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Americans of ancestry from Spain and Latin America

  • 7,684PODCASTS
  • 24,349EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 9DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jun 30, 2022LATEST
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    Best podcasts about latinas

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    Latest podcast episodes about latinas

    Buenos días América
    Buenos Días América: 06/30/2022 - junio 30, 2022

    Buenos días América

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 29:59


    En el programa de hoy, 30 de junio, la OTAN concluye hoy la Cumbre que reunió a líderes del mundo y que decidió reforzar la defensiva, luchar contra el terrorismo y continuar el apoyo a Ucrania. Esta y más noticias de Estados Unidos y América Latina en Buenos Días América.

    Good One: A Podcast About Jokes
    Cristela Alonzo's Hello, Es NASA

    Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 87:55


    This week, host Jesse David Fox welcomes comedian, actor, writer, and producer Cristela Alonzo! Creator and star of the ABC sitcom Cristela, Alonzo was the first Latina woman to create, produce, write, and star in her own US primetime comedy. Her debut Netflix special Lower Classy was released in 2017, and now Cristela's back with her second: Middle Classy. Instead of choosing a joke from her aforementioned new special, Cristela decided to go with something a little more symbolic of her life and career as a stand up: Hello, Es NASA. Not only is it the first joke she ever wrote about her family, but it's one of her first big jokes, period. From Conan to Last Comic Standing, to getting feedback that directly led to jokes written for Middle Classy, this joke and interview are a case study for Cristela Alonzo's success. Watch Middle Classy and Lower Classy on Netflix. Follow Cristela on Twitter and Instagram. Follow Jesse David Fox on Twitter and Instagram. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Hyphenated with Joanna Hausmann and Jenny Lorenzo

    Joanna and Jenny discuss the recent passing of Joanna's aunt, how different cultural rituals can help us process grief, what we can do to remember those we've lost, and the role spirituality can play in death.

    Beyond Fear: The Sex Crimes Podcast
    Episode 21: Who is the 'Ideal Victim'?

    Beyond Fear: The Sex Crimes Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 56:44


    Throughout season 1, we have discussed how society, often times through the media, blames survivors of sexual violence. Frequently, media portrayals impact trial outcomes, a survivor's willingness to report, and more. In this episode, we speak to Dr. Danielle Slakoff, a professor and prominent researcher that studies the ways in which the media inaccurately portrays survivors of domestic violence and sexual harm.  During the episode, we also talk about ‘the ideal victim'. According to her research and analysis of newspaper stories, women that are missing, that experience sexual harm or domestic abuse are portrayed differently based on race. The ideal victim has historically been white women and girls. They are frequently portrayed as being blameless and in need of protection. Black and Latina women, women that do not conform to this stereotype, are often blamed for the victimization.  According to Dr. Slakoff's research, Latina and Black women and girls were portrayed much more negatively than the white women and girl victims. Specifically, they were portrayed as risk-taking at the time that the crime occurred and somehow responsible for the harm they experienced. This deep dive into the ways in which the media influences the way we think about who experiences harm and why is a critical piece of a broader conversation about race and the criminal justice system.  Additional Readings and Resources: Media Messages Surrounding Missing Women and Girls: The “Missing White Woman Syndrome” and Other Factors that Influence Newsworthiness - Danielle C. Slakoff and Henry F. Fradella A Timeline of 22 Year Old Gabby Petito's Case - CNN White, Black, and Latina Female Victims in U.S. News: A Multivariate and Intersectional Analysis of Story Differences - Danielle C. Slakoff and Pauline Brennan How Social Media Shone a Light on the Lauren Smith-Fields Case - Time Magazine The Black and Missing Foundation Restoring Justice for Indigenous Peoples Guest Bio: Dr. Danielle Slakoff is an Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice at California State University, Sacramento. Her research interests include media representations of women and girl victims and perpetrators, women's issues within the criminal justice system, race/ethnicity, true crime, and domestic violence. Dr. Slakoff's commentary on media portrayals of the justice system has been featured in outlets such as The New York Times, The Washington Post, and Time Magazine. You can find her on Twitter at @DSlakoffPhD.  Follow us on Facebook at Beyond Fear: The Sex Crimes Podcast, on Instagram @beyondfearpodcast, and on Twitter @fearcrimes. If you have questions about this or any of our previous episodes, or if there is anything you'd like to know about our work, we hope you will email us at beyondfearpodcast@gmail.com or you can contact us on our site here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Heumann Perspective
    Mental Health Disabilities with Dior Vargas

    The Heumann Perspective

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 40:19


    CONTENT WARNING: Please be advised that this episode mentions suicidal ideation, suicide attempt, and psychiatric hospitalization. This episode, Judy interviews Dior Vargas. Dior is a Queer Latina Feminist Mental Health Activist. Judy and Dior discuss the importance of mental health, resources available to different communitites, and Dior's personal journey to advocacy. Follow Dior @dior_vargas on Instagram. Dior Vargas is a queer Latina feminist mental health activist. She works to deliver education and resources to all communities, with an emphasis on the QTBIPOC community. She is a native New Yorker and grew up in Spanish Harlem. Dior experienced a lot of trauma as a child. After several attempts to end her life, she was hospitalized and placed in a psychiatric ward. Dior's experience forced her to realize that she didn't want to have a passive role with her mental health nor her life in general. Dior lives with PTSD, persistent depressive disorder, and traits of borderline personality disorder. She believes that every day is an endeavor towards a better quality of life. Dior has identified as an activist since she was in high school. She has covered issues like body image, reproductive rights, and domestic violence but in 2013, she decided to focus on mental health. For the past several years, Dior has been able to connect with hundreds of people and learn about their experiences. Related Links: Dior's website The People of Color and Mental Illness Photo Project The Color of My Mind: Mental Health Narratives from People of Color Book The Color of My Mind on Amazon The Color of My Mind on Barnes and Noble  Therapy for Latinx Latinx Therapy National Queer & Trans Therapists of Color Network The Steve Fund Resources relating to this episode's Ask Judy question about Roe v. Wade: DREDF Infographic about #DisabledAndProChoice Statement from Disability Organizations about Supreme Court decision REV UP Voting Information If you'd like to submit a question for Ask Judy, send it to media@judithheumann.com or DM Judy on Instagram or Twitter. Find a video version of this interview on Judy's YouTube channel.  Intro music by Lachi. Outro music by Gaelynn Lea.

    Tamarindo
    Career Tips with Laura Tejeda

    Tamarindo

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 42:22


    Today's minisode episode is with Laura Tejeda, the host of LA TACO LIVE where she explores LA Culture, news, politics, lifestyle and FOOD! Laura joins Brenda to talk about East LA, the food scene and answering listener career questions. We want to take a moment to address the overturn of Roe versus Wade. This decision stripped away the legal right to have a safe and legal abortion. Restricting access to comprehensive reproductive care, including abortion, threatens the health and independence of all  PEOPLE. This decision could also lead to the loss of other rights. To learn more about what you can do to help, go to podvoices.help or donate to abortion providers today.  Laura is a freelance writer for L.A. TACO and she is the founder of Instagram based page @hungryineastlos which began in 2016 in efforts to challenge gentrification in East LA and raise awareness to support family owned & people of color owned businesses.tam Laura has a Masters Degree in Higher Education and works with college students particularly in Equity & Social Justice based education.You can find her work here! We have some fun FREE or donation-based events, check them out here: tamarindopodcast.com/events Tamarindo podcast is the Latinx show where hosts discuss politics, pop culture, and how to balance it all con calma, hosted by Brenda Gonzalez and Ana Sheila Victorino. Join us as we delve into discussions on race, gender, politics, representation, and life!  Brenda and Ana Sheila are executive producers of Tamarindo podcast with production support by Mitzi Hernández and Augusto Martinez, of Sonoro Media. Jeff Ricards produced our theme song. If you want to support our work, please rate and review our show here. You can get in touch with us at www.tamarindopodcast.com Contribute to the show: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/tamarindopodcast1 Save 10% on your order of books from Latina-owned Xolo Books with the code TAMARINDO at checkout: xolobooks.com Follow Tamarindo on instragram @tamarindopodcast and on twitter at @tamarindocast  Follow Ana Sheila on instagram @la_anasheila and twitter @Shelli1228 Follow Brenda on twitter at @BrendaRicards

    Buenos días América
    Buenos Días América: 06/29/2022 - junio 29, 2022

    Buenos días América

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 29:59


    En el programa de hoy, 29 de junio, El presidente Joe Biden inaugura la Cumbre de la OTAN en España ponderando la unidad del bloque y reiterando el apoyo a Ucrania. Esta y otras noticias de Estados Unidos y América Latina en Buenos Días América, un programa de la Voz de América.

    El Pochcast
    You speak Español? Pt.2 - No Sabo Kid Group Therapy

    El Pochcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 63:18


    So we got our first TWO Parter in El Pochcast and it's looking at Spanish, Pochos hablando español y no hablando español, some of us speak it all the time, some of us now and then, and some of us rarely speak it if at all but we're all Pochos. And it's a two parter  Because our language is a BIG Deal, we can't even form thoughts without language, it can be something unites us and something that separates us. Something that brings immense joy, and also intense pain. So speaking spanish, and what it means for pocho culture is a deep topic that could cover a million episodes but for now I'll just do two. The first part deals with the pochismo of using spanish when english won't do, and the second deals with the pochismo of not growing up fully speaking spanish. Both episodes feature the voices of pochos and pochas from all over the country and all different backgrounds and I'm so grateful for all of them, so I hope you enjoy these two episodes….listos? Amonos pues…. This episode features: Ricardo Rivera, a writer and civil rights worker from Houston, TX. His writing has appeared in Teen Vogue, Texas Monthly, and Latino Rebels. Read the piece I mention on the podcast here and you can find him on twitter @rjrivera89 Marisa Tirado,  a Latina poet from Chicago and graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop. She is the founder of an international collective called Protest Through Poetry which provides seminars, publishing opportunities, and creative community for activist poets of color. She's also the author of the chapbook “Selena Didn't Know Spanish” which you should absolutely purchase and you can find her on Instagram @marisatirado**** Find Merch here: https://theirrelevant.org/store Join The El Pochcast Discord here: https://discord.gg/AS8RuMHsxJ Twitter: @elpochcast Instagram: @elpochcast Email : elpochcast@ gmail.com El Pochast is a part of The Irrelevant Podcast Network rapture.mp3 by Vincent Augustus is licensed under a Attribution 4.0 International License. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Support El Pochcast by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/el-pochcast

    Debt-Free Latina
    The Most Wonderful Time of the Year

    Debt-Free Latina

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 12:47


    #041 - On this episode, as the second half of the year approaches, Mayra reviews a few things to keep in mind. Connect with Mayra at https://DebtFreeLatina.com  Follow Mayra on Instagram at @debtfree.latina and/or @mayra.alejandra.garcia

    Empower the stylist / Empoderar al estilista
    Healing generational wealth trauma

    Empower the stylist / Empoderar al estilista

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 32:03


    Is our childhood and life traumas keeping us from going to the next level of success, wealth and abundance. First generational Latina ✨ breaking money

    Peruvians of USA
    49 (English) Giving Politics a Chance, with Maricé Morales, Candidate for Montgomery County Council

    Peruvians of USA

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 58:35


    Maricé Morales's parents are immigrants from Peru. She lived in Peru from age 12 to 17, when she returned to the United States to attend college. She graduated from George Mason University with a bachelor's degree in Global Affairs and French and a master's degree in public policy. She received a juris doctorate from the University of Maryland School of Law and received a public service award from the law school. During this time, she was involved in legal work extended from the Public Defender's Office in New Orleans, LA to San Jose, Costa Rica at the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. From canvassing neighborhoods to encouraging jury participation in Louisiana, to contributing to the international legal framework around discrimination and excessive force against Afro-descendants. Still, while in law school, Morales competed in the National Latina/o Law Student Association's sixth annual moot court competition. In 2014, she was elected to the Maryland House of Delegates, as the first Latina to represent District 19 in Montgomery County, MD. Maricé received the Governor's Award for her work combating Human Trafficking and was recognized in 2019 as one of the top 100 Most Influential Latina Leaders in the D.C., Maryland, and Virginia metropolitan area. Maricé currently practices law in the greater Washington, D.C. area, in her Law Office focusing on immigration, criminal defense, and personal injury law. She currently serves on the Montgomery College Board of Trustees, and the boards for the Jewish Council on Aging and Emerge Maryland. Mentioned in the episode: LatinoUSA episode: Foreigner at Birth - Haitians and birthright citizenship in the Dominican Republic Book recommendation: Brown is the New White by Steve Phillips Connect with Maricé Website: https://www.maricemorales.com/event IG: @morales4moco Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/morales4moco LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/maric%C3%A9-morales-6b43242a Ways to support the podcast: Give us a review on Apple Podcast Become a Listener Supporter, see link in bio Visit our Online Store and help us change the narrative with our t-shirt: “El Mejor Amigo de un Peruano es otro peruano.” Also available in feminine (“peruana”) and gender-neutral (“peruanx”) versions Follow Peruvians of USA Podcast on IG: @peruviansofusa Like our page on Facebook! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/peruviansofusa/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/peruviansofusa/support

    Domiplay República Dominicana
    Mañanas Latinas (Top Latina 101.7) / 29-junio

    Domiplay República Dominicana

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 333:20


    Escucha el podcast del programa Mañanas Latinas a través de Top Latina 101.7, en Santo Domingo, República Dominicana correspondiente al miércoles 29-junio-2022.

    Audios de Bienestar y Amor Propio
    Walking Afirmations: Meditación para caminar afuera con afirmaciones para tener confianza en el camino

    Audios de Bienestar y Amor Propio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 23:17


    Una meditación para un paseo consciente al aire libre. Junto con afirmaciones para tomar el camino como símbolo de la propia vida. Conectando, fortaleciendo, calmando. Si compartes esta meditación con un ser querido, no solo estás haciendo algo bueno por la otra persona, sino también nos estás apoyando a nosotrxs ♥ Muchos muchos saludos, Jenni de la asociación Movimientos Auténticos e.V. Nuestra página de proyectos de crowdfunding: https://www.startnext.com/empowerment Ponte en contacto conmigo: jennifercarmenkubistin@gmail.com o https://www.instagram.com/jennifercarmenkubistin/ Los detalles de nuestra nueva cuenta de donación: Propietario: Movimientos Auténticos por Jennifer Carmen Kubistin e.V. IBAN: DE12 4306 0129 0137 0530 00 BIC: GENODEM1BOC Conviértase en unx colaboradorx y ayúdenos a realizar más proyectos de empoderamiento femenino en América Latina y Alemania

    Hechos Ecuador
    Más de 100.000 niños murieron o fueron mutilados en conflictos entre 2005 y 2020

    Hechos Ecuador

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 3:17


    Entre 2005 y 2020, más de 104.100 niños fueron asesinados o mutilados; más de 93.000, reclutados; y al menos 25.700 niños fueron secuestrados en conflictos en África, Asia, Oriente Medio y América Latina, dijo este martes UNICEF en un nuevo informe. Pese a la magnitud de las cifras, se cree que son solo una fracción de las reales, ya que “las limitaciones de acceso y seguridad, y la vergüenza, el dolor y el miedo que sufren los niños y sus familias” hacen muy difícil obtener los datos. "Este informe expone con la mayor crudeza posible el fracaso del mundo a la hora de proteger a sus niños de las violaciones graves en tiempos de conflicto armado", dijo la directora ejecutiva de UNICEF, Catherine Russell. Las partes en conflicto han violado, casado a la fuerza, explotado sexualmente y cometido otras formas graves de violencia sexual contra al menos 14.200 niños. Además, las Naciones Unidas han verificado más de 13.900 ataques contra escuelas y hospitales y no menos de 14.900 incidentes en los que se ha denegado el acceso humanitario a los niños. Basado en dieciséis años de datos del Informe Anual del Secretario General sobre los Niños y los Conflictos Armados, el reporte de UNICEF muestra que la violencia contra los niños ha aumentado gradualmente desde 2005, superando los 20.000 incidentes en un año por primera vez en 2014 y alcanzando los 26.425 en 2020. Entre 2016 y 2020, hubo más de 71 violaciones diarias, lo que, según UNICEF, demuestra “el dramático impacto que los conflictos armados -y las crisis de protección cada vez más complejas y prolongadas- tienen sobre los niños”. El número cada vez mayor de actores armados no estatales, los nuevos medios y métodos de guerra, el uso de artefactos explosivos improvisados y otras armas, especialmente en zonas pobladas, son sólo algunos de los muchos factores que contribuyen a que haya “desafíos sin precedentes” para proteger a los pequeños atrapados en conflictos armados. Que cada vez se verifiquen más violaciones también pone de manifiesto “la creciente solidez del mecanismo de supervisión y presentación de informes a lo largo de los años”, señala la agencia. "UNICEF y nuestros aliados no vacilarán en nuestro trabajo para prevenir las violaciones graves contra los niños", dijo Russell. "Con más niños afectados por los conflictos, la violencia y las crisis ahora que en cualquier momento desde la Segunda Guerra Mundial, este trabajo nunca ha sido más urgente". Afganistán, el conflicto más mortífero para los niños Entre 2016 y 2020, el 82% de todas las víctimas infantiles verificadas -o unos 41.900 niños- se produjeron en cinco conflictos: Afganistán (30%), Israel y el Estado de Palestina (14%), Siria (13%), Yemen (13%) y Somalia (9%). Los niños de entornos más pobres y los refugiados, desplazados internos e indígenas, entre otros, siguen corriendo un mayor riesgo de sufrir violaciones graves. Sólo en 2020, las armas y los restos de explosivos fueron responsables de al menos el 47% de todas las víctimas, con más de 3900 niños muertos y mutilados. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hechosecuador/message

    Latinos Out Loud
    Esperanza Teasdale

    Latinos Out Loud

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 82:15


    On this episode, the LOL crew interviews the Vice President and General Manager of the Hispanic Business Unit for PepsiCo: Esperanza Teasdale. She tells us about the ins and outs of multicultural marketing, her role as a Latina executive, and how PepsiCo is supporting Latina small business owners with their Jefa-Owned campaign.

    Buenos días América
    Buenos Días América: 06/28/2022 - junio 28, 2022

    Buenos días América

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 29:59


    En el programa de hoy, 28 de junio, el presidente Joe Biden y los miembros de la OTAN se reúnen hoy en Madrid condenando un reciente ataque ruso contra civiles en Ucrania. Esta y otras noticias de Estados Unidos y América Latina en Buenos Días América, un programa de la Voz de América. 

    El Washington Post
    El adiós a Roe vs Wade. La cumbre de la OTAN en Madrid. La izquierda en América Latina

    El Washington Post

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 20:29


    ¿Qué viene ahora en Estados Unidos para el aborto? Dori Toribio lo anticipa. ¿Qué es lo importante de la cumbre en Madrid? Juan Carlos Iragorri lo resume. Y Jorge Galindo, del diario madrileño "El País", explica por qué está ganando la izquierda

    Amiga, Handle Your Shit
    Advocating For The Next Generation of Amigas with Patty Godoy-Travieso

    Amiga, Handle Your Shit

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 43:20


    How are you making a positive impact on the next generation of amigas?While we can't go back and change our own childhood and experience as a young Latina, we can invest our time and service into helping the amigas who are currently going through the same struggles we once did. In this episode, I am joined by Patty Godoy-Travieso, the Director of Quality and Patient Safety at Men's Central Jail in LA County. Patty is also the co-founder of ELLA, which is better known as Empowering Leadership in Latina Athletes, a nonprofit corporation organized and operated exclusively for charitable purposes. The mission of the ELLA organization is to support young female Latinas to become leaders of tomorrow through sports and academic excellence. Tune in to Episode 88 of Amiga, Handle Your Shit, and learn about Patty's childhood in El Salvador, her family's experience immigrating to the United States, how her nonprofit organization is changing the lives of Latina youth, why she decided to take the job working at Men's Central Jail, and so much more. Through both Patty's work with the ELLA organization and her job at Men's Central Jail, she is an inspirational Latina advocating for the people who need it most. In This Episode, You Will Learn:About Patty's childhood (4:55)How Patty's nonprofit, ELLA, is making a difference in Latina athletes lives (16:50)Why Patty decided to take the job at Men's Central Jail (24:40)Changes that Patty would like to see in the jail system (37:14)Patty's advice for amigas to handle their shit (39:38)Resources Mentioned:Tickets - The Empowered Amiga Movement Connect with Patty ELLA - WebsiteLinkedInLet's Connect!FREE MASTERCLASSWebsiteFacebookInstagramLinkedInJackie Tapia Arbonne website See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Hoy por Hoy
    Comando N | Cuando los abanicos gobernaron nuestras noches

    Hoy por Hoy

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 39:10


    ¿Se acuerdan de ellos? Zapatos puntiagudos, hombreras imposibles, abanicos al viento... Locomia, los reyes de las noches de Ibiza, el grupo número 1 en la España musical de 1989, idolatrados en toda América Latina y Japón... Esta mañana, en Comando N, reconstruimos su enrevesada historia a través del Documental que, dirigido por Jorge Laplace, puede verse en tres episodios ahora en Movistar. Además en el Planeta hablamos con Javier Talegón, biólogo, de uno de os animales más polémicos de nuestra fauna: el lobo. 

    Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology
    My White Coat Doesn't Fit

    Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 35:52


    “My White Coat Doesn't Fit” by Narjust Florez (Duma): a medical oncologist shares her story about exclusion, depression and finding her way in oncology as a Latina in medicine and oncology.   TRANSCRIPT Narrator: My White Coat Doesn't Fit, by Narjust Duma, MD (10.1200/JCO.21.02601) There I was, crying once again all the way from the hospital's parking lot to my apartment, into the shower, and while trying to fall asleep. This had become the norm during my internal medicine residency. For years, I tried hard every day to be someone else in order to fit in. It started with off-hand comments like “Look at her red shoes,” “You are so colorful,” and “You are so Latina.” These later escalated to being interrupted during presentations with comments about my accent, being told that my medical school training in my home country was inferior to my US colleagues, and being assigned all Spanish-speaking patients because “They are your people.” Some of those comments and interactions were unintentionally harmful but led to feelings of isolation, and over time, I began to feel like an outsider. I came to the United States with the dream of becoming a physician investigator, leaving behind family, friends, and everything I knew. Over time, I felt pigeonholed into a constricting stereotype due to my ethnicity and accent. Back home, I was one of many, but in this new setting, I was one of a few, and in many instances, I was the only Latina in the room. I was raised by divorced physician parents in Venezuela; my childhood years were often spent in the clinic waiting for my mother to see that one last patient or outside the operating room waiting for my father to take me home. The hospital felt like my second home, growing up snacking on Graham crackers and drinking the infamous hospital's 1% orange juice. “She was raised in a hospital,” my mother used to say. Sadly, that feeling of being at home in the hospital changed during medical training as I felt isolated and like I did not belong, making me question my dream and the decision to come to the United States. I remember calling my family and crying as I asked “Why did I leave?” “Why didn't you stop me from coming here?” and seeking permission to return home. I felt like I was disappointing them as I was no longer the vivid, confident young woman who left her home country to pursue a bright future. I remember one colleague, Valerie (pseudonym), from Connecticut. Valerie attended medical school in the United States, did not have an accent, and was familiar with the American health care system. She understood how the senior resident-intern relationship functioned, a hierarchy that continually confused me. Over the following weeks, I took a closer look at how my colleagues and other hospital staff interacted with Valerie. I noticed that people did not comment about her clothing or personality. She was “normal” and fit in. I remember my senior resident asking me, “Narjust, why can't you be more like Valerie?” Ashamed, I mumbled that I would try and then ran to the bathroom to cry alone. That interaction was a turning point for me; I got the message. I needed to change; I needed to stop being who I was to be accepted. As the years passed, I kept key pieces of my personality hidden, hoping I could earn the respect of my colleagues. I refrained from sharing my personal stories as they were different from those around me. I grew up in a developing country with a struggling economy and an even more challenging political situation. It was clear that we simply did not share similar experiences. When I sought help from my senior residents and attending physicians, my feelings were often minimized or invalidated. I was told that “residency is tough” and that I should “man up.” A few even suggested that I mold my personality to fit the box of what a resident physician was supposed to be. I slowly realized that my clothing changed from reds and pinks to greys and blacks because it was “more professional”; my outward appearance faded, as did my once bright sense of humor and affability. All these issues led to depression and an overwhelming sense of not belonging. A few months later, I was on antidepressants, but the crying in the shower continued. Rotation by rotation, I looked for a specialty that would help me feel like I belonged, and I found that in oncology. My mentor embraced my research ideas; my ethnic background or accent did not matter; we had the same goal, improving the care of our patients with cancer. I got to travel to national and international conferences, presented my research findings, and received a few awards along the way. From the outside, it looked like I was thriving; my mentor often called me a “Rising Star,” but in reality, I was still deeply depressed and trying to fit in every day. My career successes led me to believe that not being myself was the right thing to do. I felt isolated; I was trying to be someone I was not. A year later, I matched at my top choice oncology fellowship program; the program had the balance I was looking for between clinical care and research. This meant that I needed to move to the Midwest, further away from family, and to an area of the country with less racial and ethnic diversity. After 2 years on antidepressants and the 10 extra pounds that came with it, my white coat did not fit. My white coat felt like a costume that I would put on every day to fulfill the dream of being a doctor. I would often wake up in the middle of the night exhausted and depressed. I had all the responsibilities of a hematology/ oncology trainee and the additional full-time job of trying to fit in every day; I was using all my energy trying to be someone I was not. Regardless of my fears, I felt in my element when talking to patients and interacting with my cofellows. Despite having a different skin color and accent, I felt accepted by my patients with cancer. I remember when one of my patients requested to see me while in the emergency room because “Dr Duma just gets me.” She had been evaluated by the head of the department and attending physicians, but for her, I washer doctor. Tears of happiness accompanied my bus ride to see her; at that moment, I knew I was an oncologist, and oncology was the place I belonged. The next day, I realized that it was time to be myself: Narjust from Venezuela, a Latina oncologist who was her true self. I searched the bottom of my closet for the last piece of colorful clothing I had saved, a yellow dress. I put on that brightly colored dress for the first time in 5 years and finally felt comfortable being my authentic self; the yellow dress represented freedom and embraced the culture and colors I grew up seeing in my hometown. I finally understood that I brought something special to the table: my unique understanding of the challenges faced by Latinx patients and trainees, my advocacy skills, and my persistence to endure the academic grindstone. Psychotherapy was also an essential part of my recovery; I learned that happiness lived within me as a whole person—hiding my accent, cultural background, and past experiences was also hiding the light and joy inside me. Along the way, I found colleagues who faced the same challenges and validated that my experiences resulted from an environment that excludes the difference and values homogeneity. This route to self-discovery helped me find my calling to support others in situations similar to mine.3 I learned how to incorporate and celebrate my ethnicity in the world of academic oncology by teaching others the power of cultural humility, diversity, equity, and inclusion. Together with newfound friends and colleagues, I cofounded the #LatinasinMedicine Twitter community for those who face similar burdens during their training and careers. The #LatinasinMedicine community was created to share our stories, embrace our culture, and amplify other Latinas in medicine—to create connections that alleviate the sense of isolation that many of us have experienced and serve as role models to the next generation of Latinas in medicine. To help drive systemic change, I founded the Duma Laboratory, a research group that focuses on cancer health disparities and discrimination in medical education. Through research, the Duma Laboratory has shown that my experiences are not unique but rather an everyday reality for many international medical graduates and other under-represented groups in medicine. The Duma Laboratory has become a safe environment for many trainees; we seek to change how mentorship works for under-represented groups in oncology, with the hope that the isolation I felt during my training is not something that future physicians will ever have to endure. After years of depression and self-discovery, my white coat now fits. However, this is not your regular white coat; it has touches of color to embrace my heritage and the ancestors who paved the way for me to be here today. The face of medicine and oncology is changing around the world; young women of color are standing up to demonstrate the strength of our experiences and fuel the change that medical education needs. For all minority medical students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty, we belong in medicine even during those moments when our identity is tested. Through my journey, I learned that we can and must challenge the status quo. I hope to inspire others to join me in this path of advocating for diversity, equity, and inclusion because the time for change is now. I was finally free the moment I realized I could not be anyone else but myself, a proud Latina in medicine and oncology. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Welcome to JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology, brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, which offers a range of educational and scientific content and enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all of the shows including this one at podcast.asco.org. I'm your host, Lidia Shapira, Associate Editor for Art of Oncology and Professor of Medicine at Stanford. And with me today is Dr. Narjust Duma, Associate Director of the Cancer Care Equity Program and Medical Thoracic Oncologist at Dana Farber and an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. We'll be discussing her Art of Oncology article, ‘My White Coat Doesn't Fit.' Our guest has a consulting or advisory role with AstraZeneca, Pfizer, NeoGenomics Laboratories, Janssen, Bristol Myers Squibb, Medarax, Merck, and Mirati. Our guest has also participated in a speaker's bureau for MJH Life Sciences. Narjust, welcome to our podcast. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for the invitation and for letting us share our story. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It's lovely to have you. So, let's start with a bit of background. Your essay has so many powerful themes, the story of an immigrant in the US, the story of resilience, the story of aggression and bullying as a recipient of such during training, of overcoming this and finding not only meaning, but really being an advocate for a more inclusive and fair culture in the workplace. So, let's untangle all of these and start with your family. I was interested in reading that you're named after your two grandmothers, Narcisa and Justa. And this is how your parents, both physicians, Colombian and Dominican, gave you your name, and then you were raised in Venezuela. So, tell us a little bit about your family and the values that were passed on in your family. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for asking. Having my two grandmothers names is something that my mother put a lot of effort into. She was a surgery resident with very limited time to decide to do that. And I don't have a middle name, which is quite unique in Latin America, most people in Latin America have one or two middle names. So, my mother did that to assure that I will use her piece of art, which is my first name. But little does she know that my grandmothers were going to be such an important part of my life, not only because they're in my name, but also because I am who I am thanks to them. So, the first part of my name, Narcisa was my grandma who raised me and she gave me the superpower of reading and disconnecting. So, I'm able to read no matter where I am and how loud it can be and disconnect with the world. So, it is often that my assistants need to knock on my door two or three times so, I don't like being scared because I'm able to travel away. That was also very unique because you will find me in the basketball games from high school or other activities with a book because I was able to block that noise. But it also makes very uncomfortable situations for my friends that find it embarrassing that I will pull a book in the basketball game. And as I grow, thanks to the influence of my grandmothers, I always have these, how can I say, mixed situation, in which they were very old school grandmothers with old school habits and values, and how I'm able to modify that. My grandma told me that you can be a feminist, but you still take care of your house. You can still, you know, cook. And that taught me that you don't have to pick a side, there is no one stereotype for one or another. Because as my mother being a single mother and a surgeon, my parents divorced early on, told me, ‘Yes, I can be the doctor but I can also be the person that has more than a career that's able to have hobbies.' I love cooking, and when I'm stressed, I cook. So, I had a grant deadline a few weeks ago and I cooked so much that there was food for days. So, having the names of my grandmothers is very important because I have their values, but I have modified them to the current times. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Let me ask a little bit about reading. I often ask the guests of this podcast who have written and therefore I know enjoy reading and writing, what their favorite books are or what is currently on their night table. But I'm going to ask you a second question and that is what languages do you read in? Dr. Narjust Duma: I prefer to read in Spanish. I found that books in Spanish, even if it's a book that originated in English, have these romantic characteristics. And I often tell my editors, ‘Just take into account that I think in Spanish, and write in English'. Because I grew up with Gabrielle Garcia Marquez, and when he describes a street, that's a page of the little things that he describes. So, that's how I write and that's how I read in a very romantic, elaborate way. The aspects of realistic imagism, which is my favorite genre in literature, and there are so many Latin American and South American writers that I don't think that I am going to run out. And when I run out, I reread the same books. I have read all of Gabrielle Garcia Marquez's books twice, and Borges, too. It's the type of stories that allows you to submerge yourself and you imagine yourself wearing those Victorian dresses in the heat of a Colombian street, as you try to understand if, you know, Love in the Time of Cholera, if they were more in love with being in love or what it was happening in the story. And that just gives me happiness on a Sunday morning. Dr. Lidia Schapira: That's beautiful. I must confess that reading Borges is not easy. So, I totally admire the fact that you have managed to read all of his work. And I think that you're absolutely right, that magical realism is a genre that is incredibly fresh, and perhaps for the work that we do in oncology, it's a wonderful antidote in a way to some of the realities, the very harsh realities that we deal with on a daily basis. So, let me ask you a little bit about growing up in Venezuela in the 80s, 90s, early aughts. That must have been difficult. Tell us a little bit about that, and your choice of attending medical school. Dr. Narjust Duma: So, growing up in Venezuela, with a Colombian mother, it was quite a unique perspective because she was very attached to her Colombian roots. So, a lot of the things that happened in the house were very Colombian, but I was in Venezuela. So, it was a unique characteristic of being from a country but your family is not from there. So, my parents are not from Venezuela, my grandparents either, and I'm Venezuelan because I was born and raised there. So, that brought a unique perspective, right? The music that I played in my house was Colombian music, not Venezuelan music. So, my family migrated from Colombia to Venezuela due to the challenges in the early 80s with violence and the Medellin, due to the drug cartels. So, we moved to Venezuela for a better future. And growing up in the first years, Venezuela was in a very good position. Oil was at the highest prices. Economically, the country was doing well. I remember, in my early years, the dollar and the bolivar had the same price. But then little by little I saw how my country deteriorated, and it was very heartbreaking. From a place where the shells were full of food to a place now when there is no food, and you go to the supermarket, and many of them are close. And now you're only limited to buying certain things. And you used to use your federal ID that has an electronic tracking on how much you can buy because of socialism. So, you're only allowed to buy two kilograms of rice per month, for example, you're only allowed to buy this number of plantains. So, every time I go home, because Venezuela is always going to be my home, it doesn't matter where I am., I see how my country has lost pieces by pieces, which is quite very hard because I had a very good childhood. I had a unique childhood because I was raised in hospitals. But I had a childhood in which I will play with my friends across the street. We were not worried about being kidnapped. We were not worried about being robbed. That's one thing that children in Venezuela cannot do right now. Children of doctors – there's a higher risk of being kidnapped as a kid right now if your father is a doctor or your mother. So, my childhood wasn't like that. When I teach my students or talk to my mentees, I'm often selling my country, and saying that's not what it used to be. That's not where I grew up. But every year I saw how it no longer is where I grew up. That place doesn't exist, and sometimes, Lidia, I feel like my imagination may have to fill it out with more good things. But I think it was a good childhood. It's just that nobody in Venezuela is experiencing what I experienced as a kid. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, both parents were doctors and you chose to study medicine, was this just right out of high school? Dr. Narjust Duma: Even before high school, I found myself very connected to patients. So, since I turned 15, my father would give his secretary a month of vacation because that's the month that we fill in. So, I was the secretary for a month every summer since I was 15 until I was 20. That early exposure allowed me to like get to know these patients and they know I was the daughter, but I was also the secretary. So, I really cherished that. Growing up in my household, we're a house of service. So, our love language is acts of service. That's how pretty much my grandmas and my parents were. So, in order to be a physician, that's the ultimate act of service. I have wanted to be a doctor since I was 11. I think my mother face horrible gender harassment and sexual harassment as a female in the surgery in the early 80s, that she tried to push me away from medicine. Early on, when I was 11, or 12, being an oil engineer in Venezuela was the career that everybody should have, right? Like, people were going to the Emirates and moving to different parts of the world and were doing wonderful. So, my mother, based on her experience in the 80s, was pushing me away from it. She's like, ‘You can do other things.' My father always stayed in the back and said, ‘You can do what you want.' This is how our parents' experiences affect our future. If I wouldn't be this stubborn, I would probably be an oil engineer today, and I wouldn't be talking to you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, you went to medical school, and then after you graduated, what did you decide to do? Because when I look at what we know about the history there is I think you graduated in '09, and then the story that you write about sort of begins in '16 when you come to New Jersey to do training in the US, but what happened between '09 and '16? Dr. Narjust Duma: I started residency in 2013. '16 was my fellowship. So, going to medical school was one of the hardest decisions I made because right in 2003 and 2004 was a coup in Venezuela where part of the opposition took over the country for three days, and then the President of the time came back and the country really significantly destabilized after that coup. Most schools were closed. Entire private industries were closed for a month. And I think for some people, it's hard to understand what happened. Everything closed for a month, McDonald's was closed for a month. There was no Coke because a Coke company was not producing. Everything was closed. The country was just paralyzed. So, my mother and I, and my family, my father, took into account that we didn't know when medical school would resume in Venezuela. We didn't know if the schools would ever open again. I decided to apply for a scholarship and I left Venezuela at the age of 17 to go to the Dominican Republic for medical school. Very early on, I noticed that I was going to be a foreigner wherever I go because I left home. And since then, I think I became very resilient because I was 17 and I needed to move forward. So, that is what happened in 2004. I left everything I knew. I left for the Dominican. I do have family in the Dominican, but it was very hard because even if you speak the same language, the cultures are very different. And then I went to medical school in the Dominican and when I was in the Dominican Republic, I realized I really wanted to do science and be an advocate and focus on vulnerable populations with cancer. So, then I made the decision to come to the United States, I did a year of a research fellowship at Fred Hutchinson, and then I went to residency in 2013. Dr. Lidia Schapira: I see. And that's when you went to New Jersey, far away from home. And as you tell the story, the experience was awful, in part because of the unkindness and aggression, not only microaggression but outright bullying that you experienced. In reading the essay, my impression was that the bullying was mostly on two accounts. One was gender. The other was the fact that you were different. In this particular case, it was the ethnicity as a Latin or Hispanic woman. Tell us a little bit about that so we can understand that. Dr. Narjust Duma: I think what happened is that perfect example of intersectionality because we are now the result of one experience, we're the result of multiple identities. So many woman have faced gender inequalities in medicine, but when you are from a marginalized group, those inequalities multiply. I have an accent and clearly a different skin color. I grew up in a family in which you were encouraged to be your true self. My grandmothers and my mother said, ‘You never want to be the quiet woman in the corner because the quiet woman never generates change.' That's what they said, and I bet there are some who do. But that intersection of my identities was very challenging because I was seen as inferior just for being a woman and then you multiply being one of the few Latinas you are seen like you are less just because you are - it doesn't matter how many degrees or papers or grants you had done and all, I was the most productive research resident in my residency for two years in a row - but I would still be judged by my identity and not what I have produced, or what I do on my patients' experiences, which were great – the feedback from my patients. It's just because I was the different one. Dr. Lidia Schapira: When I hear your story about your origins, it seems to me that you came from a very capable loving family, and they basically told you to go conquer the world, and you did. And then you arrive and you're a productive successful resident, and yet, you are marginalized, as you say. People are really aggressive. Now that you've had some years that have passed, if you think back, what advice would you give that young Narjust? Dr. Narjust Duma: My number one advice, would be that, I will tell myself is that I belong, in many instances, I feel like I didn't belong. It makes me question all the decisions to that day because when you're doing a presentation, and I still remember like today, and you're interrupted by someone, just for them to make a comment about your accent, it really brings everything down to your core, like, 'Is my presentation not accurate? Is the information not all right? And why am I here? Why did I left everything I love to be treated like this?' Dr. Lidia Schapira: Of course. So, from New Jersey, you write in your essay that you really discover your passion for cancer research, and you land in a fellowship with a mentor who is encouraging, and things begin to change for you. Can you tell us a little bit about that phase of your training in your life where you slowly begin to find your voice in the state, that also where you crash, where you find yourself so vulnerable that things really fall apart? Dr. Narjust Duma: So, when I was a resident, I didn't know exactly - I was interested in oncology, but I wasn't sure if it was for me. So, Dr. Martin Gutierrez at Rutgers in Hackensack is the person who I cold emailed and said, ‘I'm interested in studying gastric cancer in Hispanic patients because I think that patients in the clinic are so young.' He, without knowing me or having any idea, he trusted me. We still meet. He still follows up with me. He encouraged me. I think him being a Latino made the experience better, too, because I didn't have to explain my experience to him. I didn't have to explain that. He understood because he went through the same things. And he's like, ‘I got you. Let's follow what you want to do.' He embraced who I was, and how I put who I was into my research. And thanks to Dr. Gutierrez, I'm at the Mayo Clinic as an international medical grad. So, finding a place in which my ideas were embraced was very important to allow me to stay in medicine because, Lidia, I can tell you several times, I decided to leave. I was very committed to finding something else to do or just being a researcher and leaving clinical medicine behind. So, when I went to Mayo, I still followed with that mentor, but I already knew what I wanted to do. I wanted to do cancer health disparities. I wanted to do inclusion and diversity. And that allowed me to develop the career I have now and is having that pathway because I, with my strong personality and everything else, faced this discrimination, and I can imagine for other trainees that may still be facing that or will face that in the future. So, I use the negative aspects to find my calling and do many things I have done after that. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Speaks to your strengths and your determination. Let's talk a little bit about the people who may also feel different but whose differences may not be so apparent. How do you now as an emerging leader, and as a mentor, make sure that you create an inclusive and safe environment for your younger colleagues and your mentees? Dr. Narjust Duma: One of the things that resulted was the founding of the Duma Lab, which is a research group that focuses on cancer, health disparities, social justice as a general, and inclusion in medical education. So, one of the things that I practice every day is cultural humility. I continue to read and remember the principles. I have them as the background on my computer at work. The number one principle in lifelong learning is that we learn from everyone and that we don't know everything and other people's cultures, and subculture, we learn their culture is rich. So, in every meeting, I remind the team of the principles of cultural humility when somebody is joining the lab. I have one-on-one meetings, and I provide information and videos about cultural humility because the lab has been created as an environment that's safe. We have a WhatsApp group that is now kind of famous - it's called The Daily Serotonin. The majority of the members of the lab are part of marginalized groups, not only by gender but race, religion, sexual and gender orientation. So, we created this group to share good and bads, and we provide support. So, a few weeks ago, a patient made reference to one of their lab member's body, the patient was being examined and that was quite inappropriate. The member debriefed with the group and we all provided insights on how she had responded, and how she should respond in the future. That's not only learning from the person that brought the scenario but anybody else feels empowered to stop those microaggressions and stop those inappropriate behaviors that woman particularly face during clinical care. So, cultural humility, and having this WhatsApp group that provides a place where, first, I remind everybody that's confidential, and a place in which anything is shared has been very successful to create inclusivity in the group. Dr. Lidia Schapira: You have such energy and I'm amazed by all of the things that you can do and how you have used social connection as a way of bringing people up. So, can you give our listeners perhaps some tips for how you view creating a flatter culture, one with fewer hierarchies that makes it safer for learners and for those who are practicing oncology? What are three quick things that all of us can do in our work starting this afternoon? Dr. Narjust Duma: The concept is that we all can be allies. And being an ally doesn't take a lot of time or money because people think that being an ally is a full-time job, it is not. So, the first one tip will be to bring people with you. Your success is not only yours. It's a success of your mentees. It's a success of your colleagues. So, don't see your success as my badge on my shoulder. It's the badge that goes on everyone. So, bring people in, leave the door open, not only bring them but leave the door open because when you do it helps the next generation. Two, little things make a difference. I'm going to give you three phrases that I use all the time. When you think somebody has been marginalized in a meeting, bring them up, it takes no time. For example, 'Chenoa, what do you think we can do next?' You're bringing that person to the table. Two, you can advocate for other women and minorities when they're easily interrupted in a meeting. This takes no time. ‘I'm sorry you interrupted Dr. Duma. Dr. Duma?' So, that helps. The third thing is very important. You can connect people. So, one of the things is that I don't have every skill, so I advocate for my mentees and I serve as a connector. I have a mentee that is into bioinformatics. Lidia, that's above my head. I don't understand any of that. So, I was able to connect that person to people that do bioinformatics. And follow up. My last thing is to follow up with your people because they need you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Well, I'm very glad that you're not an oil engineer in the Emirates. I'm sure your family is incredibly proud. I hope that you're happy where you are. We started a little bit about where you started, I'd like to end with your idea of where you imagine yourself 10 years from now? Dr. Narjust Duma: That is a question I don't have an answer prepared for. I guess my career development plans I think I want to be in a place where I look back and I can see that the careers of my mentees being successful. And I think that we measure my success based not on myself, I would measure my success in 10 years based on where my mentees are. And medical education is a more inclusive place. That will be the two things I want to see in 10 years. In the personal aspect, I don't know if we have art, don't know if we have those grants as long as my mentees are in a better place. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It has been such a pleasure to have this conversation. Thank you so much, Narjust. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Until next time, thank you for listening to this JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. If you enjoyed what you heard today, don't forget to give us a rating or review on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen. While you're there, be sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode of JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. This is just one of many of ASCO's podcasts. You can find all of the shows at podcast.asco.org. The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Narrator: My White Coat Doesn't Fit, by Narjust Duma, MD (10.1200/JCO.21.02601) There I was, crying once again all the way from the hospital's parking lot to my apartment, into the shower, and while trying to fall asleep. This had become the norm during my internal medicine residency. For years, I tried hard every day to be someone else in order to fit in. It started with off-hand comments like “Look at her red shoes,” “You are so colorful,” and “You are so Latina.” These later escalated to being interrupted during presentations with comments about my accent, being told that my medical school training in my home country was inferior to my US colleagues, and being assigned all Spanish-speaking patients because “They are your people.” Some of those comments and interactions were unintentionally harmful but led to feelings of isolation, and over time, I began to feel like an outsider. I came to the United States with the dream of becoming a physician investigator, leaving behind family, friends, and everything I knew. Over time, I felt pigeonholed into a constricting stereotype due to my ethnicity and accent. Back home, I was one of many, but in this new setting, I was one of a few, and in many instances, I was the only Latina in the room. I was raised by divorced physician parents in Venezuela; my childhood years were often spent in the clinic waiting for my mother to see that one last patient or outside the operating room waiting for my father to take me home. The hospital felt like my second home, growing up snacking on Graham crackers and drinking the infamous hospital's 1% orange juice. “She was raised in a hospital,” my mother used to say. Sadly, that feeling of being at home in the hospital changed during medical training as I felt isolated and like I did not belong, making me question my dream and the decision to come to the United States. I remember calling my family and crying as I asked “Why did I leave?” “Why didn't you stop me from coming here?” and seeking permission to return home. I felt like I was disappointing them as I was no longer the vivid, confident young woman who left her home country to pursue a bright future. I remember one colleague, Valerie (pseudonym), from Connecticut. Valerie attended medical school in the United States, did not have an accent, and was familiar with the American health care system. She understood how the senior resident-intern relationship functioned, a hierarchy that continually confused me. Over the following weeks, I took a closer look at how my colleagues and other hospital staff interacted with Valerie. I noticed that people did not comment about her clothing or personality. She was “normal” and fit in. I remember my senior resident asking me, “Narjust, why can't you be more like Valerie?” Ashamed, I mumbled that I would try and then ran to the bathroom to cry alone. That interaction was a turning point for me; I got the message. I needed to change; I needed to stop being who I was to be accepted. As the years passed, I kept key pieces of my personality hidden, hoping I could earn the respect of my colleagues. I refrained from sharing my personal stories as they were different from those around me. I grew up in a developing  country with a struggling economy and an even more challenging political situation. It was clear that we simply did not share similar experiences. When I sought help from my senior residents and attending physicians, my feelings were often minimized or invalidated. I was told that “residency is tough” and that I should “man up.” A few even suggested that I mold my personality to fit the box of what a resident physician was supposed to be. I slowly realized that my clothing changed from reds and pinks to greys and blacks because it was “more professional”; my outward appearance faded, as did my once bright sense of humor and affability. All these issues led to depression and an overwhelming sense of not belonging. A few months later, I was on antidepressants, but the crying in the shower continued. Rotation by rotation, I looked for a specialty that would help me feel like I belonged, and I found that in oncology. My mentor embraced my research ideas; my ethnic background or accent did not matter; we had the same goal, improving the care of our patients with cancer. I got to travel to national and international conferences, presented my research findings, and received a few awards along the way. From the outside, it looked like I was thriving; my mentor often called me a “Rising Star,” but in reality, I was still deeply depressed and trying to fit in every day. My career successes led me to believe that not being myself was the right thing to do. I felt isolated; I was trying to be someone I was not. A year later, I matched at my top choice oncology fellowship program; the program had the balance I was looking for between clinical care and research. This meant that I needed to move to the Midwest, further away from family, and to an area of the country with less racial and ethnic diversity. After 2 years on antidepressants and the 10 extra pounds that came with it, my white coat did not fit. My white coat felt like a costume that I would put on every day to fulfill the dream of being a doctor. I would often wake up in the middle of the night exhausted and depressed. I had all the responsibilities of a hematology/ oncology trainee and the additional full-time job of trying to fit in every day; I was using all my energy trying to be someone I was not. Regardless of my fears, I felt in my element when talking to patients and interacting with my cofellows. Despite having a different skin color and accent, I felt accepted by my patients with cancer. I remember when one of my patients requested to see me while in the emergency room because “Dr Duma just gets me.” She had been evaluated by the head of the department and attending physicians, but for her, I washer doctor. Tears of happiness accompanied my bus ride to see her; at that moment, I knew I was an oncologist, and oncology was the place I belonged. The next day, I realized that it was time to be myself: Narjust from Venezuela, a Latina oncologist who was her true self. I searched the bottom of my closet for the last piece of colorful clothing I had saved, a yellow dress. I put on that brightly colored dress for the first time in 5 years and finally felt comfortable being my authentic self; the yellow dress represented freedom and embraced the culture and colors I grew up seeing in my hometown. I finally understood that I brought something special to the table: my unique understanding of the challenges faced by Latinx patients and trainees, my advocacy skills, and my persistence to endure the academic grindstone. Psychotherapy was also an essential part of my recovery; I learned that happiness lived within me as a whole person—hiding my accent, cultural background, and past experiences was also hiding the light and joy inside me. Along the way, I found colleagues who faced the same challenges and validated that my experiences resulted from an environment that excludes the difference and values homogeneity. This route to self-discovery helped me find my calling to support others in situations similar to mine.3 I learned how to incorporate and celebrate my ethnicity in the world of academic oncology by teaching others the power of cultural humility, diversity, equity, and inclusion. Together with newfound friends and colleagues, I cofounded the #LatinasinMedicine Twitter community for those who face similar burdens during their training and careers. The #LatinasinMedicine community was created to share our stories, embrace our culture, and amplify other Latinas in medicine—to create connections that alleviate the sense of isolation that many of us have experienced and serve as role models to the next generation of Latinas in medicine. To help drive systemic change, I founded the Duma Laboratory, a research group that focuses on cancer health disparities and discrimination in medical education. Through research, the Duma Laboratory has shown that my experiences are not unique but rather an everyday reality for many international medical graduates and other under-represented groups in medicine. The Duma Laboratory has become a safe environment for many trainees; we seek to change how mentorship works for under-represented groups in oncology, with the hope that the isolation I felt during my training is not something that future physicians will ever have to endure. After years of depression and self-discovery, my white coat now fits. However, this is not your regular white coat; it has touches of color to embrace my heritage and the ancestors who paved the way for me to be here today. The face of medicine and oncology is changing around the world; young women of color are standing up to demonstrate the strength of our experiences and fuel the change that medical education needs. For all minority medical students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty, we belong in medicine even during those moments when our identity is tested. Through my journey, I learned that we can and must challenge the status quo. I hope to inspire others to join me in this path of advocating for diversity, equity, and inclusion because the time for change is now. I was finally free the moment I realized I could not be anyone else but myself, a proud Latina in medicine and oncology. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Welcome to JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology, brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, which offers a range of educational and scientific content and enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all of the shows including this one at podcast.asco.org. I'm your host, Lidia Shapira, Associate Editor for Art of Oncology and Professor of Medicine at Stanford. And with me today is Dr. Narjust Duma, Associate Director of the Cancer Care Equity Program and Medical Thoracic Oncologist at Dana Farber and an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. We'll be discussing her Art of Oncology article, ‘My White Coat Doesn't Fit.' Our guest has a consulting or advisory role with AstraZeneca, Pfizer, NeoGenomics Laboratories, Janssen, Bristol Myers Squibb, Medarax, Merck, and Mirati. Our guest has also participated in a speaker's bureau for MJH Life Sciences. Narjust, welcome to our podcast. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for the invitation and for letting us share our story. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It's lovely to have you. So, let's start with a bit of background. Your essay has so many powerful themes, the story of an immigrant in the US, the story of resilience, the story of aggression and bullying as a recipient of such during training, of overcoming this and finding not only meaning, but really being an advocate for a more inclusive and fair culture in the workplace. So, let's untangle all of these and start with your family. I was interested in reading that you're named after your two grandmothers, Narcisa and Justa. And this is how your parents, both physicians, Colombian and Dominican, gave you your name, and then you were raised in Venezuela. So, tell us a little bit about your family and the values that were passed on in your family. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for asking. Having my two grandmothers names is something that my mother put a lot of effort into. She was a surgery resident with very limited time to decide to do that. And I don't have a middle name, which is quite unique in Latin America, most people in Latin America have one or two middle names. So, my mother did that to assure that I will use her piece of art, which is my first name. But little does she know that my grandmothers were going to be such an important part of my life, not only because they're in my name, but also because I am who I am thanks to them. So, the first part of my name, Narcisa was my grandma who raised me and she gave me the superpower of reading and disconnecting. So, I'm able to read no matter where I am and how loud it can be and disconnect with the world. So, it is often that my assistants need to knock on my door two or three times so, I don't like being scared because I'm able to travel away. That was also very unique because you will find me in the basketball games from high school or other activities with a book because I was able to block that noise. But it also makes very uncomfortable situations for my friends that find it embarrassing that I will pull a book in the basketball game. And as I grow, thanks to the influence of my grandmothers, I always have these, how can I say, mixed situation, in which they were very old school grandmothers with old school habits and values, and how I'm able to modify that. My grandma told me that you can be a feminist, but you still take care of your house. You can still, you know, cook. And that taught me that you don't have to pick a side, there is no one stereotype for one or another. Because as my mother being a single mother and a surgeon, my parents divorced early on, told me, ‘Yes, I can be the doctor but I can also be the person that has more than a career that's able to have hobbies.' I love cooking, and when I'm stressed, I cook. So, I had a grant deadline a few weeks ago and I cooked so much that there was food for days. So, having the names of my grandmothers is very important because I have their values, but I have modified them to the current times. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Let me ask a little bit about reading. I often ask the guests of this podcast who have written and therefore I know enjoy reading and writing, what their favorite books are or what is currently on their night table. But I'm going to ask you a second question and that is what languages do you read in? Dr. Narjust Duma: I prefer to read in Spanish. I found that books in Spanish, even if it's a book that originated in English, have these romantic characteristics. And I often tell my editors, ‘Just take into account that I think in Spanish, and write in English'. Because I grew up with Gabrielle Garcia Marquez, and when he describes a street, that's a page of the little things that he describes. So, that's how I write and that's how I read in a very romantic, elaborate way. The aspects of realistic imagism, which is my favorite genre in literature, and there are so many Latin American and South American writers that I don't think that I am going to run out. And when I run out, I reread the same books. I have read all of Gabrielle Garcia Marquez's books twice, and Borges, too. It's the type of stories that allows you to submerge yourself and you imagine yourself wearing those Victorian dresses in the heat of a Colombian street, as you try to understand if, you know, Love in the Time of Cholera, if they were more in love with being in love or what it was happening in the story. And that just gives me happiness on a Sunday morning. Dr. Lidia Schapira: That's beautiful. I must confess that reading Borges is not easy. So, I totally admire the fact that you have managed to read all of his work. And I think that you're absolutely right, that magical realism is a genre that is incredibly fresh, and perhaps for the work that we do in oncology, it's a wonderful antidote in a way to some of the realities, the very harsh realities that we deal with on a daily basis. So, let me ask you a little bit about growing up in Venezuela in the 80s, 90s, early aughts. That must have been difficult. Tell us a little bit about that, and your choice of attending medical school. Dr. Narjust Duma: So, growing up in Venezuela, with a Colombian mother, it was quite a unique perspective because she was very attached to her Colombian roots. So, a lot of the things that happened in the house were very Colombian, but I was in Venezuela. So, it was a unique characteristic of being from a country but your family is not from there. So, my parents are not from Venezuela, my grandparents either, and I'm Venezuelan because I was born and raised there. So, that brought a unique perspective, right? The music that I played in my house was Colombian music, not Venezuelan music. So, my family migrated from Colombia to Venezuela due to the challenges in the early 80s with violence and the Medellin, due to the drug cartels. So, we moved to Venezuela for a better future. And growing up in the first years, Venezuela was in a very good position. Oil was at the highest prices. Economically, the country was doing well. I remember, in my early years, the dollar and the bolivar had the same price. But then little by little I saw how my country deteriorated, and it was very heartbreaking. From a place where the shells were full of food to a place now when there is no food, and you go to the supermarket, and many of them are close. And now you're only limited to buying certain things. And you used to use your federal ID that has an electronic tracking on how much you can buy because of socialism. So, you're only allowed to buy two kilograms of rice per month, for example, you're only allowed to buy this number of plantains. So, every time I go home, because Venezuela is always going to be my home, it doesn't matter where I am., I see how my country has lost pieces by pieces, which is quite very hard because I had a very good childhood. I had a unique childhood because I was raised in hospitals. But I had a childhood in which I will play with my friends across the street. We were not worried about being kidnapped. We were not worried about being robbed. That's one thing that children in Venezuela cannot do right now. Children of doctors – there's a higher risk of being kidnapped as a kid right now if your father is a doctor or your mother. So, my childhood wasn't like that. When I teach my students or talk to my mentees, I'm often selling my country, and saying that's not what it used to be. That's not where I grew up. But every year I saw how it no longer is where I grew up. That place doesn't exist, and sometimes, Lidia, I feel like my imagination may have to fill it out with more good things. But I think it was a good childhood. It's just that nobody in Venezuela is experiencing what I experienced as a kid. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, both parents were doctors and you chose to study medicine, was this just right out of high school? Dr. Narjust Duma: Even before high school, I found myself very connected to patients. So, since I turned 15, my father would give his secretary a month of vacation because that's the month that we fill in. So, I was the secretary for a month every summer since I was 15 until I was 20. That early exposure allowed me to like get to know these patients and they know I was the daughter, but I was also the secretary. So, I really cherished that. Growing up in my household, we're a house of service. So, our love language is acts of service. That's how pretty much my grandmas and my parents were. So, in order to be a physician, that's the ultimate act of service. I have wanted to be a doctor since I was 11. I think my mother face horrible gender harassment and sexual harassment as a female in the surgery in the early 80s, that she tried to push me away from medicine. Early on, when I was 11, or 12, being an oil engineer in Venezuela was the career that everybody should have, right? Like, people were going to the Emirates and moving to different parts of the world and were doing wonderful. So, my mother, based on her experience in the 80s, was pushing me away from it. She's like, ‘You can do other things.' My father always stayed in the back and said, ‘You can do what you want.' This is how our parents' experiences affect our future. If I wouldn't be this stubborn, I would probably be an oil engineer today, and I wouldn't be talking to you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, you went to medical school, and then after you graduated, what did you decide to do? Because when I look at what we know about the history there is I think you graduated in '09, and then the story that you write about sort of begins in '16 when you come to New Jersey to do training in the US, but what happened between '09 and '16? Dr. Narjust Duma: I started residency in 2013. '16 was my fellowship. So, going to medical school was one of the hardest decisions I made because right in 2003 and 2004 was a coup in Venezuela where part of the opposition took over the country for three days, and then the President of the time came back and the country really significantly destabilized after that coup. Most schools were closed. Entire private industries were closed for a month. And I think for some people, it's hard to understand what happened. Everything closed for a month, McDonald's was closed for a month. There was no Coke because a Coke company was not producing. Everything was closed. The country was just paralyzed. So, my mother and I, and my family, my father, took into account that we didn't know when medical school would resume in Venezuela. We didn't know if the schools would ever open again. I decided to apply for a scholarship and I left Venezuela at the age of 17 to go to the Dominican Republic for medical school. Very early on, I noticed that I was going to be a foreigner wherever I go because I left home. And since then, I think I became very resilient because I was 17 and I needed to move forward. So, that is what happened in 2004. I left everything I knew. I left for the Dominican. I do have family in the Dominican, but it was very hard because even if you speak the same language, the cultures are very different. And then I went to medical school in the Dominican and when I was in the Dominican Republic, I realized I really wanted to do science and be an advocate and focus on vulnerable populations with cancer. So, then I made the decision to come to the United States, I did a year of a research fellowship at Fred Hutchinson, and then I went to residency in 2013. Dr. Lidia Schapira: I see. And that's when you went to New Jersey, far away from home. And as you tell the story, the experience was awful, in part because of the unkindness and aggression, not only microaggression but outright bullying that you experienced. In reading the essay, my impression was that the bullying was mostly on two accounts. One was gender. The other was the fact that you were different. In this particular case, it was the ethnicity as a Latin or Hispanic woman. Tell us a little bit about that so we can understand that. Dr. Narjust Duma: I think what happened is that perfect example of intersectionality because we are now the result of one experience, we're the result of multiple identities. So many woman have faced gender inequalities in medicine, but when you are from a marginalized group, those inequalities multiply. I have an accent and clearly a different skin color. I grew up in a family in which you were encouraged to be your true self. My grandmothers and my mother said, ‘You never want to be the quiet woman in the corner because the quiet woman never generates change.' That's what they said, and I bet there are some who do. But that intersection of my identities was very challenging because I was seen as inferior just for being a woman and then you multiply being one of the few Latinas you are seen like you are less just because you are - it doesn't matter how many degrees or papers or grants you had done and all, I was the most productive research resident in my residency for two years in a row - but I would still be judged by my identity and not what I have produced, or what I do on my patients' experiences, which were great – the feedback from my patients. It's just because I was the different one. Dr. Lidia Schapira: When I hear your story about your origins, it seems to me that you came from a very capable loving family, and they basically told you to go conquer the world, and you did. And then you arrive and you're a productive successful resident, and yet, you are marginalized, as you say. People are really aggressive. Now that you've had some years that have passed, if you think back, what advice would you give that young Narjust? Dr. Narjust Duma: My number one advice, would be that, I will tell myself is that I belong, in many instances, I feel like I didn't belong. It makes me question all the decisions to that day because when you're doing a presentation, and I still remember like today, and you're interrupted by someone, just for them to make a comment about your accent, it really brings everything down to your core, like, 'Is my presentation not accurate? Is the information not all right? And why am I here? Why did I left everything I love to be treated like this?' Dr. Lidia Schapira: Of course. So, from New Jersey, you write in your essay that you really discover your passion for cancer research, and you land in a fellowship with a mentor who is encouraging, and things begin to change for you. Can you tell us a little bit about that phase of your training in your life where you slowly begin to find your voice in the state, that also where you crash, where you find yourself so vulnerable that things really fall apart? Dr. Narjust Duma: So, when I was a resident, I didn't know exactly - I was interested in oncology, but I wasn't sure if it was for me. So, Dr. Martin Gutierrez at Rutgers in Hackensack is the person who I cold emailed and said, ‘I'm interested in studying gastric cancer in Hispanic patients because I think that patients in the clinic are so young.' He, without knowing me or having any idea, he trusted me. We still meet. He still follows up with me. He encouraged me. I think him being a Latino made the experience better, too, because I didn't have to explain my experience to him. I didn't have to explain that. He understood because he went through the same things. And he's like, ‘I got you. Let's follow what you want to do.' He embraced who I was, and how I put who I was into my research. And thanks to Dr. Gutierrez, I'm at the Mayo Clinic as an international medical grad. So, finding a place in which my ideas were embraced was very important to allow me to stay in medicine because, Lidia, I can tell you several times, I decided to leave. I was very committed to finding something else to do or just being a researcher and leaving clinical medicine behind. So, when I went to Mayo, I still followed with that mentor, but I already knew what I wanted to do. I wanted to do cancer health disparities. I wanted to do inclusion and diversity. And that allowed me to develop the career I have now and is having that pathway because I, with my strong personality and everything else, faced this discrimination, and I can imagine for other trainees that may still be facing that or will face that in the future. So, I use the negative aspects to find my calling and do many things I have done after that. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Speaks to your strengths and your determination. Let's talk a little bit about the people who may also feel different but whose differences may not be so apparent. How do you now as an emerging leader, and as a mentor, make sure that you create an inclusive and safe environment for your younger colleagues and your mentees? Dr. Narjust Duma: One of the things that resulted was the founding of the Duma Lab, which is a research group that focuses on cancer, health disparities, social justice as a general, and inclusion in medical education. So, one of the things that I practice every day is cultural humility. I continue to read and remember the principles. I have them as the background on my computer at work. The number one principle in lifelong learning is that we learn from everyone and that we don't know everything and other people's cultures, and subculture, we learn their culture is rich. So, in every meeting, I remind the team of the principles of cultural humility when somebody is joining the lab. I have one-on-one meetings, and I provide information and videos about cultural humility because the lab has been created as an environment that's safe. We have a WhatsApp group that is now kind of famous - it's called The Daily Serotonin. The majority of the members of the lab are part of marginalized groups, not only by gender but race, religion, sexual and gender orientation. So, we created this group to share good and bads, and we provide support. So, a few weeks ago, a patient made reference to one of their lab member's body, the patient was being examined and that was quite inappropriate. The member debriefed with the group and we all provided insights on how she had responded, and how she should respond in the future. That's not only learning from the person that brought the scenario but anybody else feels empowered to stop those microaggressions and stop those inappropriate behaviors that woman particularly face during clinical care. So, cultural humility, and having this WhatsApp group that provides a place where, first, I remind everybody that's confidential, and a place in which anything is shared has been very successful to create inclusivity in the group. Dr. Lidia Schapira: You have such energy and I'm amazed by all of the things that you can do and how you have used social connection as a way of bringing people up. So, can you give our listeners perhaps some tips for how you view creating a flatter culture, one with fewer hierarchies that makes it safer for learners and for those who are practicing oncology? What are three quick things that all of us can do in our work starting this afternoon? Dr. Narjust Duma: The concept is that we all can be allies. And being an ally doesn't take a lot of time or money because people think that being an ally is a full-time job, it is not. So, the first one tip will be to bring people with you. Your success is not only yours. It's a success of your mentees. It's a success of your colleagues. So, don't see your success as my badge on my shoulder. It's the badge that goes on everyone. So, bring people in, leave the door open, not only bring them but leave the door open because when you do it helps the next generation. Two, little things make a difference. I'm going to give you three phrases that I use all the time. When you think somebody has been marginalized in a meeting, bring them up, it takes no time. For example, 'Chenoa, what do you think we can do next?' You're bringing that person to the table. Two, you can advocate for other women and minorities when they're easily interrupted in a meeting. This takes no time. ‘I'm sorry you interrupted Dr. Duma. Dr. Duma?' So, that helps. The third thing is very important. You can connect people. So, one of the things is that I don't have every skill, so I advocate for my mentees and I serve as a connector. I have a mentee that is into bioinformatics. Lidia, that's above my head. I don't understand any of that. So, I was able to connect that person to people that do bioinformatics. And follow up. My last thing is to follow up with your people because they need you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Well, I'm very glad that you're not an oil engineer in the Emirates. I'm sure your family is incredibly proud. I hope that you're happy where you are. We started a little bit about where you started, I'd like to end with your idea of where you imagine yourself 10 years from now? Dr. Narjust Duma: That is a question I don't have an answer prepared for. I guess my career development plans I think I want to be in a place where I look back and I can see that the careers of my mentees being successful. And I think that we measure my success based not on myself, I would measure my success in 10 years based on where my mentees are. And medical education is a more inclusive place. That will be the two things I want to see in 10 years. In the personal aspect, I don't know if we have art, don't know if we have those grants as long as my mentees are in a better place. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It has been such a pleasure to have this conversation. Thank you so much, Narjust. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Until next time, thank you for listening to this JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. If you enjoyed what you heard today, don't forget

    Domiplay República Dominicana
    Cambio y fuera (Top Latina 101.7) / 28-junio

    Domiplay República Dominicana

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 333:20


    Escucha el podcast del programa Cambio y fuera a través de Top Latina 101.7, en Santo Domingo, República Dominicana correspondiente al martes 28-junio-2022.

    Domiplay República Dominicana
    Mañanas Latinas (Top Latina 101.7) / 28-junio

    Domiplay República Dominicana

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 333:20


    Escucha el podcast del programa Mañanas Latinas a través de Top Latina 101.7, en Santo Domingo, República Dominicana correspondiente al martes 28-junio-2022.

    Conversations About Art
    91. Teresita Fernandez

    Conversations About Art

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 45:36


    Teresita Fernández's work is characterized by an interest in self-reflection and conceptual wayfinding. Her immersive, monumental works are inspired by a rethinking of landscape and place, as well as by diverse historical and cultural references. Often drawing inspiration from the natural world, Fernández's practice unravels the intimacies between matter, places, and human beings. Her work questions power, visibility, and erasure in ways that prompt reflective engagement for individual viewers. Fernández is a 2005 MacArthur Foundation Fellow, the recipient of numerous awards, and was appointed by President Obama as the first Latina to serve on the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts, a 100-year-old federal panel that advises the president and Congress on national matters of design and aesthetics. She and I discuss not being a specialist, emptiness, sustainability, what lives inside of us, landscapes, vulnerability, indigenous thought, silence, not needing to hide the story, trusting your instincts, mothering, and seeing yourself in something that is not you.

    ONDEM Podcasts
    ONDE Diversidade #028 – Políticas Públicas para a Comunidade LGBTIQ+ na América Latina

    ONDEM Podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 39:48


    Neste episódio, Débora bate um papo com a pesquisadora de gênero e sexualidade Bruna Irineu sobre disputas de direitos e políticas públicas para a comunidade LGBTIQ+ na América Latina. Como parte da sua pesquisa, Bruna compara os contextos em países como Brasil, Chile, Colômbia, Argentina e Uruguai. Professora da Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso no Departamento de Serviço Social e no Programa de Pós-Graduação em Política Social, Bruna Irineu é mestra em Sociologia pela UFG e doutora em Serviço Social pela UFRJ. Ela também é bolsista de pós-doutorado júnior pelo CNPq. Conselheira e ex-presidenta da Associação Brasileira de Estudos da Transhomocultura, ela compartilha conosco sua experiência como primeira presidenta lésbica da associação. Bruna Irineu mora em Cuiabá. O Nome Disso é Diversidade é o nosso podcast focado em entrevistades LGBTIQs brasileires pelo mundo e na militância, na arte, na pesquisa científica e na política. Apresentação e entrevista: Débora Medeiros Convidada: Bruna Irineu Edição: 20a20 Arte da vitrine: JP Martins; foto por Alfonso Sangiao Delgado Feed: http://onomedissoemundo.com/feed/podcast/ Streaming: Spotify — Booking — Reserve seu hotel pelo Booking.com. — Links — Bruna Irineu no Instagram Bruna Irineu no Twitter Bruna Irineu no TikTok Bruna Irineu ResearchGate Livro da Bruna: "Nas tramas da política pública LGBT: Um estudo crítico acerca da experiência brasileira (2003-2015)" Apoia.se do ONDEM Instagram do ONDEM Twitter do ONDEM Grupo do ONDEM no Facebook Telegram do ONDEM Mapa do ONDEM Você pode entrar em contato com a gente pelo Twitter, Instagram e Facebook. Para não perder nenhum episódio, assine o podcast no iTunes, no seu agregador de podcast preferido ou no Spotify. Para apoiar o ONDEM, acesse apoia.se/ondem e contribua com nosso projeto.

    Jogo Raro
    Ep. 65 - Jogos americanos mais raros do Ps3

    Jogo Raro

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 42:44


    Agora é a vez de Samuel Leite e Luis Kuntz embarcarem em uma outra viagem, passando pela América do Norte e América Latina para falar sobre os 10 jogos considerados mais raros do Ps3.

    Hora América
    Hora América - Día Mundial del Refugiado- América Latina - 27/06/22

    Hora América

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 31:19


    En el análisis semanal de la actualidad repasamos la situación de los refugiados en el mundo y especialmente en América Latina con motivo de la celebración, el pasado 20 de junio, del Día Mundial del Refugiado. Este 2022 se ha alcanzado ya el récord de más de 100 millones de personas desplazadas de manera forzosa en el mundo, de los cuales unos 30 millones son refugiados y más de 5 millones solicitantes de asilo, según Acnur. Nos detenemos también en la celebración en Madrid de la cumbre de la OTAN que reunirá entre este 28 y el 30 de junio a unos 40 jefes de Estado y de Gobierno coincidiendo con el 40 aniversario de la adhesión de España. Recordamos que Estados Unidos designa desde 1989 a una serie de países como Aliado importante no-OTAN , entre los cuales hay tres de América Latina: Argentina, Brasil y Colombia, el último en incorporarse este año. Nos despedimos con la cumbia del grupo argentino Los Palmeras que han realizado gira por España. Escuchar audio

    LA PLATICA
    Latina Twins are trouble

    LA PLATICA

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 72:04


    follow us on instagram @ayyysebas @thejoshleyva

    Bringin' it Backwards
    Interview with Erika Ender

    Bringin' it Backwards

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 47:06


    We had the pleasure of interviewing Erika Ender over Zoom video.Panamanian singer, songwriter, producer, communicator, and philanthropist Erika Ender is celebrating 30 years in the business by sharing a video for her breath-taking version of “Abrázame,” a song from her ambitious MP3-45 album. The visual functions as a salute of her past while looking into the future, as we see her vision of a romantic vintage era delivered in her unique style.Originally by Julio Iglesias, Ender picked “Abrázame” as one of the three cover versions that makes up the Side B portion of her album MP3-45; produced by Moogie Canazio, this selection is a way of acknowledging some of the music that made an impact on her as a young person. Although Ender has excelled as a songwriter for most of her career, we now focus on her performing abilities which are just as impressive, taking the broken-hearted feelings of the lyrics and delivering them with poise and subtleness. Of her choice, Ender says, “When I was about two years old, I used to refer to Julio Iglesias as ‘Mi Novio'. I wasn't supposed to be playing vinyl records myself, because I would scratch them—but I did anyway.” Her admiration for the crooner shines through on her version.Erika Ender is an artist that is hard to pigeonhole yet there's one thing that shines through all her different facets—her big-hearted emotions. As a songwriter, she has more than 200 albums under her belt and more than 40 top singles; perhaps her biggest achievement was co-writing “Despacito,” the chart-smashing hit that managed to stay a record number 16 weeks on the number one spot of the Billboard Hot 100, earning Ender awards, accolades, and nominations to some of the biggest recognitions from the industry, including Latin Grammys for Record of the Year and Song of the Year, as well as nominations at the 2018 Grammys, making her the only Latina woman to be nominated for Record and Song of the Year. She has also written hit singles for the likes of Marc Anthony, Jenni Rivera, Los Tigres Del Norte, Chayanne, and many others. As a solo artist, she has been releasing albums since 2007's Ábreme La Puerta, making the top of the Billboard Latin charts with some of her own hits.Released in 2020, MP3-45 is composed of six original songs and three covers. Along with “Abrázame,” there's also “When I Fall In Love” by Nat King Cole and “Só Louco” by Gal Costa. With this, Erika Ender delivers a part of her history with a hint of what's to come.We want to hear from you! Please email Tera@BringinitBackwards.com.www.BringinitBackwards.com#podcast #interview #bringinbackpod #ErikaEnder #Despacito #MP345 #Abrázame #NewMusic #zoom Listen & Subscribe to BiB https://www.bringinitbackwards.com/follow/ Follow our podcast on Instagram and Twitter! https://www.facebook.com/groups/bringinbackpod

    Hold Up, Let Me Explain...
    I'm a Whitewashed Latina...(apparently)

    Hold Up, Let Me Explain...

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 33:24


    Have you ever been told you weren't "Mexican" enough, or "Puerto Rican" enough, or even "Spanish" enough? Well my friends if you have, then this episode is just for you! I have been told I spoke like a "white girl" and not "hispanic" enough because I don't like avocado. rolls eyesListen in as I tell you my evolution from being considered a New York-rican, Chonga, Mira Mira, and apparently a Whitewashed Latina....let me explain...Don't forget to find me on Instagram and Youtube: @Nicoleacev@Holdupletmeexplainhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzI6ATJPkiE9fomPsZvNXcA

    Buenos días América
    Buenos Días América: 06/27/2022 - junio 27, 2022

    Buenos días América

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 29:59


    En el programa de hoy, 27 de junio, lLíderes del G7 se reúnen en Alemania y la prioridad en su agenda es la guerra en Ucrania y el marco de ayuda a esa nación. Esta y otras noticias de Estados Unidos y América Latina en Buenos Días América, un programa de la Voz de América. 

    História pros brother
    Eu vou fazer você odiar o Equador

    História pros brother

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 41:40


    O Equador é um país da América Latina e é um dos poucos que não fazem fronteira com o Brasil. Então já começa que como não é vizinho nosso não precisamos tratar bem. A história do Equador é interessante porque todo mundo estuda na escola sem saber. O famoso Império Inca existiu num território onde hoje é o Equador. Esse mesmo território foi colonizado pelos espanhóis e a independência do Equador aconteceu em maio de 1822 com a ajuda de Simón Bolívar. Quando falamos em colonização aqui da América e em escravização logo pensamos nos africanos que foram trazidos para cá para serem escravizados. Porém, o Equador foi um território que não teve tanto a presença da população negra trabalhando em regime de escravidão. Quase a totalidade dos casos de escravidão se referem aos indígenas e com isso toda a violência colonial foi praticada contra os povos nativos equatorianos. O problema é que ao longo da história do Equador as populações indígenas precisaram lutar para não desaparecer. A escravidão indígena no Equador ficou conhecida como encomienda e se caracterizava pela posse de terras de uma parte da elite espanhola e criolla (filhos de espanhóis) que tinham nessas terras o trabalho escravo de indígenas. Dentro dessas terras os indígenas poderiam ser torturados, abusados etc., caso não “rendessem” no trabalho. Mesmo com a independência do Equador a vida dos povos indígenas no país ainda é complicada. Em 2017, por exemplo, o povo Shuar do Equador acusou o governo do país de os expulsarem de suas terras para dar esse território a uma empresa estrangeira! Uma mineradora chamada Ecuacorrientes S.A. que é da China recebeu autorização do governo para instalar territórios de mineração no território em que tinha esse povo indígena que foi simplesmente deslocado, expulso de seu próprio território! Os povos indígenas até conseguem se articular bem politicamente e são ativos na política do país, porque representam mais de 25% da população total. Mas isso não tira o fato de que muitos desses povos ainda precisam lidar com essa questão de serem expulsos de suas terras com a autorização do próprio governo. Uma outra questão indígena, aí mais recente, aconteceu durante a pandemia da COVID-19. No início da pandemia a nação Siekopai, que fica na fronteira entre o Equador e o Peru e é formada por 744 integrantes começou a apresentar taxas altas de contaminação. O líder do povo tentou chamar a atenção do governo para isolar o território, mas não obteve resposta. Os Siekopai temeram ser extintos pela COVID-19 sem nenhum tipo de amparo governamental. Com o aumento das contaminações dezenas de membros da comunidade fugiram para a floresta tropical amazônica para se proteger da pandemia. Mesmo que hoje eles tenham sobrevivido, a vista grossa que o governo fez foi criminosa.

    Latina to Latina
    Why Healthy Hood Chicago's Tanya Lozano Believes Wellness Requires Community

    Latina to Latina

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 20:04


    She grew up in a family of activists and led her first walk out as a high school student. Then she worked in city government and saw up close the need for community-based solutions. Now, motivated by Chicago's 20 year life expectancy gap, the non-profit founder and CEO is working to ensure that her community has what it needs to thrive.Follow Tanya on Instagram @_tanyalozano. If you loved this episode, listen to Why Radical Health CEO Ivelyse Andino Wants to Reimagine Health Care and LEVEL UP: How to Approach Your Health Holistically. Show your love and become a Latina to Latina Patreon supporter!This episode is sponsored by MAUI MOISTURE®. All of MAUI MOISTURE® vegan haircare products are made with 100% Aloe Vera as the first ingredient to hydrate hair across the curl spectrum. They have everything you need for wash day and general upkeep; Shampoos and Conditioners, Treatments, Oils, and Stylers that leave hair flake-free with no residue! For a limited time, Latina to Latina listeners get 15% off select MAUI MOISTURE® products on Amazon. Buy your new favorite hair products and take advantage of the special offer only open to our listeners. Just visit the link created for our show: tiny.cc/mauimoisture

    Domiplay República Dominicana
    Cambio y fuera (Top Latina 101.7) / 27-junio

    Domiplay República Dominicana

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 333:20


    Escucha el podcast del programa Cambio y fuera a través de Top Latina 101.7, en Santo Domingo, República Dominicana correspondiente al lunes 27-junio-2022.

    CAFÉ COM BOULOS
    América Latina volta a sonhar

    CAFÉ COM BOULOS

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 12:55


    No domingo passado, meu amigo Gustavo Petro venceu a direita em uma eleição duríssima e se tornará o novo presidente da Colômbia. Ele e sua companheira de chapa, Francia Marquez, fizeram história em uma das campanhas mais emocionantes das últimas décadas. Em poucos meses, Petro e Francia na Colômbia, Gabriel Boric no Chile. E antes, Fernandez na Argentina, Arce na Bolívia, Castillo no Peru, Lopes Obrador no México… Depois do pesadelo e da tempestade, o sol volta a dar as caras na América Latina. Mas afinal o que significa a vitória dessa semana na Colômbia? E esse mar de esperança no nosso continente? E aí, tem tempo para um cafézinho?

    Wisteria Lane
    Wisteria Lane - Las personas LGTBI+ tienen un 7% menos de posibilidades de encontrar empleo - 26/06/22

    Wisteria Lane

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 31:39


    Las personas LGTBI+ tienen un 7% menos de posibilidades, que el resto de la población, de conseguir un empleo. Y cuando trabajan, ganan un 4% menos. Son datos extraídos de la Organización para la Cooperación y el Desarrollo Económico. Esta semana se celebró en España el WorkPride, un evento para profesionales LGTBI+. Con Miguel Garzón, director de myGwork para España y América Latina, conversamos. Y conocemos qué está pasando con la organización del Orgullo LGTBI+ estatal de este año. Escuchar audio

    Cafe con Pam Podcast
    On Following Your Path with Laura Tejeda

    Cafe con Pam Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 61:41


    Listeners, we're back this week with Laura Tejeda.Laura Tejeda is a lifelong East LA resident. She has a Masters Degree in Higher Education and works with college students, particularly in Equity & Social Justice based education. Laura is also a freelance writer for L.A. TACO and she is the founder of Instagram-based page @hungryineastlos which began in 2016 in efforts to challenge gentrification in East LA and raise awareness and support to family-owned & people of color owned businesses. Laura is host of LA TACO LIVE where she explores LA Culture, news, politics, lifestyle, and FOOD, with dynamic guests! During this episode we talked about:5:44 - Being 2nd gen on his dad's side17:38 - Her education journey19:14 - Going to college not knowing what's gonna come from it22:56 - Ivy League - do I belong here?24:30 - Representation32:49 - Her mentor and going grad school37:03 - Creativity39:45 - Welcoming things in life 45:21 - On Inspiration52:02 - Mental Health This  episode is brought to you by MagicMind is the world's first productivity drink.

    Oppenheimer
    ¿Cómo cambiará América Latina con la presidencia de Petro?

    Oppenheimer

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 39:49


    Luis Alberto Moreno, expresidente del Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo y exembajador de Colombia en EE.UU., y la politóloga Sandra Borda hablan sobre cómo cambiará el panorama en América Latina tras la victoria de Gustavo Petro en las elecciones presidenciales en Colombia. Para conocer sobre cómo CNN protege la privacidad de su audiencia, visite CNN.com/privacidad

    Minority Report Podcast
    Ep 144 - Crystal Roman, Owner at The Black Latina Movement

    Minority Report Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 22:01


    In episode 144, Erik and Kerel talk with Crystal Shaniece Roman, Owner at The Black Latina Movement, a theater and film production company in New York City. Crystal grew up in New York City and was born to Jamaican and Puerto Rican parents. At a very young age she fell in love with acting and the arts in general and then continued on to become an actor. As she continued in her career, due to her being biracial and not fitting into the one race box everyone wanted to cast from, she wasn't getting many roles. She decided to start making her own work and that was when The Black Latina Movement started. Other than being the Founder and CEO, she has now written, produced and directed. Crystal shares the changes being created through The Black Latina Movement by traveling to different universities and opening up others' perspectives about her and others' cultures, the forward progress that's being made in the movie industry through the power of people and community, and a very important lesson Crystal has learned about herself since running her own business. “A lot of the time, especially with algorithms and Instagram, people will feel like they have to just jump into different things just to stay relevant. Like, "Oh, I'm doing this one thing and this isn't working for me. And I'm going to do this. And I'm going to do that." You have to stay firm in what your passion is because tides will change and fades go in and out, but if you falter and you don't stay firm and you don't stay disciplined, it's very easy to lose it.” Timestamps :38: Crystal Roman, Owner at The Black Latina Movement, tells us about her experience growing up with Jamaican and Puerto Rican parents in the boroughs of New York City 3:16: Kerel asks Crystal which side of the family's food is better - Jamaican or Puerto Rican 4:03: Crystal shares about The Black Latina Movement, a theater and film production company in New York City and how it became what it is today 6:08: Crystal's perspective on what has inspired change in the movie industry to feature more diverse voices and shows 8:09: How the pandemic and social and civil unrest has impacted The Black Latina Movement and the positive change that has come from sharing their perspectives with others 10:19: Crystal talks about how she got into acting 10:54: Crystal shares how times have changed with actors and artists and the lessons she's learned from when she was actively acting to how to adapt to the landscape these days 12:14: The impact Crystal's parents made on her to be an artist and a person of culture 13:25: One important thing Crystal has learned about herself since she has started running her own business 14:42: The future of The Black Latina Movement, including touring universities, different cities, more on the digital spaces and upcoming shows 17:19: Where Crystal is finding inspiration these days 18:52: Crystal shares a few of her favorite actors 20:02: The three apps Crystal uses the most to stay connected 20:54: Where you can find Crystal Shaniece Roman and The Black Latina Movement Follow Us: Newsletter: bitly.com/2QLEY8U Linkedin: bit.ly/2ZZUBxG Twitter: bit.ly/2Qp0SzK Instagram: bit.ly/2QLfEQc

    Latinoamérica 21
    Mujeres y poder en América Latina. 2da. parte

    Latinoamérica 21

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 26:57


    En el pasado episodio de La Conversación, conocimos los orígenes y las principales reformas políticas que han promovido una creciente presencia de la mujer en el ejercicio político efectivo de nuestras naciones latinoamericanas. Como vimos, mujer y poder en una misma frase sigue siendo una exigencia vigente y un proceso aún en desarrollo. Para esta segunda parte de la entrevista, conoceremos las experiencias recientes como la chilena, la mexicana, la argentina entre otras. Lo cual permitirá una visión completa de esta causa democrática, desde sus antecedentes, pasando por las reformas institucionales, y llegando a los desafíos prácticos. ¿Cuáles han sido las naciones reticentes a la paridad de género en la oferta electoral? ¿Cuáles son los compromisos jurídicos vigentes en la región? ¿Cuáles son los argumentos que han dificultado la ampliación de estos derechos políticos? De igual manera abordamos los principales temas de la agenda política de las mujeres a lo largo y ancho de la región, en términos de políticas públicas y de enriquecimiento de la esfera socio-cultural. En esta parte complementaria de la entrevista se busca además ampliar la comprensión del tema, más allá del alcance del Estado, con miras a una mayor participación ciudadana. Las entrevistadas Asumiendo el desafío de abordar esta temática tuve el honor de estar acompañado por Flavia Freidenberg y Julieta Suarez Cao. Dos grandes referentes intelectuales latinoamericanas de este tema de investigación y de activismo social. Flavia, es doctora en Ciencia Política por la Universidad de Salamanca, profesora e investigadora de la Universidad Autónoma Nacional de México. Quien además es la coordinadora de la Red de Politólogas desde donde ha desarrollado una intensiva labor de promoción a esta causa con el ya famoso hashtag #NoSinMujeres Por su parte, Julieta es doctora en Ciencia Política por la Universidad de Northwestern, así como investigadora y profesora en política comparada de la Universidad Católica de Chile. Coordinadora también de la Red de Politólogas. Destaca en su trayectoria profesional haber contribuido al diseño del "sistema electoral paritario de género" en las elecciones regionales de 2021 así como el implementado en la actual Convención Constitucional Chilena. Con su sabiduría y soporte testimonial, abordamos in extenso el mapa comparado de las inclusión femenina en la política de la América Latina de nuestros días. Mujeres y poder en América Latina fue el tema de estos dos episodios consecutivos de La Conversación. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/latinoamerica21/support

    Máximo desempeño
    Todo está en tu mente

    Máximo desempeño

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 67:42


    En el episodio # 167 de Máximo Desempeño conversamos con Diego Mejía, periodista deportivo colombiano radicado en España que por más de 20 años se ha dedicado a cubrir las principales carreras de deportes a motor como la Fórmula 1, NASCAR, IndyCar, rally y motociclismo, entre otras. Actualmente se desempeña como comentarista de las transmisiones de Gran Premio Fórmula 1, vistas cada fin de semana por cuatro millones de televidentes en América Latina y el Caribe. Su pasión por el automovilismo y su sueño de ser piloto nacieron cuando desde niño iba con su padre, Germán Mejía Pinto, a las carreras en el autódromo de Tocancipá. Esta afición lo llevó a ganar 10 títulos nacionales como piloto.Estudió Ingeniería industrial en la Universidad de los Andes, y poco después comenzó a trabajar cubriendo la participación del piloto Juan Pablo Montoya en Indycar y posteriormente en la Fórmula 1. Durante nuestra conversación Diego, a quien le dicen “la enciclopedia del Motosport”, compartió con nosotros su opinión sobre el papel de la mujer en el automovilismo y por qué cree que este es un deporte familiar. También nos reveló cómo ser perseverante – y en ocasiones terco – le ayudó a lograr un trabajo que para él no se siente para nada como tal. Conoce la historia de Máximo Desempeño de Diego Mejía, no te la puedes perder. Acompáñame.

    Mil Palabras
    #173 La reputación personal con Daniel Colombo

    Mil Palabras

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 37:37


    La reputación personalReputación personal: ¿Tienes idea de cómo te está percibiendo la gente? ¿Tienes claro que tu propia imagen es la que te puede ayudar a construir una mejor carrera así seas empleado o tengas tu propia empresa? Entrevista con Daniel Colombo, Máster Coach Ejecutivo.La reputación personal. Entrevista con Daniel ColomboHablamos de reputación personal. Desde que somos conscientes como seres humanos estamos tratando de agradar, de generar una buena percepción entre las demás personas.Incluso desde que somos niños así estemos en un "estado más salvaje" o con menos responsabilidades,  en el subconsciente sabemos que debemos generar una buena imagen entre los demás.Entiendo perfectamente aquella frase de "no somos monedita de oro para caerle bien a todo el mundo". Eso es totalmente cierto. Pero no nos digamos mentiras: es mejor generar una imagen positiva que una negativa. Es una conclusión muy básica como pudiera decir nuestro campeón mundial de boxeo en Colombia Pambelé: "es mejor tener buena imagen a tener mala imagen". Todos buscamos de cierta manera esa aprobación.Tengo una pequeña historia. Yo no sé qué tan conectada sea con el tema, pero es que en estos días me acorde de esa historia y me hizo reír impresionante. Se las quiero compartir porque los podcasts son chéveres para contar historias. La tengo atrancada, tengo que contarla. Sé que te va a gustar.Esa historia la cuento en este episodio y la conecto con el concepto de reputación personal.Así que este concepto lo desarrollamos con el experto Daniel Colombo. No te pierdas a Daniel explicando todo sobre reputación personal, y no te pierdas la historia.Daniel ColomboEs facilitador y master coach ejecutivo especializado en alta gerencia, profesional y equipos. Comunicador profesional, conferencista internacional, autor de 32 libros. Es un LinkedIn Top Voices América Latina. Coach certificado y miembro del John Maxwel Team y de ICF. Es mentor honorífico de la Red Global de Mentores.Daniel tiene varios libros entre ellos "ámate más, vive mejor Guía práctica para la superación personal y profesional". También es autor de "Organiza tu tiempo y disfruta de la vida",  de "Marca personal, cuando el producto eres tú" y de "100% coaching, guía practica para ser el súper héroe de tu vida" .Hoy nos comparte su conocimiento sobre reputación y marca personal.Recuerda por favor escucharnos y suscribirte en la plataforma que más te guste:Apple Podcast Spotify Google Podcast Para participar, escríbeme tus comentarios a santiagorios@milpalabras.com.coRecursos recomendados en este Podcastwww.danielcolombo.comlibros: www.amazon.com/author/danielcolombo Linkedin: Daniel ColomboInstagram: daniel.colomboYouTube: Daniel Colombo ComunidadFacebook: Daniel Colombo ComunidadTwitter: @danielcolomboprJuanes habla de “El que dirán” en este episodio de Historias que Nutren www.danielcolombo.com" rel="noopener" target="_blank">SpotifySuscríbete al Podcast de Mil Palabras enwww.milpalabras.comDescarga GRATIS el ebook “Cómo Crear un Podcast Corporativo”https://milpalabras.com.co/Quizás quieras escuchar el episodio anteriorhttps://www.milpalabras.com/172-la-posverdad-y-la-nueva-etica-de-los-medios/Otros podcast recomendados de nuestra redSomos CancionesEntrevistas e historias divertidas y personales con Gente que ama la música y sabe de música. (suenan canciones completas al lado de las historias).spoti.fi/3hWr020Historias que NutrenConversaciones con profesionales que tienen algo para nutrir tu vida en lo personal, lo profesional, lo espiritual y lo físico.bit.ly/historiasquenutrenDe Vuelta por San IgnacioCharlas donde conocerás la historia y la cultura de uno de los sitios emblemáticos de Medellín: El Distrito San Ignacio.bit.ly/distritosanignacioHistorias con colorRelatos inspiradores de personas que han transformado su vida y la de los demás a través del color.bit.ly/historiasconcolorConversaciones que transformanGrandes personalidades de la industria, la empresa privada y el sector público presentan su perspectiva sobre las prácticas y tendencias que transforman la sociedad.bit.ly/argoscqtInstrucciones para FlorecerConfesiones de mujeres sobresalientes que comparten sus instrucciones para realizarse personal y profesionalmente.bit.ly/instruccionespfLiderar con propósitoLos líderes de algunas de las empresas más grandes de Colombia entregan sus mejores prácticas de liderazgo a parir de casos reales.bit.ly/lcpdoriaReputación Personal, Marca Personal, Redes Sociales, podcast, Podcast Corporativo, Comunicación Organizacional, Recursos Humanos, Desarrollo Profesional, Desarrollo Personal, Comunicación Efectiva, Santiago Ríos, Mil Palabras