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    Best podcasts about Asian

    Show all podcasts related to asian

    Latest podcast episodes about Asian

    Generation Zed Podcast
    Weekend Kraken Roundup: Maxwell Sentenced, Asian NATO, "Interesting" Tasting Burgers & Much More

    Generation Zed Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 29:01


    Weekend Kraken Roundup: Maxwell Sentenced, Asian NATO, "Interesting" Tasting Burgers & Much More.

    Kansas City's Northeast Newscast
    243: Camel Culture

    Kansas City's Northeast Newscast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 33:50


    On this week's episode of the Northeast Newscast, we're joined by Joseph Williams, sales representative with Camel Culture, a brand that brings a taste of home to immigrants and refugees from all over the world. With a camel dairy right here in Missouri, Northeast businesses owned by Somali, African and Asian refugees can share the culturally appreciated and often dearly missed drink with their customers. Williams explains the unique flash pasteurization process, what camel milk tastes like, and how the connection has led him to learn about and celebrate other cultures.

    Asian Hustle Network
    SuChin Pak // S2 Ep 163 // Add To Cart

    Asian Hustle Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 56:11


    Welcome back to Season 2, Episode 163 of the Asian Hustle Network Podcast! We are very excited to have SuChin Pak on this week's show. We interview Asian entrepreneurs around the world to amplify their voices and empower Asians to pursue their dreams and goals. We believe that each person has a message and a unique story from their entrepreneurial journey that they can share with all of us. Check us out on Anchor, iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play Music, TuneIn, Spotify, and more. If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and leave us a positive 5-star review. This is our opportunity to use the voices of the Asian community and share these incredible stories with the world. We release a new episode every Wednesday and Saturday, so stay tuned! SuChin Pak is a veteran journalist who has been hosting and reporting the news for over 25 years. She has reported on ABC, NBC, Discovery Networks, Oxygen and E!. She is most known for her long career as the first Asian American reporter for MTV News. From hosting red carpet shows, to reporting on presidential elections, international relief efforts and covering some of the biggest headlines in news, Pak has been a dedicated journalist since reporting on her first show at the age of 16. She has focused much of her work on issues involving social change. She currently co-hosts Add To Cart--a podcast about consumerism and the impact on our culture, for Lemonada Media. To stay connected within the AHN community, please join our AHN directory: bit.ly/AHNDirectory --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/asianhustlenetwork/support

    Here & Now
    The tasty rebrand of Asian carp; FIFA's use of AI

    Here & Now

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 41:15


    If you can't beat 'em, eat 'em. That's the new battle cry for Illinois fisheries managers who are trying to rebrand four invasive species of Asian carp. Here & Now's Chris Bentley reports. And, ​​it's no secret that soccer fans are extremely passionate about the game — but in recent years, some of that fan fervor has crossed the line into online harassment of players. Femi Oke, host of "The Stream" on Al Jazeera English, joins us.

    Movie Trailer Reviews
    Movie Review: Minions The Rise of Gru

    Movie Trailer Reviews

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 20:52


    Director: Kyle Balda, Brad Ableson, Jonathan del Val Screenwriter: Matthew Fogel, Brian Lynch Starring:  Steve Carell, Pierre Coffin, Alan Arkin, Taraji P. Henson, Michelle Yeoh, Julie Andrews, Russell Brand, Jean-Claude Van Damme, Dolph Lundgren, Danny Trejo, Lucy Lawless Runtime: 1 hour 27 minutes Synopsis: The untold story of one twelve-year-old's dream to become the world's greatest supervillain. Kriss & Ro talk about the latest film in the Despicable Me/Minions series, Minions: The Rise of Gru. Overall this movie does what it needs to do. It's entertaining enough for kids and is serviceable enough for adults. It is becoming clear that this franchise is starting to run out of runway. One of the biggest disappointments with this movie is the underutilization of the cast. There are some actors that are used for some of the villains that could have really been used better to play on the 80's time period. There's also some cring moments surrounding some Asian characters and themes that just seem like they were clunky and lazy. Again, the movie isn't bad but it's starting to feel like the studio is trying to capture the magic of the first film and keeps getting further and further away. Like what you hear? Subscribe so you don't miss an episode! Follow us on Twitter: @Phenomblak @InsanityReport @TheMTRNetwork   Our shirts are now on TeePublic.  https://teepublic.com/stores/mtr-network   Want more podcast greatness? Sign up for a MTR Premium Account!     Like what you hear? Subscribe so you don't miss an episode! Follow us on Twitter: @Phenomblak @InsanityReport @TheMTRNetwork   Our shirts are now on TeePublic.  https://teepublic.com/stores/mtr-network   Want more podcast greatness? Sign up for a MTR Premium Account!  

    MTR Network Main Feed
    Minions The Rise of Gru - Movie Trailer Reviews

    MTR Network Main Feed

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 20:52


    Director: Kyle Balda, Brad Ableson, Jonathan del Val Screenwriter: Matthew Fogel, Brian Lynch Starring:  Steve Carell, Pierre Coffin, Alan Arkin, Taraji P. Henson, Michelle Yeoh, Julie Andrews, Russell Brand, Jean-Claude Van Damme, Dolph Lundgren, Danny Trejo, Lucy Lawless Runtime: 1 hour 27 minutes Synopsis: The untold story of one twelve-year-old's dream to become the world's greatest supervillain. Kriss & Ro talk about the latest film in the Despicable Me/Minions series, Minions: The Rise of Gru. Overall this movie does what it needs to do. It's entertaining enough for kids and is serviceable enough for adults. It is becoming clear that this franchise is starting to run out of runway. One of the biggest disappointments with this movie is the underutilization of the cast. There are some actors that are used for some of the villains that could have really been used better to play on the 80's time period. There's also some cring moments surrounding some Asian characters and themes that just seem like they were clunky and lazy. Again, the movie isn't bad but it's starting to feel like the studio is trying to capture the magic of the first film and keeps getting further and further away. Like what you hear? Subscribe so you don't miss an episode! Follow us on Twitter: @Phenomblak @InsanityReport @TheMTRNetwork   Our shirts are now on TeePublic.  https://teepublic.com/stores/mtr-network   Want more podcast greatness? Sign up for a MTR Premium Account!     Like what you hear? Subscribe so you don't miss an episode! Follow us on Twitter: @Phenomblak @InsanityReport @TheMTRNetwork   Our shirts are now on TeePublic.  https://teepublic.com/stores/mtr-network   Want more podcast greatness? Sign up for a MTR Premium Account!  

    Body Liberation for All
    Meeting Your Needs while Leading Your Revolution with Gieselle Allen

    Body Liberation for All

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 72:26


    Are you a leader of color who wants to lead and empower in revolutionary ways? Then you need Gieselle Allen...Gieselle works with revolutionary leaders of color to support them in expanding their businesses, team, and leadership, while also ensuring their needs are met in the process. In her mindset-first approach, she combines mindset, trauma healing and intuition to help her clients create and expand their businesses and revolutionary leadership practices. If discovering the confidence that comes with: decolonizing your thoughts, owning your identity, and building a thriving life that reflects your values and resonates with your core sounds like a vibe, you don’t want to miss this conversation. This episode we explore What having a revolutionary business entailsThe role that safety plays in learning and healingGetting comfortable with having more than enough Overcoming fear to answer a call to liberatory work Episode Resourceshttps://www.instagram.com/gieselleallen/https://gieselleallen.com/Decolonizing Wellness: A QTBIPOC-Centered Guide to Escape the Diet Trap, Heal Your Self-Image, and Achieve Body LiberationHello and welcome to another episode of Body Liberation for All. I am so excited about today's guest. If you are a leader of color who wants to lead and empower in revolutionary ways you need Gieselle Allen, I was in Gieselle’s coaching program now almost a year plus ago. And the changes that I experienced in the program were enough to sell me on it, but the way it served as a catalyst for growth throughout 2020 was just beyond amazing. Gieselle works with revolutionary leaders of color to support them in expanding their businesses, their teams, and their leadership while making sure all of their needs are met in the process. And this is something that unfortunately, a lot of us have never had the opportunity to experience.So, the ways in which your socialization has affected the way you approach business, the way you approach speaking up, the way you approach really leaning into your identities and feeling safe is something that a lot of us haven't visited before.Having a coach that will specifically address the ways in which your socialization as a person of color has set up barriers that you can step around and circumvent, once you're aware of them its absolutely life changing because this is not the type of instruction or care we're used to.Sometimes it's hard to even know how much of a difference it would make to have somebody tailor an educational program, a coaching program specifically to you and to address the challenges the other people for so long have been pretending don't even exist.I love this conversation with Gieselle. Let's jump right inBody Liberation for All ThemeYeah. They might try to put you in a box, tell them that you don't accept when the world is tripping out tell them that you love yourself. Hey, Hey, smile on them live your life just like you like it is.It’s your party negativity is not invited. For my queer folks, for my trans, people of color, let your voice be heard. Look in the mirror and say that it's time to put me first. You born to win. Head up high with confidence.  This show is for everyone. So, I thank you for tuning in. Let's go.Dalia: I am so excited to have you here.Gieselle: I'm really excited to be here. I'm thrilled. I've been like, I was, I've been like eyeing your podcast for forever. And I was like, when am I, when am I gonna be on this podcast? Like a baby. So, I'm really glad it's working out and that we're here.Dalia: This is awesome.Dalia: I'm glad you asked because as you know, for people who haven't already listened to the episode that I was on with someone else who was in the same coaching group as me, when I worked with you, Gieselle basically is out here changing lives and liberating people in ways that you don't even see it coming.Dalia: So, you think you're just stuck in your business and really, that's not the problem. The problem is mindset, and how we've been socialized is behind it. But I'd gotten a ton of coaching from containers that weren't made for me.  and they really didn't get to the root of my problem. So maybe they got to the root of like Becky's issue and like, oh, why don't I feel comfortable?Dalia: Cuz my Lululemon’s are too tight or whatever, and worked on her visibility problems, but didn't get to me being socialized to not take up space don't challenge authority, and don't you dare do anything culturally distinct because we will. Beat you for it, we'll punish you for it. So being in your container was life changing.Dalia: And Sarah came on the show and discussed how much the changes ripple out as time goes by. But even though I feel like I've grown so much since the container, I still would've thought Gieselle doesn't wanna be on my podcast. like Gieselle's too big, and too busy, doesn't have time.Gieselle: Well, you know, what's funny is I feel like I'm just moving into a season where I have the capacity to like be out and, in the world, and on people's podcasts there, it's not about me being too big.Gieselle: I'm still really small and like the grand scheme, I'm small, I'm intimate. I'm exclusive.Dalia: I love that. Take on it. Yes.Gieselle: Yeah. I'm exclusive. I, and I wanna be exclusive, like, that's my whole thing. I'm the kind of person where like when white folks follow me on Instagram, I delete 'em and like, I'm not gonna respond to your you' like random comment on my stuff.Gieselle: Like, I'm not gonna engage with you if you're white, like I'm very much like I'm for I'm for who I'm for. And if it's not you then like, I'm cool with it. There's enough people in the world. And I don't need that many to be in my community.Dalia: Wow. I mean, even that, how, what had to change for you to be able to get to a point that it feels safe to say that and that you don't feel compelled to explain this doesn't mean I don't like white people. It means my business is not for white people.Gieselle: Yeah. That's a really great question. What had to change? I think what had to change is that scarcity that we've all been sold and the devaluing of folks of color that we've all been sold. Right. Where people, you know, I remember when I was gonna make this change and like a big thing I was scared of and a big thing that like, people still, mostly just my dad at this point, but like people still say to me is like, oh, like how much more money could you make if you are working with white folks?Like we're missing out on those white dollars?Dalia: Those spend better apparentlyGieselle: Apparently, but here's the truth about like, you know, focusing exclusively on BIPOC folks in business and in anything is that BIPOC folks and I know this because I used to work in TV back in the day. And so like, I understand how, I understand all the things we are, the most loyal people ever.We support our people like tirelessly, especially Black folks. Like it's like what, you're a Black person, you're doing a thing I'm gonna, I'm gonna work with you. You know? And so, recognizing that, recognizing how loyal we are recognizing that we are the people of global majority in this world, there are more than enough of us was really huge for me.But I think, I think the thing that it really took for me transparently was recognizing that I'm enough and that like, I was the right kind of Black person to do this work because that was honestly my biggest hurdle. And I think that's the biggest hurdle for a lot of us in being in communities of color, is that we've, we ex exclude we've like inherited these toxic traits in our communities that make us, that make us exclude each other.Gieselle: And we've systemically been ripped from each other through the prison system, slavery, we can even talk about like immigration and the American dream. Like we've been ripped apart from our communities and culture. And so, it doesn't feel, we don't feel like we fit in with them because we're all kind of this like weird hodgepodge.Gieselle: But recognizing long story short that I was enough and that my experience was enough, and that people resonated with it that's really what made the big change for me.Dalia: That is something that I think is a uniquely Black American experience and I could be wrong, but I really haven't heard that message from other folks of color because they did not necessarily experience as much of the deliberate breakdown of community because it's been targeted.Dalia: It's been targeted and not just during the transatlantic slave trade, but it's also been targeted in more recent history, the deliberate creating of more divisions in the Black community. Yeah. So, we don't even recognize each other sometimes. And we can't seem to be cohesive or find common ground even because I've even lately been watching a TikTok’s where there's this running trend where people are explaining when white folks misunderstand them, they take something literally that's from like African American vernacular English, but I know a fraction of them.Dalia: And in the past that would've made me feel, oh, this is more proof, I'm not Black enough. I'm not the right kind of Black. Yeah. And because I'm in a multi, well was from a multiethnic household, even though both of my parents are very Black and very into their Blackness, their Blackness was in no way, similarDalia: And so, we came out a hodgepodge of their two cultures. And so, I may know random Caribbean expressions that no one's ever heard. And I think, oh, everybody says that. And then not understand. I only learned, oh, you really put your foot in it like two years ago. And I've slowly been using it. And seeing if people can tell, like, I'm waiting to see if I did it right.Dalia: But it really is a thing when you feel like. especially in public school, I was told, again and again, that I wasn't talking Black enough. Yep. Totally. And that, because I like to go to the library and inline skate that I was enjoying activities that weren't Black enough.Gieselle:  and I, I, I completely had that experience growing up.Gieselle: One thing I wanna name for the like non-Black POCs that are listening, just to honor them, is that this experience definitely isn't unique to us as Black folks. Like I've seen this so many times in Latin culture, my husband is from Ecuador, but he's white. And so, there's like this strange, but like, it's like whenever he goes to Latin events, he's always like, it's just this big, like contest of, do you speak Spanish?Gieselle: Do you speak Spanish well enough? Do you have an accent with your Spanish? Like how long did you live in whatever country you were from? Oh, you're you were born in America. Like there's all this thing. Asian folks have the same thing. South Asian folks. So, I was like, it's, it's all of us in different ways.Gieselle: The systems that ripped us apart are completely different though, you know?Dalia: Yeah. That makes me really sad because I wanted to believe that other people -somebody's, you know, feeling a sense of belonging in this country that won't allow them to experience a sense of belonging. I was hoping that somebody was out there saying I know exactly who I am and where I fit in. And, but yeah, I definitely have seen that with like how much do you speak the language, and do you have an accent?Gieselle: And how much like how much from your culture do you practice in your daily life? I think that comes up a lot in like non-Black spaces. Cause I think like Black culture, at least as a Black American, like our culture is just. It's pervasive. It's in there. Like you practice it. It's also what creates all other culture in America. Dalia: Absolutely.Gieselle: But yeah, there's so many elements to do I belong as a person of color. Do I belong in this space? Am I enough? And then like, don't even like, then we, we can't even bring like the intersection of like queerness into it. Right. Cause it's like, yeah, well I'm like Blackity, Black, Black, but I'm queer.And that does not roll either in a lot of families and not a lot of places.Dalia: It feels like in the whole country, like not at all. I already had issues with the transphobia and the homophobia and the Black community being another one of the things that would sometimes feel like a reason why I'm not Black enough or the right kind of Black, the Black that people are looking for.And then when I won't even dignify this man by saying his name, but things that happen in the news cycle, remind me of how pervasive it is. Even when I've started to really make an effort to curate my bubble, I'll find that people who say they accept my queerness and accept me and they have queer family will, when someone, you know, is being super transphobic and saying that somehow Black issues, trans issues are two separate things forgetting that there are plenty of people living at both intersections.Dalia: And then they'll explain how well I do kind of think, you know, it's tearing down the community or I think people really are choosing, and they're just seeing it too much and it's exposing them. And these are people that I vetted already. So, they said the right things, but then when they get triggered by something that really is part of the Black American cultural experience then they go back to what they were trained to believe their entire childhood, that queerness is deviant. And it's a tool that the man is using to tear us all down.  and that you're not born this way and you can somehow suppress it and you're better than everyone else.Dalia: If you're straight, basically and you're even better than, you're better than everybody if you're a straight cis Black man and everyone else's needs need to rank below that. And if you do anything to even challenge the authority of a straight Black man, well, of course you got hit of course you maybe got murdered because you're not allowed, and even though no one's gonna say out loud, well, they deserve to be murdered. The messaging is to stop questioning straight Black men.Gieselle:  and this is, this is, this is like so many layers to what you just said. But I wanna name, like, especially when we're talking about these people that you vetted and that you're like, I like did all the things I was supposed to do, and you're still showing this like deep transphobia and queerphobia.Gieselle: Right. This is why it's so important for spaces where like, it's just folks who share our marginalized identities, whether it's spaces for BIPOC folks, whether it's spaces for queer BIPOC folks for trans BIPOC folks. Right. That's so important because. That that's why like, even in the most well-meaning of spaces that s**t goes down because people are deeply committed to upholding their privileges, you know, and especially, I mean, I love us as BIPOC folks, but I feel like BIPOC folks are really, but, you know, I will say it's not just BIPOC folks.Gieselle: Cause this is like white women are the pinnacle of this, where it's like, you hold one marginalized identity and you hold onto that with everything you've got and you refuse to acknowledge like, hey, I've got all these other privileges. So, I wanted to name that piece. There was something else that was coming up for me, but I can't even remember.Gieselle: So, I'm just gonna let it go. It wasn't that important.Dalia: that, that is really important to point out. I think, cuz I think when people have a hard time understanding why you would just delete a white person when they follow you, is that because people's brainwash is so deeply ingrained you may intend to be a safe space, but you can't promise that to anybody.Dalia: And even you can't, when you are holding the same identity, someone else, you may bring your toxic internalized s**t to the table. Yep. But it's so much easier to work on that when that's the intention or you've set the tone for the space and I really appreciate you putting in the work to keep the container safe, which I find a lot of people, they have all these good intentions for inclusion, but they.Dalia: Either don't have the capacity, the understanding or the desire to keep the container safe. It's not safe to challenge people when it's unsafe and they don't put anything in place to make it less scary or traumatic for you to express a concern. It's like, there was no thought that went into things are going to go sideways because this is what happens when you get more than one person in a room.Gieselle: well, and this is something that we talked about. We recently talked about a lot in Revolutionary Rising, which is my program for BIPOC folks. Because like community, we had this moment where a lot of people were joining for community specifically. Like I think when you joined the program and most of y'all joined to work with me, and we had a moment where everyone was joining for community, but when, but like the problem with that, not the problem, but like the challenge with that is that as BIPOC folks, like we've talked about, we've been ripped from, we've been ripped from community.Gieselle: We've all been othered within our communities, unless we fit the very narrow stereotype of what we are supposed to be. And what is the right kind of Black person, Asian person, south Asian person, Latina person. Right. And so, we come into these spaces and even though it's like, okay, I wanted this community.Gieselle: I wanna believe that these BIPOC folks have me. I'm completely shut down. I'm completely triggered and I'm actually completely unable to be here. And so, something that we are in conversation around in the community is difficulty and how like, that's, it's the thing that I feel like we all are trained to avoid in community, but it's actually the thing that brings us together and really creates community is knowing that, like you said, I can show up, I can say this s**t isn’t working for me.Gieselle: That was fucked up, like all of the things and knowing that someone's gonna hold that and see it and say, okay, let's, let's make this right for you. But it's hard. It's really, really hard, especially when none of us like. Literally, none of us on this earth, I think, or very few people on this earth really know and know how to do community and have a wide capacity to do community in the way that it was intentionally meant to be.Dalia: And then it makes me wonder too, are some of our concepts of scaling and like how a business must grow incompatible with community. Because I wondered, I noticed and some other people noticed too, the bigger the group got, the less people were engaging. And I didn't know if it was because they didn't feel safe anymore because it felt like you're in a room, but people keep coming in.Dalia: And it has nothing to do with who those people are. It's just that they weren't there a few minutes ago. You're just like, whoa, who's that? You know, it's like this natural response or is it that people think once we get to a certain size, well, someone else will comment on it. And I'll just pop in when I need something.Dalia:  Gieselle: I think it's so many things. It's so, so many things, and it's been a big learning and process for us over this past year. Me and Olivia, our lead coach, but what I think it really comes down to is safety. Like, even like in the way you said it, right? It's like, oh, there's a new person. It's like your nervousGieselle: system's like, oh no, who's there? What is this? And I didn't think of that. And the person who taught me this strategy was spoiler alert, white and not creating safe spaces. Right? Like really just creating. I don't know, spaces, you know, for lack of better words. And so, we had to really look at and reevaluate.Gieselle: Okay. How are we bringing people in? Who are we bringing in? And how can we bring new people into this space without it feeling like horrible on folks, nervous system and making it even more difficult for them to step into this space? Because the reality is that even if it was like six people for a year, it would still be a hurdle for most people to show up in that space and feel safe.Gieselle: At least for the first like three to six months, because you just need time to build community. And I think that's one of the hard things, like when you are running a business, when you are building communities do you, you know, something that we've been really thinking about is the word community, and there's so many things you need.Gieselle: And one of the things is, is time is like, do you actually have the time to build the community in the well-intentioned way that you want to? I don't know. So yeah, long story short, we've been really thinking about that for ourselves in scaling and recognizing that. Yeah, it's harder. My, I was just talking to my coach about this yesterday.Gieselle: And I still want to find the way to make it bigger. Not for money's sake, but because I genuinely want there to be a beautiful thriving community of women and femmes of color interacting with each other. Right. And supporting each other and loving up on each other, but we've gotta find the way.Gieselle: And that's just the reality of it is that like, it's gonna be a process to find our way there, but I believe we can get there. And I also have to expand my capacity to hold that as well. Dalia: That makes sense. It's really interesting to see you open, not totally openly, but pretty openly growing even after you've reached a point of success that so many of us are just trying to get to so what has that been like?Dalia: Understanding that it's never over. And what, let you know that you had the wrong people in the container. I know there's like five questions and one. And how did you feel safe enough to say there's enough money out there? There's enough people out there for me to set you free, like, not necessarily fire a client, but like set you free to find a table that's right for you at this point in your life and with your growth.Gieselle: Yeah. So, one thing I will say, like, let's talk about like the firing of folks or not the firing folks, but like, because usually I would say it's mutual. Like it's just, ain't working. And for me as a person, like I, there's no amount of money that's worth working with somebody who's not a fit for the work that I do. Because as a coach specifically, if you don't trust me, if you are not down for the work we're doing, you're not gonna get results. And when you don't get results, it makes me miserable. Because I question if I'm a decent coach, like, or even a good, you know, so for me, it's just not worth it.Gieselle: And it's not fun at the end of the day, nobody starts a business to do, to be miserable. We, none of us did that. And so, I want it to be fun. I want there to be trust. I want there to be love if that can't be there. And that's not, if you're not either ready for it, if you realize it's not gonna happen with me or whatever happens then, like, I, I want you to go eat just as much as just as much as you wanna go.Gieselle: So that's the thing for me. And it's a great question about recognizing that, but I, I do wanna bring in like the abundance piece of it, because I think that's something that a lot of folks struggle with, especially when they're in the earlier stages of business, cuz it doesn't always feel abundant. It does not always feel abundant.Gieselle: And I think the truth is I'm like I'm sitting with this question cause I'm like, when did I get to the point where I knew that.Gieselle: I think it was when I got to a point where. I knew that even if I didn't generate like a billion manillion dollars, that I could strip everything down and do a workshop and still bring in some leads and bring in some folks who were interested in working with me recognizing that it doesn't have to be big.Gieselle: It just has to be a couple people. And that something else is coming. And I think if you're, you know, if we're talking to folks who are even newer where you're like, I'm not even at that stage, like, I, I can't build a workshop. I can't bring in a couple people. Like I'm still before that. What I would tell you is that everything's a building block and that's something that I've learned and that, and that's something that I'm trying to lean into.Gieselle: And so it's like every, no is a building block to a, yes, every silent post is a building block to a post that actually gets like one, like, you know, it's all a building block. And so that's something that I try to look towards as well and believe as well. Alongside the fact that like, we don't have these like, callings because they're not supposed to work. Like, that's just not like the universe, our ancestors, like all the things that give us these callings, they, they are not cruel. And so, it's supposed to work. We've just gotta keep building the blocks and then it will.Dalia: I was going to ask, like, what's the difference between a revolutionary entrepreneur?Dalia:  what else we see out there, but I'm hearing some themes already, cuz you definitely don't hear love, fun, and a calling really emphasized like sometimes you hear people throw out calling like kind of in a cavalier way, but in the container, I really felt like. I, I already knew this intuitively at least for me, maybe it's not true for everybody that your business can be an extension of your spiritual practice.Dalia: And that, that also might be beneficial for someone who is used to the concept of throwing your worries or questioning on your deity or your ancestors. And that sometimes that's the only way you can move forward because you can focus on, well, what can I do? And I'm just gonna trust that the other things will fall into place, which even if you don't believe that you know, that taking action versus doing nothing is gonna get you different results.Dalia: But for you, what are the main differences between the way you believe if you're really called to do something, you should look at business or can look at business versus what's usually taught to us.Gieselle: Yeah. I love what you caught that should cause I was like, well, there's no should but for me, revolutionary businessGieselle: it's all about at, at its like simplest terms, wanting to do things differently. And when I say differently, like wanting to do things in ways that are human, that respect not just your needs as an individual, but the needs of your people. And it's a business that prioritizes people over profits at the end of the day.Gieselle: I actually think that would truly be it in its simplest of forms. But it can look a lot of different ways. So, for example, you know, one thing that I do in my sales process is my sales process is intentionally I've intentionally slowed it down so much because. I wanna know you deeply, and I want you to know me deeply and I wanna feel really, really good when you come into my space.Gieselle: And I want us to both feel, to feel on an alignment. Something that I feel is revolutionary is pricing your offers, not just based on like what you can charge people, but what you need and letting there be a limit. A lot of times these days, when I tell folks my one-on-one prices, I mean, they're still like pretty decent.Gieselle: But a lot of times when I tell folks my one-on-one prices, they're like, oh, I was expecting it to be more. And I was like, I just don't need more. I just don't like, there's no reason to charge you thousands upon thousands of dollars for something that, I mean, I hate, I probably shouldn't say this as a coach, but I just don't think there's coaching.Gieselle: That's worth a hundred thousand dollars, unless you are a straight up millionaire. Revolutionary business is one that prior, like I said, prioritizes your body. And so, what that means is you leave space for your cycles, your ebbs and your flows, and you do things slowly and you aren't working 24 7.Gieselle: That's what I think of when I think of revolutionary business. And it's one where at the end of the day, it's really for the collective liberation of folks of color. Like that's, that's what I think about. Like, even if you know, not anyone listening to us is white, but like, even if you're white at the end of the day, like your revolution should start with the, with the collective liberation of folks of color.Gieselle: That's where everything starts at the end of the day. So that's what I think of when I think of when I think of revolutionary business. Dalia: Oh, I love that. And we would probably be surprised because that was something that I think I learned in the program, but also had reinforced by white friends who said, they have to be told don't come in for them to, for it to even occur to them that maybe not all spaces are for them.Dalia: Totally. So, they said, they would absolutely still go into a conference that says African American, blah, blah. They said it wouldn't even occur to them that maybe they're not supposed to go in there. And so, we may very well have a lot of white listeners, you know, because luckily for them they've been socialized to feel welcome everywhere they go.Dalia: Just so y'all know that it's not a universal experience. And all I can say is, must be nice, but it's interesting howGieselle: like literally kicking my feet in joy at that must be niceDalia: but it has been interesting starting to accept more how much like you said, everything is a building block and how much of our experiences, while of course you don't wanna suffer for the sake of suffering.Dalia: But it is interesting how much, if you survive and experience, it is a catalyst for growth. And that even though systemic oppression blows and racism sucks, it does help you build skills. And it creates an opportunity for you to get to know yourself in a way that people are not likely to experience if their existence isn't constantly challenged. And if their worth isn't constantly challenged. But the thing is, you get to opt out of doing that. Like you can just suffer and not grow. And sometimes depending on your trauma, that is where people hang out. And that's been one of my biggest challenges with wanting to work with people who have a lot of racialized trauma or who have a lot of trauma around gender identity and community is some people are in a place, like you said, where they're totally shut down. They can't connect. And so, you show up and you do things and all the people that come forward don't have the trauma that you were seeking to help them with and you're like, is anybody listening?Dalia: So, was there ever a point in your work where you started to wonder, is this going to work? Should I give up or should I pivot?Gieselle: Every day literally every day. I won't say it's a rational thought. I think that that hasn't been a rational thought for me in a really long time. But I actually did do a little bit of a pivot this year.Gieselle: Because for the past year, I've been speaking specifically to revolutionary business for folks of color. And then I did this small pivot to expand the message for like all change makers, all revolutionaries. And I did that and it was like crickets, absolute crickets. And I was like, okay,Gieselle: something funky is happening here. It also didn't feel quite right to me if I'm like looking back at it. It just, I knew here's what I knew about my work is that at the end of the day, what I, what I love about the work is not what context and what, like situation we're talking about, talking about. It is like, I love working with great BIPOC folks.Gieselle: And so, and I want this work to impact as many incredible BIPOC folks who are ready for it and need it as it can be. So that's why I made that. Like I opened it up for a little bit and then after having that experience of like, okay, thriving stuff, like it's kind of radio silence, like not fully working, it's not feeling fully aligned.Gieselle: That's when I came back to, okay, its still revolutionary business, but it's just a different level. It's people who are even who are more resourced, not resourced. And when I say resourced, I mean resourced in their somatic capacity and their like ability to do the work and because we can go deeper and further.Gieselle: And because, you know, as I'm working with leaders, like you talked about earlier, it ripples. And so, the more impact I make with leaders, the more they're gonna go out into their individual revolutions and be able to serve more, more, more and more. Long story short, I think about pivoting every day.Gieselle: Not right now, right now. I'm like, but I wonder I'm like, I don't know, is I, is anything happening even though I know it's just the crazy space. I do know that for myself.Dalia: And did it feel scary to feel like, oh, I'm, niching down even more to people who clearly have the capacity. It makes sense if there were people in the container that weren't ready for it yet, but I would imagine it would also feel like ekk now I'm narrowing in even more.Gieselle: It feels really scary and really vulnerable. Every time you make a change in your business, there's no place where you're going to get. If you are someone where you've been generating income, even if you're not generating it at the level, you want to, you know, that when push comes to shove, you'll be able to generate some income.Gieselle: So, it's less scary for me because I know that my business could really, truly, never die. I mean, maybe like I'm gonna knock on this bamboo, what I've got over here. but. I have the skill sets to revive it if something were funky were to happen but making that change feels really vulnerable and putting out my new season of my podcast, it's all around revolutionary leadership and it, it, it is interesting.Gieselle: You know, I know I have those revolutionary leaders in my audience. I know so many of my folks wanna be those revolutionary leaders as well. And so, it's just about me believing, and this is really at the end of the day, this is all of it. And this is what brought me to serving BIPOC folks. This is what brought me to serving BIPOC folks in that way.Gieselle: It's just about believing that if you have the calling for it, if you feel it, if it feels right to you, it's right. And even if you don't fully believe it in the moment, even if your head is like, should we jump ship every single day? It's about knowing like, no, I'm still gonna like, hold my feet to the fire because I know that this is what is right.Gieselle: And this is what's meant for me. I just have to wait for it to actually come to fruition.Dalia: How do you get back to that place when you're in a position where you feel like you're doubting? There's a lot of people out there who are so good at communicating what they do.  and which is basically marketing that they know, Hey, I can just, you know, Put up a tent somewhere and I can sell some things and there's a lot of people who don't have that and they don't have that confidence, but business comes to you in different ways and that's okay too.Dalia: But what do you do when you can't seem to reconnect to that belief that, oh, this was an actual calling. How do you stay connected to that? MmGieselle: that's a great question. I tap into like, something that I really work to do every day is like to tap into some kind of divination tool or something that like does ground me in my spirituality.Gieselle: So, like right now I'm playing with tarot. I'm like getting to know the tarot again. And so, I'm pulling tarot cards or some things that like, honestly, the most important thing for me, like aside from like the spirituality, cause even that sometimes like can't fully ground me is having space held for me where I can name all of the fears and be reoriented and shown different perspectives. And so, for me, coaching is really helpful. I know that's like such a coach thing to say, but it's the truth is that like, I wouldn't be able to do like all of the things that I've done in my business, all of the shifts and changes and pivots and growth that I've had would never have happened without having like a really good coach.Gieselle: And when I'm talking about coaching, I'm not talking about people who just like showed up one day and said that there are coach, like I'm talking about like real skilled coaches who can hold space powerfully, who aren't trying to tell you what to do, but really understand the sole job of a coach, a true coach is to ground you back into that knowing and that feeling.Gieselle: So, someone that can bring you back there even more powerfully than you might be able to in that moment that's, that's been like the most helpful thing for me is so even if you're like, I'm not resourced enough to have a coach right now, having someone who it is capable of supporting you in a way where they step aside.Gieselle: And it's just about you, because I think that's the problem with relying on friends and family and stuff is that you always have energetic connection, like even with a coach, right. But it's, it's like their interests are somehow still intertwined with yours when you are talking to a friend or a family member.Gieselle: So, if you have someone who's able to like step back and be like, I literally don't matter here and you can feel safe just like, and we'll just dance with it from your space, then that can work too.Dalia: Yeah, it's really tricky learning how so I am in the process. I've already done my 125 hours, but I have not done all the coaching practice hours that I need to finish my PCC, but I should be done by this summer.Gieselle: Look at you go.Dalia: But it's been interesting seeing in the training, the biggest problem that I needed to suppress was the desire to offer a fix. When I felt like I knew exactly what they should do and how often they had an answer. That was not my answer. That was the perfect answer for them.  and how, even in the practice sessions.Dalia: I might say what I hear you saying is, and there's one word that I added that changes the tone that they're like, well, I don't really think it's that, but it reflects how I perceive their problem.  and usually it's because I don't relate to it. And I'm like, I'm imagining that this is how people must feel when they have these kinds of problems.Dalia: Or it could be that I relate to it so much that I'm projecting. It's just been interesting. Practicing, listening just to reflect back to the person what they're saying and what they actually want, not to help them with anything.Gieselle: It's so rare that we get that in this world. And I feel like that's so often all we crave at the end of the day, right.Is someone to see us and to it's really just for someone to see us. And that's 99% of what coaching is and being, and I wanna like take it outta the context of coaching and like being truly supported is right. It's like knowing that someone sees you and they're with you. It's like, if you're an, if you're sobbing, it's like, I don't have to sob, but like I'm here.Or if you're elated, it's like, I'm also there. But it's hard. It's hard to do because we're so used to, like, I'm sure you, you notice that someone who's like getting their PCC, but even as like a friend and an individual, right. It's like, oh no, this person's got something going on. How do I fix it? I'm like, what do I do?Dalia: Absolutely. And I've become more aware of when I want to fix it. Or I wanna bring in all this previous knowledge I have about the friend. And tell them, like I, in this case, do know what's right for you because I've known you for like 30 years . And trying to understand that that still doesn't make me the authority on their life. They are the authority. And the best thing I could do for them as a friend is try and help them see that they are the authority , but usually in reality these days, I'm like, I'm gonna tell you what to do first. And then I'm gonna ask you, like, what do you think you really wanna do? It's just so hard.Dalia: you're so to turn it off, I'm like, you know, I'm gonna be right. It can take years, but you'll come back. but the, the true training has been so helpful. But one thing I did wonder about is how did you survive coaching training and all the different containers you've been in that were not made for people of color. And come out with a skillset that is so perfectly tailored for folks of color.Gieselle: Yeah. That's a really great question. So, I will say I'll be like completely honest where my journey to like decolonizing and like being where I'm at, it's pretty, fairly recent. Like it was like a deep dive and like a going straight, to the deep end.Gieselle: But when I did my coach training, I can't remember what year years are gone to me, but like four or five years, five years ago, I think at this point. I was not bothered by being in fully white spaces yet because I was so used to it. And we were still at that point in society where like, I think we were still in that point where everyone was pretending like life was post racial, like Obama was president and like, like it's all good.Gieselle: And, you know, I was just starting to get, I had actually just had my first real life experience where I genuinely felt like my success was impacted by being Black, where I had never well, I will say I had never felt like I had that experience before. Like I feel like I was lucky for the most part.Gieselle: And I still found where I was able to go despite being Black. That being said, I really like these days, I really hate when people say that. Cause I'm like, yeah, yeah, right like Blackness, like never came into play in your success.Dalia: Well, what's so funny is the conditioning is so good in some areas. That you don't know, you don't know exactly you and you may end up doing the same things as your white peers. But what you don't know is how much more you had to do to get it. Exactly. Cause I even look back at what I've had to do for certain credentials.  and I never, in a million years would've thought to go to the professor and say, I'm just overwhelmed.And they say, don't worry about it. Or you can turn in a fraction of it. Or you can turn everything in late with no penalty. I did not know these things were a thing and then they start being revealed and I'm like, oh, I didn't even know how differently I was being treated.Dalia: Or when people only network with their white students, they don't announce that they're going to network with them. You know? So, it's interesting how sometimes you may not have felt it or noticed it, but definitely doesn't mean it didn't happen, but at least you didn't lose sleep over it.Gieselle: I didn't get sleep over it for sure.Gieselle: And so that was like my initial coach training. So, like, I didn't. So, like then I was like, oh, I don't know. Like, but I was really lucky. And, and when I say lucky, I mean, like it's obvious in retrospect that the majority of my clients this entire time have been folks of color. So like, to this day, if you get on a sales call with me and you don't tell me your like racial or ethnic identity, I mean, I can't go like as granular as country, but I can typically tell you like, okay, you are you've been an American for a few generations, one generation you are an immigrant, you are Latina, you are Asian, you are south Asian.Gieselle: Cuz like I just worked with that many people and I've seen like the typical, like there are typical things that come from each culture. And they manifest in different ways. So that's what really created my experience was just doing the work and doing it with the people.Gieselle: But I have had experiences where I didn't survive the container. And one of those was the precursor to creating. My to like creating my work in the shape that it is now where like long story short, I was doing this leadership program, which it's one of those things whereas a person of color, I look back at that leadership program and I'm like, so mad that it's so exclusive because it was great.Gieselle: But it was, it was my first experience being in a white space and feeling suffocated by whiteness. Like, I literally felt like I was losing my mind. And I remember my husband he's very rarely like actually great with these things. Juan is racially white, ethnically Latino, but it's, he's like very, he's very rarely good with these things.Gieselle: And he very rarely can like actually relate to my experience as a person of color. Cuz he is white, he reads is white. And so, but I like called him crying and I was like, I'm losing my mind out here. It didn't help that this program had, this program was one of those many like white spiritual programs where it had borrowed from a lot of different cultures.Gieselle: And they just felt like if they had the right intention that we should be able to do all of the things. And people had started talking about race because because they were using the word tribe and they refused to like, just let it go. Why white people insist on keeping words that aren't theirs, it never ceases to amaze me.Gieselle: Like I just don't understand it at all.Dalia: That's so interesting, cuz I was gonna ask like how was it suffocating you?Gieselle: So yeah, it was like, we were constantly having conversations about race that the people of color had to carry. And like I, as the sole Black person, there's a difference right in what you carry because as the Black person, everyone turns to you first around these things and then there's everyone else. And in the space, everyone only wanted to talk to me about racial things sometimes. Like we did this exercise, oh my God, this exercise. So, we did this exercise, which I actually think is a really beautiful exercise, but it's basically like assuming that your thoughts around people like your judgments around people and how they feel about you are probably incorrect.Gieselle: So, you clear it, you just say like, Hey, I feel like you think I might be talking too much and it's like, they don't need to respond. They don't need to do anything cuz you know, it's all about you. It's all in your head. Right. And you just release it. But everyone's the teachers literally said do not go up to Gieselle and every time say, say something about race.Gieselle: like, they literally said that and 90% of people still came up and did it anyways, did it anyways thinking they were special little butterfly.Dalia: That's so interesting. Like that goes back to it almost being impossible to keep certain environments just are not going to be safe. They're inherently unsafe.Dalia: So maybe the people who led it, maybe the people on stage, if it had just been you and them, it would've been fine. But all these other random, oh,Gieselle: not even them. not even that the woman who led it, white woman teared me the first day. And, and we talked about holding onto your marginalized identities, she's Jewish.Gieselle: And so she was like very much holding onto the like marginalization that Jewish people feel and like incapable of seeing like her impact in other ways .Gieselle: So, yeah, it, it was inherently unsafe and it was something that I didn't know going in, but it's known about this program. I think there are so many spaces that we all know, like I think about MFA programs sometimes I think about getting my MFA. I'm like nonfiction or fiction. And, but I'm not willing to intentionally go into unsafe spaces anymore. But we, we do that all the time as folks of color.Gieselle: We intentionally step in unsafe spaces because we wanna get that information. We wanna get the knowledge and the only way to get it, sometimes it feels like is to make yourself onDalia: Set yourself on fire. Yeah. That is interesting because in the end, even when you're not recognizing that what's happening to you is unfair and there's a disparity there, the stress that you carry and how hard just thinking about how much harder somebody has to work when every time they go into a space, they feel unsafe.Versus if you come in the space and you feel like totally at home and comfortable, just the amount of emotional and cognitive energy that goes into learning and staying on alert.Gieselle: Absolutely. Well, and when we talk about the way that, like our nervous system functions and our brain functions, when you are at alert, you don't have access to the higher parts of your brain that can process information, analyze information, like and so it, it really is impactful.Gieselle: It really is a detriment because you are not physically capable of taking in the same amount of information as someone who feels a hundred percent safe. And like, this is why I do my work. Because if you don't feel safe in the places where you're being supported, you can't actually get the support you need.Gieselle: Like you're only getting a percentage of it because you're like trying to navigate being in a space instead of just actually allowing yourself to let go and be.Dalia: That resonates so much. And that really explains how you can go into healing space and get virtually nothing out of it. Because the space itself was not safe.Dalia: Like I went into a container that a white friend recommended and they said, oh, he's so great. He's so intersectional. He's so progressive. So this is another person who had multiple marginalized identities, but still cis white man  . And I will say he did feel like a very safe person, but his container, you can't control these people.Dalia: No one said anything that was blatantly problematic, but I only went to one live meeting. Cause I was like, I am too tired to even deal with people, treating me like seeing me is some kind of event, you know, totally or recommending other Black resources to me when I didn't ask them for that. Like, people can't conceive of how peculiar that feels.Dalia: When somebody, you meet someone, you don't know them from Adam and they're not a person of color. And they're like, oh, you're this color. Here's this resource. What makes you think I need you to come rescue me? What makes you think you're an expert on what kind of community I need?Dalia: And did I ask you? I don't know you like that. What makes you think I take referrals from just anybody? And that's another thing that I feel like is unique maybe not across the board, but it's a necessary function of being in a country that's always like trying to kill you or make you feel like s**t is that, you know, better than to just take referrals from just anybody.Dalia: Like you don't know this person and they don't have the same lived experience as you for all I know she just saw a flyer somewhere or I could show up and they could, it could be 100% hoteps all the way through everybody transphobic and bananas, and to just not know that you really just shouldn't be offering all this information, willy nilly to people of color.Dalia: Who said we would respond to that? So that was just enough for me to feel like, oh, well, I'm a freak show here. And everyone is aware of my color and no one's just seeing me as a person. So these other people, you're just meeting a person. And when you are meeting me, all you're seeing is this is a Black person.Dalia: And you're trying to think about what you're saying or you're trying to do the right thing. It just felt hella awkward. And I was like, I don't have time for this s**t.Gieselle: And this is like the problem. Yes. I, number one, I see you. I completely see you and like, this is the problem, right? Because it's not that we don't wanna be seen as Black or whatever we are.Gieselle: It's like we wanna be seen in all of our identities and we don't want to be special or fetishized or marginalized because of them. And there's so very few people in very few spaces that are capable of holding both. I see you in the beauty of your identities and also you're still just a person than me.You know, like you're still just a regular degular person and those get to coexist and yeah, it's really hard to find that. And that's where I think we see a lot of folks. I see so many folks of color being like, I don't want people to see me as Black. I don't want them to see me as this thing first.Gieselle: It, and it's like, well, no, like, I think you do. like, I think you want them to like, acknowledge who you are because you know, when it comes to like, I, I feel like racial identity and I think, yeah, well, I'll, I'll just stick with racial identity cuz that's where I'm most well versed, but it's like, it's one of the most important identities to you.If not the most important identity to you, cuz there's so much culture and love and joy baked into that.Dalia: Most people really take issue with people saying they're colorblind because , that reads as I refuse to acknowledge your cultural distinctness,  in any way, I am not capable of celebrating that you have a culture.And that's a problem as well  and acting like, oh, I'm gonna give you permission to assimilate is some kind of a gift doesn't vibe with me. But I would like to be seen as like a whole ass person, like, yes, I am Black. And guess what? There's something that comes after that.  but people are so used to this really flattened image of anyone.Dalia: Who's not like them.  that they don't always understand. This is a complete person. This is not a caricature. You don't know anything about me if all you've done is look at me. You literally don't know anything about me. You wouldn't look at somebody white and think, oh, you know, I know most likely where they live, how much money they make, but other people make all these assumptions.Dalia: And all they've done is look at you. And they're convinced that they don't have a problem. And in a lot of these containers, you can't convince them of otherwise.  . So when did your interest in leadership become really clear for you? And I know you mentioned that because you can have the greatest impact with people who are leaders.Dalia: What does that even mean to you? Who is a leader?Dalia: That'sGieselle: such a good question. Everyone's a leader first and foremost. I mean, we really are, right. Like, even if you're just leading yourself, like, first of all, leading yourself, isn't just leading yourself because the way that you show up does impact other people and the way that they show up.Gieselle: But sometimes leadership is like being a supporter. Sometimes leadership is being a mother sometimes, or a parent. Sometimes leadership is just being a sibling or a friend or the person who says, Hey, let's get pizza tonight. You know? So I, I wanna say that that leadership is everyone. And also what I.Gieselle: The reason why I decided to lean into revolutionary leadership. And the definition that I am leaning towards with it, which is folks who have been on this train, right? They're on a decolonial train. They've been UNlearning. They've been doing all the things. They're in the process of creating an impact.Gieselle: They have a revolution that they likely are already leading. The reason why I decided to work with them is cuz I wanted to . Oh, IDalia: love that answer. That's not what I expected.Gieselle: It's and I will say it just feels right. To me, it really, I think something for me, because I think at the end of the day leaders, the leaders that I'm most excited to work with are coaches, healers, guides, like people who are really in the, in the trenches serving 24 7, or who have some kind of like deeper calling.Gieselle: I've always been fo been focused on people who have a calling. So like creatives, I love working with creatives as well. I, I completely forgot what I wanted to say. So I don't know. It's a half thought.Dalia: I, I was thinking the other day, like something I realized, well, a friend helped me realize, and I think I was afraid to step into this or accept it is that the work that I do also is not for beginners. Yes, but because of my fear of there not being enough people or my fear of nieching down too much,  or really having a laser focus that it would hurt me.Dalia:  I kept accepting people who were nowhere near ready. Yes. Like if you haven't done any healing work, I'm not for you.  . If you have no concept of the fact that you can internalize messaging, that doesn't serve you, that  works an opposition to your identities, then we're not ready to work together.Dalia: If I'm having to convince you that it's safe to start trusting your body, we're not ready for each other. Like if we're not, you are at the point where you believe it, but you're trying to get there. You have some concept of it and you're looking for an opportunity to do deeper work, then we're ready. Yep.Dalia: But it's just been tricky for me to acknowledge too, because of how marketing generally works or is presented to people what I am always hearing about is like how to just speak to pain points. And I think the pain points for somebody who's deeper in the work is gonna be different. And it probably won't sound as, I don't wanna say dramatic, but  the person might not even recognize it as a problem.Gieselle: Yes, absolutely. Because you've already done healing work. Right. And like, I mean, I always try to stay away from pain points in general because like it's manipulative and it's based in like sales psychology, which is like just manipulating our brain. Really when you're working with someone who isn't a beginner.Gieselle: And I think that's really what I, what made me want to move more towards leaders and people who like already have this language are already thinking about these things. They're like thinking deeply. And we're just exploring in a deeper way. Same as you is that it's just more fun. It's just more fun.Gieselle: And they're actually ready for the work that you're capable of doing and that you wanna do with people. But what you're getting to expand them into is something that I think as folks of color, we don't get to expand into enough, which is just having more, like more than enough. You know, I think it's tough with like both of the kinds of works that we do, cuz it's not just like, oh, well I'm gonna go make you like $10,000 in one day.Gieselle: And like for your work, because you're doing wellness in a decolonized way, you might not lose weight or you might not do this thing that that you think you want, it's not the sexy thing. And also it's allowing you to expand into this moreness this space that we very rarely allow ourselves to even dream of, because it feels so hard to access as a person of color.Gieselle: We're always just fighting for enough. We're fighting for the scraps, the thought of having abundance and more, it's hard for us, especially as revolutionaries where, I mean, we could even talk about the concept of more it's like, well, how much is too much and then when are we hoarding and blah, blah, blah. So yeah, this it's this really difficult concept for us that comes into play..Dalia: Yeah, that brings up, this is one of my big questions. How do you reconcile the fact that some people feel like everything has to be accessible to everyone? And the people who will feel kind of like butt hurt because it's for advanced people or it's for people who have more resources and the people who feel like thriving rates, shouldn't be a thing.I was listening to something Sonya Renee Taylor was explaining was that she's not trying to be out in these streets, starving, you know, dying with an unmarked grave or doing some Zora Neale Hurston type of s**t. Like we are not, you don't have to do that. But the criticism that comes at you, especially if you're assigned female at birth, if you are not like, Hey, I just wanna bleed and give, give, give, give, give, I don't need anything.Dalia: I'm just gonna eat s**t and say, thank you. Like, how do you reconcile the part of you that does want to help  and the part of you that you were not called to do entry level s**t. and like, do you explain that to people or do you just let it go? You just say like, Hey, there's a bunch of tables out there go find another one. Like, how do youGieselle: handle that?Gieselle: Well I'll say first and foremost that I do not have the kind of personality where people feel comfortable stepping to me in that kind of way, like in any way, shape or form. So I'd never worry about someone actually saying that to my face, but to, for people who are thinking that, you know, I know that in my work, cuz people tell me all the time, like I have fundamentally shifted the way that people think just from my free content and just from the emails I sent and the Instagram posts I make in my Facebook group, like I'm constantly educating there, perspective shifting there.Gieselle: And there is so much available to you and so much growth available to you if you just hang out in my world. Which I'm always shocked by because because like at the end of the day, like I know that the real juice is in the actual coaching and then at least that's how I've always felt. Right. But there are so many people who tell me, like, I think about this thing completely differently because of these emails or this, that, so that's what I say is that like, my work is a hundred percent accessible.Gieselle: If you follow me for free, if you go to my stuff there's an abundance of information for you to sit with to process, like, sure you're not getting the like coaching side of it, but for, it's not, it's also, that's not always necessary for every single person. Like some people really just need to hear something a different way.Gieselle: And then it just like changes everything for you. And the last thing I would say to anyone who's like coming at me with that, is that what are you doing, policing what I do with my money and my and my life. Like, I am not a billionaire. I think that there's a really interesting societal, like investigation we can do here.Gieselle: Right. Because we actually so very rarely interrogate billionaires around this kind of thing. We are just like, well, they worked really hardDalia: and theyGieselle: deserve it. They're a genius. And then us like the people who are out here doing like the real work to help liberate people were expected to bleed and to do it happily.Gieselle: And that's just an, I, I would really tell anyone like, If you're gonna be like coming for somebody, go to Jeff Bezos, don't be stepping to me talking about how I should charge $1. And you're still ordering s**t off of amazon.com. Okay. Dalia: Yeah, that really says something because you'll hear people even argue like, well, the more money you send in that person's direction is gonna generate jobs.Well, who says that I wouldn't be a good steward of that money. Cause so there's multiple layers there. What makes you think the money isn't better off in my hands than someone else. And why would you want me to have to work insane hours at a job that supports me so that I can keep bleeding for you doing labor for free, like sure.Dalia: It's a labor of love, even podcasting  but the key word there is labor.Gieselle: well, and this like comes all, it, it comes back to all of our relationships with capitalism, right? It's we all are so used to living in a system where we're supposed to work 24 7, and we're supposed to exploit ourselves for someone else's gain that.Gieselle: It feels right to people and it feels it, well, let me rephrase this. It feels wrong to people when you honor yourself and your needs, that is actually like, feels wrong in like a problem to them. And so that's the real issue around it is that there's some deep internalized capitalism that anyone who's questioning that really needs to look at.Gieselle: And question, if they're coming to any person of color questioning what they're charging and they're thriving because we are all owed so much more than we could ever get in this lifetime. I don't know, maybe not Oprah. Like she's good, but but everyone, but everyone else, like, no, we we've got more than enough coming to us.Gieselle: There is, we got more than enough generations of wealth that we deserve. And if we want it, I'm not someone where I'm like out here trying to generate tons of generational wealth or things like that. That's not really what I care about at the end of the day. But if that is what you care about, and that's something that you're wanting for yourself, I support you.Gieselle: And I love you because you deserve that thriving. And it's been stripped of us for so long. Get it while, get it in this lifetime. If it feels right for you.Dalia: I love the freedom that you give people to find their own solutions and understand that the answer might not be right for everybody because we know it in general, the way things are set up now it's predatory.Dalia: Yep. People aren't prioritized, but there are a lot of people out there acting like, well, you need to burn it all down and you shouldn't accept money for anything. And you should just like live under bridge. Well, why are you out here trying to take people's freedom of choice away from them to decide like, do I wanna try and thrive?Dalia: Do I feel like I can do more if I make sure my revolution is sustainable and maybe your revolution looks different and we don't have to put that on other people. And that's, to me, that's also a sign of really quality, authentic coaching is that you give people m

    Squawk Box Europe Express
    SQUAWK BOX, FRIDAY 1ST JULY, 2022

    Squawk Box Europe Express

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 27:11


    The Federal Reserve's preferred measure of inflation eases but remains at levels not seen since the 1980s. The S&P 500 ends H1 with its worst performance since 1970. Asian equities are down but Chinese stocks outperform as factory activity rebounds at its fastest pace for a year. Siemens reports a write-down of its stake in Siemens Energy which will create a €2.8bn loss in Q3. And in crypto news, FTX is reportedly close to buying BlockFi in a $25m fire sale.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Asian Bitches Down Under
    Roe V Wade | Abortion in Asian & Australia

    Asian Bitches Down Under

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 50:19


    In this episode, Jess shares her experience of attending STC: Top Coat,  and reading Third and Final Continent, while Helen shares Dr Yumiko Kadota's Emotional Female and the heart-warming Disney Plus: Baymax! The main topic of the week: Roe V Wade, abortions in Asia and Australia and the complications/impacts on women  Nikkei Asia: Abortion in Asia and the limits of choice Guttmacher Institute Fact Sheet: Abortion in Asia Facebook | Asian Bitches Down Under Instagram | Asian Bitches Down Under  Buy Me A Coffee | Asian Bitches Down Under BUTTER BUTTER active wear - use code ABDU10 for $10 off Email: asianbdownunder@gmail.com

    Japan Station: A Podcast by Japankyo.com
    93 Kitano Takeshi, Zatoichi & Japanese Movies (Dr. Jonathan Wroot)

    Japan Station: A Podcast by Japankyo.com

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 83:40


    On this episode of the Japan Station podcast, Dr. Jonathan Wroot tells us about the movies of Ktano Takeshi, the fascinating history of the Zatoichi films, and more.. About Dr. Jonathan Wroot Dr. Jonathan Wroot is a senior lecturer in Film Studies at the University of Greenwich and the author of the book The Paths of Zatoichi: The Global Influence of the Blind Swordsman. Topics Discussed About the boom in Japanese films in the early to mid 2000s About Kitano Takeshi and his films On studying Asian cinema About Kitano Takeshi's Violent Cop About Kitano Takeshi's remake of Zatoichi About the Zatoichi films and their history Jidaigeki vs chanbara About the influence of Zatoichi on film and pop culture around the world The influence of Zatoichi on Daredevil About Shintaro Katsu About some of the differences int he Zatoichi films The Zatoichi TV show The original Zatoichi short story in which Zatoichi first appears The crazy finale of the Zatoichi film directed by Hiroshi Teshigahara About dubs and subtitling Voice actors in Japan that always do the same voices of Western actors Crazy Japanese commercials featuring Western celebrities And much more! Support on Patreon & Ko-fi If you enjoy Japan Station and want to ensure that we're able to produce more episodes, then please consider becoming a patron on Patreon.com. For a minimum pledge of $1 a month you'll get early access to all JapanKyo podcasts, bonus content, and more. And for $3 a month, you'll get access to Japanese Plus Alpha, a podcast produced by me (Tony Vega) that focuses on the Japanese language and all of its fascinating quirks. Also, all pledges get a shout-out on the show and my undying gratitude. Thank you in advance! Support Japan Station on Patreon You can also do a one time donation via Ko-fi. Support us on Ko-fi Links, Videos, Etc. To pick up a copy of The Paths of Zatoichi, you can use the link below. Remember to use the discount code LXFANDF30 to get 30% off (valid until the end of 2022). The Paths of Zatoichi: The Global Influence of the Blind Swordsman The link below is for the list of blog articles about Dr. Wroot's experience watching 30 Zatoichi films in 30 days. 30 Zatoichi films in 30 Days Here is Dr. Wroot's ranking of the Zatoichi films. From Best To Worst – My Opinions on the Zatoichi films Don't forget to check out the latest episode of Ichimon Japan. What is a famiresu? (About Japanese “Family Restaurants”) | Ichimon Japan 61 Follow Japankyo on Social Media Facebook (@JapankyoNews) Twitter (@JapankyoNews) Instagram (@JapanKyoNews) Full Show Notes Get the full version of show notes at https://www.japankyo.com/category/podcasts/japanstation/

    Voices in Japan
    The Excitement of Red Tape in Japan

    Voices in Japan

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 54:23


    Despite Japan being the best place to live in the world, there are some negatives, and perhaps part of the most infamous of those is all the red tape and cumbersome processes that one is certain to encounter multiple times per year. Matt details the very exciting experience (sarcasm intended) of renewing his drivers license - a process where waiting in line is usually the worst part in most other countries. The guys also look at Matt's renewed modeling career in Japan, someone losing a USB drive with important data on all residents of the city of Amagasaki after a drinking a party, new rules that allow people to smile for drivers license pictures, the reason for official processes in Japan moving at a snail's pace, and much more!Sponsors:Bearfoot BarLocated in downtown Sapporo, walking distance from the subway station. There are  variety of Japanese made craft bottled beers. A range of whiskeys and basic cocktails also available. Burgers and pub style snacks. Friendly English and Japanese speaking staff.  https://www.facebook.com/bearfootbarThe Red HouseLocated in the heart of Rusutsu Ski Resort, just cross the main road and it's behind the Seicomart Convenience store. The restaurant features a mix of Japanese, Asian fusion, and western Style dishes, including shabu-shabu with wagyu beef and Hokkaido wagyu beef steak. Open winter and summer, 12-3pm for lunch, 5-9pm for dinner, with prices ranging from under Yen 1000 to about Yen 5000. https://theredhouse.jp/Rusutsu LodgesOpen all year round. Located 5 minutes walk to the main Rusutsu Ski Resort Gondola. There are Japanese, Western, and apartment style rooms with breakfast packages available. There's a Japanese sento (public bath), two convenience stores less than a minute walk, ski room and tune up tables, plenty of free parking space, and summer BBQ packages available. Check out the website for more information and availability. http://rusutsulodges.comHokkaido GuideEstablished over 10 years ago, written by locals for locals and international tourists. The guide contains information on all types of businesses and locations around Hokkaido. There's information regarding all things Hokkaido such as sightseeing, nightlife, events, services, food and restaurants, entertainment, outdoor activities, and more. Currently offered in English and Thai, advertising space available. Check out website for everything you need to know about this beautiful prefecture. https://hokkaidoguide.comUse our Buzzsprout affiliate link to start your podcast today!Website:https://www.voicesinjapan.com/Follow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch:voicesinjapan@gmail.comSupport the show

    WagerTalk Podcast
    Asian Baseball Today | Asian Baseball Picks, Odds and Series Previews | KBO and NPB for July 1-3

    WagerTalk Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 37:29


    The top five teams in Japan's Pacific League are only separated by 5.5 games. Who will pull away from the pack as the NPB approaches the midway point of their season? Join Adam Trigger and Tokyo Brandon for Asian Baseball Today as we break down this weekend's featured matchups in the KBO and NPB.#KBO | #Baseball | #npb Introduction 00:00Show Start 03:35Standings Recap & What Have Bettors Learned 08:55Featured Game - SSG vs Kia 16:50Series - Trigger - SSG vs Kia 22:50Series - Brandon - NPB Orix vs Nippon Ham 26:40Show Best Bets 30:50

    St. Louis on the Air
    From ‘Asian carp' to ‘copi,' an ugly fish gets an appetizing marketing makeover

    St. Louis on the Air

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 13:22


    Asian carp has a new name — copi. The Illinois Department of Natural Resources poured hundreds of thousands of dollars into a rebranding effort and landed on the name “copi,” to reflect the copious amount of the fish that live in Midwestern rivers and streams. Harvest Public Media reporter Dana Cronin joins us to talk about this fish story.

    Spoiler Force Podcast
    EPISODE 127: Maita Vang - Amateur Muay Thai Fighter of Warman Muay Thai

    Spoiler Force Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 47:35


    On this Episode, I have New Guest and Amateur Muay Thai Fighter, Maita Vang, on the podcast!! Maita and I talk about how she started training with Warman Muay Thai, getting her mind ready for fights and cutting weight during fight camps. Maita also talks about what she does outside of training! FOLLOW Maita at:Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/atiamvang/FOLLOW Warman Muay Thai:Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/warmanmuaythai/Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/warmanmuaythaiFOLLOW Coach Kou Lee at:Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/kouasianinvasionlee/JOIN THE SPOILER FORCE PATREON!! Patrons will have their names mentioned on episodes depending on which tier is selected!! For the First Ten Patrons, the First Five Patrons who Pledge to the Level 2 Tier will receive an Exclusive Spoiler Force T-Shirt. BUT! The following Five Patrons who Pledge to the Level 2 Tier will receive an Exclusive Spoiler Force Sticker and Print!!*Only ONE SPOT left for the Exclusive Spoiler Force T-Shirt!!https://patreon.com/spoilerforcepodcastLIKE, SHARE, RATE, SUBSCRIBE, COMMENT and FOLLOW Spoiler Force Podcast!! You can find more content at:https://linktr.ee/SpoilerForcePodcastYouTube - https://www.youtube.com/spoilerforcepodcastApple Podcasts - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/spoiler-force-podcast/id1465655015Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/3edg2bpJPr85Qwry6kzvOrSoundCloud - https://www.soundcloud.com/spoilerforcepodcastAny kind of guest recommendations, comments, questions, concerns or criticisms can be sent to rickyvang92@gmail.com. I might even respond to your message in a future podcast episode!!Don't Forget to Join the Spoiler Force Discord Community!!Support Spoiler Force Podcast! ALL Tips and Donations will be used for podcasting needs such as Booking Guests, Equipment and Software!https://streamlabs.com/spoilerforcepodcast1/tipIf you want to start your very own Podcast, go tohttps://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1059248 and sign up for free!If you want a simpler way to record your Audio or Video Podcast, go to https://streamyard.com?pal=6037820492218368 and sign up to earn a $10 credit!Music from Uppbeat (free for Creators!):https://uppbeat.io/t/sensho/glow#SpoilerForcePodcast #MaitaVang #WarmanMuayThai #MuayThai #CombatSports #Olympics #SuniLee #KouLee #Glory #Fight #MMA #UFC #Boxing #KickBoxing #Grappling #Wrestling #BrazilianJiuJutsu #BJJ #Competition #Compete #Sports #Coaching #Health #Fitness #Strength #Mukbang #Food #Travel #Asian #Hmong #PodcastsSupport the show

    Dressed: The History of Fashion
    Asian Fashion Archive: An Interview with Faith Cooper

    Dressed: The History of Fashion

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 31:33


    Faith Cooper is back to discuss her work on the Asian Fashion Archive, her digital resource project that is committed to highlighting Asian fashion, culture, and history. https://www.asianfashionarchive.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The Asian Sewist Collective Podcast
    30. Zero Waste Sewing & Clothing

    The Asian Sewist Collective Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 78:26


    In this week's episode, Ada and Nicole discuss zero waste sewing, fashion and clothing. We'll talk about zero waste practices throughout history and Asian cultures, and our own zero waste habits within our sewing practices. For show notes and a transcript of this episode, please see: https://asiansewistcollective.com/30-zero-waste-sewing--clothing If you find our podcast informative and enjoy listening, you can support us by joining our monthly membership or making a one-time donation via Ko-Fi: https://ko-fi.com/asiansewistcollective 

    FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview
    Financial Market Preview - Thursday 30-June

    FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 5:25


    US equity futures are indicating a lower open as of 05:00 ET. European equity markets are weaker, while Asian trade was mixed, with China markets outperforming after PMIs returned to expansion. NATO has taken aim at Russia and China in its updated mission statement. Markets are pricing in 50 bp of Fed rate cuts after the funds rate peaks in March 2023. Companies Mentioned: Nexstar Media Group, Warner Bros Discovery, Paramount Global, Uniper

    The Pitmaster's Podcast
    Charles Wong of Umamicue

    The Pitmaster's Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 87:20


    Charles Wong set out to advance the art of BBQ by combining Texas Style BBQ and Asian dishes. The results have been pretty amazing. We chat about where BBQ is going and explore things you can smoke other than the normal BBQ fair. https://umamicue.com/

    Fruitloops: Serial Killers of Color
    Asian Madness: Temple of the (2)Thousand Fetuses

    Fruitloops: Serial Killers of Color

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 28:23


    Today's episode is from The Asian Madness Podcast, hosted by Jessica. Asian Madness is a podcast about true crime, mysteries, urban legends, and anything else weird and creepy from Asia.In this episode, Jessica discusses the 2000 plus fetuses discovered in 2010 in a temple in Thailand. All of them were from illegal abortions and meant to be cremated at some point. Police discovered the situation before all of them were disposed of.https://www.itsasianmadness.com/Thanks for listening! This is a weekly podcast and new episodes drop every Thursday, so until next time... look alive guys, it's crazy out there!SponsorsBetter Helphttps://www.betterhelp.com/FruitBest Fiendshttps://apps.apple.com/us/app/best-fiends-puzzle-adventure/id868013618https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.Seriously.BestFiends&hl=en_US&gl=USWhere to find us:Our Facebook page is Fruitloopspod and our discussion group is Fruitloopspod Discussion on Facebook; https://www.facebook.com/groups/fruitloopspod/We are also on Twitter and Instagram @fruitloopspodPlease send any questions or comments to fruitloopspod@gmail.com or leave us a voicemail at 602-935-6294. We just might read your email or play your voicemail on the show!Want to Support the show?You can support the show by rating and reviewing Fruitloops on iTunes, or anywhere else that you get your podcasts from. We would love it if you gave us 5 stars!You can make a donation on the Cash Apphttps://cash.me/$fruitloopspodOr become a monthly Patron through our Podbean Patron pagehttps://patron.podbean.com/fruitloopspodMusic“Abyss” by Alasen: ●https://soundcloud.com/alasen●https://twitter.com/icemantrap ●https://instagram.com/icemanbass/●https://soundcloud.com/therealfrozenguy●Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License“Furious Freak” by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3791-furious-freakLicense: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Connect with us on:Twitter @FruitLoopsPodInstagram https://www.instagram.com/fruitloopspodFacebook https://www.facebook.com/Fruitloopspod and https://www.facebook.com/groups/fruitloopspod

    Global Oil Markets
    Asia gasoil, jet/kerosene and gasoline cracks may stay elevated on limited exports from China

    Global Oil Markets

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 22:27


    Demand for transportation fuels has been picking up in Asia, as higher vaccination rates and improved mobility push regional economies to open up to near pre-pandemic levels. Global oil supplies, however, are not keeping pace with this recovering demand. China's move to inject more fuel supplies into the Asian market by way of a supplementary second round of oil products export quotas in early June is unlikely to help improve regional demand-supply balances. Moreover, China's oil product exports in 2022 are likely to fall from 2021 levels as Beijing aims to minimize outflows to meet its net-zero target. Refining margins for clean transportation fuels like gasoil, jet/kerosene and gasoline skyrocketed to historical highs earlier this month. Even as cracks have inched lower since, expectations are these valuations will stay elevated in the foreseeable future. In this podcast, S&P Global Commodity Insights' Rajesh Nair, Su Yeen Cheong, Oceana Zhou and Zhuwei Wang shed light on the current situation and discuss the scenarios that are likely to play out in the Asian clean fuels markets in the near to medium term.

    Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
    429: 5x with Tarush Aggarwal

    Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 31:59


    Tarush Aggarwal is the Founder and CEO of 5X, the modern data stack as a managed service that enables companies to answer business questions without having to worry about building data infrastructure or bringing in the right data engineering team. Chad talks with Tarush about the modern data stack movement, choosing things that make sense on behalf of their customers, and building a team culture at a company with a fairly large time zone distribution. 5x (https://5x.co/) Follow 5x on Twitter (https://twitter.com/DataWith5x), Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/DataWith5x), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/datawith5x/), YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyOHdgLesV3FesXXl9-8V_w), or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/datawith5x). Follow Tarush on Twitter (https://twitter.com/tarush) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/tarushaggarwal/). Follow thoughtbot on Twitter (https://twitter.com/thoughtbot) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/150727/). Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of Giant Robots! Transcript: CHAD: This is the Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots Podcast, where we explore the design, development, and business of great products. I'm your host, Chad Pytel. And with me today is Tarush Aggarwal, the Founder and CEO of 5X, the modern data stack as a managed service that enables companies to answer business questions without having to worry about building data infrastructure or bringing in the right data engineering team. Tarush, thank you for joining me. TARUSH: Chad, thank you so much for having me on the show. Really looking forward to being here and hopefully adding some value for your listeners. CHAD: Yes, I'm sure that they will. I think many companies are either thinking about how they build their data infrastructure or thinking about how they leverage data for their business now. So 5X provides a path for them to do that, and I'd love to dive in. How does 5X, like I said in the intro, enable companies to get started without having to worry about building this infrastructure themselves or this team themselves? TARUSH: Yeah, totally. It's a great question. Just to kind of zoom out for a quick second, the data space has been really hot for a few years now, and there's this area often called the modern data stack, which is really led by a few vendors mainly around this concept of the data warehouse, reporting tools, and modeling, and ingestion. And this is really a new area for the data space, which has really become popular. So you also have, you know, ten years ago, you had Hadoop and Spark, and all of these different data tools, which in general have become less popular, and the modern data stack movement is one of the big movements happening. So at a macro level, we have this new movement. If you zoom in, this movement happens to be one of the most fragmented movements. So what that means is for each different layer, you have different vendors. And so, even if you want to do something today as simple as building dashboards, you have to first ingest this data. In your average company, you've got [inaudible] at different sources. You need to put it in. You need to then store it, you need to model it, and then you can build a dashboard. CHAD: You also need to make all the different choices about which ones you're going to choose at every level. TARUSH: Exactly. At each of these levels, you have multiple billion-dollar companies today competing. So the thing about fragmentation of the space and, you know, I think data along with maybe DevOps and security are probably the most fragmented spaces. The thing about fragmented spaces is that they are great for extremely savvy customers; think of large tech companies who have 100% data teams. But for 90% of businesses, if you want to get value from data, it makes it much harder because you have to sign multiple contracts with these vendors, architecture, set up security. So what 5X very, very fundamentally is doing is we're business-focused. We allow you, you know, in a month or two, you better go to 5x.co and add your credit card, and you will have business analytics out of the box. And we can help you make some of these decisions as to what are the best vendors for your price points, for your use cases and give you an end-to-end platform so that you aren't worrying about signing these bills and sort of setting it up. You're focused on your business outcome and your business use cases. CHAD: Where did...I happen to know, but because I did my research for the episode. [laughs] But you were at WeWork leading data at WeWork, right? TARUSH: Yes. CHAD: So I imagine you faced this problem and saw this problem firsthand, right? TARUSH: You know, I've been fortunate that I've spent my career in the data space. So back in the day at Salesforce and now and most recently at WeWork. And companies like this, in general, are aggressively hiring and aggressively growing these teams. So at WeWork, we had 50 people working on stitching together the platform and finding the best vendors, and being involved in that. So at WeWork, we were really focused on building our own version of the platform. I think what's interesting is ever since I left and especially over the last 24 months, where the sort of startup space has become so active, I'm still getting pinged on LinkedIn like every day or two with companies looking to get started. And over a period of time, you see the trends that everyone is reinventing the wheel. What do I do first? What's the first use case? What infrastructure do I need? How do I set this up? So the idea of this really came less from WeWork, where we had the team and the expertise. It came more from the other 90% of the companies that don't have the resources that WeWork had, at least at that time. CHAD: So what do your customers of 5X typically look like then? Are there particular industries or data needs? Or on the tech side, on the development side, what do their development teams look like interacting with 5X? TARUSH: That's a great question. And again, at a macro level, data is a global phenomenon. It's not industry-specific. Now, different industries have different requirements. So obviously, as a consumer, what you need to collect, the tools and infrastructure you need are quite different from a B2B business. So there is this concept that for each vertical, what stack makes sense, and that's, again, something which we can do. Typically, our customers have found some sort of a product-market fit. They have a business, and now they're looking to go scale the business to get to either entering growth phase, or an optimization phase, or a profitability phase. And in each of these phases, data plays a vital role. So they are at this point where they know that they want to get value from it. They might even have a data team with 4,5,10 people. And they really might have figured out their first use cases and had the basic dashboards. And, inevitably, they come to this question of what now? What do we do now? So that's one large sort of vertical. And then the other one is they want to go do it. They want to go invest in data, but they have no idea how to do it. And in that case, they're looking at us not just the platform, but we also have this concept of on-demand talent. Today, we're interviewing thousands of data engineers a week. We get to hire the top 1%, and we pre-train them on different stacks. And then, companies can integrate these lead engineers at a weekly level or completely on-demand and use that to go build out the dashboards. We have never thought of replacing data teams for companies. But it's really interesting to see that some of the early-stage companies are using our platform and our on-demand talent to literally do end-to-end data as a service. CHAD: So at 5X, you're actually providing those team members, those consulting services? TARUSH: Yeah, so we look at it less from the consultant point of view, you know, a consultant typically you would go, and you have your statement of work, and that's going to be a three-month project, and it might be a fixed price. And sort of inevitably, they're looking to...they don't work with hundreds of thousands of companies, a few of them might, but in general, we work a little bit differently. So we have this concept of on-demand talent. So we have these engineers who we hire, and we pre-train them and essentially build software to basically allow people to add these engineers on top of the platform and sort of use them. So they work in one-week sprint cycles. It's fully on-demand. So you can have a group of engineers for one week and the next week not have that. And typically, consultants don't work in that way. And we don't really do the statements of work, and here's what's going to happen. These engineers are sort of put into these things what we call pods, and pods are three engineers and a product manager. And they operate on these one-week sprints. You can use this end-to-end team or these engineering pods to go build out your use cases, which is similar to what a consultant on the services model does, but we do it in more of a platform-first approach. CHAD: That's really interesting. I've had some guests on before where they talk about doing consulting or doing services on top of the recurring revenue platform that they've built or not doing it because it's not interesting to them or that their investors say like, "Don't get into that TNM business time and materials business. You want to focus on recurring revenue." How have you balanced that in your business? TARUSH: The reality is that it doesn't matter which vendor you are in the modern data stack space. You might be Snowflake, or you might be Tableau, or you might be Fivetran or DBT. These are just some of the popular ones. Each of these vendors is just one small part of the stack. And what that means is that they don't have a services model and [inaudible] investors happy. But in reality, it's because they don't have end-to-end stack exposure; you know, there's no company today which knows what their stack looks like. Snowflake doesn't know what their entire stack looks like. I mean, Snowflake [inaudible] its success in engagement because they just want [inaudible] And what 5X is is, you know, we've had to spin these stacks up from scratch for mid-market companies. You'll be able to map your stack. So you might have a few pieces. We can help you see what's missing. But again, because we have visibility end-to-end, having that services model, if you want to call it, makes a lot of sense because, ultimately, we're focused on adding business value. And no one's doing data for the sake of doing data. And no one is doing it to build a 50-person data team. They're doing it ultimately to enable the business. So given that we have this end-to-end scope, we look at our on-demand talent as a massive value-add of using the 5X platform is that you have this ability to get engineers end-to-end that are pre-trained on the platform. So we like it a lot. And we think it's a competitive advantage for us. CHAD: How opinionated is the 5X stack, the default stack? Can you make a lot of choices within it? Are you using lots of different things? You already mentioned Snowflake, Tableau. So it sounds like you're choosing the things that make sense on behalf of your customers. TARUSH: Yeah, so for launch, we're focused on the core BI stack, which is ingestion, storage, monitoring, reporting, and in this stack, also we have picked the best-in-class vendors so Fivetran, Snowflake, DBT, Preset. In some ways, the usual suspects which you think of as you're looking at the stack. Now our goal and really what we're building is this program called the Certified 5X Program, and that's for vendors. And that program allows us to integrate with different partners and do things like account provisioning, configuration, user management, our billing agreement, workflow setup. And as we integrate with more and more vendors, the idea is to really have a single form for the modern data stack. So, in ingestion, for now, we might be using Fivetran since they're the [inaudible], but the idea is we're also talking to Plausible, and Airbyte, and Stitch, and all of the other vendors. So at some point, we really kind of pick and choose between any of them. So the idea is, again, there could be a set of different stuff for a company, which is extremely budget-conscious, and if you're looking more for enterprise capability to use a different vendor in that same category. So ultimately, we're enabling customer freedom in the next few months. At launch, we'll have a smaller selection. But as we get into Q4 and as we get into the next year, we have the next 10-15 vendors lined up who are going to be part of the certified 5X program, and that allows us to add more and more optionality in terms of existing categories. And then, we also will focus on adding new categories like reverse ETL, or data lineage, or augmented analytics. CHAD: I love the idea of being focused for launch, saying these are the biggest things that we need to hit. How long did it take you to get to launch? When did you start working in earnest on 5X and get to a public launch? TARUSH: We've been working on this since last June. So we're 11 months old now. What we really did initially is go build relationships with these vendors. And the first thing we did is we started off more as a services business where we sort of built this automatic interview process where we were interviewing hundreds of engineers a week and adding these engineers and training them on the platform. We would go set up the platform for the customer in a semi-automatic manner. So we have been operational. We're probably working with 15-20 customers at this point, but we did it in a sort of semi-automated way. And over the last few months, as we understood more and more what their needs are, we are transitioning to a platform-first company instead of a services-first company. CHAD: So that means that you were able to be public and start getting customers fairly early on in your journey. It's only been 11 months since you started. And when did you get your first customer? TARUSH: 11 months ago. CHAD: [laughs] So at what point did you find investors and raise money and start to build a team? TARUSH: We've been fortunate enough that we were producing revenue on day one just looking at the services aspect of the business. So we needed a very tiny fundraise back in October, a very small amount. And now that we're getting closer to the platform launch, we might be announcing something soon. CHAD: What did you take money for if you were revenue-generating? Was there something specific that caused you to take it and that it was for? TARUSH: So if you kind of zoom out again and look at this whole concept of building out, you know, I think if we focused on services and focused on growing that part of the business organically, there's no real need for that. But the idea now is we're having a 20-person platform team, building out these integrations, building up software for even things like board management, hiring. The main task today is sort of engineering. So we raised capital to double down on the platform vision and become a platform first. Mid-Roll Ad: I wanted to tell you all about something I've been working on quietly for the past year or so, and that's AgencyU. AgencyU is a membership-based program where I work one-on-one with a small group of agency founders and leaders toward their business goals. We do one-on-one coaching sessions and also monthly group meetings. We start with goal setting, advice, and problem-solving based on my experiences over the last 18 years of running thoughtbot. As we progress as a group, we all get to know each other more. And many of the AgencyU members are now working on client projects together and even referring work to each other. Whether you're struggling to grow an agency, taking it to the next level and having growing pains, or a solo founder who just needs someone to talk to, in my 18 years of leading and growing thoughtbot, I've seen and learned from a lot of different situations, and I'd be happy to work with you. Learn more and sign up today at thoughtbot.com/agencyu. That's A-G-E-N-C-Y, the letter U. CHAD: So, when it comes to building a team, we're talking today, and you're in Bali. Is that where you spend most of your time now? TARUSH: I wish I could spend more time here. CHAD: [laughs] TARUSH: I'm pretty nomadic, which I really like. And I think we were born in COVID...a fun story; I got stuck in Bali for two years. I came here for vacation, and we were locked up. And it's not the worst place in the world to be stuck, and I felt very lucky that it was not somewhere else. So, in general, we started building the pilot while we were still remote. We have folks in 11 countries now. I spent six months of the year around America. That's where our clients are. About 80% of our business is from American companies today, and then I spend some time in India, where our engineering teams are aggressively growing in the Southeast Asian market. And 5X is a Singapore company. So we spend time in Singapore, and if I have some time, I come back to Bali. But in general, we are pretty nomadic. And I think as part of our culture, and how we attract people, one of our core values is what we call the hammock value where if I can build it or if you can build it while lying on a hammock in some part of the world, we're not interested in going back to an office. CHAD: With a fairly large time zone distribution of the team, how do you build a culture? How do people work together? Are people shifting their hours? Or do you build a culture of working asynchronously? TARUSH: We mostly work asynchronously. In general, the engineering teams are based out of India. So engineers who are working on the platform are in the same time zone. In terms of our pods, what's really cool is today, we hire in South America, we hire in Africa, we hire in Southeast Asia, so three distinct time zones. So you have Europe, you have the Americas, and you have the Asian time zone. And when we assemble these pods, and a pod has got three engineers and a technical project manager, we try and have at least two different time zones in a pod. So at least two of the engineers are in separate time zones, which means that for our customers, they have more around-the-clock support. They have more hours where they can get work done, which is great for productivity. So, what that means on our side is that we're really good at being able to communicate asynchronously. We have all this flexibility, and with that, in terms of accountability, the way we do it is we have daily updates. Again, it's asynchronous, so you can send that here's what you did, you know, [inaudible] by. At the end of the week, we do Loom videos really sharing what you've done. We sort focus a lot on like agenda -- CHAD: And Loom is an asynchronous video sharing. People can record videos and share it with everybody. Is that what Loom is? TARUSH: Yeah, sorry, I should mention. Loom is a great video platform that allows you to screen share, and it's just a really cool screen-sharing tool that we record these asynchronous videos and really ingraining it inside our culture. Everyone at 5X knows the importance of sending these updates and agenda before a call and summaries in a Zoom video. So that's how we are able to do it. CHAD: One of the things that we've not struggled with but dealt with at thoughtbot is we've started hiring all throughout the Americas, all throughout Europe, Middle East, and Africa. And we've got team members all over the place. And we want to treat people as employees and give them full benefits. And a lot of people want to work for a local entity and have employment laws and everything. But it's a challenge to do that. We don't necessarily want to set up entities in every country. So one strategy is contracting, another is to work with an international PEO or employer of record. How have you managed that? TARUSH: We use an international agency which allows us to hire in any country. I'm not sure the name of the platform we're using. Karan, our CFO, would know that. CHAD: [laughs] TARUSH: But it allows us on a macro level to be able to hire in all these countries as employees, you know, ask if you have the stock program. And it's also allowing us to give healthcare benefits and things like that, which we really want to have for everyone. And when it comes to the engineers on our network, at the moment, we're hiring them full-time as contractors, but again, we want to extend benefits to them and really, in some ways, give them that flexibility. Do you want to be inside a local jurisdiction where you can have more healthcare benefits and integrations with local governments, you know, employee programs and things like that? Or do you want to take advantage of our culture and be more nomadic? And these are exciting things which we're sort of figuring out now as we [inaudible] some economies of scale around, you know, having this [inaudible] CHAD: Yeah, that's great. And for what it's worth, that's the route that we've taken as well is to work with an international employer of record who actually employs people locally. And many people don't realize, like, you highlighted health benefits. A lot of countries have national health care. But it's really common, especially in white-collar or tech industry employment there, to augment that with supplemental insurance, which is not very expensive, but it is expected and oftentimes necessary to get the kind of coverage that you want to have. TARUSH: I think the world is changing. We're becoming remote-first as well. And the two areas which I believe it's going to affect the most is number one, employment and number two, education. It's just a no-brainer that more and more companies are going to emerge in this space, making it easier to hire remotely and provide benefits and, in some ways, build that operating system for remote entrepreneurs. So I'm not sure if the tools today are great. I think they solve the problem for now. But I expect there to be a lot of innovation in this space over the next few years. CHAD: Well, and I think that the pandemic has pushed that, accelerated that. There are companies now that existed before, but the scale at which they're able to operate now because so many companies have started to go remote and want to employ people everywhere; it's really driving that growth and investment in that area too. And as a result of that, there's going to be a lot of data [laughs] that these companies generate and need to get a handle on. So maybe they'll become customers of 5X, or maybe they already are. TARUSH: Yeah. If you look in the last ten years, I think the last ten years were all about digital marketing with social and sort of advertising, making it very obvious that if you don't have a web presence, if you don't care about your customers think, and if you don't find ways to attract customers, you're not going to exist. So ten years later and all those companies which didn't set up websites and they didn't figure out customer acquisition online probably don't exist anymore. In the next five years or in the next ten years, a lot of these will get a lot more sophisticated. And certainly, data comes in as a competitive advantage. So if you're not focusing on how a customer is using your product and how you personalize and being able to compare the way of spending money in terms of your lead acquisition and really, really optimize at it, what you'll face is that it will become difficult to compete because your competition is getting more and more sophisticated. So a lot of the investment in this is really predicated on becoming more efficient at these core groups of things like go-to-market strategy, engagement, optimizing internal operations as a way to find efficiencies which is typically what technology has enabled. CHAD: Especially small businesses or businesses that are just getting started, if you don't have experience with that, it can feel really overwhelming. And we talked about how 5X by coming to the table with a stack, with a team that can help do that, that's great. And it helps solve that problem. Say that I'm a founder or a CEO, maybe non-technical, and I really am just getting started, but I have a big need; how do I engage with 5X? What's the best way to think about that? And are there things that I might do as a founder that you would recommend, hey, I recognize you can't do everything, but do this, and you'll avoid some pain later on. TARUSH: We have some customers today who use us pre-product. They don't have a product. They don't have any customers. They have no data. But they use us because when they launch, they want to have the right tracking and visibility and reports and metrics. So I would have never thought someone that [inaudible] 5X. But it kind of makes sense that you want to have the right [inaudible] knowledge. You have pros and cons. I think the pros of it is instilling the data culture from day one. Data acts as a bridge between engineering and the business, Chad. It just connects the products from like the business goals. So there is an upside in bringing this on earlier on and building that and instilling that into your culture. I think the flip side of it is that if you don't have product-market fit, if you're shooting darts and seeing what works. And in general, companies at that point are running more on intuition and trying different things to see what sticks. And having systems in place at that scale, very frankly, could also be unnecessary. And at that point, if you're spending $100, you probably want to spend 80-90 of them on bringing out your product and the design that you've got. And I think they'll want to sign to be able to acquire customers, and that sort of shifts then you see the data spending increase. So again, we're obviously happy to help, and our technical product managers have a lot of experience. They're the ones who have been data leaders that are growing companies and businesses like Uber, WeWork, Alibaba, top tech companies. They've already been data team members, so they've always been part of that growth. So they're good people, the on-demand talent. You have expertise over there from someone who's seen this before. And a few of our early-stage companies leverage these people more and more, but the flipside of it is focusing on actually building a product first. CHAD: I love that. I think that that's great advice. And so I assume that there are people who come and to your team or you start talking with them, and you say, "You're not ready for us yet." TARUSH: Yeah, we sort of have done that. We have told folks, you know, Google this, this, and this, and once you have this in place and you're about to go to market, that's the right time to come engage. But at this point, honestly, it might not be the best time for you to start thinking about [inaudible] CHAD: Focus on improving your user experience, getting new users, making the best product you can. That's really great advice. TARUSH: On the flip side of that, I think the problem, not the problem, I don't know if it's the word. I think the mistake a lot of companies make is that they actually get into it too late. The typical fallacy is that the founders are sitting in this gold mine of data. We're just going to have a data scientist come, and he or she is going to start generating all these insights, and we're going to be a data-driven company. And the reality of everything in life is that things take time. You can have the stack from day one, and you can have amazing engineers. But it takes time for you to really understand what's happening in your business. And initially, your data model that's sort of changing because the understanding of the business is changing. Visibility in your data leads to asking better questions. And with asking better questions, you start changing the mental models of what's happening. It takes three iterations before your data model starts to stabilize. And what that means very, very often is that the founder is expecting in three months that the data is going to have a positive ROI and the output the business is getting from the data team is going to be positive. And that's not really how it works. It takes six to nine months. You'd have reporting in the first month and the first two months. But as you move from reporting to visibility and to actually optimization and using that data as an insight, we think of that as a three-quarter project. So number one, I think companies don't know that, and they expect that it happens much sooner. And number two is also the mindset around I'm looking at data to provide positive ROI within a small duration, which is also, in reality, not how it is. CHAD: Tarush, that's really great advice, and I hope people take it to heart. If folks want to get in touch with you or follow along with you or learn more about 5X, where are all the places that they can do that? TARUSH: So our website is 5x.co. Again, that's 5x.co. You can reach out to me at tarush@5x.co. We're also doing a lot of stuff on YouTube. We're doing a lot of podcasts to educate on the data space. We make weekly videos on different topics on our YouTube channel. I'm sure you can just search for 5X. That's another great way to engage with us. CHAD: Wonderful. You can subscribe to this show and find notes for this episode along with a complete transcript at giantrobots.fm. If you have questions or comments, email us at hosts@giantrobots.fm. And you can find me on Twitter at @cpytel. This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot and produced and edited by Mandy Moore. Thanks so much for listening and see you next time. ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success. Special Guest: Tarush Aggarwal.

    What Kind of Asian Are You?
    Celebrating Small Businesses with NCP Mag - Aya Lanzoni / #72

    What Kind of Asian Are You?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 59:17


    About our Guest:Aya Lanzoni is the owner of Tinydragon Bytes, a web design and SEO agency that works with small to medium size businesses to provide a unique digital and strategic experience to move your brand forward. She also co-founded No Cilantro Please Magazine, a quarterly digital magazine that celebrates small business and the diversity of entrepreneurship through food and lifestyle discoveries. This magazine is meant to be a digital hub and resources for like-minded individuals, and will leave you wanting and craving more.About our Conversation:Conversation on muti-racial/multi-cultural upbringing in a predominately white area,  microaggressions faced being mixed race, experience being an entrepreneur and publishing a magazine that celebrates small businesses. Find Aya and No Cilantro, Please MagazineWebsiteInstagram-AyaInstagram-No Cilantro, Pleasehttps://www.instagram.com/ncpmagazine/?hl=enhttps://nocilantroplease.com/https://www.instagram.com/tinydrag0n_/?hl=enFind us!Linktree: https://linktr.ee/whatkindofasianareyoupodSpotify:https://open.spotify.com/show/0vSqGIRXpJozlfiCDjpv5K?si=Xe9qxPdORCyu_8SDPkRmKw<clid=ca3c72c2-624b-4812-9733-9e09723a1629&nd=1Apple Podcast:https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/what-kind-of-asian-are-you/id1531615451Instagram (Podcast):https://www.instagram.com/whatkindofasianpodInstagram (Host):https://www.instagram.com/kyle.lkhhk/?hl=en(Never Jaded Podcast):https://www.instagram.com/neverjadedpod/?hl=enYoutube Channel:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJ40aGle2G564N4of7iFuKABuy Me A Coffee:https://www.buymeacoffee.com/whatkindofasian

    The John Batchelor Show
    #NorthKoreas: An Asian NATO. David Maxwell @DavidMaxwell161 @FDD, Army Special Forces colonel (ret); Fellow, Institute of Corean American Studies

    The John Batchelor Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 9:45


    Photo: #NorthKoreas: An Asian NATO. David Maxwell  @DavidMaxwell161  @FDD, Army Special Forces colonel (ret); Fellow, Institute of Corean American Studies https://www.donga.com/en/article/all/20220628/3475630/1

    The Ian Furness Show
    Furness H1 - Jeff Aaron filling in / What were the Browns thinking? / Advice to young sports fans

    The Ian Furness Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 43:14


    As Ian's vacation continues, Jeff "The Fish" Aaron fills in this afternoon. We're awaiting an announcement on a possible suspension for Deshaun Watson, and we can't help but wonder what Cleveland was thinking by picking him up. As someone who hasn't had one of his favorite teams win a championship in nearly four decades, Fish finishes off the hour with advice for young sports fans.

    KPFA - The Pacifica Evening News, Weekdays
    NATO formally invites Finland and Sweden to join the military alliance; N. Korea accuses US, S. Korea and Japan of creating an Asian version of NATO; Environmental groups file lawsuit challenging the Biden's decision to resume oil and gas sales; Cherokee

    KPFA - The Pacifica Evening News, Weekdays

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022


    Nikoli's Kitchen
    Quick Bites - Orange Sweet Chili Sauce

    Nikoli's Kitchen

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 10:42


    Hello everyone and welcome to another new Quick Bite from Nikoli's Kitchen! Today we're talking about this beautiful orange sweet chili sauce that will light up any Asian dish with a citrusy umami blast of flavor. While I didn't make it as well as I'd hoped, I'm definitely still learning and growing. Thank you so much for listening!   Season four begins July 6th! I am really excited to kick off the next full season of Nikoli's Kitchen, and especially excited now that (with big thanks to Brendan of Unchefed) I feel like I've cracked the code on the food segments of the show. The show won't be changing substantially, but more than anything I want to welcome you to my table and sit down and eat these meals with you so I can describe them to you in the moment. Thank you so much for choosing Nikoli's Kitchen. Thank you so much for coming on this journey with me.   Featured Recipe for this Episode 1/2 c orange juice Zest of 2 oranges 1/3 c dark brown sugar 1/4 c cold water (for slurry) 2 T fresh ginger, finely minced 2 T fresh garlic, finely minced 1/4 c soy sauce 1/2 c rice vinegar 2 t cornstarch 1 T gochujang 1 T cooking sherry or rice wine Combine your water and cornstarch in a bowl and set aside. Combine the remaining ingredients in a saucepan and bring to a boil over mid heat. Cook for a few minutes to bring everything together. Strain this through a fine mesh colander. Don't skip this step, or the sauce won't have quite the texture it should. Return to the pot and add your slurry. Use an immersion blender to bring everything together in the sauce. Bring back to a boil; it will immediately start to thicken.  Cook for an additional few minutes and remove from the heat. Yield: 2 cups (approx). Calories/Serving: 82 per 2 tablespoons.   Important Links (All links open in a new window) Main Website Subscribe on Patreon! Livestream for the Cure Join my Discord Community! Podcast RSS Feed Like my Facebook Page! Follow me on Twitter! Follow me on Instagram! Join my Facebook Group! Subscribe to my YouTube Channel! Follow me on Twitch!   Listen on Apple Podcasts Goodpods Spotify Google Podcasts Pandora TuneIn Radio iHeart Radio Spreaker PlayerFM Stitcher Podchaser   Guest Appearances I was honored to sit down with Ashlee of the Rabbit Ears TV Podcast again to talk about all things Big Little Lies! Check it out at https://www.netflixnswill.com/rabbitears/2021/8/31/big-little-lies. I had the amazing opportunity to sit down with Em of Verbal Diorama to talk about Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgandy and we had a blast. Please tune in at https://www.verbaldiorama.com/episode/anchorman-the-legend-of-ron-burgundy! I let out a massive ROAR with my boys on Epic Film Guys as we sat down to dissect/destroy Jurassic World: Dominion! https://epicfilmguys.podbean.com/e/efg-classic-jurassic-world-dominion-review/.   Credits Intro "Midnight in Carmel" by Wendy Marcini. Licensed from Epidemic Sound. Check out her amazing music at https://open.spotify.com/artist/4CaTfk4pRkpA8A9gXamYg2. Outro "The Climb" from Music for Makers. Sign up and get a royalty-free song delivered to your inbox every Monday at www.musicformakers.com!

    Intelligent Design the Future
    Günter Bechly: Species Pairs Wreck Darwinism

    Intelligent Design the Future

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 21:39


    On this ID the Future, distinguished German paleontologist Günter Bechly continues unpacking his new argument against modern evolutionary theory. According to Bechly, contemporary species pairs diverge hardly at all over millions of years, even when isolated from each other, and yet we're supposed to believe that the evolutionary process built dramatically distinct body plans in similar time frames at various other times in the history of life. Why believe that? He suggests this pattern of relative stasis among species pairs strikes a significant and damaging blow to Darwinian theory. In this Part 2 episode, Bechly and host Casey Luskin discuss mice/rat pairs, cattle and bison, horses and donkeys, Asian and African elephants, the Asian black bear and the South American Read More › Source

    Lagralane Spirits
    Blast from the Caste with Lagralane Spirits Production Team

    Lagralane Spirits

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 84:11


    Can we move away from caste to create a more equitable society? How do we understand racism by looking at caste and class?    Pull up a seat and join us for a special roundtable episode with the Lagralane Team.    Using the book Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents, by Isabel Wilkerson as a source of exploration, we help define what caste is, and discuss how race has become the basis of our caste system in the United States. We also talk about how caste affects each of us personally – and what we can do to bring about meaningful change.    Through the lens of our multi-ethnic and multi-generational Lagralane Team, we seek to answer the question: can we move away from caste to create a more equitable society?   How can we be the guardians of truth?   Our team has a myriad of perspectives rooted in being adopted, Black, Asian, White, mixed-race, male, female, fluid and beyond … we are representative of America and we have also lived the experiences presented in Caste. We know first-hand that we're all living in a time of discontent created by generations before us. While sipping The Comeuppance cocktail, knowing the task before us is huge, we also ask how can we make change? How can we live today so that healing can begin for so many? How do we share the task of being guardians of truth?    For more spirited discussions, make sure to subscribe to the podcast. And if you've enjoyed thinking and cocktailing along with us, we'd love for you to leave us a review.  Cheers … and Please Drink Responsibly!   Links:   Guests: The Lagralane Team (in alphabetical order)   Peppur Chambers-Soraci -  www.penandpeppur.com  https://www.instagram.com/peppurthehotone/   AJ Dinsmore -  https://writers.coverfly.com/profile/Amanda-Joy-Dinsmore https://www.instagram.com/aj.dinsmore   Courtney Oliphant -  https://www.linkedin.com/in/courtney-oliphant-6546818a/ https://www.instagram.com/cori_anne92/?hl=en,    Matthew Soraci -  www.lagralane.com https://www.facebook.com/matthew.soraci Mentions: Caste:The Origins of Our Discontents by Isabel Wilkerson  https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/653196/caste-oprahs-book-club-by-isabel-wilkerson/   The Gilded Age https://www.hbo.com/the-gilded-age   The Myth of the Model Minority: Asian Americans Facing Racism by Rosalind S. Chou, Joe R. Feagin https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-myth-of-the-model-minority-rosalind-s-chou/1124310184 Model Minority Myth https://www.learningforjustice.org/magazine/what-is-the-model-minority-myth   How the Word is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America by Clint Smith https://www.littlebrown.com/titles/clint-smith/how-the-word-is-passed/9780316492935/   Belonging - Ben McBride http://www.benmcbride.com/   The Ideal Bartender by Tom Bullock https://punchdrink.com/articles/tom-bollock-and-the-forgotten-legacy-of-african-american-bartenders/ https://euvs-vintage-cocktail-books.cld.bz/1917-The-Ideal-Bartender-by-Tom-Bullock/IV/ Additional Links + Special thanks to: Podcast Haven - https://thepodcasthaven.com/ Liam E. Allen (original music) - @Liamea97   Cocktail Recipe: The Comeuppance Jason renamed the Bizzy Izzy to “The Comeuppance” to fit the conversation around Caste in this episode. Although many believe it is “un-American” to challenge hateful and hurtful tropes or to demand reparations from the past 250+ years, that is exactly what we should be doing right now.  The Bizzy Izzy is a classic drink by an African American bartender in St. Louis from 100 years ago named Tom Bullock, who included this cocktail in his book, “The Ideal Bartender.”   1oz fresh pineapple juice (Dole or fresh) 1oz sherry (Lustau) 1 oz  templeton rye whiskey (Templeton) ¾ oz fresh lemon juice ¾ simple syrup  A couple dashes (or more) of angostura bitters  1 oz chilled club soda  Lemon wheel garnish   Shake and pour into a highball glass. 

    Bad Bunz: Not Like The Rest
    IN THE CLURRRB: Clubbing As Older Millenials, Current Dress Codes, Yachts > Clubs

    Bad Bunz: Not Like The Rest

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 45:47


    Is it us... or the clubs just don't quite hit the same anymore? We recently went back and immediately thought, "this is podcast material."

    Software Engineering Unlocked
    What hinders your career as a developer? – Mindset.

    Software Engineering Unlocked

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 29:54


    This episode is sponsored by Tonic.ai – where your data is modeled from your production data to help you tell an identical story in your testing environments. [00:01 - 05:08] Opening Segment Need to generate fake data that looks, acts, and behaves like production data for your test environments? Check out Tonic.ai!Head over to https://www.tonic.ai/ and sign up today for a free two weeks trial sandbox!Dagna talks about experiencing a plateau in her career as a software engineerRealizing the lack of support networksHow this led her to set up her own coaching business[05:09 - 11:26] How Cultural Upbringing Affects Work PerformanceWhat Dagna is doing to help immigrants like her fit into their American workplaceUsing the Hofstede model to understand the cultureCultural differences in the US and other countriesIndividualism and collectivismLong-term orientation and short-term orientation[11:27 - 26:14] Engineering Mindset for SuccessCoaching clients on career advancement and finding fulfillmentThe importance of mindsetCommon limiting beliefs engineers have and overcoming themBeing your own advocate, your work does not speak for itselfCreating a safe space for feedbackThe feedback Dagna received from her superior and how it changed how she was writing codeKnowing when to move onThe state of the US and European job market[26:15 - 29:54] Closing SegmentDagna's advice: Don't take code reviews and feedback personallyKnow more about the process Dagna uses to take her clients' careers to the next level at https://www.themindfuldev.com/podcastFinal wordsTweetable Quotes“How you think is how you act.” - Dagna Bieda“What you really have to do is market yourself. You have to talk about your achievements and accomplishments and not expect everybody in the company to just know what it is that you're doing.” - Dagna Bieda“It's very important to understand how what you're doing fits into the business as a whole, the business that you're working for, and how to communicate about it.” - Dagna BiedaResources Mentionedhttps://www.tonic.ai/ - Sign up now for a two-week free trial!The Culture Map by Erin Meyer - https://erinmeyer.com/books/the-culture-map/Dagna's WebsiteConnect with Dagna by following her on LinkedIn. Go to theMindfuldev.com and theMindfulDev.com/podcast to learn more about her coaching business.Let's Connect! You can connect with me, Dr.  McKayla on Instagram, Twitter and Youtube to look into engineering software, and learn from experienced developers and thought leaders from around the world about how they develop software!LEAVE A REVIEW + help someone who wants to know more about the engineering software world. Your ratings and reviews help get the podcast in front of new listeners. _______Transcription[00:00:00] Dr. McKayla: Hello, and welcome to the Software Engineering Unlocked podcast. I'm your host, Dr. McKayla. And today I have the pleasure to talk to Dagna Bieda. She's a software engineer turned career coach for software engineers. She's been coding for over 10 years and has been a coach or has been coaching for the past two-plus years.[00:00:24] Dr. McKayla: And today I will learn everything around how to get a job, how to be successful as a software engineer, and how to advance your career. But before I start, let me introduce you to an amazing startup that's sponsoring today's episode, Tonic.ai, the fake data company. So what does Tonic.ai do? I'm sure you know how complex and cumbersome it is to create quality test data.[00:00:51] Dr. McKayla: It's a never-ending chore that eats into valuable engineering resources. Random data doesn't do it and production data is neither safe nor legal for developers to use. What if you could mimic your entire production database to create a realistic dataset with zero sensitive data? That sounds amazing, right? [00:01:10] Dr. McKayla: Tonic.ai does exactly that. With Tonic.ai, you can generate fake data that looks, acts, and behaves like production data because it's made from production. Yet, Tonic.ai guarantees privacy so your data sets are safe to share with developers, QA, data scientists, heck, even distributed teams around the world. Visit Tonic.ai to sign up today or click the link in the show notes to get a free two weeks trial sandbox.[00:01:38] Dr. McKayla: Well, Dagna, I'm, I'm so excited to learn everything that, you know, you have been through. in your career as a software engineer and how you actually help software engineers get the most out of their career. So can you tell me a little bit, how did you go about to this shift from, you know, being a software engineer, yourself to being a full-time career coach for software engineers? Why did that happen and how?[00:02:03] Dagna Bieda: Absolutely. And first of all, thanks so much for having me on your show, McKayla. Essentially, you know, in my own career, I have seen some incredible accelerated progression in my own career. When I started programming, I went from a junior engineer to a senior engineer fairly quickly.[00:02:22] Dagna Bieda: It happened in less than three years, which, it takes a lot more for a lot of engineers in our industry. And it was all because of the people that were in my corner that supported me, that mentored me. And because I was very relentless about asking them for feedback to tell me how I can improve, how I can do better.[00:02:44] Dagna Bieda: And as I kind of like, went up in my career in my senior engineering role, what happened is I experienced this plateau, you could say. And I recognized, later on, you know, in hindsight that I was just working really hard on the wrong things, but I didn't have that kind of support that I needed that would have showed me like, Hey, Dagna, what you're focusing on is not going to take you to that next level.[00:03:11] Dagna Bieda: So after having that aha moment, I recognized like, okay, I was going super quickly, advancing in my career in the early, in the beginning, because of that support. Later on, I didn't have that support. I had to figure it out by myself. And so , it was so much slower of a process when I was trying to figure it out myself.[00:03:32] Dagna Bieda: So I decided that, you know, this is a great idea for a business because not everybody, being a software engineer, has that support network that they could lean on. So I could step in and become that support network for my clients. And that's exactly what I do today. And it's just amazing. And I've helped so many clients, you know, I've had over the past three years that I've been coaching, I've helped over 50 engineers.[00:03:59] Dagna Bieda: They had various backgrounds. Some of them work at fan companies. Some of them work for like small mom and pop shops, and they had experience ranging anywhere from 2 to 20 years of experience. Some were self-thought. Some had college degrees, some are boot camp graduates. And you know what I do right now as a coach and that lits me on fire and, you know, brings a lot of fulfillment to my life is to help my clients find that in their life and in their career.[00:04:28] Dr. McKayla: Okay. And so, what does it take from a junior to become a senior? And why was there no support for you when you were a senior to get, you know, to the next level? Maybe what was your next level? Was it like a staff engineer that you wanted to become, or is it more in a managerial role that you wanted to develop yourself? So what's the next, the next step?[00:04:52] Dagna Bieda: I wanted to become a team lead and team lead is like a mix of both, right? On one hand, like from an HR perspective, maybe you are not on the org chart on top of like a team, but you are leading your team with your technical expertise. So like it's a mix of the managerial and the engineering responsibilities.[00:05:09] Dagna Bieda: The big reason why I had the plateaued is because I moved from Poland to the United States. And as an immigrant. I didn't realize that, you know, the way I was thinking and going about work, while it made perfect sense back in Poland, it didn't necessarily set me up for success in my American workplace.[00:05:30] Dagna Bieda: And also like right now, a lot of my clients are immigrants moving from one country to another. And what I help them is to understand how their cultural upbringing affects their performance at their workplace. Because for me that was one of the blockers, right? I had to really kind of like understand my new situation, my new culture, how I was fitting in what was stopping me, and for example, there's this one situation that I can, that comes to mind is when, when I posted a joke in slack that I thought was super funny and, and being an Eastern European, we have this dark sense of humor.[00:06:06] Dagna Bieda: And, you know, in this new American company, what happened was I was called to HR and I was told that that was inappropriate. And I was like, what? That was super funny. What are you talking about? So, that was like one of the things that I had to realize, like, okay, This is the type of sense of humor that just doesn't go with my workplace.[00:06:27] Dagna Bieda: So I can, you know, keep doing that on my own and private, but this is not going to help me in terms of work advancement, right? [00:06:34] Dr. McKayla: So can you, can you go a little bit more into this in this cultural aspect, right? Okay. There are the jokes that obviously, there are cultural differences. What's funny, what's not, what's inappropriate, right, and so on. But is there also like for leadership because you were talking about tech lead, right? So it's, how, how can you show the outside world that you're ready for it? Is there a difference in your experience? [00:06:58] Dagna Bieda: Yes. So that's another like cultural aspect, you know, like, there's this specific tool that I use for analysis that helped me really map those differences. And it's called the Hofstede model. And essentially, it has, like, this database that compares different countries on, like, six different dimensions, right? And one of the things for the United States specifically is that individualism is super highly rated, right? And Poland is more rated closer to being like a collective culture, right, where we work together towards success. And I can tell you, for example, there was this initiative that I was leading in my American workplace.[00:07:45] Dagna Bieda: And what happened was I was talking to different people, different types of stakeholders. They agreed with me. So I thought, okay, if I have a buy-in, something's going to happen now, right. Because that's how it would have worked back in Poland, right? In the American workplace, I was expected to, once I picked up the initiative to lead it from end to end. And, you know, I wasn't aware of that. So, you know, I got all the stakeholders on board. Everybody agreed to my idea and then nothing happened, and I got so frustrated. I'm like, why there's nothing happening? Like, didn't we all agree, should we all collaborate together? And because they didn't realize that my cultural upbringing was different, nobody could give me that kind of feedback, right? [00:08:29] Dr. McKayla: Yeah.[00:08:29] Dagna Bieda: They just didn't know how to support me there. [00:08:32] Dr. McKayla: I think this topic is so interesting because right now I'm working on the book on code reviews and I'm working a lot about feedback and disagreements, agreements, and how to solve that, right, how to collaborate together.[00:08:45] Dr. McKayla: And so one book that I'm actually deep diving into that I found really interesting was The Culture Map. I don't know if you are familiar with, from Erin Meyer, and there she... [00:08:55] Dagna Bieda: Oh, that's interesting. Okay. [00:08:56] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, you can have a look at it and she also looks at a different perspective. And one is, for example, agreements, how are people from different countries agreeing? And for example, Germany or Austria, right? It's a little bit more collaborative or, you know, collective, right? Collective agreement. [00:09:11] Dagna Bieda: Exactly. [00:09:12] Dr. McKayla: It's really, really important. So it takes a very long time until everybody agrees. And it's a little bit an upfront process, right? Whereby in America, it's more, well, one decision is made by the leader, but then this decision can also be questioned along the way, right? And so it's quicker, quicker to get started, right? And one person brings up and says, okay, this is how we are going to do it.[00:09:34] Dr. McKayla: And then people are working on this vision. This is how she explains it, right? But yeah. And then over time, you can actually challenge that a little bit, right? You can say, but maybe, you know, we should change course because we have more information now and so on. And in Germany, it's exactly the other way around, right? So we are investing a lot in this process of collective agreement, on this is the right way to go. But because there's a lot of, you know, a lot of time and information that goes into this process, it's really hard to challenge that later on, right? So after three months of discussing that we are going to do that.[00:10:09] Dr. McKayla: It's really hard to say a month later, oh, maybe you should change that again, which I think is perfectly fine in America. I don't know. Can you see that as well? Is that something that...[00:10:20] Dagna Bieda: Oh, absolutely. Yeah, absolutely. And another interesting thing is like, for example, in terms of the short-term versus long-term orientation, in the United States, the culture as a whole is on the Hofstede model described as a more short-term oriented. So the company would be more like working towards your quarterly goals, right? And when I work, for example, with some of my clients that have Asian upbringing and working in the United States, that their cultures tend to have this long-term orientation.[00:10:51] Dagna Bieda: What happens is, for example, in an interview, whenever they present themselves, they're talking about, you know, building a solid foundation for a long term. But what happens is. American companies don't necessarily value that, right? Because, and they even have this, this saying here to hit the ground running, right? So when I work with my clients, I tell them, look, if you're starting to work in a new workplace, American workplace, you want to present yourself as someone who's operating fast and can bring results really quickly because of valuing of that short term results rather than long term. [00:11:27] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, yeah, yeah. I can totally see that. So you are working as I understood it, you're working with a very range of experiences, right? So you said people are coming from boot camp, but it's just coming from boot camp with no experience and want to go into the workplace or is it more, are they already, you said two years, something like this.[00:11:48] Dagna Bieda: Yeah. [00:11:49] Dr. McKayla: Is it really an even distribution here or do you see that it's cooling in one direction, right? More the junior engineers in the first, let's say, five years or more the senior engineers or midterm, maybe? [00:12:02] Dagna Bieda: I would say that the majority of my clients are the mid-level professionals and the more senior professionals that are kind of like finding themselves a little stuck, maybe not sure about their next step.[00:12:13] Dagna Bieda: And they're looking for, you know, figuring out first of all, how are they stopping themselves? Second of all, how to find fulfillment in their career rather than chasing money or promotions. And, you know, the truth is there's, to my knowledge, nobody else that offers the type of services that I offer, which is working on the engineering mindset for success, right?[00:12:36] Dagna Bieda: And you know, what got you to that senior engineer position was very likely your technical foundation. And I do not work on that technical foundation while having been a software engineer myself, I can definitely send my clients some pointers, like what are the gaps that they have in their skill set that they should, like, fill up in terms of you know, career advancement, but what I really am passionate about and what I really love to focus on is that mindset piece, right? Like, what kind of blind spots do you have? What kind of limiting beliefs do you have? I actually like to say that I moved from programming computers to reprogramming human minds. And it really beautifully describes what it is that I do, because once you change your mindset, I put it this way.[00:13:21] Dagna Bieda: How you think is how you act. And how you act is the results that you're getting then from, you know, the reality, the real world. [00:13:31] Dr. McKayla: Yeah. Can you tell me some limiting beliefs? I also regularly reflect on mine and, right now, you know, I'm also in a, this state where I think, because of the pregnancy and the very new birth, I think this is such an inward-facing period in my life again, right, where I'm thinking, like, what are the beliefs that I have, and that are holding me back and so on. I would be really curious, can you give some examples of beliefs that engineers have, maybe that you have seen patterns? [00:14:00] Dagna Bieda: Absolutely. [00:14:01] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, that hold them back.[00:14:02] Dagna Bieda: There are two that are super common and super popular. Number one is believing that your work speaks for itself, which it doesn't. It does not. Like, okay, if someone else works on the same code base with you and they can look at your code, they could see the value that you bring to the table if they put in the work and effort to actually go into the code, look up what it is that you committed and, you know, have some thoughts on that.[00:14:28] Dagna Bieda: But, in order to be successful in an engineer's role, what you really have to do is market yourself. You have to talk about your achievements and accomplishments and not expect everybody in the company to just know what it is that you're doing, because people just don't know. They have their own work that they're prioritizing.[00:14:44] Dagna Bieda: And it's very critical to figure out if you have that limiting belief of work speaks for itself because again, it doesn't. That keeps a lot of talented engineers stuck in their career. That's number one. The second one, which always cracks me up, but I used to think that way too. There was a moment, and I have to be honest with you, there was a moment I thought the same way. And the second limiting belief is essentially, that you are surrounded, as an engineer, with idiots that just don't want to listen to your amazing ideas.  And here's the thing, whenever, as an engineer, you have an incredible idea and you want to pitch it. You want to get people on board.[00:15:25] Dagna Bieda: It's super important for you to communicate about it in a certain way. You have to be able to negotiate. You have to be able to like really describe it, but describe it in terms of the priorities of your stakeholders, right? So if I'm going to, and I'm guilty of that as well. Like, there was this two projects that I worked on in my most recent engineering job, and I was responsible for taking care of a mobile app.[00:15:48] Dagna Bieda: And it was a pain in the butt that the build of the app was taking a few minutes, you know, and I just felt it was so inefficient. So I went ahead and I refactored how this particular app was built. And I reduced the build time from few minutes to, like, 30 seconds. And I was so proud of myself, you know, I was so like, yes, this is amazing in reality, what happened is, that what I did that work that I did, impacted my life and one other engineer. Nobody else cared. It didn't matter. Then I had a second task or project that I worked on in the same company, which was creating a deliverable for a client, super boring, a lot of copy and pasting, a lot of like following steps. I did not enjoy doing that at all, but guess what?[00:16:36] Dagna Bieda: Whenever it was deployed and the client could spread the mobile app to their own client base, I got praise from the sales representative from our BA, from the project manager. My tech lead was like, wow, Dagna, that was a super fast turnaround. You know, everybody across the organization was like, yay, success.[00:16:57] Dagna Bieda: And I'm thinking to myself, Wow. I would have never in a hundred million years figured this out on my own. If, if you ask me as an engineer to like put a value on this project versus that project, I would've thought that the refactoring was better. So here's long story, but essentially what I'm trying to say is, it's very important to understand how what you are doing trickles, like, how what you're doing fits into the business as a whole, the business that you're working for and how to communicate about it. That's the, really the key of what I was trying to say here. [00:17:35] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, I think that's really, really important, but I also found myself working at companies where. You are assigned things, right? So you're not really asked for your opinion. if this is now really helpful or not or, or something like this. And then maybe reassigned as well, right, which I think there are, there are several impacts to that. First of all, what would be your advice for people that are assigned projects where they also know maybe doesn't look like this has a big impact on the company, right? So it's also limiting my ability to advance my career here. What should you do? How do you communicate about that? What's your advice? [00:18:18] Dagna Bieda: Yeah, we're kind of going back to, you know, to that communication piece, right? So, first of all, one thing that I want to share the assumption I'm coming here up with is that whoever assigns you that work is not a mind reader, so they would not necessarily have your priorities, your career priorities in mind.[00:18:37] Dagna Bieda: So it's important to, whenever you are asking for work to kind of like be proactive and say, Hey, I am really working towards becoming, let's say a staff engineer, becoming a team lead, becoming an engineering manager, can you help me out and assign the kind of work to me that will help me achieve that goal, right?[00:18:58] Dagna Bieda: Asking for that help and support because most of us are nice and friendly people, and we want to help. But we don't always know what's the best way to provide that help. So being kind of like your own advocate and talking about what it is that you want to do is really critical here. A second thing is, you know, whenever you're in those one-on-ones with your manager, is to really ask for feedback. How are you doing, how you could be doing better, and creating that safe space for feedback. You know, something that is my strength actually, and really helped me with accelerating in my career early on was that relentlessness in asking for feedback. Like, I had this team lead that worked with me that helped me become a senior engineer because he kind of vouched for me in the meetings that I wasn't part of.[00:19:53] Dagna Bieda: And he really said like, Hey, she's ready. She can handle it. She can be a senior engineer. I think she's ready. And that's what got me the promotion. But when him and I worked together, I was telling him, look, I really want to know. Don't worry. You're not going to hurt, hurt my feelings. I want to advance, I want to be hitting the ground running, and I want to really work on the things that are holding me back.[00:20:16] Dagna Bieda: And, you know, one of the critical pieces of feedback that he initially didn't want to give me, because it felt like maybe he would hurt my feelings or maybe was too much. I don't know. But after I was pushing and pushing for that feedback, he essentially told me, Dagna, fast is great. But reliable is better.[00:20:35] Dagna Bieda: And that advice changed how I was thinking about writing code, because I was really prioritizing being fast, delivering as soon as possible, right? But sometimes my fast solutions were not fully thought out. And a senior engineer really has to have that understanding of how the engineering decisions impact business, the team and what it is that, that they're trying to accomplish as a team. [00:21:03] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, I'm thinking back of a time, right, where I think it's totally true that we have to go and advocate for ourselves, but I also wonder how many people are a little bit stuck in that, well, this is what the business needs, right? I understand that you want to advance your career. You want to become, you know, a senior engineer or a tech lead or whatnot.[00:21:27] Dr. McKayla: You know, saying that the project doesn't seem to have such big impact, right? And big impact, I think has to do with the stakeholder. Who is it visible to, right? Who is going to see and hear your name and, and so on. I thought, I think there's a little bit of political background towards that as well. Have you worked with people that are just really stuck in a situation where there is nobody that really advocates for them too much, or they are assigned a project that's, you know, low visibility and they're stuck there. Would you say the best is to move companies or? [00:22:01] Dagna Bieda: The short and sweet answer is yes. And, you know, in the very first meeting that I have with my clients whenever we start our coaching sessions in the program, what we do is we figure out what are their specific life and career goals, and what are their values and, how their current workplace supports those values. And then we measure them in a specific way. And after that, specific exercise, we're able to confidently say whether it's worth staying in that place or if it's time to move on.[00:22:38] Dr. McKayla: And so, whenever I see, like, in my Twitter bubble, right? I'm also very much in the American, you know, world somehow. And everybody is like, oh my God, the marketplace is, or the market is so hot now. And, you know, jobs are everywhere. I don't know in Europe, I don't feel that way.[00:23:00] Dagna Bieda: Got it. [00:23:00] Dr. McKayla: Is, is it like this? Do you feel like right now, it's so hot and everybody can, you know, change their career in a second and get better and you know, why would you even stay there? I feel like even if you have a good place, let's move because you can make more money and so on, which is a very different mindset.[00:23:18] Dr. McKayla: I don't see that here in Europe so much. It doesn't feel that hard or it also feels like if I'm at the good company and, you know, I make a market okay salary, I don't feel that people are looking forward, changing every one and a half, two years, more. [00:23:34] Dagna Bieda: Yeah. So two years is very common for people who are very ambitious.[00:23:39] Dagna Bieda: I want to try to see how different companies do different things and gain those experiences across a variety of industries or companies of different sizes. So, two years is definitely something that's seen as fairly normal. And I feel like you touched on an important subject there, it's very important to realize that the European job market is much more fragmented, right?[00:24:03] Dagna Bieda: Because we have different countries, different cultures, and it's not as easy to, you know, have access to all those opportunities. In the United States, it's way more streamlined because you know, it's one country and people mobility is also completely different. So like if you live in LA and then next year you get a job in New York, it's much more likely that you're just going to pick everything up and move for that job.[00:24:30] Dagna Bieda: In Europe, we are not like that. so it's more like choosing a town you want to live in, and then you find a job within that town, say, for example, right? So in that sense, we have just different priorities in Europe, and there are different priorities here in the United States, and that impacts that job market, absolutely. With that being said, with the COVID, the pandemic, and the acceleration of the remote workplaces, there's more and more opportunities for the Europe software engineers, for example, or anyone else really to access those American jobs. I cannot think of, like, anything in particular, but there's more and more companies that are supportive of those remote jobs and help pair American companies with offshore workers.[00:25:18] Dagna Bieda: And it's kind of like in that saying where Europeans work to live and Americans live to work. There's definitely something in that, some truth to it. I mean, I remember when I moved to United States and I was, you know, trying to get my very first engineering job and, on the phone interview, someone would tell me, like, we offer three weeks vacation, we're generous.[00:25:42] Dr. McKayla: Yeah, it's different. [00:25:43] Dagna Bieda: Yeah, right? It's different. It's different. There's so much more vacation time back in Europe, back at home. In the United States, even though they are coming up with, like, this unlimited time off policies it really depends on the company. Some companies are just trying to not pay you out the accrued time off.[00:25:59] Dagna Bieda: So you have to like really be wary when you are verifying if it's really unlimited time off. But with that being said, I had a client and she took like 10 weeks off within a year. So you know, there are companies that, yeah, there are companies that really kind of like honor that. [00:26:15] Dr. McKayla: Okay. Okay. Well, I have a last question for you, actually, and it's about code reviews because you were touching upon communication and also showing your work and what you are doing. How do you think can people use code reviews to do that, to accomplish that, to, you know, make their work a little bit more visible? Is it something that you thought about? How that fits together? [00:26:39] Dagna Bieda: So in terms of code reviews, the advice that I really give to my more inexperienced clients who are earlier in their career journey is to not take them personal.[00:26:51] Dagna Bieda: Just take it in as an information, as a guidance and, you know, earlier in their career, a lot of software engineers tend to take those comments, that feedback very personally, and they have their feelings hurt. But in reality, it's just feedback. It's just objective information that you can use to better yourself.[00:27:11] Dagna Bieda: Now, in terms of my more senior client, their skills are at the level that, you know, I don't see code reviews being very critical there because they already, you know, have mastered that technical foundation. So what I focus on really is those skills that are missing: the people skills, the communication, how you market yourself and all the things that we talked about today.[00:27:34] Dr. McKayla: Okay. Okay, cool. So, Dagna, thank you so much. Maybe you can also tell us a little bit how people can follow your work can find you, and maybe something that you want to. You know, give on the way for the engineers on how to find the career or the next step that makes them happy. [00:27:56] Dagna Bieda: Yeah, absolutely. So the best way to really get in contact with me is through my LinkedIn profile. You just can go to LinkedIn and find me under Dagna Bieda, D A G N A B I E D A. And then you can also go ahead to my website, the mindfuldev.com/podcast, and you'll find there a case study. And that case study beautifully explains the process that I follow with my clients and how it helped them really level up in their career. For one client, it meant going from an underappreciated senior engineer to a startup CTO in three months. For another client, it meant moving from a senior engineer to a VP of engineering and innovation at his company. For another client, that meant doubling his salary as we work together. So, you know, if that case study is something that you're interested in, you can then reach out to me and we can see if we're a good fit to work together and how I can help you accelerate your career.[00:28:57] Dr. McKayla: Okay. Cool. Thank you so much. Thank you, Dagna, for being on my show. [00:29:01] Dagna Bieda: Absolutely. It was a blast. Thanks for having me, McKayla. [00:29:04] Dr. McKayla: Yeah. Thank you. Bye. [00:29:06] Dr. McKayla: This was another episode of the Software Engineering Unlocked podcast. If you enjoyed the episode, please help me spread the word about the podcast, send the episode to a friend via email, Twitter, LinkedIn, well, whatever messaging system you use. Or give it a positive review on your favorite podcasting platforms such as Spotify or iTunes. This would mean really a lot to me. So thank you for listening. Don't forget to subscribe and I will talk to you in two weeks. Bye.

    Talking Taiwan
    Ep 193 | Joyce Teng: The Struggles Facing Couples of Same Sex Marriage in Taiwan

    Talking Taiwan

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 66:05


    A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:   It's been three years since Taiwan became the first country in Asia to legalize same sex marriage in 2019.   My guest on this episode of Talking Taiwan is Joyce Teng, the Deputy Executive Director of Taiwan Equality Campaign, previously known as the “Marriage Equality Coalition Taiwan.” We talked what's happened since 2019. Surveys and polls conducted over the past three years indicate growing support for LGBTQIA+ issues within Taiwan's society.   However, there are still some additional struggles that same sex married couples experience as opposed to heterosexual married couples in Taiwan. Joyce also touched upon a few issues concerning transgender and nonbinary individuals.   She mentioned three areas in which same sex married couples face some challenges, the first being transnational couples; problems arise for couples of different nationalities when their marriage cannot be legally recognized in Taiwan; the second issue is co-adoption and dealing with Taiwan's adoption procedures, and finally reproductive rights. It's been eye-opening for me to learn about all of this.   These are all complex issues and many of them they could also pose challenges for heterosexual married couples in Taiwan. I only recently learned about a woman's reproductive rights in Taiwan when it comes to freezing her eggs. We'll include some articles on this topic in the Related Links section of this episode.   This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by NATWA, the North America Taiwanese Women's Association.   NATWA was founded in 1988, and its mission is:   to evoke a sense of self-esteem and enhance women's dignity, to oppose gender discrimination and promote gender equality, to fully develop women's potential and encourage their participation in public affairs, to contribute to the advancement of human rights and democratic development in Taiwan, to reach out and work with women's organizations worldwide to promote peace for all.   To learn more about NATWA visit their website: www.natwa.com   Here's a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:   Taiwan Equality Campaign was previously the “Marriage Equality Coalition Taiwan” How the rights of heterosexual married couples differ from the rights of same sex married couples in Taiwan How heterosexual married couples and single individuals can adopt in Taiwan, but same sex married couple cannot adopt in Taiwan Earlier this year there was a court case that ruled that one of the spouses of a same sex couple, could adopt his spouse's child who had been adopted when the was still single, however this is only one case, and according to the law in Taiwan a same sex spouse is unable to adopt the adopted child of their spouse What is involved with the adoption process in Taiwan and how it could take up to 3-5 years The gap when it comes to reproductive rights for heterosexual women and lesbian women who want to freeze their eggs in Taiwan Reproductive rights of same sex couples in Taiwan How Taiwan has one of the lowest birth rates in the world The government in Taiwan offers subsidies for heterosexual couples to do IVF but not for same sex couples How birth rates in Taiwan tend to be low during the year of the tiger (February 1, 2022 – January 21, 2023 is a tiger year) How Taiwan has changed in the time that Joyce has been working for the Taiwan Equality Campaign and since same sex marriage was legalized in Taiwan Surveys done by the Taiwan Equality Campaign over the past three years indicate increasing support by the general public for same sex couples to adopt, do IVF Surveys done by the Taiwan Equality Campaign show that over time more of the general public have indicated that they have friends identifying as LGBTQIA+; this indicates that LGBTQIA+ individuals are more willing to come out to their family, friends and peers Surveys have also indicated that since the legalization of same sex marriage in Taiwan, LGBTQIA+ individuals are more comfortable to talk about their personal lives and spouses The different types of survey questions asked to gage people's acceptance of same sex couples in Taiwan Whether the general public in Taiwan supports teaching school-aged children about gender equality, sexual orientation and expression How attitudes and acceptance of LGBTQIA+ individuals and issues may be indicative of generational differences The film Small Talk, a documentary film about the filmmaker's difficult relationship with her mother who was a lesbian If having a nonbinary “Digital Minister” in Taiwan, Audrey Tang has had any impact on the general public's views or acceptance of LGBTQIA+ individuals How there is work to be done when it comes to awareness and understanding of transgender and nonbinary individuals in Taiwan The challenges faced by transgender and nonbinary individuals in Taiwan The question of how transgender and nonbinary individuals would like to be identified on their identification cards/documents How the Taiwan Equality Campaign works with local government officials How Taipei's MRT bathroom signs will be gender neutral How Thailand may be the next country in Asia to legalize same sex marriage Advocacy to support LGBTQIA+ activists in other Asian countries How Taiwan can serve as a case study of how the legalization of same sex marriage has impacted society Difficulties faced by same sex transnational couples in Taiwan How the Taiwan Equality Campaign has worked with local levels of government to train civil servants how to deal with LGBTQIA+ identifying individuals How the Taiwan Equality Campaign approaches local governments about implementing LGBTQIA+ sensitivity training   Related Links:

    The Best Dam Camp: A Percy Jackson Podcast
    125: Son of Neptune Part 2: War Games and Receiving a Quest

    The Best Dam Camp: A Percy Jackson Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 28:55


    Join me today as I dive into the next part of Son of Neptune that takes place from pages 101 to 149. Follow along as I examine the story. To support the show, be sure to find us on Instagram and Twitter @bestdamcamppod and, if you can, join us on Patreon for early access and bonus content. If you'd like to get your thoughts across, you can email us at thebestdamcamp@hotmail.com. Riordanverse Merchandise. Check out my Discord! Buy Echoes of the Past on eBook. Pre-Order Home to the Wild. For more Percy Jackson content check out Fran's YouTube channel A Healthy Dose of Fran. Nickel Anarchy: Instagram and Redbubble Taylor Paisley-French: Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, and Spotify _________________________ Everyone needs a little help now and then, and that's OK. If you or someone you know, need support or maybe you just need someone to understand, there is always someone to call. CheckPoint provides Mental Health Hotline numbers Worldwide. Remember, it's OK to not be OK. https://checkpointorg.com/global/ _________________________ Black Lives Matter links and resources: Ways to Help PLEASE SIGN PETITIONS, DONATE, CALL AND EMAIL TO DEMAND JUSTICE, AND SHARE Twitter Thread on how to support if you have no money Support for the Black Trans Community Twitter Thread for Black Creative Talent to support Advice on how to support from the UK 8 Lessons I Learned About Racism That Were Helpful to me a White Person Support Protestors Racism and the UK Stand With and Support the Asian community: Asian Lives Matter Resources Stand Against Hatred Stop AAPI Hate America's History of Scape-Goating its Asian citizens Support for the Trans community: How Black Trans People All About Trans Website Stonewall Website Support UK Mermaids Charity Native American Organisations: The Red Nation Stop Line 3 - Take Action Native Wellness Native American Rights Fund

    Not in a Huff with Jackson Huff
    #095- Lee Wong: Is This Patriotic Enough? The Story Behind Viral Video Combating Asian Discrimination

    Not in a Huff with Jackson Huff

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 47:12


    This week I have an extremely powerful conversation with Lee Wong about the discrimination that people in the Asian community faces both currently and in the past in America. Mr. Wong shares the story of how he was filmed speaking about this very issue at a West Chester, Ohio trustee meeting where he voiced his unhappiness of people questioning his patriotism because he looks or speaks differently than them. What people at this meeting did not know was that he is an US Army veteran and revealed the scars on his chest to prove it. It was a thought provoking speech and one that went viral. You will not want to miss this one!--------------------------------------------Midwest Chinese Chamber Website: https://www.china-midwest.com/Links to the viral video impacted so many: https://youtu.be/y3WZ0NYoCYchttps://youtu.be/wfIbRiX5r_Q—————————————————————Podcast's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/notinahuffpodcast/Please follow/subscribe to the podcast to get the new episodes when they come out each week and rate us on Apple Podcast and Spotify! :)Have a comment? Email me at NotInAHuffPodcast@gmail.com

    Daily News Brief by TRT World

    *) Türkiye's memorandum with Sweden, Finland Turkiye has lifted its objection to the NATO membership bids of Sweden and Finland, after a breakthrough in talks in Madrid. Ankara had previously blocked the two countries from joining the military alliance over concerns about arms exports and terrorism. In a memorandum, Finland and Sweden agreed to fully co-operate with Türkiye in the fight against terror groups, including the PKK, its offshoots and the FETO. Sweden and Finland also agreed not to impose embargoes on the Turkish defence industry. *) Ukraine's Zelenskyy calls for Russia's expulsion from UN Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has urged Russia's expulsion from the United Nations. Zelenskyy urged the UN to establish an international tribunal to investigate "the actions of Russian occupiers on Ukrainian soil" and to hold the country accountable. "We need to act urgently to do everything to make Russia stop the killing spree," Zelenskyy said. *) US, allies creating 'Asian NATO' – NK media North Korea has said that joint drills by the United States, South Korea and Japan are part of a dangerous prelude to the creation of an "Asian version of NATO". Pyongyang accused the US of having a "sinister aim" toward North Korea. It also accused Washington of fomenting a new Cold War. *) Inmates die in Colombia prison fire At least 52 inmates have been killed and 26 more injured after a fire broke out during a prison riot in southwestern Colombia. The tragedy occurred when rioting inmates set a fire, attempting to prevent police from entering their enclosure at the prison in the city of Tulua. Authorities had initially said they were investigating whether the incident occurred as part of an escape attempt, but later said it was a riot. And finally… *) Hamilton, F1 condemn Nelson Piquet Mercedes driver Lewis Hamilton and Formula One have condemned former world champion Nelson Piquet's racially offensive term against the British driver. Piquet reportedly uttered the Portuguese version of the N-word against Hamilton. Hamilton said that these archaic mindsets need to change and have no place in the sport. Formula One backed Hamilton, stressing that discriminatory and racist type of language "has no part in society".

    Eat Your Crust
    #GRADSCHOOL: Bioengineering PhD

    Eat Your Crust

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 44:42


    After spending a large majority of our youth in school, going into grad school isn't an easy decision, especially for something as lengthy and intensive as a PhD program! Today we get an inside look into the life of a Bioengineering PhD student and evaluate what factors are important to consider before applying to higher education programs. We also look into the perks of having a phD (vs. Masters) in the Bioengineering field & how the programs themselves set you up for success after graduation!Support the show