Twitter. Ben Elmore, CEO of Intevity, On to discuss the effects of automation on the US economy. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Scott Thompson Show
Remembering Donna Summer, pack your patience before you go to the airport, housing unaffordability in Ontario and more

Scott Thompson Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 73:14


The Hamilton Today Podcast with Scott Thompson Donna Summer passed away 10 years ago yesterday and Scott brings in Eric Alper to remember her impact on disco and the greater music scene as well as remembering the disco era and the outsized backlash of the time. A vigil will be held tonight out front of Hamilton City Hall to show support and remembrance for the victims of Russia's war in Ukraine. Scott speaks to Mary Holadyk, VP of Hamilton's Branch of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress. Housing affordability in Ontario is shot. A new report by Generation Squeeze found that with current home prices, a new homebuyer would have to work full-time for nearly 22 years to save up enough money for a 20 per cent down payment on a home — up from 15 years in late 2019. Barry Choi talks to Scott about the extensive wait times at Canadian airports, Elections Ontario gives Scott an update on advance polling for the provincial election, we get more on Finland and Sweden joining NATO and it is all coming up on the Hamilton Today Podcast. Guests: Ian Lee, Associate Professor with the Sprott School of Business at Carleton University. Paul Delaney, Professor Emeritus, Astronomy, York University, Toronto Eric Alper, Publicist and music commentator. Barry Choi, Personal Finance & Travel Expert. Aurel Braun, Professor of International Relations and a Senior Member of the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto. Colin D'Mello, Queen's Park Bureau Chief, Global News. Mary Holadyk is the vice president of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress -- Hamilton Branch Dr. Paul Kershaw, an associate professor at the University of British Columbia and the founder of Generation Squeeze. Jo Langham, Manger of Media & Public Engagement with Elections Ontario. Host - Scott Thompson Content Producer – William Erskine Technical/Podcast Producer - William Webber Podcast Co-Producer - Ben Straughan News Anchors – Diana Weeks, Dave Woodard Want to keep up with what happened in Hamilton Today? Subscribe to the podcast! https://omny.fm/shows/scott-thompson-show See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
1980: HeartFlow - Medical Tech and Coronary Artery disease.

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 21:50


I recently read that approximately 50 percent of men and 30 percent of women in the US will develop symptomatic heart disease. I wanted to learn more about the scale of the problem and how non-invasive technology can help determine who is at the greatest risk for a cardiovascular episode, Dr. Charles Taylor, co-founder, Chief Scientific Officer, and member of the Board of Directors of HeartFlow joins me on Tech Talks Daily. We discuss how technology is transforming the diagnosis and management of coronary artery disease. We also discuss how the medical community has received HeartFlow and how technology drives a more proactive healthcare approach. About Charles A. Taylor, Ph.D. Dr. Taylor is a co-founder, Chief Technology Officer (CTO), and member of the Board of Directors of HeartFlow. Previously, he was an Associate Professor in the Department of Bioengineering and Surgery at Stanford University with courtesy faculty appointments in the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Radiology. He is internationally recognized for the development of computer modeling and imaging techniques for cardiovascular disease research, device design, and treatment planning. He received his BS degree in Mechanical Engineering, MS degree in Mechanical Engineering, and MS degree in Mathematics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University.

The ADHD Women's Wellbeing Podcast
Embracing ADHD-friendly mindfulness to feel calmer, more present and balanced in daily life

The ADHD Women's Wellbeing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 48:44


Using mindfulness to help our ADHD shouldn't work but actually, it can be the perfect antidote to our restless, reactive brains - as long as we're open to being more present and self-compassionate. Kate's guest this week is Dr Lidia Zylowska MD, an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and is an internationally recognised expert in adult ADHD and mindfulness-based therapies. Her research pioneered the application of mindfulness in ADHD, helped co-found the UCLA Mindful Awareness Research Center and has been featured in ADDitude Magazine, Time Magazine, Boston Globe and New York Times.  Dr Zylowska is also an author of two books, The Mindfulness Prescription for Adult ADHD and Mindfulness for Adult ADHD - A Clinician's Guide. During the episode, Kate and Lidia talk about:  Compassionate and non-violent communication Managing emotional regulation using ADHD-friendly mindfulness tools How to communicate your feelings without conflict and judgement Mindfulness and feeling present beyond meditation What mindfulness can look and feel like with ADHD The benefits of regular mindfulness practise for those with ADHD How to integrate self-compassion and mindfulness into daily practice. You can find out more about Lidia's work via her website, http://lidiazylowska.com/ (lidiazylowska.com). https://my.captivate.fm/coachingbykate.me.uk (Kate Moryoussef is a women's ADHD Lifestyle & Wellbeing coach and EFT practitioner) helping overwhelmed yet unfulfilled (many with ADHD like her) women find more calm, balance, health, compassion, creativity and clarity in their lives.  By usinghttps://my.captivate.fm/coachingbykate.me.uk/adhd-eft ( Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT/tapping)) in her coaching practice, Kate guides more ADHD women to rediscover their inner voice, 'tap' into their expansive wisdom and potential, fulfil their desires and realise themselves outside of the overwhelm, inner pressure and family dynamic. She is also a mum to four children and will shortly be writing her first book! Interested in finding out more about Kate's new ADHD Women's Wellbeing membership?https://www.subscribepage.com/membership-interest ( Join the waitlist here.) To download Kate's new, free guides: 'Suspect you have ADHD...What Next?' and 'The ADHD Women's Wellbeing' toolkitshttps://www.coachingbykate.me.uk/quicklinks ( click here.)  Or to buy Kate's new workshop  - 'Thriving with ADHD Post-Diagnosis'https://www.coachingbykate.me.uk/store/thriving-with-adhd-workshop ( click here) Have a read of Kate's articles in ADDitude magazinehttps://www.additudemag.com/?s=kate+moryoussef ( here) https://www.coachingbykate.me.uk Instagram: @kate_moryoussef Facebook: Coaching by Kate UK Twitter: @KateMory

UltraRunning Magazine Podcast
Ultra Shorts: Poison Oak

UltraRunning Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 31:20


In our new feature, Ultra Shorts, we discuss one of the unexpected things we experience while ultra running: poison oak. We're joined by Dr. Jason Wagner as we chat about what you need to know about this nasty plant, including prevention, treatment and myths about poison oak.   Dr. Wagner is currently an Associate Professor and Residency Program Director at Washington University in St. Louis. He is also a Lt Col in MO Air National Guard where he serves as both a Flight Surgeon and Critical Care Air Transport Physician. Follow him on Twitter @TheTechDoc     Dr. Wagner's opinions do not represent those of Washington University in St. Louis. This podcast is not a medical consultation or initiation of a doctor-patient relationship. Use this advice at your own risk.   Enter the UR Swag Bag Contest   Thanks to our episode sponsor, Drymax

That Anthro Podcast
Evolutionary Approaches to Human Health with Dr. Amy Boddy

That Anthro Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 54:17


Welcome to the podcast Associate Professor of Anthropology at UC Santa Barbara, Dr. Amy Boddy. Dr. Boddy specializes in evolutionary approaches to human health and researches topics like comparative oncology, maternal fetal transfer and conflict, and much more. Dr. Boddy discusses her academic journey as a first generation student, starting with community college in Michigan and then onto Wayne State where she received her BA and PhD. Dr. Boddy has always been drawn to human health, biology and evolution, but it wasn't until her senior year of college she discovered how she could use an anthropological lens to study the questions she wanted to. We then move into her experience as a post-doc and moving internationally with a young child. Prior to her appointment at UCSB, she worked at the Comparative Oncology Center at Arizona State University where she was a professor. While she still works with this team today, in 2017 she accepted a professor position at UCSB. Currently she teaches classes like Evolutionary Medicine, Human Reproductive Ecology, Genetics, and runs a great lab on campus. We talk the transition from ASU to UCSB, quarter versus semester system from student and professorial point of view, as well as her takeaways from online learning. Currently, she and a team are investigating microchimerism, or the transfer of cells between mother and baby during pregnancy. She has obtained blood samples from a hospital in Santa Barbara to further research these fascinating cells and their role in immune response. Google scholar: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=jnNIBc4AAAAJ&hl=en Twitter: @amy_boddy http://www.boddylab.ca/ Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness
How F$^*#d Up Is Fatphobia? with Professor Sabrina Strings

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 55:36


What do Enlightenment-era paintings, 19th-century American fashion magazines, and Sir Mix-A-Lot's “Baby Got Back” have in common? They're all strong examples of what fatphobia has to do with race, class, and gender discrimination. This week, learn all about the origins of anti-fat bias, and how it persists today, with Professor Sabrina Strings. Sabrina Strings, Ph.D. is a Chancellor's Fellow and Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Irvine. Sabrina has been featured in dozens of venues, including BBC News, NPR, Huffington Post, Vox, Los Angeles Times, Essence, Vogue, and goop. Her writing has appeared in diverse venues including, The New York Times, Scientific American, Ethnic and Racial Studies, and Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society. Her book, Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia (2019), was awarded the 2020 Best Publication Prize by the Body & Embodiment Section of the American Sociological Association.You can follow Dr. Strings on Twitter @SaStrings and check out her website sabrinastrings.com. Want to learn more? Here are some books and resources she recommends:Da'Shaun Harrison's The Belly of the BeastSonya Renee Taylor's The Body Is Not An ApologyDr. Joy Cox's Fat Girls In Black BodiesRoxane Gay's HungerTressie McMillan Cottom's THICKDr. Jill Andrew's workNAAFAJoin the conversation, and find out what former guests are up to, by following us on Instagram and Twitter @CuriousWithJVN. Jonathan is on Instagram and Twitter @JVN and @Jonathan.Vanness on Facebook.Transcripts for each episode are available at JonathanVanNess.com. Love listening to Getting Curious? Now, you can also watch Getting Curious—on Netflix! Head to netflix.com/gettingcurious to dive in.Our executive producer is Erica Getto. Our associate producer is Zahra Crim. Our editor is Andrew Carson. Our socials are run and curated by Middle Seat Digital. Our theme music is “Freak” by QUIÑ; for more, head to TheQuinCat.com. Getting Curious merch is available on PodSwag.com.

The Joe Piscopo Show
7 AM Hour The Joe Piscopo Show 5-18-22

The Joe Piscopo Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 53:08


Daniel Hoffman, Ret. CIA Senior Clandestine Services Officer and a Fox News Contributor Topic: UFO intel, intel into Russia-Ukraine Dr. Jeff Gardere, America's psychologist and Associate Professor at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine Topic: Alleged Buffalo shooter allegedly suffered from isolation during COVID- how that impacts his mental state See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Great Simplification with Nate Hagens
Dr. Simon Michaux: “Minerals and Materials Blindness"”

The Great Simplification with Nate Hagens

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 79:20


On this episode, we meet with Associate Professor of Geometallurgy at the Geological Survey of Finland, Dr. Simon Michaux. Why do humans ignore important mineral and material limits that will affect human futures?  Dr. Michaux reveals how we are “minerals blind” — and the consequences of this myopia. To shed light on the effects of our minerals blindness, Dr. Michaux explores the disconnect between experts in renewable energy and economic and government leaders. Dr. Michaux offers individual strategies for us to overcome our energy and minerals blindness. How can we learn to adapt in order to overcome the coming challenges? About Simon Michaux: Dr. Simon Michaux is an Associate Professor of Geometallurgy at the Geological Survey of Finland. He has a PhD in mining engineering. Dr. Michaux's long-term work is on societal transformation toward a circular economy.

New Books in French Studies
Carolyn J. Eichner, "The Paris Commune: A Brief History" (Rutgers UP, 2022)

New Books in French Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 63:29


Carolyn Eichner's new book, The Paris Commune: A Brief History (Rutgers University Press, 2022) was published on March 18th, the anniversary of the eruption of Paris Commune of 1871. In this accessible history of the 72-day uprising during which the working-class people of Paris established their own government; experimented with forms of radical democracy and social change; and resisted the forces of the French state and military, Eichner explores the Commune within the context of nineteenth-century political, economic, and cultural history in France and beyond its borders. Structured in three parts/chapters that take up the metaphorics of illumination, fluorescence, and explosion, the book follows the lives, ideas, and actions of Communards who sought to bring about a new society, and were ultimately crushed in their efforts. After two and a half months, the French government under the leadership of Adolphe Thiers crushed the Commune during the "Bloody Week" of May 21st-28th. Thousands of Communards met their violent ends in the streets of Paris while others were arrested, tried,  and deported. The book is short and rich, clear and dramatic, an excellent resource for students, readers academic and non, anyone interested in a smart, clear introduction to these events and figures with such mythological status in the histories of popular resistance and revolution. It is also a fascinating account for those more familiar with the Commune. Attentive to the role of women and gender throughout, and interested in understanding the Commune's achievements as well as its limitations, Eichner's account revisits some of the long-standing debates about the Commune's course, and its legacies. Bonne lecture! Roxanne Panchasi is an Associate Professor of History at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada who specializes in twentieth and twenty-first century France and its empire. If you have a recent title to suggest for the podcast, please send her an email (panchasi@sfu.ca). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/french-studies

New Books in Politics
Alicia Puglionesi, "In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession, and the Landscapes of American Empire" (Scribner, 2022)

New Books in Politics

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 64:04


The important new book by Alicia Puglionesi, In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession and the Landscapes of American Empire (Scribner, 2022), is a fat sampler of episodes that show how origin stories get made, what happens when white-supremacist origin stories are mistaken for empirical fact, and how the political impacts persist. The book is decidedly anti-capitalist; resoundingly anti-colonial. It is an invitation not to jettison story-work, but to imagine, collectively, origin stories of the present that might bring into being a more just future. In Whose Ruins could easily be categorized as Environmental History or Native Studies. But Puglionesi forges a book that is more than either field could accomplish alone. The “power” of the book's subtitle has a double meeting: political power and the energy sources of a capitalist economy (oil, hydropower, and nuclear energy). The book is organized into four sections, or “sites,” that visit four evocative land features: a hulking, conical earth mound in present-day West Virginia adjacent to a decommissioned state prison; wells dug into the ground in smalltown Pennsylvania; rocks that tell stories (they're etched with petroglyphs) along the Susquehanna River with kin fragmented elsewhere; the Sonoran Desert rich with pottery, uranium, and physicists, both white and Native. In each of these sites, people with different political projects—some announced, some implicit—have generated multiple accounts of the landscapes and ideas of value. Within a context of shifting political power, white-settler stories about each site displaced empirical knowledge of Native labor, skill, presence, and endurance with harmful fables of white origins and of Native communities' need for white “rescue.” Into the present day, the effect has been to justify white theft of Native land and deadly violence against tribal communities for the purposes of resource extraction. In the end, even the false white origin stories became a resource to commodify. Puglionesi is a writer of poetry, fiction, academic scholarship, and, now, In Whose Ruins, a mass-market trade publication. She holds a PhD in History of Medicine and is a lecturer in Medicine, Science and Humanities at The Johns Hopkins University. On the page, Puglionesi has a friendly, funny, quiet presence—an affable Where's Waldo that centers the relationships of historical actors (including spirits) and the work of scholars such as Kim TallBear, Zoe Todd, and Eve Tuck. This conversation explores ways of living in good relation via writing; the status of truth; the relevance of singer-songwriter Prince for labor studies; and many other themes. It discusses the important book by Chadwick Allen, Earthworks Rising (Minnesota, 2022). In an unrecorded snippet, we also swap names of our favorite local indie bookstores. So check out Red Emma's the next time you're in Baltimore, MD (or on Bookshop.org) and Symposium, Riff Raff, and Paper Nautilus when your compass points to Providence, RI. Laura Stark is Associate Professor at Vanderbilt University's Center for Medicine, Health, and Society. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/politics-and-polemics

New Books in History
Carolyn J. Eichner, "The Paris Commune: A Brief History" (Rutgers UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 63:29


Carolyn Eichner's new book, The Paris Commune: A Brief History (Rutgers University Press, 2022) was published on March 18th, the anniversary of the eruption of Paris Commune of 1871. In this accessible history of the 72-day uprising during which the working-class people of Paris established their own government; experimented with forms of radical democracy and social change; and resisted the forces of the French state and military, Eichner explores the Commune within the context of nineteenth-century political, economic, and cultural history in France and beyond its borders. Structured in three parts/chapters that take up the metaphorics of illumination, fluorescence, and explosion, the book follows the lives, ideas, and actions of Communards who sought to bring about a new society, and were ultimately crushed in their efforts. After two and a half months, the French government under the leadership of Adolphe Thiers crushed the Commune during the "Bloody Week" of May 21st-28th. Thousands of Communards met their violent ends in the streets of Paris while others were arrested, tried,  and deported. The book is short and rich, clear and dramatic, an excellent resource for students, readers academic and non, anyone interested in a smart, clear introduction to these events and figures with such mythological status in the histories of popular resistance and revolution. It is also a fascinating account for those more familiar with the Commune. Attentive to the role of women and gender throughout, and interested in understanding the Commune's achievements as well as its limitations, Eichner's account revisits some of the long-standing debates about the Commune's course, and its legacies. Bonne lecture! Roxanne Panchasi is an Associate Professor of History at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada who specializes in twentieth and twenty-first century France and its empire. If you have a recent title to suggest for the podcast, please send her an email (panchasi@sfu.ca). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Native American Studies
Alicia Puglionesi, "In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession, and the Landscapes of American Empire" (Scribner, 2022)

New Books in Native American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 64:04


The important new book by Alicia Puglionesi, In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession and the Landscapes of American Empire (Scribner, 2022), is a fat sampler of episodes that show how origin stories get made, what happens when white-supremacist origin stories are mistaken for empirical fact, and how the political impacts persist. The book is decidedly anti-capitalist; resoundingly anti-colonial. It is an invitation not to jettison story-work, but to imagine, collectively, origin stories of the present that might bring into being a more just future. In Whose Ruins could easily be categorized as Environmental History or Native Studies. But Puglionesi forges a book that is more than either field could accomplish alone. The “power” of the book's subtitle has a double meeting: political power and the energy sources of a capitalist economy (oil, hydropower, and nuclear energy). The book is organized into four sections, or “sites,” that visit four evocative land features: a hulking, conical earth mound in present-day West Virginia adjacent to a decommissioned state prison; wells dug into the ground in smalltown Pennsylvania; rocks that tell stories (they're etched with petroglyphs) along the Susquehanna River with kin fragmented elsewhere; the Sonoran Desert rich with pottery, uranium, and physicists, both white and Native. In each of these sites, people with different political projects—some announced, some implicit—have generated multiple accounts of the landscapes and ideas of value. Within a context of shifting political power, white-settler stories about each site displaced empirical knowledge of Native labor, skill, presence, and endurance with harmful fables of white origins and of Native communities' need for white “rescue.” Into the present day, the effect has been to justify white theft of Native land and deadly violence against tribal communities for the purposes of resource extraction. In the end, even the false white origin stories became a resource to commodify. Puglionesi is a writer of poetry, fiction, academic scholarship, and, now, In Whose Ruins, a mass-market trade publication. She holds a PhD in History of Medicine and is a lecturer in Medicine, Science and Humanities at The Johns Hopkins University. On the page, Puglionesi has a friendly, funny, quiet presence—an affable Where's Waldo that centers the relationships of historical actors (including spirits) and the work of scholars such as Kim TallBear, Zoe Todd, and Eve Tuck. This conversation explores ways of living in good relation via writing; the status of truth; the relevance of singer-songwriter Prince for labor studies; and many other themes. It discusses the important book by Chadwick Allen, Earthworks Rising (Minnesota, 2022). In an unrecorded snippet, we also swap names of our favorite local indie bookstores. So check out Red Emma's the next time you're in Baltimore, MD (or on Bookshop.org) and Symposium, Riff Raff, and Paper Nautilus when your compass points to Providence, RI. Laura Stark is Associate Professor at Vanderbilt University's Center for Medicine, Health, and Society. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/native-american-studies

New Books in American Studies
Alicia Puglionesi, "In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession, and the Landscapes of American Empire" (Scribner, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 64:04


The important new book by Alicia Puglionesi, In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession and the Landscapes of American Empire (Scribner, 2022), is a fat sampler of episodes that show how origin stories get made, what happens when white-supremacist origin stories are mistaken for empirical fact, and how the political impacts persist. The book is decidedly anti-capitalist; resoundingly anti-colonial. It is an invitation not to jettison story-work, but to imagine, collectively, origin stories of the present that might bring into being a more just future. In Whose Ruins could easily be categorized as Environmental History or Native Studies. But Puglionesi forges a book that is more than either field could accomplish alone. The “power” of the book's subtitle has a double meeting: political power and the energy sources of a capitalist economy (oil, hydropower, and nuclear energy). The book is organized into four sections, or “sites,” that visit four evocative land features: a hulking, conical earth mound in present-day West Virginia adjacent to a decommissioned state prison; wells dug into the ground in smalltown Pennsylvania; rocks that tell stories (they're etched with petroglyphs) along the Susquehanna River with kin fragmented elsewhere; the Sonoran Desert rich with pottery, uranium, and physicists, both white and Native. In each of these sites, people with different political projects—some announced, some implicit—have generated multiple accounts of the landscapes and ideas of value. Within a context of shifting political power, white-settler stories about each site displaced empirical knowledge of Native labor, skill, presence, and endurance with harmful fables of white origins and of Native communities' need for white “rescue.” Into the present day, the effect has been to justify white theft of Native land and deadly violence against tribal communities for the purposes of resource extraction. In the end, even the false white origin stories became a resource to commodify. Puglionesi is a writer of poetry, fiction, academic scholarship, and, now, In Whose Ruins, a mass-market trade publication. She holds a PhD in History of Medicine and is a lecturer in Medicine, Science and Humanities at The Johns Hopkins University. On the page, Puglionesi has a friendly, funny, quiet presence—an affable Where's Waldo that centers the relationships of historical actors (including spirits) and the work of scholars such as Kim TallBear, Zoe Todd, and Eve Tuck. This conversation explores ways of living in good relation via writing; the status of truth; the relevance of singer-songwriter Prince for labor studies; and many other themes. It discusses the important book by Chadwick Allen, Earthworks Rising (Minnesota, 2022). In an unrecorded snippet, we also swap names of our favorite local indie bookstores. So check out Red Emma's the next time you're in Baltimore, MD (or on Bookshop.org) and Symposium, Riff Raff, and Paper Nautilus when your compass points to Providence, RI. Laura Stark is Associate Professor at Vanderbilt University's Center for Medicine, Health, and Society. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies