Podcasts about african american studies

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Study of the history, culture, and politics of black people from the United States

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Best podcasts about african american studies

Show all podcasts related to african american studies

Latest podcast episodes about african american studies

Velshi
Ali Velshi reports the latest on President Biden's trip abroad and more

Velshi

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 84:55


Ali Velshi is joined by NBC News Foreign Correspondent Janis Mackey Frayer, Senior Fellow at the Paul Tsai China Center at Yale Law Susan A. Thornton, Founding Director of the Boston University Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases Policy and Research & Associate Director at the National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories at Boston University Dr. Nahid Bhadelia, Political Strategist and Pollster Frank Luntz, Former Foreign Minister of Russia Andrei Kozyrev, Former Director for European Affairs at the National Security Council Lt. Col. (Ret) Alexander Vindman, Associate Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Services, University of California, San Francisco Dir. of Research, UCSF's Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health Dr. Diana Greene Foster, Professor of Center for African American Studies at Princeton University Imani Perry, andChair of the Deptment of African American Studies at Princeton University & MSNBC Political Analyst Eddie Glaude, Jr.

The New Yorker: Politics and More
The Other Kind of Racism in Buffalo

The New Yorker: Politics and More

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 35:37


Last weekend, an eighteen-year-old white man killed ten people and injured three in a Tops grocery store located in Buffalo's majority-Black East End. It was a deliberately planned attack, motivated by white-supremacist ideology; the gunman searched by Zip Code to find the highest concentration of Black people in his area, and then he drove two hundred miles to reach them. This segregation of Black people in an underserved neighborhood, in the third poorest city in the nation, is reflective of a more commonplace and more pervasive form of American racism. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor is a contributing writer at The New Yorker and a professor of African American Studies at Princeton. She joins the guest host Evan Osnos to discuss the politics of housing, policing, and education in Buffalo, and how these structural forces relate to the rise of violent right-wing extremism. “We are so enamored with the idea of racism as explicit, as you most certainly know it when you see it,” Taylor says. “But these other manifestations—that mean that forty per cent of Black children in Buffalo live under the poverty line, that thirty-eight per cent of Black adults live under the poverty line, that the quality of housing on the East Side of Buffalo is wood-based and deteriorating compared to the brick houses of the West Side of the city—these kinds of insidious forms of racism are allowed to continue unaddressed for decades.”

In the Telling
Episode 26: Melvin Collier: It Was Always In Me

In the Telling

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 42:12


In this episode, genealogist Melvin Collier talks about how he became involved in researching his family's history. From the age of 4, Melvin enjoyed listening to stories about his family. By 1993, he was actively searching archives for family records. Learn about how a DNA test and a trip to Ghana resulted in a surprise transcontinental family reunion. Melvin has been conducting historical and genealogical research for over 25 years. He's a former civil engineer, who later earned a Master of Arts degree in African American Studies at Clark Atlanta University, in 2008, with additional graduate coursework in Archival Studies from Clayton State University. For seven years, Melvin worked as a Library Associate/Archivist at the Robert W. Woodruff Library – Atlanta University Center. He now works for the Department of Defense in the Washington, D.C. area. Melvin has appeared on the NBC show, Who Do You Think You Are, as one of the expert genealogists on the Spike Lee episode in 2010. He has given numerous presentations on genealogy, slave ancestral research, and genetic genealogy at numerous events and conferences. Melvin is the author of three books: Mississippi to Africa: A Journey of Discovery (2008), 150 Years Later: Broken Ties Mended (2011) and Early Family Heritage: Documenting Our Legacy (2016). Music by Sean Bempong

New Books in American Studies
Glenda E. Gilmore, "Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination: An Artist's Reckoning with the South" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 72:41


In Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination: An Artist's Reckoning with the South (UNC Press, 2022), Glenda Gilmore meticulously documents and interprets the artistic life of Romare Bearden. Gilmore details four generations of the Bearden family and grounds the reader in places formative to Bearden like North Carolina, New York, and Pennsylvania. By centering Bearden's art, Gilmore mines the historical record and this artist's recollections which were at times conflicting, but nevertheless, shaped his creative imagination. This text weaves archival depth with visual art analysis, illuminating a richer understanding of this important twentieth-century artist and his work. Amanda Joyce Hall is a Ph.D. Candidate in History and African American Studies at Yale University. She tweets from @amandajoycehall. N'Kosi Oates is a Ph.D. Candidate in Africana Studies at Brown University. Find him on Twitter @NKosiOates. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Glenda E. Gilmore, "Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination: An Artist's Reckoning with the South" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 72:41


In Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination: An Artist's Reckoning with the South (UNC Press, 2022), Glenda Gilmore meticulously documents and interprets the artistic life of Romare Bearden. Gilmore details four generations of the Bearden family and grounds the reader in places formative to Bearden like North Carolina, New York, and Pennsylvania. By centering Bearden's art, Gilmore mines the historical record and this artist's recollections which were at times conflicting, but nevertheless, shaped his creative imagination. This text weaves archival depth with visual art analysis, illuminating a richer understanding of this important twentieth-century artist and his work. Amanda Joyce Hall is a Ph.D. Candidate in History and African American Studies at Yale University. She tweets from @amandajoycehall. N'Kosi Oates is a Ph.D. Candidate in Africana Studies at Brown University. Find him on Twitter @NKosiOates. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Biography
Glenda E. Gilmore, "Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination: An Artist's Reckoning with the South" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 72:41


In Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination: An Artist's Reckoning with the South (UNC Press, 2022), Glenda Gilmore meticulously documents and interprets the artistic life of Romare Bearden. Gilmore details four generations of the Bearden family and grounds the reader in places formative to Bearden like North Carolina, New York, and Pennsylvania. By centering Bearden's art, Gilmore mines the historical record and this artist's recollections which were at times conflicting, but nevertheless, shaped his creative imagination. This text weaves archival depth with visual art analysis, illuminating a richer understanding of this important twentieth-century artist and his work. Amanda Joyce Hall is a Ph.D. Candidate in History and African American Studies at Yale University. She tweets from @amandajoycehall. N'Kosi Oates is a Ph.D. Candidate in Africana Studies at Brown University. Find him on Twitter @NKosiOates. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books in African American Studies
Glenda E. Gilmore, "Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination: An Artist's Reckoning with the South" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 72:41


In Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination: An Artist's Reckoning with the South (UNC Press, 2022), Glenda Gilmore meticulously documents and interprets the artistic life of Romare Bearden. Gilmore details four generations of the Bearden family and grounds the reader in places formative to Bearden like North Carolina, New York, and Pennsylvania. By centering Bearden's art, Gilmore mines the historical record and this artist's recollections which were at times conflicting, but nevertheless, shaped his creative imagination. This text weaves archival depth with visual art analysis, illuminating a richer understanding of this important twentieth-century artist and his work. Amanda Joyce Hall is a Ph.D. Candidate in History and African American Studies at Yale University. She tweets from @amandajoycehall. N'Kosi Oates is a Ph.D. Candidate in Africana Studies at Brown University. Find him on Twitter @NKosiOates. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books in the American South
Glenda E. Gilmore, "Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination: An Artist's Reckoning with the South" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books in the American South

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 72:41


In Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination: An Artist's Reckoning with the South (UNC Press, 2022), Glenda Gilmore meticulously documents and interprets the artistic life of Romare Bearden. Gilmore details four generations of the Bearden family and grounds the reader in places formative to Bearden like North Carolina, New York, and Pennsylvania. By centering Bearden's art, Gilmore mines the historical record and this artist's recollections which were at times conflicting, but nevertheless, shaped his creative imagination. This text weaves archival depth with visual art analysis, illuminating a richer understanding of this important twentieth-century artist and his work. Amanda Joyce Hall is a Ph.D. Candidate in History and African American Studies at Yale University. She tweets from @amandajoycehall. N'Kosi Oates is a Ph.D. Candidate in Africana Studies at Brown University. Find him on Twitter @NKosiOates. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-south

New Books in Art
Glenda E. Gilmore, "Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination: An Artist's Reckoning with the South" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books in Art

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 72:41


In Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination: An Artist's Reckoning with the South (UNC Press, 2022), Glenda Gilmore meticulously documents and interprets the artistic life of Romare Bearden. Gilmore details four generations of the Bearden family and grounds the reader in places formative to Bearden like North Carolina, New York, and Pennsylvania. By centering Bearden's art, Gilmore mines the historical record and this artist's recollections which were at times conflicting, but nevertheless, shaped his creative imagination. This text weaves archival depth with visual art analysis, illuminating a richer understanding of this important twentieth-century artist and his work. Amanda Joyce Hall is a Ph.D. Candidate in History and African American Studies at Yale University. She tweets from @amandajoycehall. N'Kosi Oates is a Ph.D. Candidate in Africana Studies at Brown University. Find him on Twitter @NKosiOates. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/art

New Books in History
Glenda E. Gilmore, "Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination: An Artist's Reckoning with the South" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 72:41


In Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination: An Artist's Reckoning with the South (UNC Press, 2022), Glenda Gilmore meticulously documents and interprets the artistic life of Romare Bearden. Gilmore details four generations of the Bearden family and grounds the reader in places formative to Bearden like North Carolina, New York, and Pennsylvania. By centering Bearden's art, Gilmore mines the historical record and this artist's recollections which were at times conflicting, but nevertheless, shaped his creative imagination. This text weaves archival depth with visual art analysis, illuminating a richer understanding of this important twentieth-century artist and his work. Amanda Joyce Hall is a Ph.D. Candidate in History and African American Studies at Yale University. She tweets from @amandajoycehall. N'Kosi Oates is a Ph.D. Candidate in Africana Studies at Brown University. Find him on Twitter @NKosiOates. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Disability Matters
Kenya Loudd: Strength of Section 504 of Rehabilitation Act

Disability Matters

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 53:31


Joyce welcomes Kenya Loudd, a joint doctoral student at Yale University in the departments of History of Science and Medicine and African American Studies, to the show. During the show, she will discuss her research, which is centered around the nexus of race, disability, education, and institutionalization where she explores, on a large scale, the historical Black experience with disability. As we prepare to celebrate the 45th anniversary of the passage of section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, Kenya will also explain her involvement in the 1977 protest to pass the legislation and share her perspective of the strength of Section 504 today.

Taking Off The Mask
E87. The Divine Masculine And Feminine - with John Okhiulu, Creative Community Organizer & Healer

Taking Off The Mask

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 66:36


“In this society today, in this culture today that we live in… You have to have it all figured out before you can talk about it, or before you can speak on it. And we forget the school of life, we forget that we're constantly learning and evolving. And so you might need to express yourself to be able to receive that feedback and get those answers and be able to move and shake…” - John Okhiulu Ever Forward Club's Ashanti Branch is joined by John Okhiulu. A recent Stanford graduate, with degrees in African & African American Studies and Human Biology, John currently serves as a Tom Ford Philanthropic Fellow at the Decolonizing Wealth Project and Liberated Capital. Whether it is through his work or his art, John is all about promoting unity and liberation within individuals and amongst communities. John carries himself with a distinct focus and wisdom, and this can only come from his desire to generate self-reflection from honest dialogue - from taking off his mask. (1:50) Ashanti's introduction. (7:15) John introduces himself, his heritage, his professional work in the nonprofit world, his work in the arts, and his underlying goal to restore and heal. (13:35) John shares the front of his mask - humor, kindness, strength, zen. (16:20) Ashanti shares the front of his mask - serious, funny, hard-working. Then, John and Ashanti find common ground in their relationship to humor and self-talk. (22:20) John shares the back of his mask - sadness, worry, deep down anger and frustration, confidence - and then Ashanti relates to how John hides his confidence behind the mask. (27:35) Ashanti shares the back of his mask - fear of…, worry, stress. Then, John and Ashanti discuss the value in speaking up for the sake of dialogue, especially when you may not be completely informed. (31:05) Ashanti and John explore how they are trying to shift what traits they value in themselves, and they take the time to celebrate rest and relaxation as a radical act. (43:35) John looks back on his upbringing, and how he found a version of masculinity and femininity that best suited him and went beyond these gender categories. (52:35) Ashanti explains the importance of modeling the behavior he is teaching in his workshops. And John takes these explanations and applies to to building understanding across generations. (1:02:05) John expresses some final thoughts with the audience and calls for love and prayer. --- Connect with John Okhiulu: Twitter: twitter.com/souliberationar Instagram: instagram.com/souliberationary --- Create your own mask anonymously at millionmask.org If you are interested in being on the Face to Face podcast, email us at everforwardclub@gmail.com --- Connect with Ashanti Branch: Instagram: instagram.com/branchspeaks Facebook: facebook.com/BranchSpeaks Twitter: twitter.com/BranchSpeaks LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/ashantibranch Website: branchspeaks.com --- Send in a voice message: anchor.fm/branch-speaks/message

Write On, Mississippi!
Write On, Mississippi: Season 5, Chapter 2: Imani Perry

Write On, Mississippi!

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 33:23


Join our host Ebony Lumumba as she talks with author and professor, Imani Perry about her latest book, South to America: A Journey Below the Mason-Dixon to Understand the Soul of a Nation.Imani Perry is the Hughes-Rogers Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University. Perry is the author of Looking for Lorraine: The Radiant and Radical Life of Lorraine Hansberry, winner of the 2019 Bograd-Weld Biography Prize from the Pen America Foundation. She is also the author of Breathe: A Letter to My Sons; Vexy Thing: On Gender and Liberation; and May We Forever Stand: A History of the Black National Anthem. Perry, a native of Birmingham, Alabama, who grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Chicago, lives outside Philadelphia with her two sons. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Haymarket Books Live
Transformative Justice and Knowledge Production in Tech

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 92:01


Join contributors to the special edition of Logic Magazine, Beacons, for a discussion on Transformative Justice and Knowledge Production in Tech Techno-capitalism is re-negotiating the social contract but knowledge about technologies is too often sequestered behind the lock doors of industry. Black women researchers like Dr. Timnit Gebru who raised alarm about the racial and ecological implications of emergent technologies are systematically silenced and forced out. Additionally, corporate capture of academic departments has even further limited the space to do critical research. Given these obstacles, how can researchers both inside and outside of tech companies do the difficult work of research, critique, and resistance? When individualist opportunism is the guiding norm of knowledge production, how do we cultivate a practice of transformative justice in the context of tech research? What are the set of tools and collective histories Black people in the Americas and the Black global diaspora can draw on in order to care for each other in the process of producing research about tech? Get the new issue of Logic Magazine, Beacons, here: https://logicmag.io Speakers: Dr. Safiya U. Noble is an internet studies scholar and Professor of Gender Studies and African American Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) where she serves as the Co-Founder and Co-Director of the UCLA Center for Critical Internet Inquiry (C2i2). In 2021, she was recognized as a MacArthur Foundation Fellow (also known as the “Genius Award”) for her ground-breaking work on algorithmic discrimination, which prompted her founding of a non-profit, Equity Engine, to accelerate investment in companies, education, and networks driven by women of color. She is the author of a best-selling book on racist and sexist algorithmic bias in commercial search engines, entitled Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism (NYU Press), which has been widely-reviewed in scholarly and popular publications. Timnit Gebru is the founder and executive director of the Distributed Artificial Intelligence Research Institute (DAIR). Prior to that she was fired by Google in December 2020 for raising issues of discrimination in the workplace, where she was serving as co-lead of the Ethical AI research team. She received her PhD from Stanford University, and did a postdoc at Microsoft Research, New York City in the FATE (Fairness Accountability Transparency and Ethics in AI) group, where she studied algorithmic bias and the ethical implications underlying projects aiming to gain insights from data. Timnit also co-founded Black in AI, a nonprofit that works to increase the presence, inclusion, visibility and health of Black people in the field of AI, and is on the board of AddisCoder, a nonprofit dedicated to teaching algorithms and computer programming to Ethiopian highschool students, free of charge. Moderator: J Khadijah Abdurahman is an abolitionist whose research focus is predictive analytics in the child welfare system. They are the founder of We Be Imagining, a public interest technology project at Columbia University's INCITE Center and The American Assembly's Democracy and Trust Program. They are a Tech Impact Fellow at UCLA C2I2, co-founder of The Otherwise School: Tools and Techniques of Counter-Fascism alongside Sucheta Ghoshal's Inquilab at the University of Washington, HCDE. Recent edited publications include Logic Magazine: Beacons and ACM Interactions: Unmaking Democracy. This event is sponsored by Logic Magazine and Haymarket Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/WqAMkmX9AuE Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

In Focus with Carolyn Hutcheson
”Portraits from the 1950's Montgomery Bus Boycott” - TPR's In Focus - April 27, 2022

In Focus with Carolyn Hutcheson

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 9:13


Artist Lava Thomas talks with In Focus host Carolyn Hutcheson in a preview of her Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts Homecoming exhibition of drawings created from the mugshots of thirteen women who led the Montgomery Bus Boycott of the 1950s.  The exhibition curator is Associate Professor of African American Studies and Art History Bridget Cooks of the University of California Irvine.

Disrupted
Brittney Griner's detention in Russia, and the enduring legacy of sports activism

Disrupted

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 49:00


From Jesse Owens to Colin Kaepernick, some of the most iconic moments in sports history have been political. But some fans says there's no place for political activism in athletics.This hour on Disrupted, we revisit a conversation about sports activism and how it can be a platform for change. Las Vegas Aces forward A'ja Wilson talks about why she uses her platform to demand justice. Plus, the latest on the WNBA's Brittney Griner and her detention in Russia. GUESTS: Tamryn Spruill : Sports Journalist and author of forthcoming book Court Queens: The Story of the WNBA's Power, Passion and Perseverance On and Off the Court Amira Rose Davis : Assistant Professor of History and African-American Studies at Penn State University and author of forthcoming book Can't Eat a Medal: Black Women Athletes Under Jim Crow. A'ja Wilson: Las Vegas Aces forward, Olympic gold medalist and 3-time WNBA All-Star This episode was originally produced by Daniela Luna and Catie Talarski. The rest of our team includes James Szkobel-Wolff and Zshekinah Collier. Our interns are Michayla Savitt and Sara Gasparotto. Portions of this episode originally aired on December 9th, 2020. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sojourner Truth Radio
Fri.4.15.22 - ST - Roundtable

Sojourner Truth Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 61:36


Today on Sojourner Truth, journalist Laura Carlsen, peace activist and school board member Jackie Goldberg and Dr. Gerald Horne, Moores Professor of History & African-American Studies at the University of Houston, are back for this Friday's roundtable edition. Discussing the recent police killing of 26-year-old Patrick Lyoya in Grand Rapids Michigan, the latest on the Presidential election in France and the looming danger of a possible win by the far right. Could this win escalate the war in Ukraine? Also, Haitian immigrants are not being given the same refugee and asylum treatment as Ukrainian refugees in the U.S. and throughout Europe, it is undeniable but what can be done?

Real CRT
Ep. 12 - Amanda Lewis on How Schools Segregate Today

Real CRT

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 81:52


Amanda Lewis, Distinguished Professor of Sociology & African American Studies at the University of Illinois-Chicago, discusses her book Despite the Best Intentions: Why Racial Inequality Persists in Good Schools (with John Diamond, 2015) and the thought criminals discuss the stalled censorship laws in Ohio.

Sojourner Truth Radio
Thur.4.14.22. Ukraine. Dr. Gerald Horne

Sojourner Truth Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 20:17


Today on Sojourner Truth we discuss the latest developments in the Ukraine Russia war with Dr. Gerald Horne. Dr. Gerald Horne is Moores Professor of History & African-American Studies at the University of Houston, he has written more than 30 books. His most recently published book is “The Bittersweet Science: Racism, Racketeering and the Political Economy of Boxing.” He is also the author of “The Dawning of the Apocalypse:The Roots of Slavery, White Supremacy, Settler Colonialism, and Capitalism in the Long Sixteenth Century,“ White Supremacy Confronted: U.S. Imperialism and Anti-communism vs. the Liberation of Southern Africa, From Rhodes to Mandela,” “Jazz and Justice: Racism and the Political Economy of the Music, to name a few. Dr. Horne was granted the “Ida B. Wells and Cheik Anta Diop Award for Outstanding Scholarship and Leadership in Africana Studies.”

Her Story - Envisioning the Leadership Possibilities in Healthcare
70: Empowering Girls Across the Globe, with Jessica Posner Odede, CEO, Girl Effect; Co-founder and Board Member, Shining Hope for Communities

Her Story - Envisioning the Leadership Possibilities in Healthcare

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 27:36


Meet Jessica Posner Odede:Jessica Posner Odede is the CEO of Girl Effect. She is also a Co-founder and Board Member of Shining Hope for Communities (SHOFCO). Previously, she was an Associate Direction at Novastar Ventures. Jessica is the author of “Find Me Unafraid: Love, Loss and Hope in an African Slum.” She received a bachelor's in African American Studies from Wesleyan University. Key Insights:From Denver, Colorado to Nairobi, Kenya, Jessica Posner Odede is changing the world for adolescent girls. What is Girl Effect? Girl Effect utilizes media and technology to connect adolescent girls to services and opportunities, like education, finance, and healthcare. They work to decrease barriers and combat internalized gender norms, to create a world where girls are able to take control of their bodies, health, and livelihoods. (1:36)Creating Demand. Investments in services for adolescent girls has increased over time; however, the public and social sector fall short in decreasing the demand gap. Driving demand for important services requires tackling gender norms, decreasing barriers, and providing role models. (17:44)COVID's Impact on Women. There are 20 million girls out of school due to the pandemic, and many will never go back. The pandemic has decreased schooling and vaccination rates, and increased gender-based violence. The pandemic has created additional challenges for women across the world. (23:32)This episode is hosted by Julie Gerberding, M.D. She is a member of the Advisory Council for Her Story and the Chief Patient Officer and Executive Vice President at Merck.Relevant Links:Learn more about Girl EffectFollow Jessica on TwitterWatch “WISE On-Air: A Conversation On Girl Empowerment Through Media”

Conversations From The Frontlines: Real Talk, Real Change

Dr. David Turner grew up in Inglewood California and earned his Ph.D. in the Social and Cultural Studies in Education program at UC Berkeley, where his research focused on youth-based social movements, political identity, and resistance to the prison regime. David supports the movement for Black lives as a political education and research specialist, helping organizations with teach-ins, curriculum, and community engagement. David is currently a Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellow at the Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies at UCLA, under the guidance of Dr. Kelly Lytle Hernandez. 

Lit Match
BONUS Episode ft. READ UNTIL YOU UNDERSTAND: A beautiful example of how to start a memoir that blends literary criticism and nonfiction elements

Lit Match

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 30:40


Abigail K. Perry takes an in-depth look at READ UNTIL YOU UNDERSTAND by Farah Jasmine Griffin. In this special BONUS episode, Abigail uses the five commandments to analyze the structure in the first scene, and seven key questions every reader can use to determine if the first chapter will hook its readers. READ UNTIL YOU UNDERSTAND is a great example of how to start a memoir that blends other elements of nonfiction books like history and art. The goal of these bonus episodes is to provide writers with tools and examples to help them craft the best first chapters for their book before querying a literary agent. THE CHANDLER LEGACIES FIRST CHAPTER ANALYSIS (DOWNLOAD COMING SOON!): The Five Commandments: Scene Structure Inciting Incident Turning Point Crisis Question Climax Resolution 7 Key First Chapter Questions (Beyond Structure): *taken from THE WRITER'S GUIDE TO BEGINNINGS by Paula Munier* What kind of story is it? What is the story really about? Who is telling the story? Which character should they care about most? Where and when does the story take place? How should they feel about what's happening? Why should they care what happens next? About Jasmine Griffin Jr.: Farah Jasmine Griffin is the William B. Ransford Professor of English and Comparative Literature and African American Studies at Columbia University, where she also served as the inaugural Chair of the African American and African Diaspora Studies. Professor Griffin received her B.A. in History & Literature from Harvard and her Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale. She is the author or editor of eight books including Who Set You Flowin?: The African American Migration Narrative (Oxford, 1995), If You Can't Be Free, Be a Mystery: In Search of Billie Holiday (Free Press, 2001), and Harlem Nocturne: Women Artists and Progressive Politics During World War II (Basic Books, 2013). THE CHANDLER LEGACIES Blurb: Farah Jasmine Griffin has taken to her heart the phrase "read until you understand," a line her father, who died when she was nine, wrote in a note to her. She has made it central to this book about love of the majestic power of words and love of the magnificence of Black life. Griffin has spent years rooted in the culture of Black genius and the legacy of books that her father left her. A beloved professor, she has devoted herself to passing these works and their wisdom on to generations of students. Here, she shares a lifetime of discoveries: the ideas that inspired the stunning oratory of Frederick Douglass and Malcolm X, the soulful music of Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder, the daring literature of Phillis Wheatley and Toni Morrison, the inventive artistry of Romare Bearden, and many more. Exploring these works through such themes as justice, rage, self-determination, beauty, joy, and mercy allows her to move from her aunt's love of yellow roses to Gil Scott-Heron's "Winter in America." Griffin entwines memoir, history, and art while she keeps her finger on the pulse of the present, asking us to grapple with the continuing struggle for Black freedom and the ongoing project that is American democracy. She challenges us to reckon with our commitment to all the nation's inhabitants and our responsibilities to all humanity. Find us on our socials: Twitter: @abigailkperry | @FJasmineG Instagram: @abigailkperry | @farahjgriffinbooks Website: www.abigailkperry.com | www.farahjasminegriffin.com Read the books discussed in this episode: READ UNTIL YOU UNDERSTAND THE WRITER'S GUIDE TO BEGINNINGS

LibVoices
Episode 22: Dr. Safiya Noble on Knowledge Spaces, Passion, & Technology

LibVoices

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2022 36:53


Dr. Safiya Umoja Noble is an Associate Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in the Department of Information Studies, where she serves as the Co-Founder and Co-Director of the UCLA Center for Critical Internet Inquiry (C2i2). She also holds appointments in African American Studies and Gender Studies. She is a Research Associate at the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford and has been appointed as a Commissioner on the Oxford Commission on AI & Good Governance (OxCAIGG). She is a board member of the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative, serving those vulnerable to online harassment, and serves on the NYU Center Critical Race and Digital Studies advisory board. She is the author of a best-selling book on racist and sexist algorithmic bias in commercial search engines, entitled Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism (NYU Press), which has been widely-reviewed in scholarly and popular publications. Safiya is the co-editor of two edited volumes: The Intersectional Internet: Race, Sex, Culture, and Class Online and Emotions, Technology & Design. She currently serves as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies and is the co-editor of the Commentary & Criticism section of the Journal of Feminist Media Studies. She is a member of several academic journals and advisory boards and holds a Ph.D. and M.S. in Library & Information Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a B.A. in Sociology from California State University, Fresno, where she was recently awarded the Distinguished Alumni Award for 2018. Recently, she was named in the “Top 25  Doers, Dreamers, and Drivers of 2019” by Government Technology magazine.

AAS 21 Podcast
A Painter's Eye

AAS 21 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 33:35


Princeton AAS Podcast S2 E07 A Painter's Eye In this episode, we sit down with the legendary historian and artist Nell Painter to discuss her career and its connections to Black Studies. From reckoning with historical figures as individuals, to her life and work at Princeton, to her own works-in-progress, this podcast has something for everyone. Our hosts dive deep into Painter's legacy and the lessons she has for our present moment. The Culture of __ “This new and 'old' artist offers a self-portrait in starting over,” PBS NewsHour, July 23, 2018 “Nell Painter: Old In Art School,” GBH Forum Network, July 31, 2018 The Breakdown - Guest Info Nell Irvin Painter (nellpainter.com)  Nell Irvin Painter is Edwards Professor of American History, Emerita at Princeton University. She was Director of Princeton's Program in African-American Studies from 1997 to 2000. In addition to her doctorate in history from Harvard University, she has received honorary doctorates from Wesleyan, Dartmouth, SUNY-New Paltz, and Yale. Prof. Painter has published numerous books, articles, reviews, and other essays, including The History of White People. She has served on numerous editorial boards and as an officer of many different professional organizations, including the American Historical Association, the Organization of American Historians, the American Antiquarian Society, the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History, and the Association of Black Women Historians. Nell Painter (the painter formerly known as the historian Nell Irvin Painter) lives and works in Newark, New Jersey. Her work carries discursive as well as visual meaning, and is made in a manual and digital process. Using found images and digital manipulation, she reconfigures the past and self-revision through self-portraits. After a life of historical truth and political engagement with American society, her artwork represents freedom, including the freedom to be totally self-centered. See, Hear, Do “The Extraordinary Women of AAS Featuring Nell Painter,” Princeton University Department of African American Studies, March 28, 2022 Nell Irvin Painter, Southern History Across the Color Line (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2021 [2002]) Nell Painter, “American Whiteness Since Trump,” James Fuentes Gallery, 2020 “Nell Painter and Black Power in Print,” Museum of Fine Arts Boston, November 15, 2021 “Nell Irvin Painter to Deliver the Charles Homer Haskins Prize Lecture,” American Council of Learned Societies Annual Meeting, Friday, April 29, 2022 @ 6:00 PM EST (registration in link)

Queer Slam
Episode 45: “Boogeymen Dressed In Midnight And Moonshine”

Queer Slam

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 74:36


We begin with a wonderful set of open mic performers before jumping into our headliners— first is Charles Jensen (he/him) is the author of the poetry collection Nanopedia and six chapbooks of poems. His third collection, Instructions Between Takeoff and Landing, was published by the University of Akron Press in 2022. He hosts The Write Process, a podcast in which one writer tells the story of crafting one work from concept to completion. He lives in Los Angeles and directs the Writers' Program at UCLA Extension. Then, Ryan L. Gosling , a multi-hyphenate theater artist, poet, and model based in West Palm Beach Florida, with a Bachelor of Arts in Communications and African- American Studies, he attributes his competitive background in forensics, or speech and debate, as well as his deep dive into the Pan-African experience as the catalyst for his literary achievements. Ryan's Debut project BlackBoy Magic is a short collection of poetry divulging the experiences and perspectives of a Black, Fem, Gay, Christian coming of age. Following the author's mental and spiritual journey using the written language to reckon with the intersections of two marginalizing identities, Black and Queer.

The Takeaway
How Policymakers Are Twisting 'Defund the Police' into 'Refund the Police'

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 20:17


After police officer Derek Chauvin murdered George Floyd, people across the country demanded racial justice and amplified a national movement to “defund the police.” During that time, several large cities and counties promised to restructure local police budgets with plans to rein­vest in community programs. But those promises have largely faded or reversed course completely. In Minneapolis, where George Floyd was killed, a majority of the City Council pledged to dismantle the police department and create a new department of public safety in its place. But come last November, voters rejected the idea, and during that November election, many voters across the country favored mayoral candidates who campaigned on public safety and were “tough on crime.” Meanwhile the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act remains stalled in the Senate. The bill would have enacted sweeping federal police reform that would ban certain police techniques, including chokeholds and forms of potentially deadly force. It would have also ended qualified immunity, a legal provision that makes it difficult to sue police officers for any wrongdoing. In order to make sense of these new efforts to refund local police departments, we talked with Philip Atiba Goff, Co-founder and CEO of the Center for Policing Equity, and a Professor of African-American Studies and Psychology at Yale University.    

The Takeaway
How Policymakers Are Twisting 'Defund the Police' into 'Refund the Police'

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 20:17


After police officer Derek Chauvin murdered George Floyd, people across the country demanded racial justice and amplified a national movement to “defund the police.” During that time, several large cities and counties promised to restructure local police budgets with plans to rein­vest in community programs. But those promises have largely faded or reversed course completely. In Minneapolis, where George Floyd was killed, a majority of the City Council pledged to dismantle the police department and create a new department of public safety in its place. But come last November, voters rejected the idea, and during that November election, many voters across the country favored mayoral candidates who campaigned on public safety and were “tough on crime.” Meanwhile the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act remains stalled in the Senate. The bill would have enacted sweeping federal police reform that would ban certain police techniques, including chokeholds and forms of potentially deadly force. It would have also ended qualified immunity, a legal provision that makes it difficult to sue police officers for any wrongdoing. In order to make sense of these new efforts to refund local police departments, we talked with Philip Atiba Goff, Co-founder and CEO of the Center for Policing Equity, and a Professor of African-American Studies and Psychology at Yale University.    

THIS IS REVOLUTION >podcast
THIS IS REVOLUTION>podcast Ep. 265: The Panthers Can't Save Us Now f/ Cedric Johnson

THIS IS REVOLUTION >podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 67:49


We talk with Cedric Johnson about his latest book that details the futility of a Black Nationalist project.   Get Cedric's Book Here: https://www.versobooks.com/.../3937-the-panthers-can-t...   Cedric Johnson Cedric Johnson is associate professor of African American Studies and Political Science at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His book, Revolutionaries to Race Leaders: Black Power and the Making of African American Politics was named the 2008 W.E.B. DuBois Outstanding Book of the Year by the National Conference of Black Political Scientists. Johnson is the editor of The Neoliberal Deluge: Hurricane Katrina, Late Capitalism and the Remaking of New Orleans. His 2017 Catalyst essay, “The Panthers Can't Save Us Now: Anti-policing Struggles and the Limits of Black Power,” was awarded the 2018 Daniel Singer Millenium Prize. Johnson's writings have appeared in Nonsite, Jacobin, New Political Science, New Labor Forum, Perspectives on Politics, Historical Materialism, and Journal of Developing Societies. In 2008, Johnson was named the Jon Garlock Labor Educator of the Year by the Rochester Central Labor Council, AFL-CIO. He previously served on the representative assembly for UIC United Faculty Local 6456.   About TIR Thank you, guys, again for taking the time to check this out. We appreciate each and every one of you. If you have the means, and you feel so inclined, BECOME A PATRON! We're creating patron-only programming, you'll get bonus content from many of the episodes, and you get MERCH!   Become a patron now: https://www.patreon.com/join/BitterLakePresents Please also like, subscribe, and follow us on these platforms as well, especially YouTube!   THANKS Y'ALL   YouTube: www.youtube.com/thisisrevolutionpodcast   Twitch: www.twitch.tv/thisisrevolutionpodcast & www.twitch.tv/leftflankvets Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Thisisrevolutionpodcast/   Twitter: @TIRShowOakland Instagram: @thisisrevolutionoakland   Pascal Robert in Newsweek: https://www.newsweek.com/black-political-elite-serving...   Get THIS IS REVOLUTION Merch here: www.thisisrevolutionpodcast.com   Get the music featured on the show here: https://bitterlakeoakland.bandcamp.com/   Follow Djene Bajalan @djenebajalan Follow Kuba Wrzesniewski @DrKuba2

The_C.O.W.S.
The C.O.W.S. w/ Dr. Gerald Horne: RACE WAR! #Tojo

The_C.O.W.S.

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022


The Context of White Supremacy (C.O.W.S.) Radio Program welcomes the return of Dr. Gerald Horne. Currently employed at the University of Houston holding the Moores Professorship of History and African American Studies, Dr. Horne is a distinguished scholar, prolific author and historian. We've read his biography of Paul Robeson and discussed his fascinating study of professional boxing and White Supremacy (The Bittersweet Science). Speaking of The C.O.W.S. book club, we recently completed Philip K. Dick's #TheMan in the High Castle. One of the Asian characters is mocked called "Tojo." Gus was ignorant about Tojo, until Retired Firefighter informed me about former Japanese General Hideki Tojo, who was executed as a war criminal following World War II. Gus flipped to Dr. Horne's Race War and felt guilty for not having already read this extraordinary book. General Tojo is mentioned a few times. Dr. Horne details the counter-racist motivations that led Japan to battle Britain, the U.S... White people. Horne describes how central the theme of global White Supremacy is for the duration of the conflict. He gives fascinating data on the psychological wounds inflicted on Whites when Japan defeated the British - which resulted in some White men wearing dresses! And we'll discuss the failed efforts to produce a global non-white alliance. #RaceWar INVEST in The COWS – http://paypal.me/TheCOWS Cash App: https://cash.app/$TheCOWS CALL IN NUMBER: 720.716.7300 CODE: 564943#

In Her Space
Be Limitless, Be Boundless with Pamela Cone

In Her Space

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 55:10


PAMELA CONE MINISTER, WIFE, MOTHER, MIMI, AUTHOR & ENTREPRENEUR   Pamela Cone wholeheartedly believes being called to the ministry is the reason why she was born. She is extremely humbled by this God given assignment to "feed HIS sheep".   She is married to Elder Steven Cone, who she works alongside as his Assistant Pastor at Dominion, CLGI located in Dayton, Ohio. The couple has been in ministry for over 25 years. She is the mother of 3 beautiful children and Mimi to 2 (for now) adorable grandchildren.   She is the Founder and CEO of Curated Spaces, LLC and is actively engaged in her community and women's ministry. Minister Cone serves on the International Elect Ladies Board for The Church of the Living God International, Inc. and the Board of Directors for Women in Christian Leadership.  Pamela is currently pursuing her Master of Arts in Ministry – Biblical Studies at Indiana Wesleyan University and has an undergraduate degree in Communication Studies with a minor in African American Studies, and an associates' degree in Interior Design.    Find More About Pamela Cone https://www.facebook.com/pamelarcone

The Takeaway
Black Masculinity and 'The Slap' Felt Around the World

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 16:15


  The 94th Academy Awards became quite tense on Sunday when Will Smith got on stage and slapped Chris Rock in response to an insensitive joke that Rock made about Jada Pinkett Smith. Shortly after the incident, Smith won the Oscar for Best Actor and gave a speech about family and protecting the people you love. The takes on the incident have ranged from insightful to groan inducing to flat out racist. The Takeaway takes a step back and speaks with Mark Anthony Neal, James B. Duke Distinguished professor of African and African American Studies at Duke University and host of the podcast, "Left of Black," about what this moment revealed about Black masculinity and race in mass media.

The Takeaway
Black Masculinity and 'The Slap' Felt Around the World

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 16:15


  The 94th Academy Awards became quite tense on Sunday when Will Smith got on stage and slapped Chris Rock in response to an insensitive joke that Rock made about Jada Pinkett Smith. Shortly after the incident, Smith won the Oscar for Best Actor and gave a speech about family and protecting the people you love. The takes on the incident have ranged from insightful to groan inducing to flat out racist. The Takeaway takes a step back and speaks with Mark Anthony Neal, James B. Duke Distinguished professor of African and African American Studies at Duke University and host of the podcast, "Left of Black," about what this moment revealed about Black masculinity and race in mass media.

The Engineering Leadership Podcast
Group coaching, team accountability & ‘next-level' goals with Joy Dixon #78

The Engineering Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 46:01


Joy Dixon (Sr Manager, Engineering @ Salesforce) walks us through a unique goal-setting framework: Next Level Goals - to help you harness group accountability & accelerate their growth. Joy breaks down the process of getting buy-in from skeptical engineers, the power of peer accountability stand-ups, and why embodying your goals can be more effective than moving towards them.ABOUT JOY DIXONJoy Dixon (@JoyD1x0n) is a people-first, innovative, daring, JEDI Leader with strong technical prowess and deep business acumen. Joy has worked in the tech industry for 20+ years as a people leader, software engineer, technical trainer, and network administrator. Joy holds a Bachelor's degree in African-American Studies, a Master's degree in Software Engineering, and several professional certifications in software development and Agile methodologies.In the course of a diverse career, Joy has… Led and grown development teams to deliver engineering excellence in code, collaboration, and commitment all while modeling collective genius and having fun. Designed and developed applications using several programming languages and in various environments. In addition, she has configured and administered networks for global companies. Designed and delivered online and in-person, web, animation, and game development courses. Started a software development training company, Mosaic Presence to expand opportunities, cultivate community, and promote the Mosaic.As a self-described sunflower in a bed of roses, Joy conceives and constructs new paths that inspire innovation and transform cultures. She gives 100%+ to herself, team, and work modeling care, creativity, and excellence. Joy is a courageous communicator whose authenticity and integrity are valued and admired. Along with the above, Joy connects people and ideas in a heartfelt effort to support the success of everyone.Additionally, Joy loves music, animation, women's basketball, the Golden State Warriors, and motorcycles. Joy lives by the following quote from the world-record-holding Olympic champion and international sports icon, Wilma Rudolph: "'I can't' are two words that have never been in my vocabulary. I believe in me more than anything in this world.""Don't tell people 'I like to run.' Tell them 'I'm a runner!'It makes a world of difference! So you are embodying that person or those attributes that you want to have. And then from there, you move forward.Because if you say 'I'm moving towards my goal.' Then you're also saying 'I'm not there yet.' But if you embody the end, ‘I'm already there!' Right?We know you're not holy already there, but you embody the end and then, act as if! And it makes a world of difference. You make so much more progress.- Joy Dixon  Check out our friends and sponsor, Jellyfish. Jellyfish helps you align engineering work with business priorities and enables you to make better strategic decisions.Learn more at Jellyfish.co/elcSHOW NOTES:Team building happens in the in-between moments (2:07)Get the right things done with smaller goals (5:52)Help eng team members make realistic business impacts (8:59)How to implement the Next Level framework with your eng teams (12:07)The magic wand: monthly accountability check-ins (16:42)Leverage peers for accountability, not just managers (18:52)The network effects of group accountability (19:47)Embodying your goals vs. moving towards them (25:01)Getting buy-in from skeptical engineers (29:03)How to measure and track abstract goals (31:46)Apply BRAVING to engineering leadership (34:34)Rapid Fire Questions (37:40)LINKS AND RESOURCES(book) Awaken the Giant Within by Tony Robbins - book Joy referenced talking about “constant and never-ending improvement(book) The Art of Gathering by Priya Parker - book referenced by Patrick discussing facilitation principles(book) Dare to Lead by Brene Brown - book referenced by Joy discussing BRAVING framework applied within her engineering team meetings(book) Linchpin by Seth Godin - what Joy is reading now

Swag Bender with Dr. Dariel
Swag Bender Episode 040 “From College Basketball to PhD” w/guest José González

Swag Bender with Dr. Dariel "DT" Henry

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 33:33


José González is a first-generation Afro-Caribbean immigrant who grew up in Holyoke, Massachusetts. His educational journey has been nontraditional. After graduating from his community college, he transferred to Westfield State University and earned a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology with a double concentration in Ethnic Studies and Philosophy. In 2020, he earned his Master of Arts degree in African American Studies at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Currently, José is a first-generation doctoral student in the W. E. B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies at UMass-Amherst. Apart from his intellectual endeavors, José is an artist who uses Hip Hop as a medium to help build community, facilitate healing, create social change, and raise consciousness and awareness around social issues. His stage name is Dr. Zae and you can find his music on all platforms.

Berkeley Talks
A Poetry for the People conversation

Berkeley Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 83:09


The Department of African American Studies at UC Berkeley's 2021-22 Critical Conversations speaker series is a celebration of the life and legacy of June Jordan, an award-winning poet, activist and longtime professor in the department.At Berkeley, Jordan founded the Poetry for the People program, where writers of all levels wrote and showcased their own poems, and taught poetry to other university students, high school students and community members.In this episode of Berkeley Talks, two Berkeley alumni and former students of Poetry for the People — Samiya Bashir, an associate professor of creative writing at Reed College, and Solmaz Sharif, an assistant professor of English at Arizona State University — read their work, share some of their favorite poems by Jordan, and discuss the Poetry for the People program and the impact it continues to have on their lives.The Feb. 28 conversation was moderated by Chiyuma Elliot, a poet and associate professor in the Department of African American Studies at Berkeley.Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News.Follow Berkeley Talks and review us on Apple Podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Takeaway
The Intersection of Motherhood and the Supreme Court

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 15:43


On day one of her confirmation hearings, Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson addressed her daughters directly: "Girls, I know it has not been easy, as I have tried to navigate the challenges of juggling my career and motherhood. And I fully admit, I did not always get the balance right. But I hope that you've seen that with hard work, determination and love it can be done." This isn't the first time motherhood has played a role in Supreme Court hearings. Justice Amy Coney Barrett famously spoke about being a mother when she was getting confirmed. We look at the intersection of motherhood and the Supreme Court with Irin Carmon,  Senior Correspondent, New York magazine and Nadia Brown, Professor of Government, chair of the Women's and Gender Studies Program and affiliate in the African American Studies program at Georgetown University. Continue watching the the hearings live. 

The Takeaway
The Intersection of Motherhood and the Supreme Court

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 15:43


On day one of her confirmation hearings, Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson addressed her daughters directly: "Girls, I know it has not been easy, as I have tried to navigate the challenges of juggling my career and motherhood. And I fully admit, I did not always get the balance right. But I hope that you've seen that with hard work, determination and love it can be done." This isn't the first time motherhood has played a role in Supreme Court hearings. Justice Amy Coney Barrett famously spoke about being a mother when she was getting confirmed. We look at the intersection of motherhood and the Supreme Court with Irin Carmon,  Senior Correspondent, New York magazine and Nadia Brown, Professor of Government, chair of the Women's and Gender Studies Program and affiliate in the African American Studies program at Georgetown University. Continue watching the the hearings live. 

The Working Artist Project
Courtney Bryant: Teaching the Diaspora of Black American Music

The Working Artist Project

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 61:26


Courtney Bryan, a native of New Orleans, La, is “a pianist and composer of panoramic interests” (New York Times). Her music is in conversation with various musical genres, including jazz and other types of experimental music, as well as traditional gospel, spirituals, and hymns. Focusing on bridging the sacred and the secular, Bryan's compositions explore human emotions through sound, confronting the challenge of notating the feeling of improvisation. Bryan has academic degrees from Oberlin Conservatory (BM), Rutgers University (MM), and Columbia University (DMA) with advisor George Lewis, and completed postdoctoral studies in the Department of African American Studies at Princeton University. Bryan is the Albert and Linda Mintz Professor of Music at Newcomb College in the School of Liberal Arts, Tulane University and a Creative Partner with the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra. She was the 2018 music recipient of the Herb Alpert Award in the Arts, a 2018 Hermitage Fellow, a 2019 Bard College Freehand Fellow, a 2019-20 recipient of the Samuel Barber Rome Prize in Music Composition, a 2020 United States Artists Fellow, and a 2020-21 Civitella Ranieri Fellowship recipient.

Culture Stew
A Historical View on Civil Rights with Dr. Randal Jelks

Culture Stew

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 53:50


Join us on another special episode where Maria Morukian and guest host, Roger Moreano welcome Dr. Randal Jelks to Culture Stew. Come along as the three speak about the historical trends of civil rights, Dr. Jelks' background, and his experience with DEI as a democratic process. “Randal Maurice Jelks is Professor of African and African American Studies and American  Studies. He is the co-editor of the academic journal American Studies (AMSJ). Jelks is an award-winning author and documentary film producer.” Learn more about Dr. Jelks and his books:African Americans in the Furniture City: The Struggle for Civil Rights Struggle in Grand Rapids,  Benjamin Elijah Mays, Schoolmaster of the Movement: A Biography,  Faith and Struggle in the  Lives of Four African Americans: Ethel Waters, Mary Lou Williams, Eldridge Cleaver,  Muhammad Ali and Letters to Martin: Meditations on Democracy in Black America. Connect with Dr. Jelks here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/randalmauricejelks

Green Connections Radio -  Women Who Innovate With Purpose, & Career Issues, Including in Energy, Sustainability, Responsibil

In honor of the confirmation hearings for Ketanji Brown Jackson to the U.S. Supreme Court, this is a replay of Joan's interview with Dr. Marcia Chatelain of Georgetown University on the role of Black Women Suffragists in women getting the right to vote. This episode was recorded under our previous name, Green Connections Radio, and before President Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris were elected. When the 19th Amendment ratified that women have the right to vote in this country, black women were not included. However, black women suffragists were quite strategic , as you'll hear as you listen to professor Chatelain, professor of history and African American Studies at Georgetown University. You'll hear:  How black women managed the racial tensions within the suffrage movement. Stories of remarkable black women suffragists who played a critical role in successful passage of the Amendment. Strategies the black women suffragists employed to make sure their voices were heard. Her surprising take on the impact of Kamala Harris as the Democratic VP Nominee. Plus, insightful career advice! Also read Joan's Forbes blog on Marica's insights here, and for more on the suffrage movement, including Joan's sold-out even at the Newseum go here. You'll also want to listen to: Newseum event on Suffrage Movement, Lori Harrison-Kahan on the role of women journalists in the suffrage cause and how the #MeToo movement began in suffrage Brooke Kroeger, Author of “The Suffragents” on the male supporters of women's vote (Is Joe Biden a “Suffragent” for choosing Senator Kamala Harris as his VP) Jennifer Palmieri, Former Communications Director for Hillary Clinton's 2016 campaign and President Obama, and author of “Dear Madam President.” Thank you for subscribing to Electric Ladies Podcast on Apple Podcasts or iHeartRadio and leaving us a review! Also, join our Private Facebook Group and share your insights! Join our mailing list to stay up to date on the top podcasts! Reach us on Twitter @joanmichelson  

Industry Standard w/ Barry Katz
Adam Leon (Part 2 of 2)

Industry Standard w/ Barry Katz

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2022 45:16


ADAM LEON is a critically acclaimed director and writer. He was born and raised in Manhattan and still proudly resides there. His three feature films, "Gimme the Loot" (2012), "Tramps" (2016), and "Italian Studies" (2022) all depict the various parts of New York where he grew up thus making the iconic city a character in and of itself that resonates distinctively in each film. "Italian Studies," his most recent film, stars Vanessa Kirby, Fred Hechinger, Maya Hawke, and features the music of Oscar nominated composter Nicholas Britell. Leon graduated from University of Pennsylvania with a B.A. in African American Studies. He began his career as a production assistant and coordinator for some of the industry's most prestigious film festivals. Adam has now come full circle as a filmmaker whose cinematic contributions have received critical praise and recognition from many of the very same festivals where he got his start. He won the SXSW Grand Jury Award in 2012 for "Gimme the Loot" and in the same year was nominated for the Camera D'or award at The Cannes Film Festival where the movie premiered internationally. "Gimme the Loot" also received the Independent Spirit Award for "Someone to Watch" in 2013 and was nominated for Independent Spirit's "Best First Film" award. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/industry-standard-w-barry-katz/support

Industry Standard w/ Barry Katz
Adam Leon (Part 1 of 2)

Industry Standard w/ Barry Katz

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2022 42:31


ADAM LEON is a critically acclaimed director and writer. He was born and raised in Manhattan and still proudly resides there. His three feature films, "Gimme the Loot" (2012), "Tramps" (2016), and "Italian Studies" (2022) all depict the various parts of New York where he grew up thus making the iconic city a character in and of itself that resonates distinctively in each film. "Italian Studies," his most recent film, stars Vanessa Kirby, Fred Hechinger, Maya Hawke, and features the music of Oscar nominated composter Nicholas Britell. Leon graduated from University of Pennsylvania with a B.A. in African American Studies. He began his career as a production assistant and coordinator for some of the industry's most prestigious film festivals. Adam has now come full circle as a filmmaker whose cinematic contributions have received critical praise and recognition from many of the very same festivals where he got his start. He won the SXSW Grand Jury Award in 2012 for "Gimme the Loot" and in the same year was nominated for the Camera D'or award at The Cannes Film Festival where the movie premiered internationally. "Gimme the Loot" also received the Independent Spirit Award for "Someone to Watch" in 2013 and was nominated for Independent Spirit's "Best First Film" award. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/industry-standard-w-barry-katz/support

New Books in African American Studies
Brian J. Peterson, "Thomas Sankara: A Revolutionary in Cold War Africa" (Indiana UP, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 71:33


Thomas Sankara: A Revolutionary in Cold War Africa (Indiana University Press, 2021) by Brian J. Peterson is a thoroughly researched biography of Thomas Sankara, the revolutionary leader of Burkina Faso. Peterson sketches Sankara's rise to power in the early 1980s and focuses specifically on how his military experiences, educational background, and community of mentors, family, and friends shaped his radicalism. Peterson frames Sankara within a second-generation of anti-colonial radicals who both admired anti-colonial luminaries like Kwame Nkrumah and Julius Nyerere, but also refined their anti-colonial perspective to critique the limits of their leadership. We learn that during this moment of late-Cold War and decolonization, Sankara used his international platforms to resist and condemn neo-colonialism, imperialism, and European-American networks of surveillance and subterfuge while tackling corruption, poverty, gender discrimination, and environmental issues in Burkina Faso. Sankara's fierce commitment to revolutionary politics intimated the U.S. and French governments, Western-aligned African nations, and Burkinabé officials who ultimately conspired to assassinate him in 1987. Peterson's Thomas Sankara examines the powerful legacies of an incredible revolutionary figure and offers a foundation for understanding contemporary anti-imperialist politics in Burkina Faso and beyond. Amanda Joyce Hall is a Ph.D. Candidate in History and African American Studies at Yale University. She is writing an international history on the global movement against South African apartheid during the 1970s and 1980s. She tweets from @amandajoycehall. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books in Military History
Brian J. Peterson, "Thomas Sankara: A Revolutionary in Cold War Africa" (Indiana UP, 2021)

New Books in Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022