Podcasts about Blackness

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  • 1,893PODCASTS
  • 3,143EPISODES
  • 56mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 14, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Blackness

Show all podcasts related to blackness

Latest podcast episodes about Blackness

The Beached White Male Podcast with Ken Kemp
S3E32 Rev. Mark Chase, Associate Rector at All Saints

The Beached White Male Podcast with Ken Kemp

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 66:15


Ken welcomes the newly appointed Associate Rector of the historic All Saints Episcopal Church in Pasadena. Ken got to know "Chase" (his preferred name) at the Center for Racial Reconciliation. They open with a discussion of his first sermon at the church - a powerful, high-energy, prophetic word. A graduate of Fuller Theological Seminary, Chase has thought deeply about the dynamics of both "blackness" and "whiteness." In his new position, technically - "Father Chase" - believes his calling is to make the gospel good news for all people. Chase shares his stories of awakenings, from his awareness of enslavement in his ancestry that is rooted in Guyana in the Caribbean, to high school and on to college in New York. His Episcopal legacy goes all the way back to the Anglicanism of the colonial era. As a high school kid, he fell in love (Tupac) with rap - and engaged in freestyle rap competitions. As an English and Political Science major at the State College of New York in Albany, he got serious about his faith. In seminary (Fuller Theological Seminary), he encountered a "white, Eurocentric" version of Christianity. His awareness drove him into a broader exploration, especially with professors Dr. Ralph Watkins, Dr. Love Seacrest, Dr. Mignon Jacobs, and Dr. Anthea Butler. They talk about the "black exodus" at FTS. Chase takes issue with the label "affirming" and would rather talk about what is means to be human. Chase addresses the current backlash against conversations around race and racial history in America. SHOW NOTESBecome a Patron: www.patreon.com/beachedwhitemaleSupport the show

Busy Being Black
Da'Shaun L. Harrison – Belly of the Beast

Busy Being Black

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 58:50


I've long admired the work of Da'Shaun L. Harrison. Like many of those I've come to encounter and adore over the past few years, Da'Shaun's work came across my timeline on social media and their incisive and invigorating intellectual offerings have had me hooked since. Da'Shaun is a Black, fat, queer and trans theorist and abolitionist, and in their debut book, Belly of the Beast: The Politics of Anti-fatness as Anti-Blackness, they argue that to live in a body that is both fat and Black is to exist at the margins of a society that limits us in ways we may have never considered. In our conversation today, Da'Shaun expands on the connection between anti-fatness and anti-Blackness, explains how diet culture persists as a tool of social control and offers up ways of thinking about how the policing each of us might do of our own bodies invariably impacts how we interact with – and even judge – those around us. Like all of the best intellectual work, Da'Shaun's intervention is grounded in a political awakening that took place at the community-level, where they say they felt safe and brave enough to explore who they wanted to be in the world; and so we also discuss how community-building has shown them what the future – or, a beyond as they call it – could look like, and they make a compelling case for the power of our imaginations to help us think beyond what we know. About Da'Shaun L. Harrison Da'Shaun L. Harrison is a Black, fat, queer and trans theorist and abolitionist in Atlanta. Harrison is the author of Belly of the Beast: The Politics of Anti-Fatness as Anti-Blackness, and a public speaker who often gives talks and leads workshops on Blackness, queerness, gender, fatness, disabilities and their intersections. Da'Shaun currently serves as the Editor-at-Large for Scalawag Magazine and is the co-host of the podcast Unsolicited: Fatties Talk Back. About Busy Being Black Busy Being Black is the podcast exploring how we live in the fullness of our queer Black lives. Thank you to our partners: UK Black Pride, BlackOut UK, The Tenth, Schools Out and to you the listeners. Remember this, your support doesn't cost any money: retweets, ratings, reviews and shares all help so please keep the support coming.  Thank you to our funding partner, myGwork – the LGBT+ business community. Thank you to Lazarus Lynch – a queer Black musician and culinary extraordinaire based in New York City – for the triumphant and ancestral Busy Being Black theme music. The Busy Being Black theme music was mixed and mastered by Joshua Pleeter. Busy Being Black's artwork was photographed by queer Black photographer and filmmaker Dwayne Black. Join the conversation on Twitter and Instagram #busybeingblack Busy Being Black listeners have an exclusive discount at Pluto Press. Enter BUSY50 at checkout. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Lin. Woods' Gospel Entertainment Podcast
Episode 157: DeMarcus Green-Things Will Get Better Better Better

Lin. Woods' Gospel Entertainment Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 26:51


Don't miss this episode of Lin. Woods Gospel Entertainment Podcast when Gospel recording artist, producer and songwriter Demarcus Green shares his backstory from Waterloo, Iowa and Minneapolis, to Houston, his gospel upbringing, burgeoning hit song “Better” inspired by the George Floyd tragedy and uprising in his neighborhood, working with Todd Dulaney, James Grear & Company, Sounds of Blackness and more. Listen. Follow. Comment. Share. Download Free. Subscribe.Follow on Social Media:Twitter: @linwoods, @demarcusgreenmusic; Instagram: @linwoods96, @DemarcusGreen; Facebook: @Lin Woods, @demarcusgreen; LinkedIn: @Lin Woods#LinWoodsGospelEntertainmentPodcast #podcast #gospel #demarcusgreen #linwoods96

The Business
Stories shouldn't have to justify Blackness or womanness: Natasha Rothwell

The Business

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 28:32


Natasha Rothwell played Kelli on HBO's “Insecure,” and the  beleaguered spa manager in “The White Lotus.” Now, she's in the hit sequel “Sonic The Hedgehog 2.” With her own production company and an overall deal at ABC Signature, she plans to create movies and TV that skip the tired tropes and feature diverse casts. "I think so many scripts use page real estate in Act One just to justify someone's Blackness, or fatness or womanness, and then the story can start," Rothwell says. "We have to acclimate the audience to our otherness before we can tell a story, and I think that's bullshit." Natasha Rothwell talks about blossoming in the "Insecure" writers room, and says that she has big plans for her company, Big Hattie Productions.

New Books in Critical Theory
Dhanveer Singh Brar, "Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century" (Goldsmiths Press, 2021)

New Books in Critical Theory

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 69:24


Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century (Goldsmiths Press, 2021) uses three Black electronic musics – footwork, grime, and the work of the producer Actress – to provide a theory of how Black musical experimentation has disrupted the circuits of racialized domination and exclusion in the 21st Century city. The book carefully attends to the unique ‘sonic ecologies' produced by these three musical forms in South/West Chicago; East London and South London respectively, steering a course between uncritical celebration narratives of ‘resistant' cultural production and dystopian analyses of urban decay. Brar instead theorises these musics as forms of popular experimentalism which are not just inseparable from questions of space, race and class, but are productive of social and spatial relations. The book draws upon, and intervenes in, Black Studies literature to contribute a set of examples, questions and provocations that help readers to think about how the ‘Blackness of Black electronic dance music' has produced (and continues to produce) a fugitive urban aesthetic sociality that has flourished in spite of the degradations of state and capital. At the end of the interview, Dhanveer recommended some music as good entry points into the three musical worlds that we discuss and that he analyses in the book: Actress – Splazsh (2010) DJ Rashad – Just a Taste Vol. 1 (2011) Slimzee/Wiley/Dizzee Rascal and more – Sidewinder sessions (2002-2004) Gummo Clare is a PhD researcher in the School of Media and Communications, University of Leeds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

New Books Network
Dhanveer Singh Brar, "Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century" (Goldsmiths Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 69:24


Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century (Goldsmiths Press, 2021) uses three Black electronic musics – footwork, grime, and the work of the producer Actress – to provide a theory of how Black musical experimentation has disrupted the circuits of racialized domination and exclusion in the 21st Century city. The book carefully attends to the unique ‘sonic ecologies' produced by these three musical forms in South/West Chicago; East London and South London respectively, steering a course between uncritical celebration narratives of ‘resistant' cultural production and dystopian analyses of urban decay. Brar instead theorises these musics as forms of popular experimentalism which are not just inseparable from questions of space, race and class, but are productive of social and spatial relations. The book draws upon, and intervenes in, Black Studies literature to contribute a set of examples, questions and provocations that help readers to think about how the ‘Blackness of Black electronic dance music' has produced (and continues to produce) a fugitive urban aesthetic sociality that has flourished in spite of the degradations of state and capital. At the end of the interview, Dhanveer recommended some music as good entry points into the three musical worlds that we discuss and that he analyses in the book: Actress – Splazsh (2010) DJ Rashad – Just a Taste Vol. 1 (2011) Slimzee/Wiley/Dizzee Rascal and more – Sidewinder sessions (2002-2004) Gummo Clare is a PhD researcher in the School of Media and Communications, University of Leeds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in American Studies
Dhanveer Singh Brar, "Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century" (Goldsmiths Press, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 69:24


Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century (Goldsmiths Press, 2021) uses three Black electronic musics – footwork, grime, and the work of the producer Actress – to provide a theory of how Black musical experimentation has disrupted the circuits of racialized domination and exclusion in the 21st Century city. The book carefully attends to the unique ‘sonic ecologies' produced by these three musical forms in South/West Chicago; East London and South London respectively, steering a course between uncritical celebration narratives of ‘resistant' cultural production and dystopian analyses of urban decay. Brar instead theorises these musics as forms of popular experimentalism which are not just inseparable from questions of space, race and class, but are productive of social and spatial relations. The book draws upon, and intervenes in, Black Studies literature to contribute a set of examples, questions and provocations that help readers to think about how the ‘Blackness of Black electronic dance music' has produced (and continues to produce) a fugitive urban aesthetic sociality that has flourished in spite of the degradations of state and capital. At the end of the interview, Dhanveer recommended some music as good entry points into the three musical worlds that we discuss and that he analyses in the book: Actress – Splazsh (2010) DJ Rashad – Just a Taste Vol. 1 (2011) Slimzee/Wiley/Dizzee Rascal and more – Sidewinder sessions (2002-2004) Gummo Clare is a PhD researcher in the School of Media and Communications, University of Leeds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Music
Dhanveer Singh Brar, "Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century" (Goldsmiths Press, 2021)

New Books in Music

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 69:24


Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century (Goldsmiths Press, 2021) uses three Black electronic musics – footwork, grime, and the work of the producer Actress – to provide a theory of how Black musical experimentation has disrupted the circuits of racialized domination and exclusion in the 21st Century city. The book carefully attends to the unique ‘sonic ecologies' produced by these three musical forms in South/West Chicago; East London and South London respectively, steering a course between uncritical celebration narratives of ‘resistant' cultural production and dystopian analyses of urban decay. Brar instead theorises these musics as forms of popular experimentalism which are not just inseparable from questions of space, race and class, but are productive of social and spatial relations. The book draws upon, and intervenes in, Black Studies literature to contribute a set of examples, questions and provocations that help readers to think about how the ‘Blackness of Black electronic dance music' has produced (and continues to produce) a fugitive urban aesthetic sociality that has flourished in spite of the degradations of state and capital. At the end of the interview, Dhanveer recommended some music as good entry points into the three musical worlds that we discuss and that he analyses in the book: Actress – Splazsh (2010) DJ Rashad – Just a Taste Vol. 1 (2011) Slimzee/Wiley/Dizzee Rascal and more – Sidewinder sessions (2002-2004) Gummo Clare is a PhD researcher in the School of Media and Communications, University of Leeds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/music

New Books in Dance
Dhanveer Singh Brar, "Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century" (Goldsmiths Press, 2021)

New Books in Dance

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 69:24


Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century (Goldsmiths Press, 2021) uses three Black electronic musics – footwork, grime, and the work of the producer Actress – to provide a theory of how Black musical experimentation has disrupted the circuits of racialized domination and exclusion in the 21st Century city. The book carefully attends to the unique ‘sonic ecologies' produced by these three musical forms in South/West Chicago; East London and South London respectively, steering a course between uncritical celebration narratives of ‘resistant' cultural production and dystopian analyses of urban decay. Brar instead theorises these musics as forms of popular experimentalism which are not just inseparable from questions of space, race and class, but are productive of social and spatial relations. The book draws upon, and intervenes in, Black Studies literature to contribute a set of examples, questions and provocations that help readers to think about how the ‘Blackness of Black electronic dance music' has produced (and continues to produce) a fugitive urban aesthetic sociality that has flourished in spite of the degradations of state and capital. At the end of the interview, Dhanveer recommended some music as good entry points into the three musical worlds that we discuss and that he analyses in the book: Actress – Splazsh (2010) DJ Rashad – Just a Taste Vol. 1 (2011) Slimzee/Wiley/Dizzee Rascal and more – Sidewinder sessions (2002-2004) Gummo Clare is a PhD researcher in the School of Media and Communications, University of Leeds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/performing-arts

New Books in African American Studies
Dhanveer Singh Brar, "Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century" (Goldsmiths Press, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 69:24


Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century (Goldsmiths Press, 2021) uses three Black electronic musics – footwork, grime, and the work of the producer Actress – to provide a theory of how Black musical experimentation has disrupted the circuits of racialized domination and exclusion in the 21st Century city. The book carefully attends to the unique ‘sonic ecologies' produced by these three musical forms in South/West Chicago; East London and South London respectively, steering a course between uncritical celebration narratives of ‘resistant' cultural production and dystopian analyses of urban decay. Brar instead theorises these musics as forms of popular experimentalism which are not just inseparable from questions of space, race and class, but are productive of social and spatial relations. The book draws upon, and intervenes in, Black Studies literature to contribute a set of examples, questions and provocations that help readers to think about how the ‘Blackness of Black electronic dance music' has produced (and continues to produce) a fugitive urban aesthetic sociality that has flourished in spite of the degradations of state and capital. At the end of the interview, Dhanveer recommended some music as good entry points into the three musical worlds that we discuss and that he analyses in the book: Actress – Splazsh (2010) DJ Rashad – Just a Taste Vol. 1 (2011) Slimzee/Wiley/Dizzee Rascal and more – Sidewinder sessions (2002-2004) Gummo Clare is a PhD researcher in the School of Media and Communications, University of Leeds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books in Sociology
Dhanveer Singh Brar, "Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century" (Goldsmiths Press, 2021)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 69:24


Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski: The Sonic Ecologies of Black Music in the Early 21st Century (Goldsmiths Press, 2021) uses three Black electronic musics – footwork, grime, and the work of the producer Actress – to provide a theory of how Black musical experimentation has disrupted the circuits of racialized domination and exclusion in the 21st Century city. The book carefully attends to the unique ‘sonic ecologies' produced by these three musical forms in South/West Chicago; East London and South London respectively, steering a course between uncritical celebration narratives of ‘resistant' cultural production and dystopian analyses of urban decay. Brar instead theorises these musics as forms of popular experimentalism which are not just inseparable from questions of space, race and class, but are productive of social and spatial relations. The book draws upon, and intervenes in, Black Studies literature to contribute a set of examples, questions and provocations that help readers to think about how the ‘Blackness of Black electronic dance music' has produced (and continues to produce) a fugitive urban aesthetic sociality that has flourished in spite of the degradations of state and capital. At the end of the interview, Dhanveer recommended some music as good entry points into the three musical worlds that we discuss and that he analyses in the book: Actress – Splazsh (2010) DJ Rashad – Just a Taste Vol. 1 (2011) Slimzee/Wiley/Dizzee Rascal and more – Sidewinder sessions (2002-2004) Gummo Clare is a PhD researcher in the School of Media and Communications, University of Leeds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

LIVE! From City Lights
D. S. Marriott in Conversation with Frank B. Wilderson III

LIVE! From City Lights

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 73:54


D. S. Marriott in conversation with Frank B. Wilderson III, celebrating the publication of D. S. Marriott's "Before Whiteness: City Lights Spotlight No. 21," published by City Lights Books. This event was originally broadcast live via Zoom and was hosted by Peter Maravelis with an opening statement by Garrett Caples. Poet and scholar D.S. Marriott was born in Nottingham and educated at the University of Sussex, UK. He is the author of the poetry collections "Incognegro"(Salt, 2006), "Hoodoo Voodoo" (Shearsman, 2008), "The Bloods" (Shearsman, 2011), and "Duppies" (Commune Editions, 2019). His chapbooks include "In Neuter" (Equipage, 2012) and "Lative" (Equipage, 1992). His work is sometimes associated with the Cambridge school of poetry. In his critical and creative work, Marriott, of Jamaican heritage, draws on postcolonial thought and thinkers such as Frantz Fanon and is a leading theorist of Afro-pessimism. His critical books include "On Black Men" (Edinburgh University Press and Columbia University Press, 2000), "Haunted Life" (Rutgers University Press, 2007), and "Whither Fanon? Studies in the Blackness of Being" (Stanford University Press, 2018). He has taught at many universities and is currently based in Oakland, CA. Frank B. Wilderson III is a writer, dramatist, filmmaker and critic. He is a full professor of drama and African American studies at the University of California, Irvine. He is the author of "Red, White & Black: Cinema and the Structure of US Antagonisms" (Duke University Press, 2010), "Incognegro: A Memoir of Exile & Apartheid" (South End Press, 2008), "Gramsci's black marx: Whither the slave in civil society?" (Social Identities 9.2 , 2003) and "Afropessimism" (Liveright, 2020). He has received numerous honors for his work including The Eisner Prize for Creative Achievement of the Highest Order, The Maya Angelou Award for Best Fiction Portraying the Black Experience in America, an American book Award, amongst others. Wilderson has been described as one of the first writers in the tradition of Afro-pessimism. This event was made possible by support from the City Lights Foundation: citylights.com/foundation

How Easy is That
Spare Time Book Club: Don't Cry for Me + Delilah Green Doesn't Care [w/ Dr Daniel black]

How Easy is That

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 37:40


We are so excited to bring you the first installment of the Spare Time Book Club, where we'll be recapping our reads of Don't Cry for Me  by Daniel Black and Delilah Green Doesn't Care by Ashley Herring Blake. We are so thrilled to be joined on this episode by Dr. Daniel Black. Tune in for a legitimately inspiring discussion about his beautiful novel, queerness, Blackness, and masculinity in America. More about Dr. Black on Instagram and Twitter.

The Digital Gumbo Podcast
The With Slavery and Injustice For All Episode

The Digital Gumbo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 93:04


The crew goes in on the leaked SCOTUS draft Roe vs. Wade opinion. Another week, another WH-linked super-spreader event plus stories about colonoscopies and annoying birds. Share our show: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-digital-gumbo-podcast/id1498718446 Our Twitter Handles: @thedigitalgumbo @nookiebishopjr @iamidriselbow @tpetty1619 Find Us On IG: @thedigitalgumbopodcast @iamnookiebishopjr @iamidriselbow Our full library of episodes is available here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-digital-gumbo-podcast/id1498718446 and on all pod platforms and smart devices. #thedigitalgumbopodcast

Battle Fatigue
Regulators, Mount Up! We're Stealing A Boat

Battle Fatigue

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 56:08


Well, it finally happened. AJ finally gets to nerd out about one of her other favorite historical figures: her main man Rob. In this episode of Battle Fatigue, the duo journey through the fascinating life of Robert Smalls. This spy story is wild and winding and just when you think it's over, there's more. The reveals are too many to count and Dalin has a lot of questions. There aren't too many stories from the days of enslavement that end with a sense of unbridled hope and overflowing pride. This isn't just a tale of survival. It's a tale of what's possible. So buckle up, buttercup! We're going on a wild ride with the badass, Robert Smalls. Hope you don't get seasick. 

Waving the Red Flag
117 | Was Rick James' music r*pey?

Waving the Red Flag

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 69:26


While Alvin oversees the repair of the CO2 scrubbers on the international space station Eddy and Josh have a gentle convo about going no contact, the overuse of mental health psychology buzzwords, the creepiness of old school r&b/modern toxic music, pimp culture, Exotic the sex worker from Soft White Underbelly, misandristic music, whether Jordan Peterson has any value, does everyone deserve redemption and forgiveness, does suffering enrich the human experience, is Blackness synonymous with suffering, and who get the front seat your mama or your girl?

Latina to Latina
Karla Monterroso is Interrogating the Language of Power

Latina to Latina

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 21:40


A personal leadership crisis shaped her understanding of how power is built and distributed. Now the leadership coach, strategist, and racial equity advocate shares how others can navigate the unique demands of leaders of color, and the work necessary to eradicate anti-Blackness in Latino communities.Follow Karla on Twitter @karlitaliliana. If you liked this episode, listen to How Mildred Otero Learned to Negotiate and Daisy Auger-Dominguez Knows What it Takes to Build an Inclusive Workplace. Show your love and become a Latina to Latina Patreon supporter!

The Digital Gumbo Podcast
The 54 Dollars & 20 Cents A Share Episode

The Digital Gumbo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 99:11


Topics on this episode include the pending sale of #Twitter, a couple of aviation-related stories and a potentially bad real estate deal in Va. Link: Red Bull Mishap: https://unofficialnetworks.com/2022/04/28/red-bull-plane-swap-stunt-results-in-crash/amp/ Share our show!: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-digital-gumbo-podcast/id1498718446 Our Twitter Handles: @thedigitalgumbo @nookiebishopjr @iamidriselbow @tpetty1619 Find Us On IG: @thedigitalgumbopodcast @iamnookiebishopjr @iamidriselbow Our full library of episodes is available on Apple Podcasts and all pod platforms and smart devices.

Beneath The Surface
Queer Blerds Unite

Beneath The Surface

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 115:12


In this episode of Beneath The Surface I talk with Richard Gallon (He/Him), the Organizing and Training Manager for Defend Our Future. In this episode we have a conversation about Superheroes, Comics and the ways that Blackness is treated in the genre. We also discuss his experience as a Blerd, the ways he has seen the representation of BIPOC Characters shift over time and what he would still like to see for the superhero genre moving into the future. If you want to support me and the channel you can do so by becoming a patron on Patreon. Patrons get access to exclusive content that can't be found anywhere else. You can become a Patron by following the link. Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/BeneathTheSurfacePodcast If you would like to make a one time donation to Beneath The Surface you can so so through PayPal by following this link here: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/BTSurfacePod Beneath The Surface Socials Twitter: @BTSurfacePod Instagram: BTSurfacePod Facebook: Beneath The Surface Email:PodcastBenathTheSurface@gmail.com Comic Book Queens Socials Twitter: @comicbookqueens Instagram:@comicbookqueens Facebook:Comic Book Queens Richard Socials Twitter:@slightlycommon Instagram: @slightlycommon Richard Bio Richard is the Organizing and Training Manager for Defend Our Future, and helps train and mentor campus ambassadors who advocate for climate justice and clean energy solutions within their communities and on their college campuses. With his experience in community organizing and training in Diversity Equity and Inclusive topics, Richard helps equip the campus ambassadors with the skills and training needed to help uplift marginalized voices in climate spaces. Richard studied Sociology and communications at the University of Arizona and lives in Phoenix, but spends a lot of time in Colorado. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/beneathtspodcast/support

New Books Network
Rana A. Hogarth, "Medicalizing Blackness: Making Racial Difference in the Atlantic World, 1780-1840" (UNC Press, 2017)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 46:41


Medicine and slavery went hand-in-hand. But what was the nature of this vile partnership? In Medicalizing Blackness: Making Racial Difference in the Atlantic World, 1780-1840 (UNC Press, 2017), Rana Hogarth shows that familiar histories, though excellent, fail to explain how and why medicine and slavery became fused in the first place. No doubt, defenders of slavery used medicine to justify the corrupt practice once it was under threat. But Hogarth shows how science and medicine grafted during times and in places where slavery was secure—where white elites had no need to justify the violent practice with medical ideas because slavery was taken for granted. How and why did medicine and slavery fuse, Hogarth asks, in the Atlantic World of the newly invented United States and ascendant imperial Britain? Understanding the answer helps us grasp the valences and impacts of racialized national and social identities, then as well as today. White physicians inflated their value—financial as well as reputational—by locating medical reasons for already existing racist tropes. Circa 1800, white physicians were a disreputable and loosely aligned lot. They had many rivals (Black healers), rich skeptics (plantation owners), and no professional organization until the mid-nineteenth century under which they could rally. Before then, a wide-spread, active white belief in an innate difference between Black and white bodies was the foregone conclusion that white physicians worked to explain in order to appear of use. White physicians in the English-speaking Caribbean developed medical theories of innate difference in the etiology, progress and experience of illness in Black and white bodies—evidence to the contrary be damned. As a consequence, they ignored immense Black suffering, exposed Black workers to deadly diseases, and policed Black people through the hospital system, all the while seeing Black people as appropriate for service in the military and as objects for teaching dissection, that is to say, in projects of imperial and professional expansion. Medicalizing Blackness broadens the story of medicine in the Atlantic World with a lens that perceives more than the institution of slavery. It also demonstrates the emergence of the Caribbean as a locus—not an outpost—of trustworthy medical knowledge circulated through an array of genres, including journals articles, plantation guides, hospital advertisements, and other media of “textual subjugation” that Hogarth reads with great insight. In short, medicine needed the racist logics of slavery in order to gain power before slavery needed racist medicine to defend its own might. July 2022 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the exposure of the abusive and unethical Tuskegee Syphilis Experiments in the US media. Engaging the roots of white supremacist ideas and practices is essential for better understanding and for stronger political action against racism, as important fifty years ago as it is in our ongoing racialized pandemic. This interview was a collaborative effort among Professor Laura Stark  and students at Vanderbilt University in the course “American Medicine & the World.” Please email Laura with any feedback on the interview or questions about the collaborative interview process: laura.stark@vanderbilt.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Rana A. Hogarth, "Medicalizing Blackness: Making Racial Difference in the Atlantic World, 1780-1840" (UNC Press, 2017)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 46:41


Medicine and slavery went hand-in-hand. But what was the nature of this vile partnership? In Medicalizing Blackness: Making Racial Difference in the Atlantic World, 1780-1840 (UNC Press, 2017), Rana Hogarth shows that familiar histories, though excellent, fail to explain how and why medicine and slavery became fused in the first place. No doubt, defenders of slavery used medicine to justify the corrupt practice once it was under threat. But Hogarth shows how science and medicine grafted during times and in places where slavery was secure—where white elites had no need to justify the violent practice with medical ideas because slavery was taken for granted. How and why did medicine and slavery fuse, Hogarth asks, in the Atlantic World of the newly invented United States and ascendant imperial Britain? Understanding the answer helps us grasp the valences and impacts of racialized national and social identities, then as well as today. White physicians inflated their value—financial as well as reputational—by locating medical reasons for already existing racist tropes. Circa 1800, white physicians were a disreputable and loosely aligned lot. They had many rivals (Black healers), rich skeptics (plantation owners), and no professional organization until the mid-nineteenth century under which they could rally. Before then, a wide-spread, active white belief in an innate difference between Black and white bodies was the foregone conclusion that white physicians worked to explain in order to appear of use. White physicians in the English-speaking Caribbean developed medical theories of innate difference in the etiology, progress and experience of illness in Black and white bodies—evidence to the contrary be damned. As a consequence, they ignored immense Black suffering, exposed Black workers to deadly diseases, and policed Black people through the hospital system, all the while seeing Black people as appropriate for service in the military and as objects for teaching dissection, that is to say, in projects of imperial and professional expansion. Medicalizing Blackness broadens the story of medicine in the Atlantic World with a lens that perceives more than the institution of slavery. It also demonstrates the emergence of the Caribbean as a locus—not an outpost—of trustworthy medical knowledge circulated through an array of genres, including journals articles, plantation guides, hospital advertisements, and other media of “textual subjugation” that Hogarth reads with great insight. In short, medicine needed the racist logics of slavery in order to gain power before slavery needed racist medicine to defend its own might. July 2022 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the exposure of the abusive and unethical Tuskegee Syphilis Experiments in the US media. Engaging the roots of white supremacist ideas and practices is essential for better understanding and for stronger political action against racism, as important fifty years ago as it is in our ongoing racialized pandemic. This interview was a collaborative effort among Professor Laura Stark  and students at Vanderbilt University in the course “American Medicine & the World.” Please email Laura with any feedback on the interview or questions about the collaborative interview process: laura.stark@vanderbilt.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Medicine
Rana A. Hogarth, "Medicalizing Blackness: Making Racial Difference in the Atlantic World, 1780-1840" (UNC Press, 2017)

New Books in Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 46:41


Medicine and slavery went hand-in-hand. But what was the nature of this vile partnership? In Medicalizing Blackness: Making Racial Difference in the Atlantic World, 1780-1840 (UNC Press, 2017), Rana Hogarth shows that familiar histories, though excellent, fail to explain how and why medicine and slavery became fused in the first place. No doubt, defenders of slavery used medicine to justify the corrupt practice once it was under threat. But Hogarth shows how science and medicine grafted during times and in places where slavery was secure—where white elites had no need to justify the violent practice with medical ideas because slavery was taken for granted. How and why did medicine and slavery fuse, Hogarth asks, in the Atlantic World of the newly invented United States and ascendant imperial Britain? Understanding the answer helps us grasp the valences and impacts of racialized national and social identities, then as well as today. White physicians inflated their value—financial as well as reputational—by locating medical reasons for already existing racist tropes. Circa 1800, white physicians were a disreputable and loosely aligned lot. They had many rivals (Black healers), rich skeptics (plantation owners), and no professional organization until the mid-nineteenth century under which they could rally. Before then, a wide-spread, active white belief in an innate difference between Black and white bodies was the foregone conclusion that white physicians worked to explain in order to appear of use. White physicians in the English-speaking Caribbean developed medical theories of innate difference in the etiology, progress and experience of illness in Black and white bodies—evidence to the contrary be damned. As a consequence, they ignored immense Black suffering, exposed Black workers to deadly diseases, and policed Black people through the hospital system, all the while seeing Black people as appropriate for service in the military and as objects for teaching dissection, that is to say, in projects of imperial and professional expansion. Medicalizing Blackness broadens the story of medicine in the Atlantic World with a lens that perceives more than the institution of slavery. It also demonstrates the emergence of the Caribbean as a locus—not an outpost—of trustworthy medical knowledge circulated through an array of genres, including journals articles, plantation guides, hospital advertisements, and other media of “textual subjugation” that Hogarth reads with great insight. In short, medicine needed the racist logics of slavery in order to gain power before slavery needed racist medicine to defend its own might. July 2022 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the exposure of the abusive and unethical Tuskegee Syphilis Experiments in the US media. Engaging the roots of white supremacist ideas and practices is essential for better understanding and for stronger political action against racism, as important fifty years ago as it is in our ongoing racialized pandemic. This interview was a collaborative effort among Professor Laura Stark  and students at Vanderbilt University in the course “American Medicine & the World.” Please email Laura with any feedback on the interview or questions about the collaborative interview process: laura.stark@vanderbilt.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/medicine

New Books in American Studies
Rana A. Hogarth, "Medicalizing Blackness: Making Racial Difference in the Atlantic World, 1780-1840" (UNC Press, 2017)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 46:41


Medicine and slavery went hand-in-hand. But what was the nature of this vile partnership? In Medicalizing Blackness: Making Racial Difference in the Atlantic World, 1780-1840 (UNC Press, 2017), Rana Hogarth shows that familiar histories, though excellent, fail to explain how and why medicine and slavery became fused in the first place. No doubt, defenders of slavery used medicine to justify the corrupt practice once it was under threat. But Hogarth shows how science and medicine grafted during times and in places where slavery was secure—where white elites had no need to justify the violent practice with medical ideas because slavery was taken for granted. How and why did medicine and slavery fuse, Hogarth asks, in the Atlantic World of the newly invented United States and ascendant imperial Britain? Understanding the answer helps us grasp the valences and impacts of racialized national and social identities, then as well as today. White physicians inflated their value—financial as well as reputational—by locating medical reasons for already existing racist tropes. Circa 1800, white physicians were a disreputable and loosely aligned lot. They had many rivals (Black healers), rich skeptics (plantation owners), and no professional organization until the mid-nineteenth century under which they could rally. Before then, a wide-spread, active white belief in an innate difference between Black and white bodies was the foregone conclusion that white physicians worked to explain in order to appear of use. White physicians in the English-speaking Caribbean developed medical theories of innate difference in the etiology, progress and experience of illness in Black and white bodies—evidence to the contrary be damned. As a consequence, they ignored immense Black suffering, exposed Black workers to deadly diseases, and policed Black people through the hospital system, all the while seeing Black people as appropriate for service in the military and as objects for teaching dissection, that is to say, in projects of imperial and professional expansion. Medicalizing Blackness broadens the story of medicine in the Atlantic World with a lens that perceives more than the institution of slavery. It also demonstrates the emergence of the Caribbean as a locus—not an outpost—of trustworthy medical knowledge circulated through an array of genres, including journals articles, plantation guides, hospital advertisements, and other media of “textual subjugation” that Hogarth reads with great insight. In short, medicine needed the racist logics of slavery in order to gain power before slavery needed racist medicine to defend its own might. July 2022 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the exposure of the abusive and unethical Tuskegee Syphilis Experiments in the US media. Engaging the roots of white supremacist ideas and practices is essential for better understanding and for stronger political action against racism, as important fifty years ago as it is in our ongoing racialized pandemic. This interview was a collaborative effort among Professor Laura Stark  and students at Vanderbilt University in the course “American Medicine & the World.” Please email Laura with any feedback on the interview or questions about the collaborative interview process: laura.stark@vanderbilt.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in African American Studies
Rana A. Hogarth, "Medicalizing Blackness: Making Racial Difference in the Atlantic World, 1780-1840" (UNC Press, 2017)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 46:41


Medicine and slavery went hand-in-hand. But what was the nature of this vile partnership? In Medicalizing Blackness: Making Racial Difference in the Atlantic World, 1780-1840 (UNC Press, 2017), Rana Hogarth shows that familiar histories, though excellent, fail to explain how and why medicine and slavery became fused in the first place. No doubt, defenders of slavery used medicine to justify the corrupt practice once it was under threat. But Hogarth shows how science and medicine grafted during times and in places where slavery was secure—where white elites had no need to justify the violent practice with medical ideas because slavery was taken for granted. How and why did medicine and slavery fuse, Hogarth asks, in the Atlantic World of the newly invented United States and ascendant imperial Britain? Understanding the answer helps us grasp the valences and impacts of racialized national and social identities, then as well as today. White physicians inflated their value—financial as well as reputational—by locating medical reasons for already existing racist tropes. Circa 1800, white physicians were a disreputable and loosely aligned lot. They had many rivals (Black healers), rich skeptics (plantation owners), and no professional organization until the mid-nineteenth century under which they could rally. Before then, a wide-spread, active white belief in an innate difference between Black and white bodies was the foregone conclusion that white physicians worked to explain in order to appear of use. White physicians in the English-speaking Caribbean developed medical theories of innate difference in the etiology, progress and experience of illness in Black and white bodies—evidence to the contrary be damned. As a consequence, they ignored immense Black suffering, exposed Black workers to deadly diseases, and policed Black people through the hospital system, all the while seeing Black people as appropriate for service in the military and as objects for teaching dissection, that is to say, in projects of imperial and professional expansion. Medicalizing Blackness broadens the story of medicine in the Atlantic World with a lens that perceives more than the institution of slavery. It also demonstrates the emergence of the Caribbean as a locus—not an outpost—of trustworthy medical knowledge circulated through an array of genres, including journals articles, plantation guides, hospital advertisements, and other media of “textual subjugation” that Hogarth reads with great insight. In short, medicine needed the racist logics of slavery in order to gain power before slavery needed racist medicine to defend its own might. July 2022 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the exposure of the abusive and unethical Tuskegee Syphilis Experiments in the US media. Engaging the roots of white supremacist ideas and practices is essential for better understanding and for stronger political action against racism, as important fifty years ago as it is in our ongoing racialized pandemic. This interview was a collaborative effort among Professor Laura Stark  and students at Vanderbilt University in the course “American Medicine & the World.” Please email Laura with any feedback on the interview or questions about the collaborative interview process: laura.stark@vanderbilt.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

That Black Couple Podcast
#ThatBlackCouple Ep 36 - Black Women and the Downside of Being the First

That Black Couple Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 28:30


In the first segment, Jenn and Daren celebrate the landmark confirmation of Ketanji Brown Jackson to the U.S. Supreme Court and the burden that she will need to bear as a result. In the second segment, they discuss why celebrating “firsts” for Black people can be complex and problematic and ask if the “race for firsts” is even a good thing for Black people. In the third segment, Jenn and Daren reflect on the conversation and explain why we need to shift the conversation to interrogate what we mean by a “win”, divorcing value from white-centered ideals to defining and centering independent Black excellence. Reference Material: * “The History Lesson About Black Women That You Never Got” - Jenn M. Jackson https://www.teenvogue.com/story/the-history-lesson-about-black-women-that-you-never-got * “I'll be so proud when my daughter is president and runs a corrupt oligarchy” - Kiese Laymon - https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/feb/22/daughter-us-president-corrupt-oligarchy * Viola Davis Gives Powerful Speech About Diversity and Opportunity | Emmys 2015 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OSpQfvd_zkE&ab_channel=TelevisionAcademy www.ThatBlackCouple.com FB: www.facebook.com/ThatBlackCouple Twitter: www.twitter.com/ThatBlkCouple Instagram: www.instagram.com/thatblkcouple iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/that-black-couple-podcast/id1284072220?mt=2 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/2M7GIQlWxG05gGq0bpBwma?si=xSkjzK0BRJW51rjyl3DWvw Stitcher: www.stitcher.com/podcast/that-black-couple SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/thatblackcouple Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cDovL2ZlZWRzLnNvdW5kY2xvdWQuY29tL3VzZXJzL3NvdW5kY2xvdWQ6dXNlcnM6Mjc2MDExMzcwL3NvdW5kcy5yc3M Email: ThatBLKCouple@gmail.com Podcast Summary: This is an accidentally funny podcast about the realities of Blackness and adult life. We do “adult” differently. We are That Black Couple. Our goal is to create a space for Black millennials to discuss and embody adult life on their own terms. We aren't beholden to “traditional” gender or parenting roles, queerness is fluid and present in the ways we show up in our relationships and in the world, and we want to build community with other 30-something Black folx who are trying to figure this ish out.

The Integrated Schools Podcast
Examining Anti-Blackness: A Multiracial Parent Roundtable

The Integrated Schools Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 63:55


Some of the most meaningful episodes we record for this show are the conversations we have with parents and caregivers reflecting on the choices they make for their kids and their own learning journeys. Our last episode with Dr. Chantal Hailey examined the role of anti-Black racism in school preferences across racial identities. One of the themes was the many ways that anti-Blackness shows up in White communities, but also in communities of color. We deeply believe in the power of multiracial dialog and so thought we would pair that episode with a conversation with a multiracial group of parents reflecting on Dr. Hailey's research. We're joined by Dr. Daniela Boyd, a Latina daughter of Ecuadorian immigrants, and Tricia Ebarvia, an Asian American daughter of Filipino immigrants. Through love and a commitment to knowing better and doing better, we explore many of the ways that anti-Blackness shows up for each of us, and in our respective communities.  Content warning, particularly for Black listeners, there is discussion of anti-Black racism that can be difficult to hear. This conversation is grounded in love and community, but please take care of yourself.  LINKS: Dr. Chantal Hailey Dr. Hailey's recent research on racial preferences in school choices Teaching Hard History - podcast from Learning for Justice Just Mercy - Brian Stevenson Use these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us. Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further. Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org. The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits. Music by Kevin Casey.

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness
Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness- Podcast Episode 026: Regine Jean-Charles

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 38:58


Part of the year-long Reimagining Together speaker series (Fall 2021- Spring 2022) held at Northeastern University in Boston, Host Yndia sat down with guest Haitian American activist, professor, scholar and author Regine Jean-Charles. Originally recorded in front of an in-person and virtual audience, they discussed her latest book, Martin Luther King and The Trumpet of...

Bad at Sports
Bad at Sports Episode 798: Gio Swaby

Bad at Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 48:59


Gio Swaby is a Bahamian Toronto based visual artist whose work explores and celebrates Blackness and womanhood. Her elegant thread based portraits centres on Black joy as a radical act of resistance. Through love as liberation she explores pathways of healing and empowerment through conversation and observational drawing, allowing the strong and soft to coexist beautifully.  https://www.gioswaby.com/ https://www.claireoliver.com/artists/giovanna-swaby/

This Is Karen Hunter
S E1077: 111: Double Down on Blackness! (And a Celebration of "Your Legacy")

This Is Karen Hunter

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 131:22


Dr. Greg Carr and Karen have a discussion about the power of #Blackness. Dr. Carr also weaves the conversation to celebrate #YourLegacy, a book by Schele Williams. Also, Happy Birthday, Granville T. Woods! #GranvilleTWoods #InClasswithCarrJOIN KNARRATIVE/KNUBIA: https://www.knarrative.comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Millennials Are Killing Capitalism
"Practice Toward Future Sovereignty" - How We Stay Free, Black Philly Radical Collective and the Fight to Defend Black Trans Lives with Gabriel Bryant and Abdul-Aliy Muhammad

Millennials Are Killing Capitalism

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 86:06


This is part 2 of a 2 part conversation with the editors and contributors to a book called How We Stay Free: Notes on a Black Uprising. This book is edited by Christopher R. Rogers, Fajr Muhammad and the Paul Robeson House & Museum and is a great testament to the local dimensions of the Black uprising in Philadelphia in the months after the murder of George Floyd.  In this part of the conversation we talk to Gabriel Bryant and Abdul-Aliy Muhammad. These conversations were recorded separately, just due to availability, but are presented here as a unified whole.  Gabriel Bryant is an organizer and youth advocate for groups that have included Sankofa Community Empowerment and Philadelphia Community Bail Fund.  Abdul-Aliy Muhammad is a Philadelphia-born writer and organizer. They often write about Blackness, bodily autonomy and medical surveillance. In this conversation both Gabe and Abdul-Aliy offer reflections on the Philly Black Radical Collective and on the long work of organizing outside of the spectacle of the mass mobilization. Gabe talks about some of the nuts and bolts of community organizing and building power as well as some recent developments in solidarity organizing for political prisoners including Mumia Abu Jamal's latest campaign #LoveNotPhear. Abdul-Aliy talks about their piece from How We Stay Free, which is titled “Black Trans Lives Matter.” They talk about organizing in defense of Black Trans and Black Queer lives and working with Dominque “Rem'mie” Fells' family after Dominque was murdered in 2020. Featured in this conversation are also two songs from Gabe, whose stage name is Gabriel Prosser, a nod to the enslaved abolitionist who planned a massive slave rebellion in Virginia at the turn of the 19th Century. We'll include links to Gabe's bandcamp in the show notes. After the interviews with Abdul Aliy and Gabriel, How We Stay Free editors Christopher Rogers and Fajr Muhammad rejoin a discussion of other struggles ongoing in Philadelphia. In the show notes, we'll include links to buy How We Stay Free, and possibly get a solidarity copy for a student, elder, organizer or political prisoner. And if you like what we do, we're still trying to get our patreon back where it was a few months ago. We're only down about $20 this month as we release this episode, so if a few of you can commit to $1 a month or more, or a small yearly pledge, we should be able to make that up. Black Philly Radical Collective Abdul-Aliy's piece "As Philadelphia mourns Dominique ‘Rem'mie' Fells, Black trans lives still matter" Our previous conversation with BPRC organizers Megan Malachi & Robert Saleem Holbrook Abdul-Aliy Muhammad's latest on the struggle for MOVE family members to recover their children's remains Gabriel Prosser Bandcamp Songs featured in the episode: “New Season” Gabriel Prosser featuring Verse Mega  “F.U.T.U.R.E.” Gabriel Prosser featuring Blak Rapp Madusa - 

In The Moement (The Podcast)
Episode 111 | Waltrud Staples

In The Moement (The Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2022 146:00


Moe talks about what happened with his friend when he went to Vegas and feeling a way toward his family. The gang is mad at Keity again, Romeo fires back at the people for coming at him about his "Blackness", and 11 harsh truths that may change your life. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ur Internet Friends Podcast
23. Serving Blackness W/ Tay

Ur Internet Friends Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 59:32


Listen and join us in conversation with Tay Amari Little, where we chat about serving and prioritizing Blackness. She is a Detroit based practitioner, but is everywhere doing Birth work, divination, and more! She also has a podcast, (Un)Veiled Divine Technologies, full of conversations around Hoodoo, Islam, war, Black gender, Black queerness, the End of this world and coming of the Next, indigenous African epistemologies and criminologies, and beyond. Follow @tayamarilittle and find them online!

The Digital Gumbo Podcast
The Two Pumps, A Tickle and A Squirt Episode

The Digital Gumbo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 82:25


Sometimes, an episode title speaks for itsself. Listen to episode 85 and find out why. Share our show!: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-digital-gumbo-podcast/id1498718446 Our Twitter Handles: @thedigitalgumbo @nookiebishopjr @iamidriselbow @tpetty1619 Find Us On IG: @thedigitalgumbopodcast @iamnookiebishopjr @iamidriselbow Our full library of episodes is available on Apple Podcasts and all pod platforms and smart devices.

In The Moement (The Podcast)
PT 4: Waltrud Staples

In The Moement (The Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 32:02


Moe talks about what happened with his friend when he went to Vegas and feeling a way toward his family. The gang is mad at Keity again, Romeo fires back at the people for coming at him about his "Blackness", and 11 harsh truths that may change your life. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Art from the Outside
Artist Kahlil Robert Irving

Art from the Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 54:34


This episode we are so excited to be chatting with the incredible artist Kahlil Robert Irving. Currently living and working in St. Louis, MO, Kahlil's work encompasses ceramics, sculpture, site-specific wallpaper, and other mediums to mine the archive of visual culture and explore notions of Blackness. In December 2021, Kahlil opened his first museum solo exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, titled Projects: Kahlil Robert Irving. His work has been exhibited at the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas; the Craft Contemporary in Los Angeles; and the RISD Museum in Rhode Island - amongst others. He was selected to participate in the 2019 Great Rivers Biennial hosted by Contemporary Art Museum of St. Louis where he had a solo exhibition in May 2020. In 2018 his first institutional solo exhibition “Street Matter decay and forever: golden age” took place at Wesleyan University Center of the Arts in CT and was accompanied by a full color catalog with essays and an interview. His work is in the collection the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas; and the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh; and the Whitney Museum of Contemporary Art in New York. He received his MFA from the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Art in Washington University in St. Louis; and he got his BFA from the Kansas City Art Institute in Art History & Ceramics. Some artists discussed in this episode: Dayanita Singh Kelley Walker Alex Da Corte Elizabeth Catlett Robert Gober Chuck Close William Pope.L Willie White Royal Robertson Lee Bontecou Glenn Ligon For images, artworks, and more behind the scenes goodness, follow @artfromtheoutsidepodcast on Instagram. Enjoy!

In The Moement (The Podcast)
PT 3: Waltrud Staples

In The Moement (The Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 44:10


Moe talks about what happened with his friend when he went to Vegas and feeling a way toward his family. The gang is mad at Keity again, Romeo fires back at the people for coming at him about his "Blackness", and 11 harsh truths that may change your life. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

In The Moement (The Podcast)
PT 2: Waltrud Staples

In The Moement (The Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 36:44


Moe talks about what happened with his friend when he went to Vegas and feeling a way toward his family. The gang is mad at Keity again, Romeo fires back at the people for coming at him about his "Blackness", and 11 harsh truths that may change your life. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The W.O.M.A.N., Inc. Podcast
Part 3: Interview with Tania Parks, a Legacy Volunteer and Paid Advocate

The W.O.M.A.N., Inc. Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 44:29


This is part three of the series where we've spoken with volunteers and advocates at various levels. Listen in as Mary, WOMAN, Inc.'s Co-Director, has a conversation with Tania Parks, a long time WOMAN, Inc. community member. In this episode Tania reflects on her time working with survivors of domestic violence at the organization, including what brought her to the work and what keeps her here at WOMAN, Inc. Tania Parks has been part of the WOMAN, Inc. community for over a decade. With ten years of experience in the non-profit and NGO sector, Tania has had the opportunity to participate in and spearhead various research, training, development, and advocacy roles at organizations working to end gender based violence. She is especially interested in the relationship between gender and refugee rights and in policy implementation that will enact positive change for those impacted by displacement. Tania is an adjunct professor of American Government at a community college in Northern California where she places particular focus on the intersection of race and American politics and place student equity at the core of her teaching philosophy. Mary Martinez (she/her) comes from the San Francisco Bay Area. She is the Co-Director of WOMAN, Inc., who started at the organization as a support line volunteer back in February 2008. For most of her time at the organization Mary has been involved in the 24 hour Support Line program, and has expanded her work in the general programs and operations of WOMAN, Inc. She also represents WOMAN, Inc. in the community, works one-on-one with survivors, and continues to do the work alongside the WOMAN, Inc. team of upholding their value of centering Black, Indigenous, and other people of color while also holding the organization and one another accountable in divesting from white supremacy and anti-Blackness. During her free time you can find Mary hanging out in nature and taking her little fluffy dog, Nemo, on walks and car rides.

In The Moement (The Podcast)
PT 1: Waltrud Staples

In The Moement (The Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 34:35


Moe talks about what happened with his friend when he went to Vegas and feeling a way toward his family. The gang is mad at Keity again, Romeo fires back at the people for coming at him about his "Blackness", and 11 harsh truths that may change your life. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

In The Moment podcast
132. Treva B. Lindsey with Leoma James: Violence, Black Women, and the Struggle for Justice

In The Moment podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 68:38


Studies clearly indicate that Black women, girls, and non-binary people face disproportionately high rates of physical and sexual violence, and face a greater risk of death by homicide than women and non-binary people of white, Latinx, and Asian/Pacific Islander descent. What forces have contributed to a legacy of violence, and is justice possible? In America, Goddam, Black feminist historian Dr. Treva B. Lindsey explores the combined force of anti-Blackness, misogyny, patriarchy, and capitalism in the lives of Black women and girls in the United States today. Dr. Lindsey explains that the struggle for justice begins with a reckoning of the pervasiveness of violence against Black women and girls in the United States. Through a combination of history, theory, and memoir, Dr. Lindsey highlights the gender dynamics of anti-Black violence and addresses how the circumstances of this violence remain underreported and understudied. Dr. Lindsey also shows that the sanctity of life and liberty for Black men has been a rallying cry within Black freedom movements – movements that Black women are rarely the focus of despite their lived experiences, frontline participation, and leadership in demanding justice. Across generations and centuries, their refusal to remain silent about violence against them led many to envision and build toward Black liberation through organizing and radical politics. In the 132nd episode of Town Hall's In the Moment podcast, Dr. Lindsey and Leoma James discuss the collective journey toward just futures for Black women. Dr. Treva B. Lindsey is Associate Professor in the Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department at Ohio State University and founder of the Transformative Black Feminism(s) Initiative in Columbus, Ohio. Leoma James is a writer, activist, political science and communication broadcasting Alum at Washington State University and Peace Corps Namibia 2017-2019.    Buy the Book—America, Goddam: Violence, Black Women and the Struggle for Justice    Presented by Town Hall Seattle. To become a member or make a donation click here. 

Black History Gives Me Life
Creating The Culture

Black History Gives Me Life

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 1:33


For four seasons – that's right, four seasons – we've learned histories hidden from us, challenged the systemic structures built to subjugate us, and asked those critical questions that can push us towards Black liberation. In season five, those conversations can't stop–won't stop!–as we continue using history building toward liberated Black futures. That's why we're talking about the exploitative rewritings of our narratives, and asking what's required of us to confront an anti-Black system. We're digging into the culture, too! Don't miss talks about our holidays, the digital packaging of Blackness, and the Black horror genre in film, literature, and everyday life. When it comes to Black liberation, we can't stop and won't stop fighting. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Digital Gumbo Podcast
The Black Marl Heather/Duke of Earl Episode

The Digital Gumbo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 73:13


On this episode; Nook chats about an incident of shopping online while Black, T. Petty discusses attending an event with thousands of people, and Dris “works like an Egyptian”. Share our show!: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-digital-gumbo-podcast/id1498718446 Twitter: @thedigitalgumbo @nookiebishopjr @iamidriselbow @tpetty1619 IG: @thedigitalgumbopodcast @iamnookiebishopjr @iamidriselbow Our full library of episodes is available on Apple Podcasts and all pod platforms and smart devices.

GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp
Crews | Day 9 | Gordon Parks

GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 46:01


A different kind of click.  More powerful than a gun.  He pointed and shot.  In his crosshairs - the lies told by the American media about Black men, women, and children. Lies that we were savage, dangerous, ugly.  Photographer Gordon Parks bodied that plot with a portfolio for the people. Thousands of crystal clear images of perfect Blackness.  Telling the truth.  Shining a light on humanity.  From his iconic camera came cover photos. He documented a broken-hearted city after Dr. King's assassination. He attended the funeral of Medgar Evers and showed the world the stoicism of his beautiful wife.  Gordon Parks and his editorial crew placed these powerful images on the cover of Life magazine.  He set out to offer perspective and clarity on historic moments AND the ordinary lives of extraordinary people.  Like Red Jackson, the benevolent drug dealer in Harlem. Or the Fontonelle family, who could not survive the destitution of urban poverty. Or the women in Malcolm X's mosque.  Our collective image of Black history was rendered in his dark room.  Today, we shine a light and raise a glass to truth in journalism. And to all the storytellers of the movement. Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excepts reference or played during this broadcast. You can find original content that was referenced or played here:Across 110th Street | Bobby Womack:https://open.spotify.com/track/2zyTP97uGsIc1C4KNNEkyn?si=363cc85ec8c34670The Ghetto | Donny Hathaway:https://open.spotify.com/track/1yeIxOEFmpQ3qlOb2R3g2m?si=656073f483e14536

The True Beauty Brooklyn Podcast
Hands! The forgotten Step Child w/Keesha Clark of Born Noir

The True Beauty Brooklyn Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 53:59


Hey beauty baddies! We have been talking about aging recently, and some of the factors that can give away your age without you knowing–I'm calling these the black sheep of aging. The places we don't think of first when it comes to aging like a fine wine namely your hands. We also have a guest on to speak with us about nails and nail art. In our conversation with today's guest, Keesha Clark, the owner of Born Noir, we look at nail care through a socio-historical lens.Keesha is the owner of Born Noir (meaning Born Black), which is her response to the pervasive, worldwide issue of anti-Blackness and amplification of her voice encouraging self-care and self-love for ALL. They believe self-care and nail care are genderless and necessary and she intends to create safe spaces and healing venues for BIPOC, LGBTQ+ folx, and allies. Don't forget to send us YOUR beauty, skincare, or life, questions, your Milk?! With Your Dinner?! And “I Didn't Know Then, But I'm Older Now” segments to truebeautybrooklynpodcast@gmail.com.DM us on Instagram @truebeautybrooklynpodcast. Check us out on Twitter @truebeautyBKpodDon't forget to rate us 5-stars, subscribe, and leave a review on Apple iTunes.Tell a friend to tell a friend if you like the show!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Greater LA
Black history and humanity are focus of SoFi's Kinsey art exhibit

Greater LA

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 25:29


The Kinsey African American Art & History Collection is back in LA. “What we do is about illuminating a fuller scope of Blackness and humanity at large,” says the chief curator. LA artist Phung Huynh honors the kids of Cambodian American immigrants and refugees in her new exhibit, “Donut (W)hole.” High Desert Test Sites' 2022 biennial is titled “The Searchers.” It features nine artists at various locations in the Mojave Desert. 

Revolutionary Left Radio
[BEST OF] Critical Race Theory and Black Liberation w/ Zoé Samudzi

Revolutionary Left Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 69:00


[Originally released Oct 2017] Zoe Samudzi is a black feminist writer whose work has appeared in a number of spaces including The New Inquiry, Warscapes, Truthout, ROAR Magazine, Teen Vogue,BGD, Bitch Media, and Verso, among others. She is also a member of the 2017/18 Public Imagination cohort of the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA) Fellows Program, and she is a member of the Black Aesthetic, an Oakland-based group and film series exploring the multitudes and diversities of black imagination and creativity. She is presently a Sociology PhD student at the University of California, San Francisco in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences where academic interests include biomedicalization theory, productions of race and gender, and transgender health. She is a recipient of the 2016-17 Eugene Cota-Robles Fellowship. Her dissertation "'I don't believe I should be treated like a second citizen by anybody': Narratives of agency and exclusion amongst male and transgender female sex workers in Cape Town, South Africa" engages hegemonic gender constructs in South Africa as they affect identity construction and health of transgender women and cisgender men in sex work. Zoe sits down with Brett to apply critical race theory to our current US society. Topics Include: The Anarchism of Blackness, Double Consciousness, Zoe's experiences growing up as a black girl in the Midwest, the failures of white liberalism and the democratic party, Trump, racist and sexist tropes in film, the White Gaze, and much more! Here is Zoe's website: http://www.zoesamudzi.com/ Outro: "African Son" (featuring Chindo Man, Songa, Wise Man, Mic Crenshaw. Recorded at Watengwa Studios, Kijenge, Tanzania as part of the Afrikan Hiphop Caravan 2015) Support Rev Left Radio: https://www.patreon.com/RevLeftRadio

RENELL’S REAL TALK.fm
Ep#223- Avoiding Blackness

RENELL’S REAL TALK.fm

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2022 30:39


Avoiding blackness, out of the book powernomics. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/renell-real-talk/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/renell-real-talk/support

As Told By Nomads
Blackness Has Range

As Told By Nomads

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 2:43


In this short audio, I talk about the range of Blackness. This was originally posted on my TikTok page at tayorockson. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Stoop
Dance with Me

The Stoop

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 23:01


You see each other from across the room. You lock eyes, slowly walk towards each other and the dance begins. We're reminiscing about slow dancing - the rhythm, the beat, the Blackness of it all- and we're wondering- is it still alive? We talk to Chicago Steppers who break down the power of the slow jam. Let's slow it down and snap to the beat..

The Breakdown with Shaun King
Throwback Episode: Joe Biden is the Father of Modern Mass Incarceration

The Breakdown with Shaun King

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 32:39


For today's episode, we revisit our 33rd episode. In it, Shaun King breaks down Joe Biden's comments from 2019 defending his 1994 Crime Bill. To understand what the implications are of defending this bill, Shaun needs us to understand that mass incarceration in America was designed and planned to criminalize Blackness.