Podcasts about historically

The study of the past as it is described in written documents

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Veterinary Viewfinder Podcast
A Flurry of Frenchies: How Will Winston's Win Affect Vets and Pet Parents?

Veterinary Viewfinder Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 27:38


Winston, an unarguably adorable French bulldog, took top honors at the 2022 National Dog Show. Historically, breeds crowned Best in Show surged in popularity. Will Winston's win result in a flurry of French bulldogs this year? Viewfinders, this is another potentially sticky situation for veterinary professionals. Hosts Dr. Ernie Ward and Beckie Mossor, RVT, discuss the dichotomy of a French bulldog winning the crown jewel of US dog shows in the same year countries such as Norway are banning them. The pair review the diverging differences in attitudes toward brachycephalic breeds in European countries and the US. Our hosts share ideas to bridge the divide between breeders, breed enthusiasts, and rescue/shelter communities. Dr. Ward expresses his support for identifying and registering responsible breeders and the need for state and national veterinary organizations to get involved. Beckie reveals that loving and supporting pure breeds and rescue pets aren't mutually exclusive. She calls on veterinary professionals and breeders to share how they can - and should - work together. Viewfinders, do you anticipate a flurry of Frenchies in your clinic? What are you do to educate clients on the unique needs of brachycephalic breeds? Please share your thoughts and opinions on one of our social media platforms or email us at VeterinaryViewfinder@gmail.com.

The Intersection
What's Really Holding Black Women Back At Work… And It's Not What You Think

The Intersection

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 39:56


Historically, women, and black women, in particular, have been treated in ways that actively hinder their professional development. Laura Knights, founder and CEO of Knights Consulting LLC, joins me to discuss the systemic barriers and what we can do to dismantle them.  You'll hear us discussing ideas, such as: The glass ceiling. This concept does not accurately describe the experience of black women at work. According to research conducted by McKinsey, it doesn't fit most women at all. The biggest barrier is what they coin the “broken rung”- the first step into leadership. Systemic barriers. The most common systemic barriers that actively stunt black women's professional growth include a lack of quality feedback, mentoring, and corporate resistance to doing equity work. How black women experience burnout. A Black Women Thriving report shared that burnout is a survival mode for black women, which is also applicable on a societal level, not just in the workplace.  Imposter syndrome. The original research for imposter syndrome excluded black women, so it does not reflect their lived experiences. Using the framework of imposter syndrome creates false narratives about themselves that black women internalize, when the barriers to their success are external and systemic.  Resources Laura Knights on LinkedIn | Twitter | Website Reframing Imposter Syndrome Black Women Leading Every Level Leads

iForumRx.org
Level Up! An Abstinence Game for Smoking Cessation

iForumRx.org

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 15:51


Smoking remains a habit for many people, even among those who are motivated to quit. Historically, most smoking cessation interventions have targeted individuals who are ready to quit smoking in the next 30 days, overlooking those who are not yet ready to quit.  Perhaps an abstinence game, Take a Break, can move people in pre-contemplation and contemplation toward quitting. Guest Authors:  Anna Rhett, PharmD and Ha K. Pham, PharmD, BCACP Music by Good Talk

Frenemies Sports
NFL Week 11 Pick'em: Jake makes his third massive wager!

Frenemies Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 33:18


The NFL had a fantastic week 11 and the Frenemies made their picks for their game. Hunter, Carter, and Jack are battling for that first place spot in the Pick'ems. Jake however had a new battle this week. Historically, Jake has made massive wagers such as a pierced nipple and getting punched by a D-1 defensive tackle. In this episode, jake was so determined to pick a game right that he decided if the team he picked lost, then he would wax his entire right leg! Tune in to see if Jake's team kept his leg hairy! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/fsports/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/fsports/support

The Lunar Society
Edward Glaeser - Cities, Terrorism, Housing, & Remote Work

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 57:08


Edward Glaeser is the chair of the Harvard department of economics, and the author of the best books and papers about cities (including Survival of the City and Triumph of the City).He explains why:* Cities are resilient to terrorism, remote work, & pandemics,* Silicon Valley may collapse but the Sunbelt will prosper, * Opioids show UBI is not a solution to AI* & much more!Watch on YouTube. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any other podcast platform. Read the full transcript here.Follow me on Twitter for updates on future episodes.If you enjoy this episode, I would be super grateful if you shared it. Post it on Twitter, send it to your friends & group chats, and throw it up wherever else people might find it. Can't exaggerate how much it helps a small podcast like mine.A huge thanks to Graham Bessellieu for editing this podcast and Mia Aiyana for producing its transcript.Timestamps(0:00:00) - Mars, Terrorism, & Capitals (0:06:32) - Decline, Population Collapse, & Young Men (0:14:44) - Urban Education (0:18:35) - Georgism, Robert Moses, & Too Much Democracy? (0:25:29) - Opioids, Automation, & UBI (0:29:57) - Remote Work, Taxation, & Metaverse (0:42:29) - Past & Future of Silicon Valley (0:48:56) - Housing Reform (0:52:32) - Europe's Stagnation, Mumbai's Safety, & Climate ChangeTranscriptMars, Terrorism, & CapitalsDwarkesh Patel 0:00:00Okay, today, I have the pleasure of speaking with Professor Edward Glaeser, who is the chair of the Harvard Department of Economics, and author of some of the best books and papers about cities. Professor Glazer, thanks for coming on The Lunar Society.Edward Glaeser 0:00:25Oh, thank you so much for having me on! Especially given that The Lunar Society pays homage to one of my favorite moments in urban innovation in Birmingham during the 18th century.Dwarkesh Patel 0:00:26Oh wow, I didn't even catch that theme, but that's a great title. My first question is, What advice would you give to Elon Musk about building the first cities on Mars?Edward Glaeser 0:00:35[laughs] That's a great question. I think that demand for urbanism in Mars is going to be relatively limited. Cities are always shaped by the transportation costs that are dominant in the era in which they're created. That both determines the micro-shape of the city and determines its macro future. So cities on Mars are, of course, going to be limited by the likely prohibitive cost of traveling back and forth to the mother planet. But we also have to understand what cars people are going to be using on Mars. I assume these are all going to be Teslas, and everyone is going to be driving around in some appropriate Tesla on Mars. So it's going to be a very car-oriented living experience. I think the best strategy would be to create a fairly flexible plan, much like the 1811 grid plan in New York, that allows entrepreneurs to change land use over time and put a few bets on what's necessary for infrastructure and then just let the city evolve organically. Usually, the best way is to put more trust in individual initiative than central planning–– at least in terms of micromanaging what goes where. Dwarkesh Patel 0:01:58Gotcha. Now, since 9/11, many terrorist groups have obviously intended to cause harm to cities. But by and large, at least in Western countries, they haven't managed to kill off thousands of people like they were able to do during 9/11. What explains this? Do you think cities are just more resilient to these kinds of attacks than we would have otherwise thought? Or are the terrorists just not being creative enough?Edward Glaeser 0:02:20I don't know. There's also the question of what the objectives are. Even for the 9/11 terrorists, their end game was not to kill urbanites in America. It was to effect change in Saudi Arabia or in the Middle East more generally. We've also protected our cities better. If you think about it, two things go on simultaneously when you collect economic activity in one place in terms of defense: one of which is they become targets–– and of course, that's what we saw on 9/11; it's hard to think of a symbol that's clearer than those twin towers. But at the same time, they're also a defensible space. The origin of the urban agglomeration and use for cities and towns was the fact that they could be walled settlements. Those walls that brought together people collectively for defense are the ultimate reason why these towns came about. The walls provided protection.I think the same thing has been playing out with cities over the past 20 years. Just as New York was a target, it was also a place where post-2001, the city ramped up its anti-terrorism efforts. They put together a massive group as London had previously done. The cameras that implemented congestion pricing in London were the same cameras that used against the Irish terrorists. So both effects went on. I think we've been fortunate and that we've shown the strength of cities in terms of protecting themselves.Dwarkesh Patel 0:03:52If you look throughout ancient world history, there are so many examples of empires that are basically synonymous with their capital cities (ex. Rome or Athens, or Sparta). But today, you would never think of America as the ‘Washingtonian Empire.' What is the explanation for why the capital city has become much less salient in terms of the overall nation? Is there a Coasian answer here?Edward Glaeser 0:04:20There are specific things that went on with English offshoot colonies where in many cases, because they recognized the tendency of the capital city to attract lots of excess goodies that had been taken from elsewhere in the country, they located the capital city in a remote place. It's actually part of the story of the Hamilton musical in The Room Where it Happens. Part of the deal was about moving the capital of the US to a relatively remote Virginia location rather than having it be in Philadelphia, New York. That was partially to reflect the fact that the South needed to be protected against all of the extra assets going to New York and Philadelphia.So, whether or not this is Canberra or Ottawa, you see all of these English offshoot places without their capitals in the big metropoles. Whereas traditionally, what's happened in these places that have been around for centuries, is that even if the capital didn't start off as the largest city, it became the largest city because centuries of French leaders thought their business was to take wealth from elsewhere in France and make Paris great. I think the French Empire was as synonymous with Paris as most of those ancient empires were with their capital city. I guess the question I could throw back to you is, what are places where this is not true? Moscow, St. Peter's, and Beijing are examples. Do we think that Beijing is less synonymous with China than the Roman Empire is with Rome? Maybe a little–– possibly just because China is so big and Beijing is a relatively small share of the overall population of China. But it's more so certainly than Washington, D.C. is with the U.S. Decline, Population Collapse, & Young MenDwarkesh Patel 0:06:32That's a really interesting answer. Once a city goes through a period of decline (maybe an important industry moved out, or maybe it's had a sequence of bad governance), are you inclined to bet that there will be some sort of renewal, or do you think that things will continue to get worse? In other words, are you a momentum trader, or are you a reversion to the mean trader when it comes to cities?Edward Glaeser 0:06:54I can tell you different answers for different outcomes. For housing prices, I can tell you exactly what we know statistically about this, which is at higher frequencies, let's say one year, housing prices show wickedly large levels of momentum. For five years or more, they show very significant levels of mean reversion. It's a short-term cycle in housing prices followed by decline. Population just shows enormous persistence on the downside. So what happens is you typically will have an economic shock. Detroit used to be the most productive place on the planet in 1950, but a bunch of shocks occurred in transportation technology which made it no longer such a great place to make cars for the world. It takes a century for the city to respond in terms of its population because the housing is sticky. The housing remains there. So between the 50s and 60s, the population declines a little bit, and prices drop. They drop sufficiently far that you're not going to build a lot of new housing, but people are going to still stay in the houses. They're not going to become vacant. So, the people are still there because the houses are still there. During the 60s to 70s, the population drops a  little bit further and prices kind of stay constant, but still it's not enough to build new housing. So the declines are incredibly persistent, and growth is less so. So on the boom side, you have a boom over a 10-year period that's likely to mean revert and it's not nearly as persistent because it doesn't have this sticky housing element to it. In terms of GDP per capita, it's much more of a random walk there in terms of the straight income stuff. It's the population that's really persistent, which is, in fact, the reality of a persistent economy.Dwarkesh Patel 0:08:44Interesting. Why don't Americans move as much as they used to a century ago? So you have a paper from 2018 titled Jobs in the Heartland, where you talk about how there's increasing divergence between the unemployment rates between different parts of America. Why don't Americans just move to places where there are better economic circumstances? Edward Glaeser 0:09:04I want to highlight one point here, which is that you said “unemployment rate”, and I want to replace that with non-employment rate. That's partially what we're seeing now. It looks like America's labor force couldn't be better in terms of the low levels of unemployment, but what's happened over the last 50 years is there has been a very large rise in the share of prime-age men who are not in the labor force. So they've stopped looking for work, and those guys are miserable. It's not that those guys are somehow rather productive and happy,–– this is a very bad outcome for prime-age men. I'm separating men from women, not to say that the female labor markets aren't just as important, just as fascinating, just as critical. But labor force participation means something different for many women than it does for men. There are many women who are not in the labor force who are doing things that are enormously productive socially, like caring for their children and caring for their families.I wish it were symmetric across the genders. It just isn't true. I mean, there just are very few men not in the labor force who are doing anything much other than watching television. It's just a very different thing. So yes, there are big differences in the non-employment rate. There are some parts of America where, for much of the past decade, one in four prime-age men have been jobless. It's an enormous gap. The question is, why don't they get out?I think the answer is really twofold: one of which is the nature of how housing markets have frozen up. Historically, the differences in housing costs in the US weren't that huge across places. Most parts of America had some kind of affordable housing, and it was relatively easy to put up. At the dawn of the 20th century, these were kit helms sold by Sears and Roebuck that sprung up by the thousand. You bought the kit from Sears and Roebuck, and you just built it yourself. After World War II, it was mass-produced homes in places like Levittown.For most of the last 50 years, in places like coastal California or the East Coast, building has just become far more difficult. With the decline of mass-produced housing, it's become far more expensive, and it becomes harder and harder for relatively low-income people to find opportunities in places that have high levels of income, and high levels of opportunity. That's partially why there's not just a general decline in mobility, there's a decline in directed mobility for the poor. Historically, poor people moved from poor areas to rich areas. That's pretty much stopped. In part, that's because rich areas just have very, very expensive housing. The other thing is the rising importance of the informal safety net.So if you think about most particularly prime-aged men, they're not receiving significant handouts from the government except if they're on disability. But they will typically have some form of income, some form of housing that's being provided for them by someone other than themselves. A third of them are living in their parent's homes. That informal safety net is usually very place dependent. Let's say you're living in Eastern Kentucky; it's not like your parents were going to buy you a condo in San Francisco. You can still have your own bedroom, but you can't go anywhere else and still get that level of support. And so that's, I think, another reason why we're increasingly stuck in place.The third you mentioned, is that a third of the non-employed population of young men or is that a third of all young men? Non-employed is a third of non-employed prime aged men. So that's 25 to 54. There are a lot of 45 year olds who are living on their parents' couches or in their old bedroom. It's a fairly remarkable thing.Dwarkesh Patel 0:12:49Now, we'll get to housing in just a second, but first, I want to ask you: If the fertility trends in East Asia and many other places continue, what will the impact on cities be if the average age gets much older and the possible eventuality of depopulation?Edward Glaeser 0:12:53That's a really interesting question.The basic age fact on cities is that within the bracket of the sort of high-income or middle-income, for prime-aged parents, cities tend to be relatively bad for them. Once you're in the sort of high end of the upper middle class, the distrust of our public school systems, merited or not, means that that group tends to leave. You have plenty of parents with kids who are lower income, and then you have groups who are part of a demographic barbell that like cities. So this is partially about people who don't feel like they need the extra space and partially because if they're young, they're looking to find prospective mates of various forms.Cities are good for that. Urban proximity works well in the dating market. And they've got time on their hands to enjoy the tremendous amenities and consumption advantages that cities have. For older people, it's less about finding a mate typically, but the urban consumption amenity still has value. The ability to go to museums, the ability to go to concerts, and those sorts of activities continue to draw people in.Going forward, I would have continued to expect the barbell dimension to persist until we actually get around to solving our urban schools and declining population levels. If anything, I would have thought that COVID skews you a bit younger because older people are more anxious and remember that cities can also bring pandemics. They remember that it can be a nice thing to have a suburban home if you have to shelter in place. So that might lead some people who would have otherwise relocated to a dense urban core to move out, to stay out.Urban EducationDwarkesh Patel 0:14:44You just mentioned urban schools, and I'm curious because you've written about how urban schools are one of the reasons people who have children might not want to stay in cities. I'm curious why it's the case that American cities have some of the best colleges in the world, but for some reason, their K-to-12 is significantly worse, or it can be worse than the K-to-12 in other parts of the country. Why is it that the colleges are much better in cities, but K to 12 is worse? Edward Glaeser 0:15:19So it's interesting. It's not as if, I don't think there's ever been an Englishman who felt like they had to leave London to get better schools for the kids, or a Frenchman who thought they needed to leave Paris. It's not like there's something that's intrinsic to cities, but I've always thought it's a reflection of the fact that instead of allowing all of the competition and entrepreneurship that thrives in cities and that makes cities great, in the case of K to 12 public education, that's vanished.And your example of colleges is exactly right. I'm in this industry; I'm a participant in this industry and let me tell you, this industry is pretty competitive. Whether or not we're competing for the best students, at our level we go through an annual exercise of trying to make sure we get Ph.D. students to come to our program instead of our competitors, whether it's by hiring faculty members or attracting undergraduates, we occupy a highly competitive industry where we are constantly aware of what we need to do to make ourselves better. It doesn't mean that we're great along every dimension, but at least we're trying. K through 12 education has a local monopoly.So it's like you take the great urban food, leisure and hospitality, and food industries, and instead of having in New York City by a hyper-competitive world where you constantly have entry, you say, “You know what? We're going to have one publicly managed canteen and it's going to provide all the food in New York City and we're not going to allow any competitors or the competitors are going to have to pay a totally different thing.” That canteen is probably going to serve pretty crappy food. That's in some sense what happens when you have a large-scale public monopoly that replaces private competition.Dwarkesh Patel 0:16:50But isn't that also true of rural schools? Why are urban schools often worse? Edward Glaeser 0:17:46There's much more competition in suburban schools. So in terms of the suburban schools, typically there are lots of suburbs, and people are competing amongst them. The other thing that's actually important is (I don't want to over exaggerate this, but I think it is something that we need to think a little bit about) the role of public sector unions and particularly teachers unions in these cases. In the case of a suburban school district, the teachers union is no more empowered on the management side than they would be in the private sector.Dwarkesh Patel 0:17:30So in a normal private sector, you've got a large company, you've got a union, and they're arguing with each other. It's a level playing field. It's all kind of reasonable. I'm not saying management has done awful things, and that unions have done foolish things. I'm not saying that either are perfect, but it's kind of well-matched. It's matched that way in the suburbs as well. You've got highly empowered parents who are highly focused on their kids and they're not dominated.It's not like the teachers union dominates elections in Westchester County. Whereas if you go into a big city school district, you have two things going on. One of which is the teachers tend to be highly involved politically and quite capable of influencing management essentially, because they are an electoral force to be reckoned with, not just by the direct votes, but also with their campaign spending. On top of this, you're talking about a larger group of disparate parents, many of whom have lots of challenges to face and it becomes much harder for them to organize effectively on the other side. So for those reasons, big urban schools can do great things and many individual teachers can be fantastic, but it's an ongoing challenge. Georgism, Robert Moses, & Too Much Democracy?Dwarkesh Patel 0:18:35What is your opinion on Georgism? Do cities need a land value tax? Would it be better if all the other taxes are replaced by one?Edward Glaeser 0:18:41Okay. So Henry George, I don't know any economist who doesn't think that a land value tax is an attractive idea. The basic idea is we're going to tax land rather than taxing real estate values. And you would probably implement this in practice by evaluating the real estate and then subtracting the cost of construction, (at least for anything that was built up, meaning you'd form some value of the structures and you just subtract it).The attractive thing from most of our perspectives is it doesn't create the same disincentive to build that a real estate tax does. Real estate tax says, “Oh, you know what? I might want to keep this thing as a parking lot for a couple of years so I don't have to pay taxes on it.”If it were a land value tax, you're going to pay the same tax, whether or not it's a parking lot or whether or not you're going to put a high rise on it, so you might as well put the high rise on it and we could use the space. So I think by and large, that's a perfectly sensible idea. I'd like to see more places using land value taxes or using land value taxes in exchange for property taxes.Where George got it wrong is the idea that a land value tax is going to solve all the problems of society or all the problems of cities. That is ludicrously not true.One could make an argument that in those places that just have a property tax, you could replace it with a land value tax with little loss, but at the national level, it's not a particularly progressive tax in lots of ways. It would be hard to figure out how to fund all the things you want to fund, especially since there are lots of things that we do that are not very land intensive. I think George was imagining a world in which pretty much all value-creating enterprises had a lot of land engaged. So it's a good idea, yes. A panacea, no. Dwarkesh Patel 0:20:20No, that's a good point. I mean, Google's offices in San Francisco are probably generating more value than you would surmise just from the quantity of land they have there. Do American cities need more great builders like Robert Moses?Edward Glaeser 0:20:36Robert Caro's The Power Broker is one of the great biographies of the past 100 years, unquestionably. The only biography that I think is clearly better is Robert Caro's biography of Lyndon Baines Johnson, right? I mean, it's Caro is truly amazing. That being said, I would not exactly call it a fair and balanced view of Robert. I mean, it is true that Robert Moses was high handed, and it is true that there are things that he did that were terrible, that you never want to do again. But on the other hand, the man got stuff built. I mean, I think of myself as a child growing up in New York City, and whether or not it was the public pool that I swam in or the parks that I played in, or the roads that I traveled on, they were all delivered by Robert Moses. There's got to be a middle ground, which is, no, we're not going to run roughshod over the neighborhood as Robert Moses did, but we're still going to build stuff. We're still going to deliver new infrastructure and we're not going to do it for 10 times more than every other country in the world does it.Dwarkesh Patel 0:21:37We're actually going to have sensible procurement policies that bring in things at a reasonable cost, and I think we need to balance a little bit back towards Robert Moses in order to have slightly more empowered builders who actually are able to deliver American cities the infrastructure they need at an affordable cost. Dwarkesh Patel 0:21:57Do we have too much democracy at the local level? You wrote a paper in 2017 titled The Political Economy of Transportation Investments and one of the points you make there is that the local costs are much more salient to people for new construction than the public benefits, and the benefits to newcomers would be. Does that mean we have too much federalism? Should we just have far less power at the city level and not universally? There are lots of good things that local control does.Edward Glaeser 0:22:25I do think we have too much local ability to say no to new housing projects. So that's a particular case that I'm focused on. I think it's exactly right that the near neighbors to a project internalize all of the extra noise and perhaps extra traffic that they're going to have due to this project. They probably overestimate it because they are engaging in a bit of status quo bias and they think the present is great and can't imagine any change.By contrast, none of the people who would benefit from the new project are able to vote. All of the families that would love to move into this neighborhood are being zoned out by the insiders who get a say. I think the goal is to make sure that we have more ability to speak for outsiders. Cities at their best, are places where outsiders can find opportunities. That's part of what's so great about them. It's a tragic thing that we make that so hard. Now I'm not sure exactly that I'm claiming that I want less democracy, but I do want more limitations on how much regulations localities can do. So I think there are certain limitations on local power that I think are fine.I would prefer to call this not a limitation on local democracy, but an increase in the protection of individual rights or the individual rights of landowners to do what they want with their land. Which in effect, is a limit on democracy. But the Bill of Rights is a limit on democracy! The Bill of Rights says that they don't care if 51% of your voters want to take away your right to free assembly. They're not allowed to do that. So in some sense, what I'm just arguing for is more property owners' rights so that they can actually allow more housing in their building.In terms of transportation projects, it's a little bit dicier because here the builder is the government itself. I think the question is you want everyone to have a voice. You don't want every neighborhood to have a veto over every potential housing project or potential transportation project. So you need something that is done more at the state level with representation from the locality, but without the localities getting the ultimate sayDwarkesh Patel 0:24:33I wonder if that paper implies that I should be shorting highly educated areas, at least in terms of real estate. One of the things you mentioned in the paper was that highly educated areas that had much higher opposition were able to foment much more opposition. Edward Glaeser  0:24:49Okay. So here's the real estate strategy, which I have heard that actually there are buyers who do this. You take an area that has historically been very pro-housing. So it's got lots of housing, and it's affordable right now because supply is good. But lots of educated people have moved in. Which means that going forward, they're going to build much less, which means that going forward, they're likely to become much more expensive. So you should, in fact, buy options on that stuff rather than shorting it. You should short if you have a security that is related to the population level in that community. You should short that because the population growth is going to go down, but the prices are likely to go up. Opioids, Automation, & UBIDwarkesh Patel 0:25:29So you wrote a paper last year on the opioid epidemic. One of the points that you made there was that the opioid epidemic could be explained just by the demand side stuff about social isolation and joblessness. I wonder how this analysis makes you think about mass-scale automation in the future. What impact do you think that would have? Assume it's paired with universal basic income or something like that. Do you think it would cause a tremendous increase in opioid abuse?Edward Glaeser 0:26:03I would have phrased it slightly differently–– which is as opposed to the work of two amazing economists, Anne Case and Angus Deaton, who really emphasized the role of deaths of despair; we are much more focused on the supply side. WIth the demand side, meaning just the way that we handled the distribution of large-scale pain relieving medicines, we tell a story where every 30 to 50 years, someone comes up with the same sort of idea, which is we know that human beings love opioids in different forms. We also know they're highly addicted and lead to a terrible cycle. So all of a sudden comes along this innovator says, you know what? I've got a new opioid and it's safe. You don't have to worry about getting addicted to this one. It's magical.It won't work. 100 years ago, that thing was called heroin. 200 years ago, that thing was called morphine. 300 years ago, that thing was called Meldonium. We have these new drugs which have come in, and they've never been safe. But in our case, it was OxyContin and the magic of the time relief was supposed to make it safe, and it wasn't safe.Dwarkesh Patel 0:27:30There's a lot of great work that just shows that the patterns of opioid use was related to the places that just had a lot of pain 30 years ago. Those places came with a lot of tendency to prescribe various things for pain. So when opioids came in, when OxyContin came in, those were the places that got addicted most. Now it's also true that there are links between these economic issues. There are links with joblessness, and I basically do believe that things that create joblessness are pretty terrible and are actually much worse than income inequality. I push back against the universal basic income advocates who I think are basically engaging in a materialist fallacy of thinking that a human being's life is shaped by their take home pay or their unearned pay. I think for most people, a job is much more than that. A job is a sense of purpose. A job is a sense of social connection. When you look at human misery and opioid use, you look at the difference between high-income earners, mid-income earners. There are differences, but they're small. You then look at the difference between low-income earners and the jobless, then unhappiness spikes enormously, misery spikes enormously, family breakups spike enormously. So things like universal basic income, which the negative income tax experimented on in the 1970s, are the closest thing we have for its large-scale experiments in this area, which had very large effects on joblessness by just giving people money. They feel quite dangerous to me because they feel like they're going to play into rising joblessness in America, which feels like a path for its misery. I want to just quickly deviate and some of the UBI advocates have brought together UBI in the US and UBI in the developing world. So UBI in the developing world, basically means that you give poor farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa fairly modest amounts of money. This is a totally sensible strategy.These people are not about to live life permanently not working. They're darn poor. It's very efficient relative to other ways of giving.  I am in no sense pushing back on UBI with modest amounts of money in the poorest parts of the world. By all means, it's been deemed to be effective. It's just a very different thing if you're saying I'm going to give $100 to a poor Congolese farmer, or I'm going to give $10,000 to a long-term jobless person in Eastern Kentucky. You're not buying a PS5 for $100 in Congo.Remote Work, Taxation, & MetaverseDwarkesh Patel 0:29:57I want to ask you about remote work. You write in The Survival of the City, that improvements in information technology can lead to more demand for face-to-face contact because FaceTime complements time spent communicating electronically. I'm curious, what distinguishes situations where FaceTime substitutes for in-person contact from situations where it complements FaceTime complements virtual contact?Edward Glaeser 0:30:25So there's not a universal rule on this. I wrote a paper based on this in the 1990s about face-to-face contact complements or substitutes for electronic contacts. It was really based on a lot of anxiety in the 1970s that the information technology of their day, the fax machine, the personal computer was going to make face-to-face contact in the cities that enable that contact obsolete. That discussion has reappeared amazingly in the past two and a half years because of Zoom, and all of those questions still resonate. I think in the short run, typically these things are substitutes.Typically you don't necessarily need to meet some person who's your long-term contact. You can actually just telephone them, or you can connect with them electronically. In the long run, they seem to be much more likely to be complements, in part because these technologies change our world. The story that I tell over the last 40 years is that, yes, there were some face-to-face contacts that were made unnecessary because of electronic interactions. But it's not just that cities did well over the past 40 years–– business travel went through the roof over the past 40 years. You'd think that that would have been made unnecessary by all these electronic interactions, but I think what just happened was that these new technologies and globalization created a more interconnected world, a world in which knowledge was more important, and we become smart by interacting with people face-to-face. This world became more knowledge and information intensive and more complicated, and as things get more complicated, it's easier for ideas to get lost in translation. So we have these wonderful cues for communicating comprehension or confusion that are lost when we're not in the same room with one another. So I think over the longer time, they tend to complements, and over the shorter term, they tend to be substitutes.One of the things I think was helpful in my earlier work on this was looking at the history of information technology innovations. I think probably the first one is the book. It's hard to imagine an innovation that did more to flatten distance. Now you can read stuff that people are saying hundreds of miles away. Yet there's not a shred of evidence that the book led to less urbanization in Europe or to less connection. It helped create a totally different world in which people were passionate about ideas and wanted to talk to each other. They wanted to talk to each other about their books.Flash forward 350 years when we have the telephone. Telephones started being used more in cities, and they were used mostly by people who were going to meet face-to-face. There's no evidence that this has created a decline in the demand for face-to-face contact or a decline in the demand for cities. So I think if we look at Zoom, which unquestionably has allowed a certain amount of long-distance contact, that's very, very useful. In the short run, it certainly poses a threat to urban office markets. My guess is in the long run; it's probably going to be likely to be neutral at worst for face-to-face contact in the cities that enable that contact. Dwarkesh Patel 0:33:37I think that my podcast has been a great example for me about this. I mean, right now we're talking virtually. So maybe, in a way it's substituted, and perhaps I would have interviewed in person without the podcast. However, in another way, I've also met so many people that I've interviewed on the podcast or who have just connected with me because of the podcast in person. The amount of in-person interactions I've had because of a virtual podcast is a great anecdote to what you're talking about, so that makes total sense.Edward Glaeser 0:34:05Absolutely.Dwarkesh Patel 0:34:06Why do even the best software engineers in India or in Europe make so much less when they're working remotely from those locations than remote engineers working in America make? I mean, why don't employers just pay them more until the price discrepancy goes away?Edward Glaeser 0:34:23That's interesting. I don't fully know the answer to that question. I would suspect some of it just has to do with the nature of supply and demand. There are some things that are just very hard to be done remotely. Either because you have very precise informational needs that you have that are easier to communicate to people who are nearby or the person who's nearby has evolved in ways in terms of their mind that they actually know exactly what you want and they have exactly the product that you need. So even though the remote call center worker and the local one may be totally equivalent on raw programming talent, you may still end up in equilibrium and be willing to pay a lot more to the local one just because, right?So there's a slightly differentiated skill the local one has, and look, there's just a lot of competition for the remote ones, so the price is going to be pretty low. There's not that much supply of the one guy who's down the hall and knows exactly what you're looking for. So that guy gets much higher wages, just because he can offer you something that no one else can exactly reproduce.Dwarkesh Patel 0:35:27Let me clarify my question. Even remote engineers in America will make more than remote engineers in Europe or in India. If somebody is working remotely but he just happens to live in the US, is that just because they can communicate in English in the same way? Edward Glaeser 0:35:54I would take the same stance. I would say that they're likely to have just skills that are somewhat idiosyncratic and are valued in the US context.Dwarkesh Patel 0:35:56Are you optimistic about the ability of the metaverse and VR to be able to better puncture whatever makes in-person contact so valuable?Edward Glaeser 0:36:19No, I do not think the metaverse is going to change very much. I do think that there will be a lot of hours spent on various forms of gaming over the next 20 years, but I don't think it ultimately poses much of a threat to real-world interactions. In some sense, we saw this with the teenage world over the last three years. We saw a lot of America spend an awful lot of time, 15, 16-year-olds, 17-year-olds, gaming and connecting entirely virtually during the whole time of the pandemic lockdowns.Every single person that I've seen in that cohort, when you allowed them to interact with real members of their group live, leaped at the opportunity. They leaped at the opportunity of meeting and actually hanging out with real people until three o'clock in the morning and arguing over whatever it is–– whether or not it's football or Kant. I think particularly for the young, living life live just beats the alternative.Dwarkesh Patel 0:37:05That sounds like a very Harvard scenario, having to argue over football or Kant, those two topics. [laughs] Are you predicting lower taxes over the coming decades in places like California and New York, specifically because of how remote work sets a sort of maximum bar of how much you can tax highly productive people before they will just leave? Edward Glaeser 0:37:29This is a great question. It's a central issue of our day. Here's how I think about it. In part, it's why I wrote my recent book, Survival of the City. It's because I was worried about this. Two things happened simultaneously. One, as you correctly say, Zoom has made it easier to connect anywhere. I don't think that Zoom is going to cause our tech startup currently in Silicon Valley to say, oh, you know what? We're just going to go home to our Orange County suburban homes and never meet live again. I think that's a low-probability event.But what seems to be a perfectly high probability event is saying, “Oh, we can Zoom with our VCs, we can Zoom with our lawyers. Why don't we just relocate to Austin, Texas, not pay taxes, or relocate to Boulder, Colorado, so we can have beautiful scenery, or relocate to Honolulu so we can surf?” That seems like we've made the ability for smart people to relocate much easier, even if they're going to keep on seeing each other in the office three or four days a week. That collides with this very fervent desire to deal with festering social inequities at the local level. Be this limited upward mobility for poorer people, be this high housing costs, be this the rise of mass incarceration and police brutality towards particularly minority groups. There's this progressive urge which runs up against the fact that the rich guys can run away.If your model, which says, “Oh, the local governments are going to realize the rich guys can run away, so they will seamlessly lower tax rates in order to make sure that they attract those people,” that's running up against the fact that there's a whole lot of energy on the progressive side, which says, “No! Massachusetts just passed a millionaire's tax. For the first time ever, we have the possibility to have a progressive tax, which feels extraordinarily dangerous given this time period.”I think we may need to see a bunch of errors in this area before we start getting things right. We went through a lot of pain in the 1970s as cities first tried to deal with their progressive goals and rich people and companies ran away, and it wasn't until the 1980s that people started realizing this was the path to local bankruptcy and that we had real city limits on what the locality could do.Dwarkesh Patel 0:39:44You cited research on the survival of the city, which said that firms like Microsoft were much less willing to hire new people once they went online because of the pandemic. What do you make of the theory that this is similar to when industrialization first hit and we hadn't figured out exactly how to make the most use of it to be most productive, but over the long run, somebody will do to remote work what Henry Ford did to the factory floor and in fact, just make it much more effective and efficient than in-person contact just because we'll have better ways of interacting with people through remote work, since we'll have better systems?Dwarkesh Patel 0:40:17It's entirely possible. I never like betting against the ingenuity of humanity. On the other hand, you need a lot of technology to override 5 million years of evolution. We have evolved to be an in-person species, not just because we're productive and learn a lot face-to-face, but also because we just like it. A world of hyper-efficient remote work where you basically are puttering around your apartment doing things very quickly and getting things done, doesn't sound particularly joyful to me.Workplaces are not just places of productivity; they're also places of pleasure, particularly at the high end. Remember in 2019 and earlier, Google, and Yahoo, the companies that should have had the biggest capacity to do remote stuff, weren't sending their workers home; they were building these paradises for high-skilled workers, stuffed with foosball tables and free snacks and whatever else they had in these giant campuses in the Google lex. So they were certainly betting on the power of face-to-face and creativity rather than on the ability of remote work to make everything work. I think the most reasonable view, let's say that of Nick Bloom of Stanford, is that for those types of workers, 20% of your week being hybrid, maybe 40%, seems quite possible.That seems like a thing, particularly for workers who have families who really value that degree of flexibility. But fully remote, I guess that's a pretty niche thing. There's some jobs like call center workers where you could imagine it being the norm, but in part, that's just because it's just hard to learn the same amount remotely that you do face-to-face. This came out both in the earlier Bloom study on remote call center workers in China and on more recent work by Natalia Emmanuel and Emma Harrington. Both studies found the same thing, which is in these call centers, are plenty productive when they're remote, but the probability of being promoted drops by 50%.The entrepreneur may make it very efficient to do things in the short run remotely, but they're going to turn off this tendency that we have to be able to learn things from people around us, which is just much harder to duplicate remotely.Past & Future of Silicon ValleyDwarkesh Patel 0:42:29Now, I'm curious why Silicon Valley became the hub of technology. You wrote a paper in 2018 about where pioneer and non-pioneer firms locate. So, I was hoping you had insight on this. Does it stand for it? Is it where Fairchild Semiconductor is located? What is the explanation?Edward Glaeser 0:42:48So, we take it as being earlier. It is Stanford. I traced through this, I think in Triumph. Yeah, it was a company called Federal Telegraph Company that was founded by a guy called Cyril Frank Elwell, who was a radio pioneer, and he was tapped by his teacher to head this radio company. The story was, as I remember it, there'd been this local genius in San Francisco who had attracted all these investors and was going to do this wireless telegraphy company. Then he died in a freak carriage accident.These investors wanted to find someone else, and they went to Stanford's nearby factory and asked, who should we hire? It was this guy Elwell who founded Federal Telegraph. Federal Telegraph then licensed, I think Danish technology which was originally the Poulsen Telegraph Company. They then hired some fairly bright people like Lee DeForest and they did incredibly well in World War I off of federal Navy contracts, off of Navy contracts. They then did things like providing jobs for people like the young Fred Terman, whose father was a Stanford scientist. Now, Fred Terman then plays an outsized role in this story because he goes to MIT, studies engineering there, and then comes back to become Dean of Stanford's engineering program.He really played an outsized role in setting up the Stanford Industrial Park which attracting Fairchild Semiconductor. Then there's this sort of random thing about how the Fairchild Semiconductor attracts these people and then repels them because you have this brilliant guy Shockley, right? He's both brilliant and sort of personally abhorrent and manages to attract brilliant people and then repel all of them. So they all end up dispersing themselves into different companies, and they create this incredibly creative ecosystem that is the heart of Silicon Valley.In its day, it had this combination of really smart people and really entrepreneurial ethos, which just made it very, very healthy. I think the thing that many of us worry about is that Silicon Valley more recently, feels much more like it's a one-industry town, which is dangerous. It feels more like it's a bunch of industrial behemoths rather than a bunch of smart and scrappy startups. That's a recipe that feels much more like Detroit in the 1950s than it does like Silicon Valley in the 1960s.Dwarkesh Patel 0:45:52Speaking of startups, what does your study of cities imply about where tech startups should locate and what kind of organization in person or otherwise they should have? I think there's a lot to like about in person, certainly. Relying too much on remote feels quite dangerous if you're a scrappy startup. But I like a lot the Sunbelt smart cities.I sort of have a two-factor model of economic growth, which is it's about education, and it's about having governments that are pro-business. If you think about sort of the US, there's a lot of heterogeneity in this. If you think about the US versus other countries, it's heterogeneity. So the US has historically been better at being pro-business than, let's say, the Northern European social democracies, but the Northern European social democracies are great on the education front.So places like Sweden and the Netherlands, and Germany are also very successful places because they have enough education to counter the fact that they may not necessarily be as pro-business as the US is. Within the US, you also have this balance, whereas places like Massachusetts, and California are certainly much less pro-business, but they're pretty well-educated. Other parts of the country may be more pro-business, but they're less so. The real secret sauce is finding those places that are both highly educated and pro-business.So those are places like Charlotte and Austin and even Atlanta, places in the Sun Belt that have attracted lots of skilled people. They've done very, very well during COVID. I mean, Austin, by most dimensions, is the superstar of the COVID era in terms of just attracting people. So I think you had to wait for the real estate prices to come down a bit in Austin, but those are the places that I would be looking at. Dwarkesh Patel 0:47:46I don't know if you know, but I live in Austin, actually.Edward Glaeser 0:47:50I did not know that. [laughs]Dwarkesh Patel 0:47:54Well, actually, I'm surprised about what you said about education because you write in the paper, “general knowledge measured as average years of schooling is not a strong determinant of the survival of a pioneer firm, but relatedness of knowledge between past and present activities is.” So I'm surprised that you think education is a strong determinant for pioneer firms.Edward Glaeser 0:48:15No, I'm a big human capital determinist. So I tend to believe that individuals, cities, and nations rise and fall based on their skill levels. Certainly, if you look over the last 40 or 50 years, skills are very predictive of which cities (particularly colder cities) manage to do well versus poorly. If you ask yourself why Detroit and Seattle look different, more than 50% of Seattle's adults have college degrees, and maybe 14, 15% of Detroit's adults do.That's just a huge, huge gap. Certainly, when we think about your punitive startup, you're going to be looking for talent, right? You're going to be looking to hire talent, and having lots of educated people around you is going to be helpful for that.Housing ReformDwarkesh Patel 0:48:56Let's talk about housing. Houston has basically very little to no zoning. Why is it not more of interesting today? Nobody goes to Houston for tourism.Edward Glaeser 0:49:07I have. [laughs] I have, in fact, gone to Houston for tourism. Although part of it, I admit, was to look at the housing and to go to the woodlands and look at that. Interesting has a lot to do with age in this country. So the more that a city has… Boston is good for tourism just because it's been around for a long time, and it hasn't changed all that much. So it has this sort of historical thing. Houston's a new place, not just in the sense that the chronological age is lower but also in the sense that it's just grown so much, and it's dominated by new stuff, right?That new stuff tends to be more homogenous. It tends to have less history on it. I think those are things that make new cities typically less interesting than older cities. As witnessed by the fact that Rome, Jerusalem, London, are great tourist capitals of the world because they've just accreted all this interesting stuff over the millennium. So I think that's part of it. I'm not sure that if we look at more highly zoned new cities, we're so confident that they're all that more interesting.I don't want to be particularly disparaging any one city. So I'm not going to choose that, but there's actually a bunch that's pretty interesting in Houston, and I'm not sure that I would say that it's any less interesting than any comparably aged city in the country.Dwarkesh Patel 0:50:35Yeah. I'm visiting Houston later this month. I asked my friend there, should I stay here longer? I mean, is there anything interesting to do here? And then he responds, “Well, it's the fourth biggest city in the country, so no.”Dwarkesh Patel 0:50:47Many people, including many economists, have said that we should drastically increase US population through immigration to a figure like 1 billion. Do you think that our cities could accommodate that? We have the infrastructure, and I mean, let's say we reformed housing over a decade or so. Could we accommodate such a large influx of people? Edward Glaeser 0:51:24A billion people in a decade? I love the vision. Basically, in my heart, I'm an open borders person, right? I mean, it's a moral thing. I don't really like the idea that I get to enjoy the privileges of being an American and think that I'm going to deny that opportunity to anyone else. So I love this vision. A billion people over 10 years is an unimaginably large amount of people over a relatively short period of time. I'd love to give it a shot. I mean, it's certainly not as if there's any long-term reason why you couldn't do it.I mean, goodness knows we've got more than enough space in this country. It would be exciting to do that. But it would require a lot of reform in the housing space and require a fair amount of reform in the infrastructure space as well to be able to do this at some kind of large scale affordability.Dwarkesh Patel 0:52:05What does the evidence show about public libraries? Do they matter?Dwarkesh Patel 0:52:09My friend Eric Kleinberg has written a great book about… I think it's called Palaces for the People about all the different functions that libraries have played. I've never seen anything statistically or systematically about this, but you're not going to get a scholar to speak against books. It's not a possible thing.Europe's Stagnation, Mumbai's Safety, & Climate Change Dwarkesh Patel 0:52:32Why do European cities seem so much more similar to what they look like decades or even centuries ago than American cities, even American cities that are old, obviously not as old as European cities, but they seem to change much more over time. Edward Glaeser 0:52:46Lower population growth, much tougher zoning, much tougher historic preservation. All three of these things are going on. So it's very difficult to build in European cities. There's a lot of attention to caring about history. It's often part of the nationalist narrative. You often have huge amounts of national dollars going to preserve local stuff and relatively lower levels of population growth.An extreme example of this is Warsaw, where central Warsaw is completely destroyed during World War II, and they built it up to look exactly like it looked before the bombing. So this is a national choice, which is unlikely that we would necessarily make here in the US. Dwarkesh Patel 0:53:27Yeah. I was in Mumbai earlier this year, and I visited Dharavi, which is the biggest slum in Asia. And it's a pretty safe place for a slum. Why are slums in different countries? Why do they often have different levels of how safe they are? What is the reason?Edward Glaeser 0:53:45I, too, have been in Dharavi and felt perfectly safe. It's like walking around Belgravia and London in terms of it. I think my model of Dharavi is the same model as Jane Jacobs's model of Greenwich Village in 1960, which is this is just a well-functioning community.People have eyes on the street. If you're a stranger in these areas, they're going to be looking at you, and it's a community that just functions. There are lots of low-income communities throughout the world that have this. It requires a certain amount of permanence. So if the community is too much in flux, it becomes hard to enforce these norms and hard to enforce these sort of community rules. It's really helpful if there aren't either a massive number of guns floating around or an unbelievably lucrative narcotics trade, which is in the area. Those are both things that make things incredibly hard. Furthermore, US drug policy has partially been responsible for creating violence in some of the poor parts of Latin American cities.Dwarkesh Patel 0:54:43Maybe you don't play video games enough to know the answer to this question. But I'm curious, is there any video game, any strategic video game like Civilization or Europa that you feel does a good job representing the economics of cities? Edward Glaeser 0:55:07No, I will say that when I was in graduate school, I spent a few hours playing something called Sim City. I did think that was very fun. But I'm not going to claim that I think that it got it right. That was probably my largest engagement with city-building video games.Dwarkesh Patel 0:55:12What would you say we understand least about how cities work? Edward Glaeser 0:55:18I'm going to say the largest unsolved problem in cities is what the heck we're going to do about climate change and the cities of the developing world. This is the thing I do not feel like I have any answer for in terms of how it is that we're going to stop Manila or Mumbai from being leveled by some water-related climate event that we haven't yet foreseen.We think that we're going to spend tens of billions of dollars to protect New York and Miami, and that's going to happen; but the thing I don't understand and something we really need to need to invest in terms of knowledge creation is what are we going to do with the low-lying cities of the developing world to make them safe. Dwarkesh Patel 0:55:54Okay. Your most recent book is Survival of the City. And before that Triumph of the City, both of which I highly recommend to readers. Professor Glaeser, thank you so much for coming on the podcast. This was very interesting.Edward Glaeser 0:56:05I enjoyed this a lot. Thank you so much for having me on. I had a great deal of fun. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.dwarkeshpatel.com

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio
Boomer says the Pats were screwed, Razor loves soccer and the Bruins are historically good

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 39:07


HOUR 4 Boomer says the Pats were screwed Razor loves soccer, Curtis blows his stack talking about how much he hates soccer, says it's only the most popular sport in places that don't have football The Bruins are historically good

Clips Nation: for Los Angeles Clippers fans
Zu Historically Dominates in Easy W Over Turner & Pacers

Clips Nation: for Los Angeles Clippers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 26:51


Shap & Lucas chat after Zu dropped 31/29 on 14/17 from the field on a helpless Indiana team. How awesome was Zu today? How encouraging were a flurry of nice performances from role players? And how are we feeling about a Clipper team still dealing with injuries to their stars?

#ESBC NFL Betting and Team Report
College Football Expert Picks Historically 80% For ThanksGiving Weekend -2022

#ESBC NFL Betting and Team Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 21:19


Bottomline:46-32 =59% last week and 176-130 =57.5% for the year $37,200 profit  @josuevizcay instagram and Twitter

Biohacking Superhuman Performance
Episode #126: Biohacking Longevity & Health From a Bodybuilder's Perspective

Biohacking Superhuman Performance

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 71:02


My guest this week is Kris Gethin, Editor-in-Chief of BodyBuilding.com & Co-Founder and CEO of Kaged Muscle.   In this episode, Kris and I discuss how you can achieve peak physical performance without sacrificing longevity or health. Historically, this health tradeoff has been common in the bodybuilding and extreme sport communities; an often short lived career (or hobby) with long-term health implications from the physical and biological abuse they put their bodies through.  But Kris' approach is proving otherwise.  The best part of this conversation is that the strategies Kris uses and shares with us are not just for elite athletes, and extremely applicable to anyone interested in making sure their health span is equivalent to their lifespan. So, whether you are a fitness fanatic, biohacker, or just interested in being healthy inside and out, this episode's expert advice is one you've been waiting for!    Follow Kris Instagram Kaged Muscle Instagram Website     ------     Episode Sponsors DrinkHRW: I drink molecular hydrogen water every morning before anything else and have my clients do the same. Why? Molecular hydrogen is foundational to supporting a healthy body; through its ability to help to manage reactive oxygen species (ROS), inflammation, improve metabolic balance, and more. DrinkHRW also has hydrogen tablets with ImmunoLP20 to support the body's immune, respiratory, liver, oral, and stress response health. Visit DrinkHRW and use code Longevity for 15% off. BiOptimizers: 25% off Black Friday special Nov 21-29, 2022 with bionat10 code (after this promo period, you can still receive 10% off with the same code). Why choose BiOptimizers? 80% of American are magnesium deficient and could be making their deficiency worse by not taking the right form! So what's the solution? Magnesium Breakthrough; the only full-spectrum magnesium supplement with 7 unique forms of magnesium that your body actually absorbs.  Visit here and use code bionat10 for a discount.     ------     Episode Takeways [05:30] What took Kris from bodybuilding into biohacking?.. [10:50] What metrics does Kris use to measure biological age? [13:00] What is the importance of genetics when it comes to bodybuilding?.. [14:55] Kris expands on his experience with mold toxicity… [18:00] What foods are the most problematic for those with mold issues?.. [21:00] Fasting as an athlete… [30:20] Protein intake requirements… [37:50] Are frequent small meals or less frequent big meals better?.. [46:38] Are there any good preworkouts?.. [51:10] Recommended post workout fuel… [54:50] Do most people over 50 need more time to recover?.. [01:00:00] Kris's closing foundational and biohacking tips…     ------     Follow Nat Facebook Facebook Group  Instagram Mighty Networks BSP Community Work with Nat: Book Your 20 Minute Optimization Consult

Five Minute Finance with LVM
Fundamental Factors of Investing Part 2: What is the Value Factor?

Five Minute Finance with LVM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 10:18


Tyler and Craig review the “Value Factor” for our second installment of the fundamental factors of investing. In the investment industry there are various definitions of the value factor, but one description refers to the value factor as the factor that aims to capture excess returns from stocks that have low prices relative to their fundamental value. This is commonly tracked by price to book, price to earnings, dividends, and free cash flow. Historically it is the price to book valuation method that is most often cited for value investing. With low price to book being classified as a value stock. Price to book simply compares the company's accounting book value or net assets relative to the market capitalization. We review how LVM uses the value factor in finding attractive investments including relative valuation methods such as price to earnings and absolute valuations such as the discounted cash flow method.  Craig reviews some common pitfalls investors come across when analyzing the value factor and discusses some of the historical return studies on value versus growth. Tyler reviews current market valuations and compares them to recent historical averages. 

CityChurch Podcast
Episode 43: Are The Scriptures The Word Of God?

CityChurch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 35:31


What ultimately determines how we, the body of Christ, shall live?  Historically the final authority has been the Bible.  Yet the authenticity and authority of the holy scriptures have come under fire.  Many question whether the scriptures are the Word of God?  Brian Higbee explores this question in light of what Moses, David, Peter, and finally Jesus said about scripture.  

Financial Survival Network
The Right Place and Right Time for Energy Transitions - Dee Carter #5661

Financial Survival Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 17:09


Summary: Inflation continues on, despite the efforts of the federal reserve and the government to make us believe that it is abating. With latent uncertainty and a long ride ahead, which sectors should we invest in right now? I sit down and chat with Dee Carter to recap what's been happening in the markets—specifically in the energy sector. People are hesitant to invest in oil companies because of the push for renewable energy; on the other hand, fossil fuels are still an integral component of production. For general investing, Dee advises his clients to evaluate which sectors fit their particular situation, and mentions some things to consider in the current economy. Highlights: -We're in a situation where we really don't know what is going to take place over the next couple of months -The senate is still 50/50 -We're in for a long, tough ride that will probably last beyond January -The problem right now is that no one wants to invest in energy—especially in oil companies -No one wants to invest in something that may not be around 5-10 years from now -Oil companies are receiving mixed directions in regard to production -You can't get away from fossil fuels because of how many products they are tied to -We are perhaps entering the electrical situation a bit too early -Right now, it is not feasible for all cars to run on electricity. It's too early to do away with fossil fuels; we have to take it one step at a time -Historically, energy transitions have been market driven—not government driven. The government needs to back down and let the markets do their work -Energy is the place to invest. There are still some companies drilling, but some refineries have reached capacity -We need to invest in the refinery process -Surprisingly, consumer buying has not slowed down. We're also still looking at pharmaceuticals and other health related sectors -Look at sectors that fit your particular situation Useful Links: Financial Survival Network Carter Financial

EcoJustice Radio
Indigenous Voices from the Northeast: Past, Present and Future

EcoJustice Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 63:14


Native people inhabited the Connecticut River Valley of western Massachusetts for more than 10,000 years. It is the homeland of many First People, all related to one another. They are called the Sokoki, Pocumtuck, Nonotuck, Woronoco, and Agawam. Many other tribes visited and still visit this Native homeland. Among them are the Abenaki, Nipmuck, Wampanoag, Narragansett, Mohegan, Pequot, Mohican, and Mohawk. These tribes are recognized today by states or the federal government as sovereign nations. Historically, tribes gathered in this valley to trade, to fish, to plant, to participate in sacred ceremonies. The sad fact remains that during the wars waged in the colonial period, the Native people were driven from this valley. They blended into the Abenaki, Nipmuck, and Mohican tribes across the Northeast. Often, they integrated into the settler communities. Some were herbal doctors, basket makers, and carvers. They dressed like their European descendant neighbors, but kept the fire of their culture alive. Our guest on this show is Jennifer Lee, Northern Narragansett Educator and Board member of the Nolumbeka Project [https://nolumbekaproject.org/], an organization dedicated to honoring the Northeastern Tribal Heritage of the Connecticut River Valley. The word Nolumbeka is Abenaki for “the calm waters between the rapids.” Jennifer Lee, Grandmother, bark basket maker, and culture bearer, provides histories, insights and perspectives of Native Peoples of the Northeast. Jennifer grew up without knowledge of her Native ancestry which compelled her to seek out the true history and culture of the Northeast Woodlands Indigenous Peoples as an independent researcher. For roughly 30 years, she has held classes in her Eastern Conical Wigwam to tell the stories of Northeastern Native Peoples and share her cultural knowledge. She is co-producer with the Nolumbeka Project of the 10-part film series “Indigenous Voices'' [https://nolumbekaproject.org/indigenous-voices/]. She has been a bark basket maker [http://Barkbasketsbyjlee.com] for 40 years. Carry Kim, Co-Host of EcoJustice Radio. An advocate for ecosystem restoration, indigenous lifeways, and a new humanity born of connection and compassion, she is a long-time volunteer for SoCal350, member of Ecosystem Restoration Camps, and a co-founder of the Soil Sponge Collective, a grassroots community organization dedicated to big and small scale regeneration of Mother Earth. For an extended interview and other benefits, become an EcoJustice Radio patron at https://www.patreon.com/posts/indigenous-from-74952004 Podcast Website: http://ecojusticeradio.org/ Podcast Blog: https://www.wilderutopia.com/category/ecojustice-radio/ Support the Podcast: https://www.patreon.com/ecojusticeradio Executive Producer: Jack Eidt Hosted by Carry Kim Intro By: Jessica Aldridge Engineer and Original Music: Blake Quake Beats Episode 156 Photo credit: Jennifer Lee

Locked On Canes - Daily Podcast On Miami Hurricanes Football & Basketball
REACTION: Miami Hurricanes Lose To Clemson 40-10 In Historically Bad Offensive Showing, Any Positives?

Locked On Canes - Daily Podcast On Miami Hurricanes Football & Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 35:25


The Miami Hurricanes lost to the Clemson Tigers 40-10. Miami's defense forced 3 turnovers and gave the offense chances to make the game close. However, Miami's offense only managed 98 total yards, their lowest team output in a single game since 1965! True freshman Jacurri Brown started the game for the injured Tyler Van Dyke. Jake Garcia came on in the 4th quarter and threw a touchdown but also lost a fumble. Miami only managed 7 points off 3 takeaways.  Host Alex Donno reacts to the loss and discusses where the program needs to go from here. There were some positive takeaways from Miami's defense including excellent performances from S Kam Kinchens, DT Leonard Taylor, DE Akheem Mesidor and true freshman linebacker Wes Bissainthe. On offense, the complexion of the game could have been far different if Brown had hit Xavier Restrepo wide open for an easy 73 yard touchdown or of freshman tight end Jaleel Skinner had held on to a drop on an accurate pass from Jake Garcia.  Donno reads questions and comments from listeners on twitter. You can tweet the show @LockedOnCanes. Will head coach Mario Cristobal have to make changes to his coaching staff after this season? Does the offensive philosophy need to change, too? Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! LinkedIn LinkedIn jobs helps you find the candidates you want to talk to, faster. Post your job for free at Linkedin.com/lockedoncollege Terms and conditions apply. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKEDON15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Underdog Fantasy Sign up on underdogfantasy.com with the promo code LOCKED ON and get your first deposit doubled up to $100! SimpliSafe With Fast Protect™️ Technology, exclusively from SimpliSafe, 24/7 monitoring agents capture evidence to accurately verify a threat for faster police response. There's No Safe Like SimpliSafe. Visit SimpliSafe.com/LockedOnCollege to learn more. Upside Download the FREE Upside App at https://upside.app.link/locked to get $5 or more cash back on your first purchase of $10 or more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

In Focus Church Podcast
Take A Step

In Focus Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 38:00


What does it take for a church to be a church? Historically there are a couple of core values the church has always been required to have, or actions that have been necessary to identify the church as God's people. Two of these indelible markers is that we would gather and that we would scatter. With that being said, throughout the next few weeks, we will talk about how we as Christians, we as In Focus Church, which is you, are answering the call to make disciples, or maybe more commonly referred to as answering the Great Commission.

Leading Saints Podcast
Leading with Authority & Equality | An Interview with Brooke Rasmussen

Leading Saints Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 57:36


Brooke Rasmussen is completing her masters in Marriage and Family Therapy at Whitworth University in Spokane, Washington and is an intern at Partners with Families and Children, a social safety net for families facing neglect and abuse. Brooke is passionate about helping clients find personal and relational growth in their marriages and teaches Gottman Institute Marriage Courses online with her husband, Scott. Her research at Whitworth focuses on pornography use and its connections to emotional intelligence. Brooke and Scott traveled the world through his career as a diplomat, living in Africa, Europe, and the Middle East before putting down roots in Spokane with their eight children. Brooke's experience as a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is fundamental to her development as a leader and thinker. Highlights 02:15 Introduction to Brooke and the topic of personal development 05:30 Brooke's process of preparing for the Leading Saints Women's Conference 07:45 What is a vertical relationship? 10:00 In a vertical relationship, there are only winners and losers. You are one up or one down. It can lead to pulling rank, shaming, and others feeling less than. 14:30 Identifying our own behaviors of trying to one up someone else 16:30 Kurt gives examples of one-up situations 18:40 We go one down in a vertical relationship when we are playing a victim role. When we are minimizing our choices and acting like we are forced into things. When we hide our needs or desires. 20:00 A one-down mindset can be when we let others emotionally protect us or we try to protect them. This happens a lot in families. Brooke gives examples of what this looks like. 22:00 Playing small can be deflecting or self deprecating. It's ok to want to aspire. 24:30 Historically women use the one-down spot for power. There is a victim power. 26:00 It gets tricky with the one-down position by saying it's a Christlike position 26:30 Brooke explains what it really means to turn the other cheek 28:30 Christ invites us to have horizontal relationships, where we are all on equal ground 29:40 The call of Christianity isn't a call to be a victim. It's a call to step into power. 30:40 If someone tries to one-up you then what does it look like to bring them back down to a horizontal relationship? 31:30 Brooke shares her own personal experience of a marriage fight and stopping the dynamic of trying to one-up each other 34:15 What to do in a church meeting when you feel like you got bulldozed. Learn to speak up for yourself and bring a meeting back to horizontal. 37:20 What can you do or say when someone else is playing the one-down card and acting like they are fine? You know they are trying to be accommodating. You can invite them to equal ground. 38:15 How anxiety plays into the horizontal and vertical relationship dynamics 41:00 God has established horizontal relationships and plans since the beginning of time. It's not meant to be a power struggle, that is why He established councils. 42:00 If you are receiving as much as you are giving then you aren't going to get burned out in your calling. It has to be a team effort and a horizontal experience in our wards. 46:20 We shouldn't abolish all authority and priesthood keys but it's all about inner intention. As a leader you can take the time to listen to everyone and put yourself on equal ground with others. 49:30 What to do when you have a tyrannical leader? Some people will refuse to step down. 51:30 There are real victims and perpetrators. We can still find dignity in our situation and show respect for ourselves. Links The Courage to Be Disliked, by Ichiro Kishimi and Fumitake Koga Jennifer Finlayson Fife Read the TRANSCRIPT of this podcast WATCH on YouTube Get 14-day access to the Core Leader Library The Leading Saints Podcast has ranked in the top 20 Christianity podcasts in iTunes, gets over 500,

The Journal.
A Historically Bad Year to Retire

The Journal.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 19:06


For decades, investing in a mix of stocks and bonds was one of the safest ways to save for retirement. But this year, that strategy has stopped working. WSJ's Akane Otani breaks down the unique market conditions of today's economy that are causing so much pain for retirees. Further Reading: -The Classic 60-40 Investment Strategy Falls Apart. ‘There's No Place to Hide.'  Further Listening: -How High Will Interest Rates Go?  -Will There Be a Recession? America's Top Bankers Weigh In  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Afropop Worldwide
Global Griots In France

Afropop Worldwide

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 59:00


Traditional Manding (Mande) griots living in France sit at the crossroads between Africa and Europe. Historically, their role has been to weave traditional, oral histories, often within music, to promote a united, peaceful society. As they have become part of the modern global community, each griot has their own way of staying true to these historical roles, while also broadening their appeal to multicultural audiences. In this program, we hear how these international troubadours spread their messages to the world by blending European music with the kora, the balafon, the guitar, and their own voices. Produced by Lisa Feder. APWW #864

Behind The Knife: The Surgery Podcast
Clinical Challenges in Surgical Critical Care: Management of the Brain Dead Organ Donor

Behind The Knife: The Surgery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 19:50


Historically, a paucity of data has existed in the most appropriate modality of critical care management of brain dead organ donors prior to organ harvest. In this episode, Drs. Bankhead, Dumas, and Park are joined by special guest Dr. Ashley McGinity, a director in the donor management unit the Center for Life at the UT Health Science Center in San Antonio, joins us to discuss modern and current practices in the management of these patients to maximize the gift for patients and families.  References:  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24980425/ https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25978154/  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31957104/ https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23116641/ https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28318674/ https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25056510/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7145376/  Please visit https://behindtheknife.org to access other high-yield surgical education podcasts, videos and more.   If you liked this episode, check out other surgical critical care episodes here: https://behindtheknife.org/podcast-category/surgical-critical-care/

This Jungian Life
Episode 240 - STAY-AT-HOME DADS: Emerging Potentials in the Father Archetype

This Jungian Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 68:32


As our bonds to historic roles loosen, fathers are finding new ways to express themselves within the family dynamic. In 2014 Pew Research Center identified two million stay-at-home-dads in the United States. Those men tell us that tending their children is more rewarding than chasing a paycheck. Being liberated from the hunter-gatherer role has allowed more men to incarnate aspects of the Father archetype infrequently seen since the industrial revolution. Being caregiver and homecreator does not diminish their experience of masculinity but rallies inner resources that had been set aside. Despite the national call for a redistribution of family duties and liberation from traditional paradigms, at-home dads face isolation, suspicion, and stigma.   Historically, as father's left the home to work at factories and offices, their presence in the family psyche dimmed. Children often lost touch with the significance of their fathers, and family courts consistently relegated them to providers of income. Poet Robert Hayden captures this ambivalence and regret in his poem Those Winter Sundays.   Sundays too my father got up early and put his clothes on in the blueblack cold, then with cracked hands that ached from labor in the weekday weather made banked fires blaze. No one ever thanked him.   I'd wake and hear the cold splintering, breaking. When the rooms were warm, he'd call, and slowly I would rise and dress, fearing the chronic angers of that house,   Speaking indifferently to him, who had driven out the cold and polished my good shoes as well. What did I know, what did I know of love's austere and lonely offices?   Growth and change are central to Jung's ideas. Making room for the incarnating Self in all its complex diversity is the task of humanity. When we muster understanding and support, cultural and personal transformation might be a little less painful   Here's the dream we analyze: “I am in New York with my sister. We are in the reception of a hotel, and it is cavernous, with walls and arches made from rich brown marble. The light is golden. We are taken to our room, and we are jetlagged and tired. This feels OK; we didn't have anything planned in our itinerary anyway. Our room is big, but we go into the small bedroom and get into the bed, one of us at each end. Later, I go to a Victoria's Secret in a mall. All the clothes are really expensive: the sale rack is not really reduced, and I find it annoying. Other people don't seem to mind, and they are clamoring for the clothes. I return to the hotel room and find that I have accidentally stolen some underwear: I have no idea how it got into my bag. My dad has arrived, with some of my friends and my sister. The bedroom feels really cramped. Everyone seems to be in New York. I'm embarrassed about the ‘stealing,' and everyone tells me I have to take it all back. I don't know how to do this surreptitiously without getting into trouble.”   REFERENCES: Dad Saves the Day: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6YmKIoUdZc, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zEPq2rGLKZU Farrell, W. (2019). The boy crisis: Why our boys are struggling and what we can do about it. BenBella Books. Available on Amazon: https://a.co/d/abRKOzW Hayden, R., & Glaysher, F. (2013). Robert Hayden: Collected poems. Liveright. Available on Amazon: https://a.co/d/ay0nLoi National At-Home Dad Network: https://athomedad.org/advocacy/statistics-on-stay-at-home-dads/ Pew Research Center: https://www.pewresearch.org/social-trends/2014/06/05/growing-number-of-dads-home-with-the-kids/#:~:text=Just%2024%25%20of%20stay%2Dat,%2Dat%2Dhome%20mothers). Warren Farrell: https://warrenfarrell.com/   GIVE US A HAND! Please become our patron: https://www.patreon.com/ThisJungianLife   RESOURCES: Learn to Analyze your own Dreams: https://thisjungianlife.com/enroll/ Enroll in our Philadelphia Jungian Seminar and start your journey to becoming an analyst: https://www.cgjungphiladelphia.org/seminar.shtml Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisJungianLife/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thisjungianlifepodcast/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thisjungianlife/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ThisJungianLife   HASHTAGS:  

Dollar Wise Podcast
4 Tips to Better Position Yourself In This Bear Market

Dollar Wise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 16:10


You already know that markets are declining so much that we are in bear market territory. But, what's the right thing to do? Stop investing? Sell the stock you have? Will the market come back soon? We answer the key questions on your mind about the 2022 market crash and share 4 ways you can make and save money during this market downturn. Tune into this episode to learn: Tips to grow your money when the market is down How to unlock 10 years' worth of tax savings The worst thing you can do when the market is down What we discussed(00:48) Will the market recover?(02:25) “I don't have time to wait for the market to recover” OR "How long does it take for bear markets to recover?"(04:11) 4 tips to make and save money when the market is down (04:11) Tip 1: tax loss harvesting (07:04) Tip 2: Roth conversions(08:54) Tip 3: rebalancing(10:52) Tip 4: what to do if you have cash right now(13:38) NEVER do this when the market is down 3 Things To Remember Whenever the market is down, we must start with the assumption that it will come back and recover at some point. History teaches us that this is the case. Believing history is our best bet. Historically, bear markets take around a year and a half to return to where they were. Just because the market is down doesn't mean you can't use that opportunity to your advantage. Some strategies to make and save money during a bear market include tax loss harvesting, Roth conversions, and rebalancing. Useful LinksConnect with Jason Gabrieli: jgabrieli@HFMadvisors.com | LinkedInConnect with Tyler Reedman: treedman@hfmadvisors.com | LinkedInLike what you've heard…Learn more about HFM HERESchedule time to speak with us HERECheck out our Financial Wellness Program – HFM Ignite

The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
Your Sales Forecast Is Broken, but You Can Fix It with Udi Ledergor

The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 43:13


Do you know who the true magicians are in the business world? Salespeople. That's right, and that's all down to their forecasting abilities. Historically, salespeople have relied more on gut feeling and opinions instead of data when forecasting. But things don't work like that anymore, and, as a result, sales forecasting is broken. So how can we fix it? Why is it not working anymore? How can we fix mistakes and create better predictability? Udi Ledergor, the CMO of Gong.io, joins us today to answer the questions and fix the problem. Join us as we discuss: -Why is sales forecasting broken? -Less guessing, more data -Four steps to get the right data and make better predictions -Does swearing on sales calls really work?

The Nonlinear Library
EA - NY Times on the FTX implosion's impact on EA by AllAmericanBreakfast

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 4:31


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: NY Times on the FTX implosion's impact on EA, published by AllAmericanBreakfast on November 14, 2022 on The Effective Altruism Forum. The impact of the FTX scandal on EA is starting to hit the news. The coverage in this NY Times article seems fair to me. I also think that the FTX Future Fund leadership decision to jointly resign both was the right thing to do, and comes across that way in the article. Will MacAskill, I think, is continuing to show leadership interfacing with the media - it's a big transition from his book tour not long ago to giving quotes to the press about FTX's implosion. The article focuses on the impact this has had on EA: [The collapse of FTX] has also dealt a significant blow to the corner of philanthropy known as effective altruism, a philosophy that advocates applying data and evidence to doing the most good for the many and that is deeply tied to Mr. Bankman-Fried, one of its leading proponents and donors. Now nonprofits are scrambling to replace millions in grant commitments from Mr. Bankman-Fried's charitable vehicles, and members of the effective altruism community are asking themselves whether they might have helped burnish his reputation... ... For a relatively young movement that was already wrestling over its growth and focus, such a high-profile scandal implicating one of the group's most famous proponents represents a significant setback. The article mentions the FTX Future Fund joint resignation, focusing on the grants that will not be able to be honored and what those might have helped. The article talks about Will MacAskill inspiring SBF to switch his career plans to pursue earning to give, but doesn't try to blame the fraud on utilitarianism or on EA. This is my opinion, but I'm just confused by people's eagerness to blame this on utilitarianism or the EA movement. The common-sense American lens to view these sorts of outcomes is a framework of personal responsibility. If SBF committed fraud, that is indicative of a problem with his personal character, not the moral philosophy he claims to subscribe to. His connection to the movement in fact predates the vast fortune he won and lost in the cryptocurrency field. Over lunch a decade ago while he was still in college, Mr. Bankman-Fried told Mr. MacAskill, the philosopher, that he wanted to work on animal-welfare issues. Mr. MacAskill suggested the young man could do more good earning large sums of money and donating the bulk of it to good causes instead. Mr. Bankman-Fried went into finance with the stated intention of making a fortune that he could then give away. In an interview with The New York Times last month about effective altruism, Mr. Bankman-Fried said he planned to give away a vast majority of his fortune in the next 10 to 20 years to effective altruist causes. He did not respond to a request for comment for this article. Contrary to my expectation, the article was pretty straightforward in describing the global health/longtermism aspects of EA: Effective altruism focuses on the question of how individuals can do as much good as possible with the money and time available to them. Historically, the community focused on low-cost medical interventions, such as insecticide-treated bed nets to prevent mosquitoes from giving people malaria. More recently many members of the movement have focused on issues that could have a greater impact on the future, like pandemic prevention and nuclear nonproliferation as well as preventing artificial intelligence from running amok and sending people to distant planets to increase our chances of survival as a species. Probably the most critical aspect of the article was this: Benjamin Soskis, senior research associate in the Center on Nonprofits and Philanthropy at the Urban Institute, said that the issues raised by Mr. Bankman-Fried's rev...

Thoughts on the Market
Mike Wilson: Dealing With the Late Cycle Period

Thoughts on the Market

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 4:20


As we transition away from our fire and ice narrative and into the late cycle stage, investors will want to change up their strategies as we finish one cycle and begin another.----- Transcript -----Welcome to Thoughts on the Market. I'm Mike Wilson, chief investment officer and chief U.S. equity strategist for Morgan Stanley. Along with my colleagues, bringing you a variety of perspectives, I'll be talking about the latest trends in the financial marketplace. It's Monday, November 14th, at 11 a.m. in New York. So let's get after it. Last year's fire and ice narrative worked so well, we decided to dust off another Robert Frost jewel to describe this year's outlook, with The Road Not Taken. As described by many literary experts, and Frost himself, the poem presents the dilemma we all face in life that different choices lead to different outcomes, and while the road taken can be a good one, these choices create doubt and even remorse about the road not taken. For the year ahead, we think investors will need to be more tactical with their views on the economy, policy, earnings and valuation. This is because we are closer to the end of the cycle at this point, and that means that trends in these key variables can zig and zag before the final path is clear. In other words, while flexibility is always important to successful investing, it's critical now. In contrast, the set-up was so poor a year ago that the trends in all of the variables mentioned above were headed lower in our view. Therefore, the right choice or strategy was about managing or profiting from the new downtrend. After all, Fire and Ice the poem is not a debate about the destination, it's about the path to that destination. In the case of our bear market call, it was a combination of both fire and ice - inflation and slowing growth, a bad combination for stocks. As it turned out, the cocktail has been just as bad for bonds, at least so far. However, as the ice overtakes the fire and inflation cools off, we're becoming more confident that bonds should beat stocks in this final verse that has yet to fully play out. That divergence can create new opportunities and confusion about the road we are on, and why we have recently pivoted to a more bullish tactical view on equities. In the near term, we maintain our tactically bullish call as we transition from fire to ice, a window of opportunity when long term interest rates typically fall prior to the magnitude of the slowdown being reflected in earnings estimates. This is the classic late cycle period between the Fed's last hike and the recession. Historically, this period is a profitable one for stocks. Three months ago, we suggested the Fed's pause would coincide with the arrival of a recession this cycle, given the extreme inflation dynamics. In short, the Fed would not be able to pause until payrolls were negative, the unequivocal indicator of a recession, but too late to kick save the cycle or the downtrend for stocks. However, the jobs market has remained stronger for longer, even in the face of weakening earnings. More importantly, this may persist into next year, leaving the window open for a period when the Fed can slow or pause rate hikes before we see an unemployment cycle emerge. That's what we think is behind the current rally, and we think it can go higher. We won't have evidence of the hard freeze for a few more months, and markets can dream of a less hawkish Fed, lower interest rates and resilient earnings in the interim. Last week's softer than expected inflation report was a critically necessary data point to fuel that dream for longer. We expect long duration growth stocks to lead the next phase of this rally as interest rates fall further. That means Nasdaq should catch up to the Dow's outsized move higher so far. Unfortunately, we have more confidence today than we did a few months ago in our well below consensus earnings forecast for next year, and that means the bear market will likely resume once this rally is finished. Bottom line, the path forward is much more uncertain than a year ago and likely to bring several twists and periods of remorse for investors wishing they had traded it differently. If one were to take our 12 month S&P 500 bear, base and bull targets of 3500, 3900, and 4200 at face value, they might say it looks like we are expecting a generally boring year. However, nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, we would argue the past 12 months have been boring because a bear market was so likely we simply set our defensive strategy and stayed with it. That strategy has worked well all year, even during this recent rally. But that kind of strategy won't work over the next 12 months, in our view. Instead, investment success will require one to turn over the portfolio more frequently as we finish one cycle and begin another. Thanks for listening. If you enjoy Thoughts on the Market, please take a moment to rate and review us on the Apple Podcast app. It helps more people to find the show.

UBM Unleavened Bread Ministries
UBBS 11.13.2022

UBM Unleavened Bread Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 116:49


Restoration of the Saints (12) (Audio) David Eells - 11/13/22 Destroying Your DNA or Restoring Your DNA As we have seen the confession of the curse brings destruction of the DNA. This is what men do everyday as a norm as they see their natural face in the mirror instead of the Gospel face of Jesus as in 2Co 3:18. As a narrow example of  this very broad principle of the DNA curse, the medical establishment demonstrates this phenomena by pointing out specifically all of man's curses and making sure they fear them so that they can control the people.   As Job said in Job 3:25  For the thing which I fear cometh upon me, And that which I am afraid of cometh unto me.  Jesus confirmed this saying in Mat 8:13 ... as thou hast believed, so be it done unto thee. Fear is faith in the curse. The medical establishment confesses the curses and demands that we do so also but they always ultimately lose the patient to the curse. Their pharmakeia actually brings more curses as side effects.  They made sure everyone who would listen feared C-19 enough to take the vaccine which people are dying of in a geometric progression. Before this man-made curse the Journal of the American Medical Association said, 450,000 people were dying a year in the US from Iatropic [healer related] causes. The Angels told us that the Lord would return in His Man-child body and completely restore the DNA of his Holy People who confess Him before men. The angel Baruch said, “There is much busyness happening in the Kingdom of our Lord; Much excitement is among the saints and the angels. Everything is prepared and ready for His return.” And then after a moment he said, “The Son is waiting for the Father's command.” David asked, “So the Man-child is coming?” Baruch said, “Surely.” David asked, “What does the coming restoration involve personally?” The angel Jeruel  answered, “Restoration on a DNA cellular level. Faith and power will be imputed to receive healing and restoration. It will be complete restoration not partial. The first fruits are first. They will be the trail blazers. There will be a mighty supernatural outpouring of spiritual restoration of closeness to God through His Holy Spirit.” Science is pointing this out.  It appears to me that the Lord, through the spoken Words of His Man-child, will bring the frequency needed to restore DNA, and all we need to supply is the Words of Faith in the promises of God which we have known is the cure for the curse. Jesus through His sacrifice took away the devil's power of death (Heb.2:14) for those who believe. He never had the authority of death. Authority is the right to use power. (1Sa.2:6) The Lord killeth, and maketh alive: He bringeth down to Sheol, and bringeth up. Death and life are in the hand of the Lord, not any other. But again, that does not negate our responsibility. (Pro.18:21) Death and life are in the power of the tongue… We need to be careful to agree with God's Word that we fall not under the curse (Rev.22:18-19). (Num.14:28)… As ye have spoken in mine ears, so will I do to you. (Mat.12:37) For by thy words thou shalt be justified, and by thy words thou shalt be condemned. God reacts to the way we react to His Word. Everything is subject to the Word God has spoken, even His own will. (Psa.138:2)… thou hast magnified thy word above all thy name. God puts the Word first, as a standard to trust even above His own name, which in Hebrew means “character and authority.” God wants us to know that He puts His Word above any desire or purpose that we might think He has. But His Word is His desire and purpose.   Words Heal or Curse Your DNA Deb Horton - 10/26/11 (David's notes in red) Below are Cliffs Notes by Deb Horton of an article which reports that science has finally acknowledged that words have physical power. After removing all the New Age gobbledygook, the article acknowledges that Russian scientists have discovered that spoken words alone can and do reprogram DNA. So the tongue conquers the curse or the tongue can bring the curse. Key points quoted from the article, which is translated from German, so the terminology will sound a little strange in English (my comments in parentheses): 1. DNA can be influenced and reprogrammed by words and frequencies WITHOUT cutting out and replacing single genes. 2. The Russian linguists found that the genetic code, especially in the apparently useless 90% (which has been called "junk DNA"), follows the same rules as all our human languages...(and that) human languages ... are a reflection of our inherent DNA. 3. One can simply use words and sentences of the human language ... to influence genetic information! (i.e. agreeing with the Words that we are not under the curse, that by His stripes we were healed, etc.) This, too, was experimentally proven! Living DNA substance (in living tissue, not in vitro) will always react to language-modulated laser rays and even to radio waves, if the proper frequencies are being used. 4. This finally and scientifically explains why affirmations ...(can) repair genetic defects.(Our confessions of the positive promises of God concerning us and our circumstances change us. Death and life are in the power of the tongue. Pro 18:21  Death and life are in the power of the tongue; And they that love it shall eat the fruit thereof.) 5. ...our body is programmable by language, words and thought. This has now been scientifically proven and explained....The individual person must work on the inner processes and maturity in order to establish a conscious communication with the DNA. (i.e., 2Co. 10:5 casting down imaginations, and every high thing that is exalted against the knowledge of God, and bringing every thought into captivity to the obedience of Christ;) 6. The Russian scientists also found out that our DNA can cause disturbing patterns ....Stress, worries or a hyperactive intellect prevent (or) distort the communication (and) make it useless. (Isa. 26:3 Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace whose mind is stayed on thee.) 7. An ordered group consciousness creates order in its whole surroundings! When a great number of people get together very closely, potentials of violence also dissolve. (Coming into one accord is powerful especially when we come into one accord with God. Rom. 15:5 Now the God of patience and of comfort grant you to be of the same mind one with another according to Christ Jesus:  Rom. 10:10 for with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation.) Researchers think that if humans with full individuality would regain group consciousness, they would have a god-like power to create, alter and shape things on Earth! (That would be Christ in us, the hope of glory. Mat 18:19 Again I say unto you, that if two of you shall agree on earth as touching anything that they shall ask, it shall be done for them of my Father who is in heaven.) …   Verbal First Aid and the Power of Words: (Natural News) by Dani Veracity - 5/16/06 (David's notes in red) …According to Professor Judith Simon Prager, what you say to a person in a crisis is just as important as what you do. "How a person experiences an illness or injury is important to both the healing process and the person not developing post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)," says Professor Prager, who travels worldwide training people in what she calls "verbal first aid." The technique she teaches takes “Fight-or-flight" response into account and incorporates two systems largely ignored by mainstream medicine: The body's powerful self-healing system and its extremely influential belief system. (Jesus said, “As you have believed so be it done unto you.” and when you believe Him, it comes out of your mouth. Hence, there is a positive vibrational frequency.) Furthermore, this mind-body approach can make the difference between life and death for someone suffering from a major illness or injury. (Pro.18:21) Death and life are in the power of the tongue…) ...Unfortunately, Fight-or-flight response does more harm than good ... because, in Professor Prager's words, it "makes you stupid.” (When we forget God's Word and His promises, Demons will take advantage of fear, anxiety, and negativity in order to make people "stupid.”) Though no one can doubt the power of intuition, Fight-or-flight response does in fact hinder complex thought, (which occurs in the frontal lobe) because it makes the blood nourishing the frontal brain go to the mid-brain. This mid-brain thinking is an altered state that Professor Prager calls the "Healing Zone." This is a highly susceptible position or state, in which, the injured or ill person is unable to exercise personal judgment; therefore, the words others say around that person weigh heavily on his or her emotions and, because all emotions illicit a physical response, physical well-being. This mind-body connection is core to verbal first aid. "Our thoughts give rise to physical manifestations," explains Professor Prager. The mind-body link is not just a theory, either, as studies show that words alone can influence automatic nervous system activities, such as heart rate and breathing rate. Furthermore, she cites two former medical “mysteries": doctor-induced illness and the placebo effect -- as proof that the mind-body connection exists. Many of us have experienced some form of doctor-induced illness. For example, when a doctor says, "This medication may make you sick," most people will perceive some form of negative side effect. The placebo effect is a similar phenomenon, in which we feel what we believe we are supposed to feel. The fact that the placebo works as well or better than the tested pharmaceuticals 33 percent of the time concerns some and mystifies others. It's certainly not information that Big Pharma would like you to think about, but nevertheless, it is the truth. So how can it be? Well, the body makes its own chemicals, Professor Prager reasons, so if you think a pill will help you, it often will, even if it's just a sugar pill masquerading as a pharmaceutical drug. (Think how much better it would be to not have the bad side effects of drugs or "trusting in the arm of the flesh.” Jer 17:5-8 Thus saith Jehovah: Cursed is the man that trusteth in man, and maketh flesh his arm, and whose heart departeth from Jehovah. 6 For he shall be like the heath in the desert, and shall not see when good cometh, but shall inhabit the parched places in the wilderness, a salt land and not inhabited. 7 Blessed is the man that trusteth in Jehovah, and whose trust Jehovah is. 8 For he shall be as a tree planted by the waters, that spreadeth out its roots by the river, and shall not fear when heat cometh, but its leaf shall be green; and shall not be careful in the year of drought, neither shall cease from yielding fruit.) University of Kansas professor M. Eric Wright discovered verbal first aid in 1990, when he experimented with two groups of emergency medical technicians. The control group was told to continue normal emergency response procedure, but the other group was given a set of parameters to follow: 1. Minimize extraneous input, such as witnesses' reactions. 2. Say a specific paragraph that includes: "The worst is over...[Tell your body to preserve itself. Encourage healing and limited blood loss]... You're in a safe position. The worst is over." 3. Don't talk too much about anything else. After six months of following these parameters, the trained group's patients ... experienced a much lower mortality rate. (How much more powerful it would be if we spoke the Words of Life over people! This is going beyond the natural to the supernatural. Jesus said in Joh 6:63,  It is the spirit that giveth life; the flesh profiteth nothing: the words that I have spoken unto you are spirit, and are life. And Mar. 11:23-24 Verily I say unto you, Whosoever shall say unto this mountain, Be thou taken up and cast into the sea; and shall not doubt in his heart, but shall believe that what he saith cometh to pass; he shall have it. 24 Therefore I say unto you, All things whatsoever ye pray and ask for, believe that ye receive them, and ye shall have them.)    “Diagnostitis" and the Power of Words (NaturalNews) by Dr. Carolyn Dean - 5/11/11 (David's notes in red) “Diagnostitis" is a new disease that I invented, I'm sure many others have had the same idea. It's a condition caused by health professionals declaring that you have something wrong with you that's incurable … [and] the symptoms can only be treated with drugs or surgery. “Diagnostitis" is an inflammation and irritation that you feel when you are given the wrong diagnosis. Or it could be a diagnosis callously embellished with all the horrors of the disease. (i.e. “The bad report”. How many wrong diagnosis' come to pass because they had so much faith in the doctors? Or a true diagnosis that came to pass because the person acted upon it by faith.) (Years ago, in one week, two women associated with our fellowship were told they had breast cancer. We prayed for them and told them that they were healed and to believe Jesus' words. We warned them not to believe any other words. In both cases, the doctors convinced them otherwise. They both ended up having Mastectomies and the lab results showed that there was no cancer in the breast tissues.) Back to the article: When I was a second-year medical student doing rounds with an orthopedic surgeon and my clinical group, I witnessed our surgeon describing the terrible fate awaiting a young man recently diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis (a deforming arthritic condition), in front of the patient. I was appalled! At the end of rounds the doctor started to criticize me for sitting on another patient's bed to obtain … their history. I said, “No, I want to talk to you!" I immediately launched into his incredible insensitivity for dashing any hope of recovery from Adam, the spondylitis patient. “Diagnostitis" can be the result of being given a diagnosis. ... The doctor may not have the tools to help his patient but he dashes any hope that something else or someone else might have answers. (That someone we know is Jesus Christ. “By His stripes ye were healed.”) Here's another cause of diagnostitis. I've had clients who tell me doctors have blurted out, "I can't believe you're still alive!" Or the doctor simply says, "I can't believe you are doing so well." This statement to some can be a triumph that you've surpassed your doctor's expectations. But to another it could reactivate the feeling that you didn't have a very good chance of surviving and initiate a setback. (Doubt and unbelief will always cause us set backs whether it is our own or that of someone else's.) That recently happened to a client of mine. After extensive back surgery he went for his two-week check up and x-rays. The x-ray technician was shocked at the major work that had been done. The technician's genuine surprise that he was doing so well in the face of such extensive surgery threw my client into irrational fears that his recovery was probably tenuous and wouldn't last. I remember when I first went to medical school, doctors didn't tell patients how sick they were or whether or not they had cancer. Then came the era of the "informed consent”. Now Doctors felt obliged to tell patients if there was even a 5 percent chance that they had cancer. You may not agree, but I think telling a person they may have cancer can actually sow the seeds of cancer in their vulnerable mind and body. (Pro. 23:7 For as he thinketh within himself, so is he… Jesus said, "As you have believed so be it done unto you.”) I recently wrote a foreword for a soon-to-be-published book called Become a Wellness Champion by Pam Bartha, a science teacher and writer. In 1988, at age 28, Pam was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. She was told by her neurologist that it was only a matter of time before she would land in a wheelchair and then be completely disabled. This doctor was playing God. He was adamant there was nothing she could do to change the prognosis of her disease. He even warned her against snake oil cures, saying they were useless. He put nails in her coffin and added the stress of "incurability" to her list of symptoms. He added diagnositis and the fear of never recovering from her MS diagnosis. ... How cruel are these doctors who so often sentence their patients to a life of illness. ... Doctors issue a divine proclamation that keeps many people … discouraged and hopeless. With their presumed authority and their words, they pass judgment on … people. Doctors have indeed become the priesthood and wield terrible authority over their patients. And some of them don't even realize the power of their words. They know very little … and yet they never state their ignorance. They just pass on their hopelessness to their patients. ... The words they say are geared to fit into the standard practice of medicine. Any words outside that box can get them in trouble. (This is part of the Rockefeller population control agenda. The Rockefellers' bought out and funded all the medical schools in the 20th century and began teaching and brain washing all the upcoming medical students with Allopathic pharmaceutical treatment methods.) In the comments section below the article is a moving story by a reader who says, "I am a burn survivor and was advised to not use insect repellent, perfume, shampoo, soap, aftershave, shaving cream, sunscreen, etc. When I asked my doctor why he wasn't telling the world about the crap (harmful substances) in all these products he looked me in the eye and said, 'I have a wife, children, a mortgage and other patients to help. If I told the world what I told you I wouldn't have any of it.' I felt sorry for him, he had a tear in his eye, but I understood why he didn't tell the world.” (Many doctors who have come out publicly speaking against the Covid and vaccine agendas have lost their medical license; most recently like the famous Dr. Peter McCullough.) What's my message? Make your own words be "the tell" of how you want your world to be and how you want your health to be. Don't let anyone else's words take away from your power. No authority on earth can do that. For an example of this, read my Natural News article, "The Medical Monopoly" (http://www.naturalnews.com/Author_Dr_Carolyn...).     The Power of Words are HUGE! YouTube – A&O Productions (David's notes in red)   [Editors notes italicized or in red] ...God said, “Let there be light.” And there was light. I want to remind you of the power of the mind. You can think yourself into a depression. You can think your way into stress. You can think your way into misery and frustration. There's so much more power in the mind than you probably would like to give yourself credit for. Change your mind. Decide that you love yourself enough to not surround yourself with people, things and situations that can have your mind continuing to spiral down this negative and dysfunctional train. “Once …you are fed with an idea ... you are susceptible to, … like an idea that this pill that we just got from the pharmaceutical company, it's the greatest, best thing for your issue, and I give you this pill and you get better, and then later you find out it was a sugar pill, and everybody says, ‘Yeah, that's called the placebo effect.'” ... “What does it really mean?” ... “You didn't get healed by the pill, you got healed by the belief in the pill.” “Well, ... that's what placebo's all about,” and ... a minimum of one-third, of all medical intervention is the placebo effect, that's where the healing comes from. (Imagine how the power would be multiplied beyond the natural if we put our faith in the Word of God.) …That's the result of positive thinking. But what about negative thinking?” This is what we don't talk about, but the reality is that it's equally powerful in regard to affecting your biology as is positive thinking, but it works in the opposite direction. A negative thought is called the nocebo effect. It can cause any disease and you can die. If you believe you're going to die, you can die from the belief. So, we really have to watch out because, as psychologists would tell us, 70% or more of our thoughts are negative and redundant and we're replaying the same negative thoughts. I say, “If thoughts have nothing to do with it, fine, but thoughts, positive or negative, shape our biology.” …It's time to wake up because our negative thinking is manifesting in negative life experiences.” (Again, we should enter the supernatural power by faith in God's promises.) Words are extremely powerful. You actually create your own laws and limitations for yourself, using the words that you say most often. The greatest teacher to ever live, the Carpenter from the plains of Galilee once said, “By your words you are justified and by your words you are condemned.” He understood the spiritual properties words possess. (Faith makes us justified but unbelief is a sin.) …God actually spoke the universe into existence, also known as cymatics or vibration. And remember, you are a piece [rather, we are made in the likeness] of the Creator and possess the same creative qualities. Never use phrases like, “This is killing me,” or “This makes me sick.” Though lighthearted, those are actual commands that are stirring energy in motion. “From the fruit of their mouth, a person's stomach is filled. With the harvest of their lips they are satisfied. The tongue has the power of life and death, and those who love it will eat its fruit.” (Proverbs 18:20-21) There are high energy words and there are low energy words. High energy words attract to you positive people, positive situations, positive outcomes, positive circumstances. They also raise your health and the health and wellness of those listening. “From the fruit of their lips, people are filled with good things and the work of their hands brings them reward. An honest witness tells the truth, but a false witness tells lies. The words of the reckless pierce like swords but the tongue of the wise brings healing. Truthful lips endure forever but a lying tongue lasts only a moment.” (Proverbs 15:14-19) Low energy words do the exact opposite. They attract all manner of negative situations and circumstances. And they have also been proven to lower your immune system, making you more susceptible to illness. Dr. Emoto's water experiment proved that words and intention actually have a physical impact on water. Dr. Emoto's laboratory does research on water samples which are subjected to various forms of outside influence. The impressions made upon the water are recorded by swiftly freezing it in a cryogenic chamber. Somebody said, “Thank you,” to this water, or “Excuse me,” or “You disgust me,” or, “Idiot,” or, “I hate you,” or, “love,” “hope,” and “soul.” (Pictures in video show that the positive words created beautiful designs and the negative words made the water form chaotic and disorganized blobs.) In Dr. Emoto's numerous experiments, aimed at finding the word that cleanses the water most powerfully, have shown that it's not just one word, but a combination of two: "love and gratitude. “For whoever would love life and see good days must keep their tongue from evil and their lips from deceitful speech.”  (1 Peter 3:8-10) And Jesus said that your words are spirit. “The Spirit gives life. The flesh counts for nothing. The words I've spoken to you, they are full of the Spirit and life. It is the Spirit that quickeneth. [Which means, “gives life to”] The flesh profiteth nothing. The words that I speak unto you, they are Spirit and they are life. But there are some of you that believe not.” (John 6:63-64) Faith comes by hearing. Like when we say, “I can do this,” and set out to accomplish it. That it is the very words, when heard, because faith comes by hearing, that when you hear yourself saying these words, “I can do this,” that you actually can get the courage and strength and the wherewithal to get something done. That's why it's not just important to think good thoughts, you have to speak those thoughts. If you want things to come out and you want them to be manifested into the world, if you have a thought within you, you need to speak that thought out. You need to create by speaking the very thing that you have within you. You need to bring it, somehow, into this world and make it so. Think of it this way: a thought that is within you is not in this world. The thought that is in you is within you. It is only until you speak that thought and you give it a vibration in this world that it actually manifests. The Scriptures say that God spoke and everything became. The Scriptures say that every word that we speak will be judged accordingly, that we will be held accountable for everything that we say and everything that we think. This is why we must take every thought captive. Every thought that comes into our mind, it has the potential to create that thought in the world, if manifested by the words that you speak. Your thoughts create, your words make them become the very thing that you believe that they will be. “We all stumble in many ways. Anyone who is never at fault in what they say is perfect, able to keep their whole body in check. If we put bits into the mouths of horses to make them obey us, we can turn the whole animal. Or take ships, as an example, although they are so large and driven by strong winds, they are steered by a very small rudder wherever the pilot wants to go. Likewise, the tongue is a small part of the body, but it makes great boasts. Consider what a great forest is set on fire by a small spark. The tongue also is a fire. A world of evil among the parts of the body. It corrupts the whole body. It sets the whole course of one's life on fire and is itself set on fire by hell. All kinds of animals, birds, reptiles and sea creatures are being tamed and have been tamed by mankind, but no human being can tame the tongue. It is a restless evil, full of deadly poison. With the tongue, we praise our Lord and Father, and with it, we curse human beings who have been made in God's likeness. Out of the same mouth come praise and cursing. My brothers and sisters, this should not be. Can both fresh water and salt water flow from the same spring? My brothers and sisters, can a fig tree bear olives or a grapevine bear figs? Neither can a salt spring produce fresh water.” (James 3:1-12) Dr. Emoto has conducted another interesting experiment. He placed rice into three glass beakers and covered it with water and then every day for a month, he said, “Thank you,” to one beaker, “You're an idiot,” to the second, and the third one, he completely ignored. After one month, the rice that had been thanked, began to ferment, giving off a strong, pleasant aroma. The rice in the second beaker turned black. And the rice that was ignored began to rot. …Another experiment was to say good, beautiful, positive things to the good apple and nasty things to the bad apple. So, I just took out my apples from the bad apple jar and the good apple jar, and ... it's just amazing. …(The bad apple had brown spots all over it and the good apple was preserved with no spots.) Try using 25 containers, or even 50 containers, this works, and it shows that our thoughts literally shape our lives. (Another experiment was to put two strawberries in two plastic baggies and label one bag, “Love” and the other bag, “Hate” The individual said, “I love you, strawberry.” to the baggie labeled Love and “I hate you, strawberry.” to the baggie labeled “Hate.” …The “Love” strawberry looks completely normal. …And the hate berry had mold all over it.) ...People do things that annoy, disappoint and anger. Though we cannot look into another's heart, we assume that we know a bad motive or even a bad person when we see one. This topic of judging others could actually be taught in a two word sermon. When it comes to hating, gossiping, ignoring, ridiculing, holding grudges or wanting to cause harm, please apply the following: Stop it! “Do not let any unwholesome talk come out of your mouths, but only what is helpful to building others up according to their needs, that it may benefit those that listen.” (Ephesians 4:29) Haven't we all at one time or another meekly approached the mercy seat and pleaded for grace? Haven't we wished with all the energy of our souls for mercy to be forgiven for the mistakes we have made, and the sins we have committed? Forgiving ourselves and others is not easy. In fact, for most of us, it requires a major change in our attitude and way of thinking, even a change of heart. This mighty change of heart is exactly what the Gospel of Jesus Christ is designed to bring about. Let us be kind. Let us forgive. Let us talk peacefully with each other. Let us do good unto all men. Allowing us to see others the way our heavenly Father sees us, as flawed and imperfect mortals who have potential and worth, far beyond our capacity to imagine. Because God loves us so much, we too must love and forgive. Remember, in the end, it is the merciful who obtain mercy. Believe it or not, each word that you speak is an affirmation. You are always affirming that you want more of it into your life by speaking it, by placing your attention on it, by talking about it. Since that's the case, only talk about the joyous things that you would like to have and experience. And before you know it, those words will become an everyday part of your vocabulary and your life will soon follow suit. Our confession forbids or permits, and determines who will win the battle in the heavens. Victory in the battle in heaven has nothing to do with the power of the angels or demons, but our authority. One angel will easily bind Satan and cast him into the abyss as in Rev.20:1-2. It says in Rev.12:7 And there was war in heaven: Michael and his angels [going forth] to war with the dragon; and the dragon warred and his angels; (8) and they prevailed not, neither was their place found any more in heaven. Even though the angels and demons carry out the warfare, the saints give authority by the words of their mouth to the winning side. (11) And they (saints) overcame him because of the blood of the Lamb, and because of the word of their testimony; and they loved not their life even unto death. The saints forbid or permit angels and demons according to the “word of their testimony.” This is according to Jesus in, (Mat.18:18) Verily I say unto you, what things soever ye shall bind (forbid) on earth shall be bound (forbidden) in heaven; and what things soever ye shall loose (permit) on earth shall be loosed (permitted) in heaven. Because of this, we are motivated to agree with the Word even when it is contrary to the sight realm or human sentiment. The Word of God in us gives authority to the angels to conquer Satan. Many say, “I bind the demons,” or “I loose the angels,” while they continue to disagree with the Word. This is only hot air. It accomplishes nothing. Neither Jesus nor His disciples made these statements. We do not have to either; just agree with the Word in our everyday thinking, speech, and actions. Demons will be forbidden while angels will be permitted. I include actions here because we cannot confess Christ while living in willful sin and expect the demons to be forbidden. It is imperative that we repent, change our mind, in order to cast down Satan's ability to rule us. (2Co.10:4) (For the weapons of our warfare are not of the flesh, but mighty before God to the casting down of strongholds); (5) casting down imaginations (Greek: “reasonings”), and every high thing that is exalted against the knowledge of God, and bringing every thought into captivity to the obedience of Christ. If we want to win the battle in the heavens, we must first win it in our mind and with our tongue. (Pro.18:21) Death and life are in the power of the tongue…   The Ultimate Fate of Slanderers and Railers David Eells {Psa.11:2} For, lo, the wicked bend the bow, They make ready their arrow upon the string, That they may shoot in darkness at the upright in heart.   God says in His Word that slanderers and revilers (or railers) will not be saved without repentance, but in these days many will not return from this path, just as when Jesus came the first time. The word "slanderer" in Greek is diablos, meaning, "accuser" or "devil" and is, in fact, the Spanish translation of "devil". According to Vines Expository Dictionary, these are "those who are given to finding fault with the demeanor and conduct of others, and spreading their innuendos and criticisms in the Church". In a similar way, the word "reviler" or "railer" in Greek is often blasphemeo, meaning "to blaspheme or speak against God or the brethren or both". Those who blaspheme are obviously of the same nature and controlled by the devil and not God. Whenever you see a person or group of people abusing some person like this, remember that these are demons speaking. Demons slander and rail against the righteous. So, you can suspect that their victim is righteous. The only exception to this rule is when God turns their venom onto one another in judgment. You cannot associate with such people without a little leaven leavening the whole lump, so we are commanded in 1 Corinthians 5 to separate from them. Paul, by God, turned blasphemers, who have fallen away from the faith and defiled their conscience, over to Satan. {1Ti.1:19} holding faith and a good conscience; which some having thrust from them made shipwreck concerning the faith: {20} of whom is Hymenaeus and Alexander; whom I delivered unto Satan, that they might be taught not to blaspheme. God still does this. Revilers or railers are placed with the worst of men and rejected by all good men. {1Co.6:9} Or know ye not that the unrighteous shall not inherit the kingdom of God? Be not deceived: neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor effeminate, nor abusers of themselves with men, {10} nor thieves, nor covetous, nor drunkards, nor revilers [railers], nor extortioners, shall inherit the kingdom of God. "Faction" here is the purpose of slander and railing. It means to separate followers for selfish ambition. We are commanded to separate from such after just two instances because it will leaven you so quickly. {Tit.3: 9-11} but shun foolish questionings, and genealogies, and strifes, and fightings about law; for they are unprofitable and vain. 10 A factious man after a first and second admonition refuse; 11 knowing that such a one is perverted, and sinneth, being self-condemned. Gal 5:19  Now the works of the flesh are manifest, which are these: fornication, uncleanness, lasciviousness, 20  idolatry, sorcery, enmities, strife, jealousies, wraths, factions, divisions, parties, 21 envyings, drunkenness, revellings, and such like; of which I forewarn you, even as I did forewarn you, that they who practise such things shall not inherit the kingdom of God. "Parties" here is very similar. It means a self-willed opinion leading into dividing into sects or denominations. Slander and faction are always associated with lying spirits and other forms of deceit, like subtle innuendos. {Psa.50:19} Thou givest thy mouth to evil, And thy tongue frameth deceit. {20} Thou sittest and speakest against thy brother; Thou slanderest thine own mother's son. {21} These things hast thou done, and I kept silence; Thou thoughtest that I was altogether such a one as thyself: [But] I will reprove thee, and set [them] in order before thine eyes. None of these enter the kingdom of God without repentance. {Rev.21:8} But for the fearful, and unbelieving, and abominable, and murderers, and fornicators, and sorcerers, and idolaters, and all liars, their part [shall be] in the lake that burneth with fire and brimstone; which is the second death. We must endure the cross of death to fleshly lusts of unforgiveness, bitterness, hatred, faction, strife, slander, railing, lying, criticism, judging others, etc. and cast them off as the weights that hold us back from winning this race. {Heb.12:1} Therefore let us also, seeing we are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us, {2} looking unto Jesus the author and perfecter of [our] faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising shame, and hath sat down at the right hand of the throne of God. The one who receives the prize is the true body of Christ in whom Christ Himself lives. Those who live after these lusts cannot receive the prize, for the race is to bear the fruit of Christ, 30-, 60- and 100-fold before our time is up. {1Co.9:24} Know ye not that they that run in a race run all, but one receiveth the prize? Even so run; that ye may attain. If there is no cross, there is no crown. All who indulge their flesh in unforgiveness, bitterness, hatred, faction, strife, criticism, judging others, will not inherit the prize of Christ. {25} And every man that striveth in the games exerciseth self-control in all things. Now they do it to receive a corruptible crown; but we an incorruptible. The flesh that desires these lusts must be crucified or the person will be rejected, no matter how much they think they have done for God. {26} I therefore so run, as not uncertainly; so fight I, as not beating the air: 27 but I buffet my body, and bring it into bondage: lest by any means, after that I have preached to others, I myself should be rejected. Again, if they refuse to deny their flesh to obey God's Word, they will be destroyed. Paul said in Romans 8 that if we walk after the flesh, we must die. We have watched these people over the years lose their health, the respect of all righteous people, their ministries and often their lives. The Lord takes no pleasure in the strength of the beastly flesh or the walk of man. {Psa.147:10} He delighteth not in the strength of the horse: He taketh no pleasure in the legs of a man. God forbade Israel to use horses from Egypt because of what they represented. Those full of slander, railing/reviling, criticism, unforgiveness, delusion, paranoia, gossip, Jezebel, are often judged because they refuse to forgive anyone and are turned over to the tormentors, as Jesus said in Matthew 18:34,35. Rejection and self-will and lust for position is the common denominator and root of most slanderers and railers/revilers. There is deliverance from rejection and its fear. These people are not qualified to judge, for they themselves are sinners. {2Co.10:6} and being in readiness to avenge all disobedience, when your obedience shall be made full. These people usually do not prefer to face the ones they accuse in front of the righteous because they know they cannot stand up in the light of the truth of the Word they would be faced with. {Psa.11:2} For, lo, the wicked bend the bow, They make ready their arrow upon the string, That they may shoot in darkness at the upright in heart. They are "Christian" Snipers. We must forgive these people of all of their backstabbing attacks. Like Judas, they are necessary for the crucifixion of the body of Christ but also like Judas they hang themselves with their own hands and woe be to them, as Paul said. We may plead with them for peace but they consistently refuse. Therefore, they are turned over to the tormentors, as Jesus said. {120:6} My soul hath long had her dwelling With him that hateth peace. {7} I am [for] peace: But when I speak, they are for war. ...{Isa.48:22} There is no peace, saith the Lord, to the wicked. Here are some verses the Lord gave me about the constant slander and railing we endure from these kinds of people: {Jud.8} Yet in like manner these also in their dreamings defile the flesh, and set at nought dominion, and rail at dignities [or glories]. {9} But Michael the archangel, when contending with the devil he disputed about the body of Moses, durst not bring against him a railing judgment, but said, The Lord rebuke thee. {10} But these rail at whatsoever things they know not: and what they understand Naturally [in the letter], like the creatures without reason, in these things are they destroyed. {11} Woe unto them! For they went in the way of Cain [to kill their more spiritual brother], and ran riotously in the error of Balaam for hire [paid by their flesh to do evil], and perished in the gainsaying of Korah [who usurped authority not his]. {12} These are they who are hidden rocks in your love-feasts when they feast with you, shepherds that without fear feed Themselves [feed their own flesh]; clouds without water, carried along by winds; autumn leaves without fruit, twice dead, plucked up by the roots; {13} Wild waves of the sea, foaming out their own shame; wandering stars [not keeping their position in the heavenlies], for whom the blackness of darkness hath been reserved forever. {Psa.50:19} Thou givest thy mouth to evil, And thy tongue frameth deceit. {20} Thou sittest and speakest against thy brother; Thou slanderest thine own mother's son. {21} These things hast thou done, and I kept silence; Thou thoughtest that I was altogether such a one as thyself: [But] I will reprove thee, and set [them] in order before thine eyes. {52:1} Why boastest thou thyself in mischief, O mighty man? The lovingkindness of God [endureth] continually. {2} Thy tongue deviseth very wickedness, Like a sharp razor, working deceitfully. {3} Thou lovest evil more than good, And lying rather than to speak righteousness. Selah {4} Thou lovest all devouring words, thou deceitful tongue. {5} God will likewise destroy thee for ever; He will take thee up, and pluck thee out of thy tent, And root thee out of the land of the living. {55:18} He hath redeemed my soul in peace from the battle that was against me; For they were many [that strove] with me. {19} God will hear, and answer them, Even he that abideth of old, Selah [The men] who have no changes (They are not born from above by the Word), And who fear not God. {20} He hath put forth his hands against such as were at peace with him: He hath profaned his covenant. {21} His mouth was smooth as butter, But his heart was war: His words were softer than oil, Yet were they drawn swords. {22} Cast thy burden upon Jehovah, and he will sustain thee: He will never suffer the righteous to be moved. {23} But thou, O God, wilt bring them down into the pit of destruction: Bloodthirsty and deceitful men shall not live out half their days; But I will trust in thee. {3Jn.9} I wrote somewhat unto the church: but Diotrephes, who loveth to have the preeminence among them, receiveth us not. {10} Therefore, if I come, I will bring to remembrance his works which he doeth, prating against us with wicked words: and not content therewith, neither doth he himself receive the brethren, and them that would he forbiddeth and casteth [them] out of the church. {11} Beloved, imitate not that which is evil, but that which is good. He that doeth good is of God: he that doeth evil hath not seen God. If you or anyone you know has fallen into blasphemy or speaking against others must repent to be saved. Slanderers or railers usually have rejection and selfish ambition that perverts their thinking so quickly. I would caution anyone who has witnessed these spirits in action to look at the facts. They most often offer slander without witnesses of sin. What do the witnesses say? {Pro.18:17} He that pleadeth his cause first [seemeth] just; But his neighbor cometh and searcheth him out. Many times God draws vessels of dishonor against us for a purpose. {Mic.4:11} And now many nations are assembled against thee, that say, Let her be defiled, and let our eye see [our desire] upon Zion. {12} But they know not the thoughts of Jehovah, neither understand they his counsel; for he hath gathered them as the sheaves to the threshing-floor. {13} Arise and thresh, O daughter of Zion; for I will make thy horn iron, and I will make thy hoofs brass; and thou shalt beat in pieces many peoples: and I will devote their gain unto Jehovah, and their substance unto the Lord of the whole earth. We pray in each case that this is not for the destruction of souls but the flesh of the old man. We pray that souls will walk away from this being better for the experience. But those who do not repent will die spiritually and/or physically. Get your swords, saints, and fight on the side of the Lord and His Word! Don't be afraid of a few arrows shot out of darkness into your back! {Psa.11:2} For, lo, the wicked bend the bow, They make ready their arrow upon the string, That they may shoot in darkness at the upright in heart. What they do to the least of Jesus' brethren they do to Him. {Psa.22:12,13,16}  ... {12} Many bulls have compassed me; Strong bulls of Bashan have beset me round. {13} They gape upon me with their mouth, [As] a ravening and a roaring lion. ... {16} For dogs have compassed me: A company of evil-doers have inclosed me; They pierced my hands and my feet. As we can see, their problem is being a hearer of the Word while not doing the Word. This is what separates the Judases from the disciples, as tares from the wheat. The tares will walk after their lusts of defilement because they cannot bear the fruit of Christ. Even though we all hate to see them fall away, it is necessary for the body to be sanctified. Read The Son of Perdition. As we have seen, slanderers, railers and liars cannot enter the Kingdom of God. It is my Father who wrote these words of Scripture, Whom they do not fear, believe, nor obey. On the other hand, saints, or "sanctified ones", dwell in the Kingdom of God for they abide in Jesus Who is the Word. When corrected by the Word, Judas went to Jezebel to crucify Jesus. History always repeats. The only people who would believe Judases are evil, for "An evil doer giveth heed to lying lips". We have no fear that righteous people will follow the Judases and Jezebels. It cannot happen, for they are not born of the same father and therefore they look quite different. Let us see if this is true. I have been criticized by Judases because I have pointed out, by dreams and the Word, that they will die. I have said that this is happening spiritually and can end up in physical death. Whereas they have been ministered to in love, some for years; nevertheless, they have chosen lies, unforgiveness and hatred when corrected. The righteous see these things and they are exceedingly sorry and go to their Father. {Mat.18:31} So when his fellow-servants saw what was done, they were exceeding sorry, and came and told unto their lord all that was done. {32} Then his lord called him unto him, and saith to him, Thou wicked servant, I forgave thee all that debt, because thou besoughtest me: {33} shouldest not thou also have had mercy on thy fellow-servant, even as I had mercy on thee? {34} And his lord was wroth, and delivered him to the tormentors, till he should pay all that was due. {35} So shall also my heavenly Father do unto you, if ye forgive not every one his brother from your hearts. Notice that their unforgiveness turns them over to demons who in turn HATE the righteous and cannot have peace with them. So these spirits will be manifested in them as HATRED towards the righteous. {1Jn.3:13} Marvel not, brethren, if the world hateth you. {14} We know that we have passed out of death into life, because we love the brethren. He that loveth not abideth in death. {15} Whosoever hateth his brother is a murderer: and ye know that no murderer hath eternal life abiding in him. But like Judas, it is themselves they are killing, for they "abideth in death" and as we have seen they cannot enter life with those sins. This death is increasingly manifesting them, for everything they learned by Word and example has been forgotten through criticism and hatred. Historically, I have seen this happen with every railer. They fall away and are sick in their bodies and dying or dead. Only those who love and know God are born of Him. The rest have a different father and his nature is in them. {4:7} Beloved, let us love one another: for love is of God; and every one that loveth is begotten of God, and knoweth God. {8} He that loveth not knoweth not God; for God is love. {9} Herein was the love of God manifested in us, that God hath sent his only begotten Son into the world that we might live through him. {10} Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us, and sent his Son [to be] the propitiation for our sins. {11} Beloved, if God so loved us, we also ought to love one another. {12} No man hath beheld God at any time: if we love one another, God abideth in us, and his love is perfected in us ... {16} And we know and have believed the love which God hath in us. God is love; and he that abideth in love abideth in God, and God abideth in him. Notice that God is not in those who hate and cannot love. This hatred in them twists everything into a lie. They cannot tell the truth for they cannot keep the commandment of love. {2:4} He that saith, I know him, and keepeth not his commandments, is a liar, and the truth is not in him. These people do not love God but their true father from whom they are being begotten. As in the parable of the sower, the Word from heaven is the seed of God in us and the word from Hell is the seed of Satan in them. {4:20} If a man say, I love God, and hateth his brother, he is a liar: for he that loveth not his brother whom he hath seen, cannot love God whom he hath not seen. {21} And this commandment have we from him, that he who loveth God love his brother also. Look at their fruit and you can tell if they are lying. If there is hatred and their mouth is opened, they are liars. Lying witnesses, who claimed to be the people of God, sent Jesus and the apostles to their deaths. You cannot feed at the table of Satan's lies without being affected or infected. Don't worry, when they are through separating the tares unto themselves through their lies, we will shine forth in the kingdom of our Father as a spotless and blemishless bride. They who are "forsaking the right way" are the "spots and blemishes" among us.   {2Pe.2:12} But these, as creatures without reason, born mere animals to be taken and destroyed, railing in matters whereof they are ignorant, shall in their destroying surely be destroyed, {13} suffering wrong as the hire of wrong-doing; [men] that count it pleasure to revel in the day-time, spots and blemishes, revelling in their deceivings while they feast with you; {14} having eyes full of adultery, and that cannot cease from sin; enticing unstedfast souls; having a heart exercised in covetousness; children of cursing; {15} forsaking the right way, they went astray, having followed the way of Balaam the [son] of Beor, who loved the hire of wrong-doing. ... {21} For it were better for them not to have known the way of righteousness, than, after knowing it, to turn back from the holy commandment delivered unto them. {22} It has happened unto them according to the true proverb, The dog turning to his own vomit again, and the sow that had washed to wallowing in the mire. Those who work so hard to divide people unto themselves for lustful purposes are doing the kingdom a service. {1Co.11:19} For there must be also factions among you, that they that are approved may be made manifest among you. Birds of a feather flock together. "An evil doer giveth heed to lying lips". By these liars, God is first separating the tares into bundles to burn them so that the righteous will then shine forth in the kingdom of our Father. {Mat.13:30} Let both grow together until the harvest: and in the time of the harvest I will say to the reapers, Gather up first the tares, and bind them in bundles to burn them; but gather the wheat into my barn. ... {37} And he answered and said, He that soweth the good seed is the Son of man; {38} and the field is the world; and the good seed, these are the sons of the kingdom; and the tares are the sons of the evil [one]; {39} and the enemy that sowed them is the devil: and the harvest is the end of the world; and the reapers are angels. {40} As therefore the tares are gathered up and burned with fire; so shall it be in the end of the world. {41} The Son of man shall send forth his angels, and they shall gather out of his kingdom all things that cause stumbling, and them that do iniquity, {42} and shall cast them into the furnace of fire: there shall be the weeping and the gnashing of teeth. {43} Then shall the righteous shine forth as the sun in the kingdom of their Father. He that hath ears, let him hear. Notice that Father is gathering out of His Kingdom those that do iniquity and cause others to stumble. The Bride will not be finished until this process completed. Take courage and the sword of the Spirit to fight the good fight of the faith. {Mat.5:11} Blessed are ye when men shall reproach you, and persecute you, and say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake.   Select Language Afrikaans Albanian Amharic Arabic Armenian Assamese Aymara Azerbaijani Bambara Basque Belarusian Bengali Bhojpuri Bosnian Bulgarian Catalan Cebuano Chichewa Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Traditional) Corsican Croatian Czech Danish Dhivehi Dogri Dutch Esperanto Estonian Ewe Filipino Finnish French Frisian Galician Georgian German Greek Guarani Gujarati Haitian Creole Hausa Hawaiian Hebrew Hindi Hmong Hungarian Icelandic Igbo Ilocano Indonesian Irish Italian Japanese Javanese Kannada Kazakh Khmer Kinyarwanda Konkani Korean Krio Kurdish (Kurmanji) Kurdish (Sorani) Kyrgyz Lao Latin Latvian Lingala Lithuanian Luganda Luxembourgish Macedonian Maithili Malagasy Malay Malayalam Maltese Maori Marathi Meiteilon (Manipuri) Mizo Mongolian Myanmar (Burmese) Nepali Norwegian Odia (Oriya) Oromo Pashto Persian Polish Portuguese Punjabi Quechua Romanian Russian Samoan Sanskrit Scots Gaelic Sepedi Serbian Sesotho Shona Sindhi Sinhala Slovak Slovenian Somali Spanish Sundanese Swahili Swedish Tajik Tamil Tatar Telugu Thai Tigrinya Tsonga Turkish Turkmen Twi Ukrainian Urdu Uyghur Uzbek Vietnamese Welsh Xhosa Yiddish Yoruba Zulu Powered by Translate Printer-friendly version

Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper
Norm Finkelstein Takes Down Bernie and the Squad

Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 48:41


For $5 a month, become a Useful Idiot! Get extended interviews, Thursday Throwdowns, and a chance to have your comment read on the show in the Absurd Arena at http://usefulidiots.substack.com Click here for the extended interview with Norm Finkelstein: https://open.substack.com/pub/usefulidiots/p/extended-episode-norm-finkelstein?r=je5va&utm_campaign=post&utm_medium=web Norman “X” Finkelstein returns to Useful Idiots, fired up and with a scathing critique of Bernie Sanders and The Squad. He begins with a definition of radicalism and The Left, citing the writing of Rosa Luxemburg: “The whole job of The Left is to constantly point out the conflict of interest between the ruling elite, the capitalist class, and yourself. To constantly point out: ‘Their interests are not your interests. Don't be fooled.'” Historically, he says, Bernie Sanders has upheld this left tradition, calling out the crooks who steal your money. But when it came to Ukraine, “the bunch of crooks metamorphosed into a band of angels. You're telling me the same people who are cheating you day in and day out, stealing your wealth, stealing your labor, those same people are suddenly heartbroken by what's happening to the Ukrainian people?” Norm does not pull any punches in his assessment of The Squad and Sanders: “The day the squad and Bernie voted for war credits for Ukraine, that whole progressive enterprise turned into a rotting corpse.” Plus, subscribe to hear the full interview where Norm dissects the midterm election results, the Israel election, and the weaponization of identity politics. It's all this, and more, on this week's episode of Useful Idiots. Check it out. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Chase Thomas Podcast
Giannis Dominating With Bucks Again, Durant's Future With Nets, & Louisville Might Be Historically Bad With The Washington Post's Michael Lee & Stats By Will

The Chase Thomas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 107:04


Chase Thomas is the Sports Renaissance Man, Atlanta Sports Guy & VFL. On today's program, Chase is joined by The Washington Post's Michael Lee to talk about the Bucks hot start in the East, Giannis vs. Luka for MVP, what happens with Kevin Durant this season, Kawhi missing a lot of time with the Clippers, John Wall's return, if the Lakers would really trade Anthony Davis, Lebron and Miles Davis similarities and much more (1:00). Then, Stats By Will joins the program to talk about Tennessee's big opening win, Tyreke Key being a bucket, USC's embarrassing loss to FGCU, Houston looking awesome, Drew Pember Hive, Graham Ike being out for Wyoming, the horrible Louisville Cardinals and much more (60:00). Host: Chase Thomas Guests: Michael Lee & Stats By Will Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

KUOW Newsroom
Food banks are growing – and transforming – to meet a rising need

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 3:57


Historically, many food banks started small, usually in church basements or as an extension of a religious organization. But starting with the pandemic, demand has been rising, with no signs of letting up any time soon. And increasingly, food banks are providing more than nourishment.

The Real Estate Sales Podcast
TRES 220: David Childers - Answering the question: Is Now a Good Time to Buy?

The Real Estate Sales Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 24:13


The biggest question right now is if right now is a good time to buy a house. Seeing the rise in interest rates and prices, many people have questions.  The decision to buy a home is a very personal decision for everyone. There are two things everyone should ask themselves. What do you believe about interest rates and what do you believe about prices?  Interest Rates Since the first week of this year, interest rates have shot up. It has been the fastest rise in interest rates in 50 years. This has added, on average, $1,000 to mortgage payments across the country.  In the short term, experts are forecasting rates to go higher - because of inflation - and this is driving us toward a recession. Historically, recessions have meant a fall in interest rates.  Pricing A rise in interest rates is causing demand to pull back which is reducing the downward pressure on prices. There are not many reputable sources calling for a crash in the market.  David believes that next year will be relatively even.  Long-term benefits of home ownership In the last few years, we have gotten too used to appreciation in price. That is not a normal market.  For many individuals owning a home is a major life event and ultimately it is about the American dream.  David's advice to agents In David's office, they have a large wall that reads “Every family should feel confident in buying a home”.  Check out Keeping Current Matters and learn how to create credibility in your market.  Do you have a video or content idea perfect for your business? Share it with Jimmy! Connect with Jimmy Burgess on LinkedIn and Facebook and his YouTube channel.  If you like what you heard today, we'd love it if you'd share a rating or review and then subscribe to the podcast and tell others about it. You can find The Real Estate Sales Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Audible, and our website, The Real Estate Sales Podcast.

Dr. Streicher’s Inside Information: THE Menopause Podcast
47: Episode 47 Orgasm Equality with Dr. Mintz

Dr. Streicher’s Inside Information: THE Menopause Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 47:57


There is a long history of women not only not knowing anything about sexual pleasure but also being made to feel as if there is something dangerous and wrong with them if they seek it. My guest for this episode is Dr. Laurie Mintz a professor, a therapist, and the author of “Becoming Cliterate: Why Orgasm Equality Matters- and How to Get it”, the groundbreaking book that changed not only how millions of women, and men, think about female sexual pleasure, but how women can OWN sexual pleasure. In this episode, Dr. Streicher and Dr. Mintz discuss: Why, HISTORICALLY, women have not been educated about the clitoris and its role in female pleasure and orgasm Why Dr. Mintz wrote Becoming Cliterate: Why Orgasm Equality Matters and How to Get it Why women often feel SHAME about the appearance of their genitalia Why women still believe that orgasm will occur during intercourse The anthropological explanation for why the clitoris is OUTSIDE the vagina  What is meant by “ORGASM EQUALITY” The POLITICS of orgasm Why it is important to have a SEX SCRIPT Why PORN can be problematic MASTURBATION education Why a vibrator is a TOOL, not a TOY What a VIBRATOR and a RAFT have in common MEN and Vibrators The problem with SEX EDUCATION in America Why MINDFULNESS is so important when it comes to sexual pleasure LABIAL diversity Sign up for Dr. Streicher's free Inside Information Monthly Newsletter for videos, events, and much more!  Laurie Mintz, Ph.D. www.drlauriemintz.com Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Florida Becoming Cliterate: Why Orgasm Equality Matters and How to Get it       A Tired Woman's Guide to Passionate Sex TEDx Talk A New Revolution for Orgasm Equality Facebook https://www.facebook.com/DrLaurieMintz/  Instagram https://www.instagram.com/drlauriemintz Twitter https://twitter.com/drlauriemintz LINKS OMG YES: The Science of Women's Pleasure The Labia Library Gyno Diversity FOR MORE INFORMATION  Slip Sliding Away: Turning Back the Clock on Your Vagina-A gynecologist's guide to eliminating post-menopause dryness and pain Episode 15: Post Menopause Orgasm- Everybody Come! Episode 29: Has Your Hysterectomy Hijacked Your Sex Life?  Episode 21: Say Yes! to Testosterone for Women Lauren Streicher, MD is a clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, and the medical director of the Northwestern Medicine Center for Sexual Medicine and Menopause. She is a certified menopause practitioner of the North American Menopause Society.  Dr. Streicher is the medical correspondent for Chicago's top-rated news program, the WGN Morning News, and has been seen on The Today Show, Good Morning America, The Oprah Winfrey Show, CNN, NPR, Dr. Radio, Nightline, Fox and Friends, The Steve Harvey Show, CBS This Morning, ABC News Now, NBCNightlyNews,20/20, and World News Tonight. She is an expert source for many magazines and serves on the medical advisory board of The Kinsey Institute, Self Magazine, and Prevention Magazine. She writes a regular column for The Ethel by AARP and Prevention Magazine.  Sign Up to receive  Dr. Streicher's Free Newsletter:   Subscribe and Follow Dr. Streicher on  DrStreicher.com Instagram @DrStreich Twitter @DrStreicher Facebook  @DrStreicher YouTube  DrStreicherTV Books by Lauren Streicher, MD  Slip Sliding Away: Turning Back the Clock on Your Vagina-A gynecologist's guide to eliminating post-menopause dryness and pain Hot Flash Hell: A Gynecologist's Guide to Turning Down the Heat Sex Rx- Hormones, Health, and Your Best Sex Ever The Essential Guide to Hysterectomy

Daily Signal News
INTERVIEW | Midterms 2022: What We Know and What We Don't Know

Daily Signal News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 13:38


As results from Election Day continue to trickle in, it's still not clear whether Republicans or Democrats will control the next House and Senate, and by how much. However, it's clear that Republicans suffered both major wins and major losses in midterm elections across the nation."Some of the big wins we saw in Florida. [Gov. Ron] DeSantis got about 19 [percentage points] over [Democrat Charlie] Crist, which is a massive margin. This is a state that Donald Trump carried in 2020 by 3 points," says Noah Weinrich, communications director for Heritage Action for America, the grassroots arm of The Heritage Foundation. (The Daily Signal is Heritage's multimedia news organization.)"Historically before that, it's been seen as a swing state," Weinrich says of Florida. "It's the bellwether."On the flip side, however, Republicans suffered a loss in Pennsylvania's Senate race, where Lt. Gov. John Fetterman, a Democrat, defeated Dr. Mehmet Oz, a Republican. "So some of the losses we saw ... were in really tight races like Pennsylvania. Dr. Oz lost against John Fetterman. I haven't checked the final margin, but it was only by, I believe, 2 points or something like that," Weinrich says."Now, that was a state that President Trump won very narrowly in 2016 [and] lost very narrowly in 2020," he says.Weinrich joins this episode of "The Daily Signal Podcast" to discuss the wins and losses of Election Day, the races still up in the air as of the podcast's recording, and key issues that drove voters to the polls. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Daily
How Democrats Defied the Odds

The Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 25:21


This week's elections have been startlingly close. Control of both chambers of Congress remain up in the air.Historically, the president's party is blown away in midterms. And the Democrats were further hampered this time round by President Biden's unpopularity.Considering the headwinds, how did they do so well?Guest: Nate Cohn, chief political analyst for The New York Times.Background reading: President Biden appears to have had the best midterms of any president in 20 years.Election denial didn't play as well as Republicans hoped. And former President Donald Trump has faced unusual public attacks from across his party following a string of losses.As the results continue to come in, here are the latest updates.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

The Mt. GOATmore Cliff Dive Podcast
Episode 152 - Greatest Stop Motion Films

The Mt. GOATmore Cliff Dive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 67:25


Historically, Stop Motion animation is one of the earliest forms of not only animation, but film in general. Numerous classics have been released using the work-intensive art style and this week we're discussing our picks for the GOATs!You can find us at https://mtgoatmore.buzzsprout.com/ or by searching Mt. GOATmore on your favorite podcast host.Contact us at facebook.com/mtgoatmore or send us an email at andremtgoatmore@gmail.com 

Fangs & Fur
Add Moisture to Your Pet's Food with Flo from Crude Carnivore

Fangs & Fur

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 38:47


Why is moisture important in your pet's diet?We talk about the WHY!Makes your body crave moisture when you feed your pet dry kibble, so they drink more. Both dogs and cats.Your pets are designed (think carnivores) to eat food that contains 60-80% moisture.Intracellular moisture is extremely important for the digestive tract, for the proper digestion and breakdown of food nutrients. Without this moisture, in the example of dry food kibble diets, the cat or dog is in a constant state of dehydration. Drinking water from a bowl is not usually sufficient.Historically, cats derive most of the water their bodies needed from their prey. Because dry food has a low moisture content, your cat needs to get water from a dish, fountain or wet food. Feeding a combination of wet and dry food, rather than just dry, is a great way to help your cat get more water.What can you do? Add filtered water (if tap water is something you wouldn't drink it). You can warm up the water and pour it over the food. Or warm up the broth you are using as a pour-over.Flo Glodde After completing her Master's degree in Animal Nutrition and working as a pet nutritionist at a local natural pet supply store, “Crude Carnivore” was born. With an avid interest in nutrition, she has fed her pets Hurley, Marvin, Ovie & Clem the way nature intended for years and now spends every day spreading food awareness to as many pet owners as possible. Flo's Website Join the Wildside for updates and discounts!Learn more about Steve's Real Foods.Learn more about Northwest Naturals.Learn more about Lifetime Pet Wellness Center.We are a local, independent, and owner-operated shop that is committed to providing the dogs and cats in our hometown of Columbus, Ohio with the best possible foods, supplements, and gear available. Also, we're a little different. Our small shop is not your typical pet food store. We don't carry unnecessary pet supplies like a lot of other shops do. We do not saturate our little space with products that we don't believe in and feel are unnecessary. Our goal is to have a place full of positive vibes that you and your pet feel comfortable in.We answer a "question of the week" in every episode, so send your question. Either DM us at @fangsfurpets or send us an email at danielle@fangsfur.com. Find us on Facebook and Instagram.Music in this episode thanks to...Uppbeat: https://uppbeat.io/t/soundroll/fuzz-buzz - License code: LXYRDYTBCUZ8NMUCUppbeat: https://uppbeat.io/t/all-good-folks/habanera-bizet-hip-hop-remix -License code: HGGVZ43LS1MCK8PDCopyright 2022 Fangs & Fur