Podcasts about Blackness

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  • 1,697PODCASTS
  • 2,762EPISODES
  • 56mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 25, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Blackness

Show all podcasts related to blackness

Latest podcast episodes about Blackness

Late Night Live - ABC RN
Howard French: Born in Blackness

Late Night Live - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 53:26


Howard French has written an acclaimed new book putting Africa and Africans front and centre in their contribution to the making of the modern world.

Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast

The role of Africa, and Africans, has been sidelined from the story of the making of the modern world, an acclaimed new book argues. The examples include the great expansion and exploration of Europeans to Asia and the Americas, from the 1400s through to the 1600s, that was only possible because of earlier involvements in Africa and the reality that the founders of America only had the time to write and reflect on how to build their new nation, because slaves were on hand to cook, clean and grow their wealth from their labors on the plantations.

Tech Won't Save Us
Don't Give Surveillance for Christmas w/ Chris Gilliard

Tech Won't Save Us

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 57:05


Paris Marx is joined by Chris Gilliard to discuss the ethics of tech media recommending surveillance devices, aspects of “smart” technologies you might not have considered, and why we should think twice about surrounding ourselves with cameras and microphones.Chris Gilliard is a Visiting Research Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School Shorenstein Center. Follow Chris on Twitter at @hypervisible.

IBJ‘s The Freedom Forum with Angela B. Freeman
The Freedom Forum: Attorney, author and speaker Dawn Rosemond

IBJ‘s The Freedom Forum with Angela B. Freeman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 79:55


Dawn Rosemond is the first African American woman to make equity partner at Barnes & Thornburg and is now diversity partner, in charge of activating the firm's commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion. She's also an author, a keynote speaker and the founder of Reign, a company aimed at helping people find their greatness. But success hasn't been an easy road. Dawn tells podcast host Angela B. Freeman about her experiences blazing a trail for Black women in law, her journey to finding herself and how she's changed since the death of George Floyd. "I'm a 180-degree different Dawn than I was before 2020," Dawn tells Angela during the podcast. "I just refuse now to downplay my Blackness, to downplay my Black womanness, to apologize for not liking your joke, to apologize for you not seeing me."   IBJ's The Freedom Forum with Angela B. Freeman is sponsored by Cummins Inc.  

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness
Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness- Podcast Episode 021: Black Farmers Collective

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 44:13


Season 3, Episode 021: In this episode, host Yndia sits down with Black Farmers Collective's managing director Ray Williams and board treasurer James King Jr.  The Black Farmers Collective is a group of urban food system activists, growers, sellers, preparers, and educators dedicated to improving the health, wealth and wellbeing of Black, Indigenous and people...

Adventures In Black Cinema With Desmond Thorne
Adventures in Blackness & the Business (Hollywood Shuffle)

Adventures In Black Cinema With Desmond Thorne

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 50:51


Let's go to the 80's to revisit the classic satire, HOLLYWOOD SHUFFLE! Desmond gets into how the White gaze pervades Hollywood and their ideas of Blackness, along with aspects of the film that he disagrees with, while still having the utmost appreciation for it. Also, Black Noir is a big theme in this episode. I wonder why that is... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

[un]phased podcast
Let's Talk About Race (Episode 63)

[un]phased podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 36:40


Talking about race is really F%$*&^g hard. It is. But that doesn't mean we shouldn't do it. If we constantly duck and dodge frank conversations about how race affects our daily lives, then we will not resolve the persistent hold racial inequity has on our culture and our sporting lives and loves. This week, spurred by article after article speculating on what happened in the Virginia gubernatorial race, we thought we would talk directly about why we resist talking about race. We, well, mostly white people, skirt the issue of race. We talk about it in veiled ways - crime, education, parenting, work ethic - because we have been taught implicitly and explicitly that to talk about race is itself racist. White people are worried about race discussions in school because we have been fed a steady diet of “colorblindness” throughout our lives. White people's hyper-sensitivity around race, particularly when it comes to White-Black relations in the U.S. context, is built on a common sense of guilt about the U.S.'s “original sin” -- slavery. Slavery -- via the Middle Passage -- happened here. The enslavement of African (and Asian!) people, the violence enacted against them, the rape and murder of enslaved people by white slaveholders, the fracturing of enslaved people's families for white profit is real and cannot be denied. Talking about the legacy of this history is not racist towards white people. Racism is a system of racial hierarchy where whiteness is at the top and Blackness is at the bottom. This hierarchy is woven through everything, whether it is housing loans, red-lining, public education, generational wealth, or sport. To deny the effects of racial violence and segregation on our lives today is to willfully ignore this history. It is not racist to recognize the effects of slavery, nor is it a statement that all white people are racist. Racism exists in the fabric of the U.S., and yeah, it sucks to acknowledge that. Teaching upcoming generations about this legacy equips them with the tools the rest of us (white people) weren't given - the ability to talk about and understand the implications of race and its social construction to maintain white power. In this sense, we will be enabling the next generation of athletes to build systems that are smart and nimble, able to institute practices and policies that resist the effects of this history. We have to be able to talk about this as an endurance sport community -- and, just like in endurance sport -- embrace the suck. Embrace the discomfort as growing a muscle rather than experiencing an injury. It won't be easy, and it might feel sad or gross or painful. But, burying our collective head in the sand because it is easier hurts us more. Support the podcast and use our sponsor codes! InsideTracker: 25% off at insidetracker.com/feistytriathlon Nuun Hydration: 30% off with code StayFeisty at nuunlife.com

New Books Network
Jasmine Mitchell, "Imagining the Mulatta: Blackness in U. S. and Brazilian Media" (U Illinois Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 41:04


Brazil markets itself as a racially mixed utopia. The United States prefers the term melting pot. Both nations have long used the image of the mulatta to push skewed cultural narratives. Highlighting the prevalence of mixed race women of African and European descent, the two countries claim to have perfected racial representation-all the while ignoring the racialization, hypersexualization, and white supremacy that the mulatta narrative creates. In Imagining the Mulatta: Blackness in U. S. and Brazilian Media (U Illinois Press, 2020), Jasmine Mitchell investigates the development and exploitation of the mulatta figure in Brazilian and U.S. popular culture. Drawing on a wide range of case studies, she analyzes policy debates and reveals the use of mixed-Black female celebrities as subjects of racial and gendered discussions. Mitchell also unveils the ways the media moralizes about the mulatta figure and uses her as an example of an "acceptable" version of blackness that at once dreams of erasing undesirable blackness while maintaining the qualities that serve as outlets for interracial desire. Mickell Carter is a doctoral student in the department of history at Auburn University. She can be reached at mzc0152@auburn.edu and on twitter @MickellCarter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Sociology
Jasmine Mitchell, "Imagining the Mulatta: Blackness in U. S. and Brazilian Media" (U Illinois Press, 2020)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 41:04


Brazil markets itself as a racially mixed utopia. The United States prefers the term melting pot. Both nations have long used the image of the mulatta to push skewed cultural narratives. Highlighting the prevalence of mixed race women of African and European descent, the two countries claim to have perfected racial representation-all the while ignoring the racialization, hypersexualization, and white supremacy that the mulatta narrative creates. In Imagining the Mulatta: Blackness in U. S. and Brazilian Media (U Illinois Press, 2020), Jasmine Mitchell investigates the development and exploitation of the mulatta figure in Brazilian and U.S. popular culture. Drawing on a wide range of case studies, she analyzes policy debates and reveals the use of mixed-Black female celebrities as subjects of racial and gendered discussions. Mitchell also unveils the ways the media moralizes about the mulatta figure and uses her as an example of an "acceptable" version of blackness that at once dreams of erasing undesirable blackness while maintaining the qualities that serve as outlets for interracial desire. Mickell Carter is a doctoral student in the department of history at Auburn University. She can be reached at mzc0152@auburn.edu and on twitter @MickellCarter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books in Gender Studies
Jasmine Mitchell, "Imagining the Mulatta: Blackness in U. S. and Brazilian Media" (U Illinois Press, 2020)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 41:04


Brazil markets itself as a racially mixed utopia. The United States prefers the term melting pot. Both nations have long used the image of the mulatta to push skewed cultural narratives. Highlighting the prevalence of mixed race women of African and European descent, the two countries claim to have perfected racial representation-all the while ignoring the racialization, hypersexualization, and white supremacy that the mulatta narrative creates. In Imagining the Mulatta: Blackness in U. S. and Brazilian Media (U Illinois Press, 2020), Jasmine Mitchell investigates the development and exploitation of the mulatta figure in Brazilian and U.S. popular culture. Drawing on a wide range of case studies, she analyzes policy debates and reveals the use of mixed-Black female celebrities as subjects of racial and gendered discussions. Mitchell also unveils the ways the media moralizes about the mulatta figure and uses her as an example of an "acceptable" version of blackness that at once dreams of erasing undesirable blackness while maintaining the qualities that serve as outlets for interracial desire. Mickell Carter is a doctoral student in the department of history at Auburn University. She can be reached at mzc0152@auburn.edu and on twitter @MickellCarter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books in Latin American Studies
Jasmine Mitchell, "Imagining the Mulatta: Blackness in U. S. and Brazilian Media" (U Illinois Press, 2020)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 41:04


Brazil markets itself as a racially mixed utopia. The United States prefers the term melting pot. Both nations have long used the image of the mulatta to push skewed cultural narratives. Highlighting the prevalence of mixed race women of African and European descent, the two countries claim to have perfected racial representation-all the while ignoring the racialization, hypersexualization, and white supremacy that the mulatta narrative creates. In Imagining the Mulatta: Blackness in U. S. and Brazilian Media (U Illinois Press, 2020), Jasmine Mitchell investigates the development and exploitation of the mulatta figure in Brazilian and U.S. popular culture. Drawing on a wide range of case studies, she analyzes policy debates and reveals the use of mixed-Black female celebrities as subjects of racial and gendered discussions. Mitchell also unveils the ways the media moralizes about the mulatta figure and uses her as an example of an "acceptable" version of blackness that at once dreams of erasing undesirable blackness while maintaining the qualities that serve as outlets for interracial desire. Mickell Carter is a doctoral student in the department of history at Auburn University. She can be reached at mzc0152@auburn.edu and on twitter @MickellCarter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

New Books in American Studies
Jasmine Mitchell, "Imagining the Mulatta: Blackness in U. S. and Brazilian Media" (U Illinois Press, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 41:04


Brazil markets itself as a racially mixed utopia. The United States prefers the term melting pot. Both nations have long used the image of the mulatta to push skewed cultural narratives. Highlighting the prevalence of mixed race women of African and European descent, the two countries claim to have perfected racial representation-all the while ignoring the racialization, hypersexualization, and white supremacy that the mulatta narrative creates. In Imagining the Mulatta: Blackness in U. S. and Brazilian Media (U Illinois Press, 2020), Jasmine Mitchell investigates the development and exploitation of the mulatta figure in Brazilian and U.S. popular culture. Drawing on a wide range of case studies, she analyzes policy debates and reveals the use of mixed-Black female celebrities as subjects of racial and gendered discussions. Mitchell also unveils the ways the media moralizes about the mulatta figure and uses her as an example of an "acceptable" version of blackness that at once dreams of erasing undesirable blackness while maintaining the qualities that serve as outlets for interracial desire. Mickell Carter is a doctoral student in the department of history at Auburn University. She can be reached at mzc0152@auburn.edu and on twitter @MickellCarter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in African American Studies
Jasmine Mitchell, "Imagining the Mulatta: Blackness in U. S. and Brazilian Media" (U Illinois Press, 2020)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 41:04


Brazil markets itself as a racially mixed utopia. The United States prefers the term melting pot. Both nations have long used the image of the mulatta to push skewed cultural narratives. Highlighting the prevalence of mixed race women of African and European descent, the two countries claim to have perfected racial representation-all the while ignoring the racialization, hypersexualization, and white supremacy that the mulatta narrative creates. In Imagining the Mulatta: Blackness in U. S. and Brazilian Media (U Illinois Press, 2020), Jasmine Mitchell investigates the development and exploitation of the mulatta figure in Brazilian and U.S. popular culture. Drawing on a wide range of case studies, she analyzes policy debates and reveals the use of mixed-Black female celebrities as subjects of racial and gendered discussions. Mitchell also unveils the ways the media moralizes about the mulatta figure and uses her as an example of an "acceptable" version of blackness that at once dreams of erasing undesirable blackness while maintaining the qualities that serve as outlets for interracial desire. Mickell Carter is a doctoral student in the department of history at Auburn University. She can be reached at mzc0152@auburn.edu and on twitter @MickellCarter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

The Digital Gumbo Podcast
The Newz Tonite

The Digital Gumbo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 93:17


Hosts T. Petty, Idris Elbow and Nookie Bishop, Jr. take on the news of the day including:Trucker Wins NJ Senate Race: https://www.nbcnews.com/video/truck-driver-edward-durr-defeats-new-jersey-s-top-democrat-with-153-campaign-125489733588Cancun Shootout: https://nypost.com/2021/11/06/americans-hurt-in-shooting-at-cancuns-hyatt-ziva-riviera-resort/amp/“Casket Drop”: https://nypost.com/2021/11/11/massachusetts-family-sues-after-mans-casket-opens-and-body-falls-out/amp/All eps. here: https://digitalgumbo.simplecast.comFollow us on:Twitter: @thedigitalgumboIG: @thedigitalgumbopodcastIG: @iamnookiebishopjrIG: @iamidriselbow (be part of the “Ashy Recruits” this fall/winterT. Petty's IG coming soon! 

The Table Is Ours
Ernie Hudson: There's Something Strange in Hollywood

The Table Is Ours

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 42:42


In this special episode Kirby and Amira sit down with the original Black Ghostbuster, Ernie Hudson. Ernie talks about the trials and tribulations of surviving Hollywood at a time when Blackness was not openly welcomed. His experience has spanned Blaxploitation to the modern day and he's been through it all. From stereotypes in Black roles to getting left out of the Ghostbusters franchise Ernie goes in! Don't miss the slime he spills. See the timestamps below to catch it all. (13:20) Military and Marriage at 16!(19:49) A change ‘gon come in the industry?(24:41) Rejection in the industry and Ernie's first chance (29:11) Standards and fighting stereotypes in Hollywood(32:32) Respect and disrespect from the Ghostbuster franchise(33:32) Being left out of Ghostbusters multiple times and how Ernie keeps his cool (38:15) Being black balled and still finding a way (41:13) My Black is powerful… See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Experiment
How ‘Passing' Upends a Problematic Hollywood History

The Experiment

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 31:41


Hollywood has a long history of “passing movies”—films in which Black characters pass for white—usually starring white actors. Even as these films have attempted to depict the devastating effect of racism in America, they have trafficked in tired tropes about Blackness. But a new movie from actor-writer-director Rebecca Hall takes the problematic conventions of this uniquely American genre and turns them on their head. Hall tells the story of how her movie came to life, and how making the film helped her grapple with her own family's secrets around race and identity. A transcript of this episode will soon be made available. Please check back.  Further reading: “Netflix's ‘Passing' Is an Unusually Gentle Movie About a Brutal Subject” Apply for The Experiment's spring internship. Applications will be accepted through November 19, 2021. Be part of The Experiment. Use the hashtag #TheExperimentPodcast, or write to us at theexperiment@theatlantic.com. This episode was produced by Tracie Hunte and Peter Bresnan with help from Alina Kulman. Editing by Emily Botein, Julia Longoria, and Jenny Lawton. Special thanks to B.A. Parker. Fact-check by Will Gordon. Sound design by David Herman with additional engineering by Joe Plourde. Transcription by Caleb Codding.

How to Survive the End of the World
Sibling Miniseries #9: Benji and Maya Hart

How to Survive the End of the World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 64:25


Our youngest organizer siblings join the Brown sisters to discuss their journeys of becoming radical, with stories on queerness, Blackness and parenting. Music by Tunde Olaniran and Mother Cyborg TRANSCRIPT HTS ESSENTIALS SUPPORT Our Show on Patreon https://www.patreon.com/Endoftheworldshow PEEP us on IG https://www.instagram.com/endoftheworldpc/ TWEET @ us https://twitter.com/endoftheworldPC --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/how-to-survive-the-end-of-the-world/message

Bringin' it Backwards
Interview with Lafemmebear

Bringin' it Backwards

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 40:55


We had the pleasure of interviewing Lafemmebear over Zoom video! As an up-and-coming producer, Mitchell worked alongside producers for Boyz II Men, Grammy-winners The Jackie Boyz, Eric Dawkins of The Underdogs, Polo Molina of Will. I. Am/The Black Eyed Peas, and Interscope Records producers from Nelly's songwriting team. When she came out as a transgender woman in 2013, she was effectively blacklisted from the industry despite her skill and accomplishments, including a 2012 Grammy win for album engineering.This only prompted Mitchell to take her music into her own hands under the name Lafemmebear in 2018. The arrival of her first indie release, Blaq* A Note to the World, showed that her sound has evolved into a genre-blending experience speaking to the trials of Black queer, trans femmes. The music video for the EP single "SHUTUP! (feat. Bella King)" premiered on Billboard.com in March of 2019; she subsequently became the first Black trans woman to headline the state of Utah's Pride Festival in June, performing original music to an audience of over 60,000. Her words and work have since been featured by The Guardian, MTV News, GLAAD, Queerty, Out.Tv Euro, and Autostraddle.Her first full album, Blaq: the Story of Me, premiered Fall 2019 and is available on all platforms. She is composing, mixing, and sound designing part of the original score for Alice Sheppard and Kinetic Light's new work WIRED. In 2020 she collaborated with PEG Records, Cody Belew, and Dustin Ransom to co-write and produce the first mainstream Pop-R&B single “What You're Looking For” for Rupaul's Drag Race's Peppermint. She and Peppermint later collaborated with Mila Jam in a remake of Sounds of Blackness' "Optimistic," an anthem for Trans Day of Remembrance 2020. In February 2021 she opened for Chika at Stanford University's Black Love concert, premiering songs from her new EP titled My Blaq Feels.We want to hear from you! Please email Tera@BringinitBackwards.com.www.BringinitBackwards.com#podcast #interview #bringinbackpod #Lafemmebear #zoom #lgbtq+ #lgbtq Listen & Subscribe to BiBFollow our podcast on Instagram and Twitter! 

RISE podcast
230: What Makes Us Different, and Alike - with Khalil Gibran Muhammad and Ben Austin

RISE podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 45:26


Today, I'm sitting down with the hosts of the new podcast, "Some Of My Best Friends Are". Khalil Gibran Muhammad is a Harvard historian and author of The Condemnation of Blackness, and in every episode, he sits down with his childhood best friend, award winning journalist Ben Austin. They talk about their interracial friendship, using pop culture and history to explore the absurdities and the intricacies of race and racism. And today on the show, we are talking about a little bit of everything, exploring what it looks like to talk openly and honestly about the hard stuff and about the good stuff, what makes us different, what makes us alike, and what are the things we can learn from each other along the way. --- Have you heard about the HOTLINE yet? Call (737) 400-HOCO, and press 1 to leave a question for Rach. Press 2 to share your story about the Hollis Company - it can be about your Start Today Journal, attending a RISE conference, coaching, or anything you want! We can't wait to hear from you ;) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

In The Moment podcast
114. Tina Campt with Elisheba Johnson: Contemporary Black artists who are changing the way we see

In The Moment podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 49:54


Visual art holds the extraordinary power to connect the dots between ideas or emotions, the person thinking or feeling them, and the outside viewer; but how might the viewer go beyond simply looking to experiencing art, in all its joys and especially in its challenges and discomforts? In the 114th episode of Town Hall's In the Moment podcast, Elisheba Johnson interviews Tina Campt about her latest book, A Black Gaze. In the book, Campt explores the work of eight contemporary Black artists who are shifting the nature of visual interactions with art and demanding that Blackness be seen anew. She considers, “Rather than looking at Black people, rather than simply multiplying the representation of Black folks, what would it mean to see oneself through the complex positionality that is Blackness — and work through its implications on and for oneself?” The featured artists' work includes the portraiture of Deana Lawson, the video of Arthur Jafa, the film of Khalil Joseph, the photography of Dawoud Bey, and the multimedia practices of Okwui Okpokwasili, Simone Leigh, and Luke Willis Thompson. Through their work, Campt discusses how seeing — especially seeing Blackness — cannot be the passive act of simply looking; it must be actively felt with, through, and alongside the experiences of the Black artist. Tina M. Campt, a Black feminist theorist of visual culture and contemporary art, is Owen F. Walker Professor of Humanities and Modern Culture and Media at Brown University and a Research Associate at the VIAD (Visual Identities in Art and Design Research Centre) at the University of Johannesburg. She is the author of Image Matters: Archive, Photography, and the African Diaspora in Europe, Listening to Images, and other books. Elisheba Johnson Elisheba Johnson is a multimedia artist, curator, and organizer based in Seattle. Along with her father, Charles Johnson, she created the young adult science-fiction series, The Adventures of Emery Jones, Boy Science Wonder. She is also one of the co-founders of Wa Na Wari a Black arts center in Seattle's Central District that uses art to fight displacement. Buy the Book: https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/black-gaze  Presented by Town Hall Seattle. To become a member or make a donation click here. 

Battle Fatigue
Forgiveness? I'm Good Luv, Enjoy.

Battle Fatigue

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 46:29


Do you feel like there's a blanket expectation for Black folks to forgive in the face of racial terror? On this episode of Battle Fatigue, your favorite twosome dig into their current ideas around forgiveness. With a historical backdrop, AJ and Dalin delve into the layers of forgiveness within the context of racial terror. How do you feel about forgiveness? Do you ask for it or just expect it? Join us as we explore what the post credits scene looks like after an apology.

Black History Gives Me Life
Why Words Matter with Farah Jones

Black History Gives Me Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 39:18


You've likely heard them before. "Don't get too dark." Or "You look good, have you lost weight?" And even, "Be quiet -- that's not ladylike." These phrases might seem inconsequential, but embedded deep within are messages of anti-Blackness. And they're messages that the most impressionable of us especially internalize: our children. Today we'll unpack three problematic phrases -- and their implicit meanings -- with Farah Jones. They are a multiracial writer, editor, and educator. A former middle and high school teacher, they currently write for various publications and present workshops and trainings around the country focusing on racial and gender justice and community building. Words matter. It's time to get intentional about how we use them. BHY is produced by PushBlack, the nation's largest non-profit Black media company - hit us up at BlackHistoryYear.com and share this with your people! PushBlack exists because we saw we had to take this into our own hands. You make PushBlack happen with your contributions at https://BlackHistoryYear.com​. Most people do 5 or 10 bucks a month, but everything makes a difference. Thanks for supporting the work. The Black History Year production team includes: Tareq Alani, Patrick Sanders, Leslie Taylor-Grover, William Anderson, Jareyah Bradley, Brooke Brown, Shiavon Chapman, Tabitha Jacobs, Abeni Jones, Briona Lamback, Courtney Morgan, Zain Murdock, Akua Tay, Tasha Taylor, and Darren Wallace. Producing the podcast we have Cydney Smith, who performs our narrative pieces, and Sasha Kai Parker, who also edits the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Dr Boyce Breakdown
Dr Boyce Watkins, Judge Joe Brown and Dr George C Fraser speak on the state of blackness in America and beyond

The Dr Boyce Breakdown

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 83:28


In this conversation, Dr Boyce Watkins speaks with George C Fraser and Judge Joe Brown. The wide-ranging dialogue covers a number of epic issues on race in America and what it's going to take for black people to be successful.

Voices of Esalen
Jazsalyn: black beyond

Voices of Esalen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 54:04


Jazsalyn is the creative and curatorial Director of black beyond, a radical space for artists and activists to define alternate realities for Blackness. As an anti-disciplinary artist, she combines new media and community organizing practices to reimagine Black futures and to decolonize and re-indigenize social and creative practice. Her work has been featured in CULTURED Magazine, Vogue, The New Yorker, and Huffington Post. Jazsalyn was interviewed for today's episode by Michelle McCrary. Michelle is a daughter, granddaughter, niece, cousin, mother, wife, and friend who lives on occupied Duwamish land in the Pacific Northwest.  She has roots in Coastal Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina.  When she's not leading the Communications team at Esalen, she's training to become a facilitator with the Healing and Reconciliation Institute, tending to her winter garden, reading her way through a massive pile of books on her nightstand, and working on the screenplay for her horror anthology.  some links from this great conversation: SUPPORT black beyond at https://www.nyfa.org/ EXPLORE https://newart.city/show/blackbeyond XR on New Art City SHOP black beyond https://blackbeyond.myshopify.com/ FOLLOW https://www.blackbeyond.xyz/ Instagram @blackbeyond_ Twitter @blackbeyond_ #blackbeyond And here's a dublab mix from black beyond — alternate realities Featured artist KESSWA reps Detroit and explores afro surrealist soundscapes across genres on this continuum of alternate realities. https://www.dublab.com/archive/black-beyond-alternate-realities-w-kesswa-07-28-21 And in Esalen news: Last year, Friends of Esalen helped us to survive closures due to the pandemic, fires and mudslides.  We're here today because of you. When you become a Friend of Esalen with a donation, your contribution helps us finance our day to day operations in Big Sur-from staff to infrastructure. This year, our goal is to raise 450K and make 300 new friends so that we can continue to keep our doors open for generations to come.   Become A Friend Now: https://www.esalen.org/give Give Yourself the Gift of More Time Are you ready to gift yourself more time at Esalen this winter season? With the weeklong Self-Guided Exploration program, you'll have more time to learn, connect, and reflect. Spend five days and four nights in Big Sur and soak in the baths, experience Esalen massage, and explore our menu of open classes.  As an added bonus, when you reserve premium plus, point house, and point house plus accomodations for a weeklong Self-Guided Exploration program, an Esalen Massage will be included with your stay. You'll receive the promo code for your complimentary massage in your confirmation email after booking your stay. Dates from November to December are still available, but going fast.   Book now  https://www.esalen.org/learn/self-guided-explorations A New Way To Experience Esalen If you can't come to Big Sur, our Digital Extended Education Program (DEEP) offers an online Esalen workshop you can experience from the comfort of your home. The first six-week workshop, We're All Gonna Die, led by Reverend Bodhi Be, kicks off on January 10, 2022. Bodhi will lead students through an exploration of how a healthy life includes a healthy relationship to death, how that awareness can help shape who we are as a community, and how we care for each other now and when we are dying.   The second online course, Moon Lodge, begins January 17, 2022. Moon Lodge is a six-week online workshop focused on celebrating the body of Woman+ and the sacred feminine within. Through ritual practices, instructors Lucia Horan and Dr. Julia Von will share in the sisterhood of humanity and all that it encompasses.  Register Now for We're All Gonna Die https://www.esalen.org/online/were-all-gonna-die Register Now for Moon Lodge https://www.esalen.org/online/moon-lodge-2022

Faith, Family & Freedom with Curtis Bowers
The Blackness of Evil: From MKUltra to the Covid Conspiracy

Faith, Family & Freedom with Curtis Bowers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 57:36


From MKUltra to the Covid Conspiracy to the move toward trans humanism, the evil we are up against is satanic to the core. This episode deals with how black the darkness is. To subscribe and get all of our weekly resources go to: www.AgendaWeekly.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/curtisbowers/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/curtisbowers/support

In The Thick
Nuestro Crossover: Jonathan Jayes-Green

In The Thick

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 37:44


In this crossover episode, ITT airs the second episode of Nuestro, a new podcast from Chuck Rocha, Democratic strategist and former Bernie Sanders campaign adviser. Nuestro gives space to Latino artists, advocates, politicians and journalists, to get deep into the moments that have defined and shaped their lives. In this episode, Chuck talks to Jonathan Jayes-Green, vice president of programs at the Marguerite Casey Foundation and co-founder of the UndocuBlack Network. They talk about DACA, anti-Blackness in the immigrant rights movement, and how Jonathan's journey as an Afro-Latinx, undocumented trans person, taught them about solidarity and the intersections of race and immigration. Subscribe here to Nuestro, or wherever you get your podcasts. Photo credit: Courtesy of Nuestro Podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

PRI: Arts and Entertainment
'Born into Blackness': A new book centers Africa in the expansive history of slavery

PRI: Arts and Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021


Major aspects of the trans-Atlantic slave trade from an African perspective have gotten erased throughout time. Howard French set out to illuminate a more expansive understanding in a new book called, "Born in Blackness: Africa, Africans, and the Making of the Modern World, 1471 to the Second World War."

Other Voices
Merton Simpson says America must come to grips with the legacy of racism

Other Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 36:57


Merton D. Simpson has always had a sense of his African ancestry and his Blackness.He was born in Charleston, South Carolina and raised in Brooklyn so he says he's always known the deep divisions in the United States.“My mother has just turned 89 years old and she's a master teacher,” says Simpson in this week's podcast.As a first-born son, he has his father's name. “My father was one of the foremost African art dealers in the world. He also was at the vanguard of the expressionist art movement with Picasso and Romare Bearden,” says Simpson. His father was an artist himself and also a jazz musician.Simpson is an Albany County legislator, representing Arbor Hill, Sheridan Hollow, Washington Park, and West Hill.He came to Albany in 1978 “for a job” — as a senior minority group personnel specialist for Civil Service.“My job was to get employment in New York State government for Blacks and Hispanics who had been traditionally neglected by Civil Service,” said Simpson. As a lead plaintiff in a federal lawsuit, Simpson v. New York State Department of Civil Service, Simpson won a long legal battle, securing a $45 million settlement for more than 4,000 Black and Hispanic state workers and job applicants who claimed a Civil Service test was biased.The litigation stretched from 1997 to 2010. “It was a long but historic and necessary fight ….,” said Simpson. “People were promoted on the basis of a test that didn't legitimately test their knowledge, skills, and abilities and also was tremendously discriminatory.”He also said, “Had I not stopped that test, it would have been used in every state in the country.”While a friend continually encourages Simpson to run for Congress, he said, “I can do more in the Albany County Legislature in real terms than I could in Washington because of the tremendous gridlock.”He recently spoke passionately at a legislative committee meeting on expanding the county's version of the CROWN Act and elaborated on that with The Enterprise. (See related editorial.) CROWN stands for Creating a Respectful and Open Workplace for Natural hair.“When it comes to the CROWN Act, what we see is another manifestation of the denial of the legacy of racism in America,” said Simpson. The committee was discussing adding headcoverings to the list of protected hairstyles, which Simpson described as “a longstanding feature of Black people in America and that's a cultural transition from our history in Africa.”He went on, “We actually have present situations here in Albany County where people have been denied employment rights or been treated in an inappropriate way because of their hair preferences, which has nothing to do with their ability to do their job.”He recognized there could be jobs where certain hairstyles would present a hazard but said, “When it comes to a question of: well, you just think it's nice to have short hair, then that's a problem.”Traditional black hairstyles can help some people do their jobs better, says Simpson, stating that the New York City Police Department for many years has not had restrictions on how Black officers wear their hair.“In many communities, to see people who have sort of indigenous hairstyles endear them to the community,” said Simpson.He's an advocate of community policing done by people who are part of the community “because there's a knowledge, understanding, and a commitment to that community.” See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Deep Cover
Down But Not Out

Deep Cover

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 54:51


The guys take a look back at the Ravens 34-31 overtime win against the Vikings and preview the TNF game against the Dolphins. Intro: “Optimistic” by the Sounds of Blackness of the album “The Evolution of Gospel” (1991) Download & subscribe so you never miss an episode! Thumbnail photo credit: Shawn Hubbard, Ravens Team Photographer (baltimoreravens.com) Interact with the show on Twitter @deepcoverpod

Afropop Worldwide
The Hidden Blackness Of Flamenco

Afropop Worldwide

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 59:00


Flamenco as we know it was “born” in Spain in the mid-19th century. But for centuries before that, Roma (Gitanos, Gypsies) had been living in Spanish cities, often rubbing shoulders with the descendants of Africans (Moors), who had been there as both citizens and slaves going back to Medieval times and earlier. This overlooked pre-history of flamenco is explored in Miguel Angel Rosales's groundbreaking film Gurumbé. In this program, we meet Rosales and learn to hear flamenco in a new way. We also meet maverick flamenco artist Raul Rodriguez, inventor and master of the tres flamenco. Rodriquez's solo concert, sampled in this program, is a tour de force and an anthropology master class, all in one. Produced by Banning Eyre. APWW #792 Originally broadcast in 2018

Hoodrat to Headwrap: A Decolonized Podcast
What is Brown?: The Fear and Future of a Black Planet feat. Alan Pelaez(@Migrantscribble)

Hoodrat to Headwrap: A Decolonized Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 99:51


BIPOC, POC, NBPOC and other acronyms for Others...what are their origins and how do they inform a desire for and distance from Blackness across nation-states? Is the term POC a relic from slavery legislation in the US or a useful modifier that can unify the "global majority"? Leading up to Transgender Awareness Week we get deep into it all and mo' with our love and special guest, afroindígena poet, award winning author and artist Alan Pelaez (They/Them)! Support for this episode can go directly to Alan: Venmo--@migrantscribble Recommended Reading: https://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2014/03/30/295931070/the-journey-from-colored-to-minorities-to-people-of-color https://thegrio.com/2021/05/01/black-freedmen-tribal-struggle/ https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10714413.2021.1968235?scroll=top&needAccess=true#b0001 All things Alan: https://linktr.ee/MigrantScribble

Tea with Queen and J.
#303 It's Giving Anti-Black

Tea with Queen and J.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 76:57


On this episode… Revenge of the Black nerds! Were you othered for being queer or Black or nerdy, or all of that sh!t? Then, why labels may or may not be important to you and if any of that has to do with your privilege Queen & J. are two womanist race nerds dismantling white supremacist patriarchal capitalism one episode at a time. Drink up! This week's hot list: Sex toys, daylight savings or takings, Queens (the TV show), velvet, anti-Blackness and othering at the intersections of nerdiness & queerness, demisexuality, Cardi cosplay, labels, belonging, who gets to claim queer, who needs to claim queer, who cares and mad other ish EPISODE TIMESTAMPS Libations: 4:57 Donation Libations: 17:08 Affirmations: 20:18 Anti-Blackness and Black nerds: 22:37 Who claims queerness, who gets to say: 55:33 Tweet us while you listen! @teawithqj or use #teawithqj and add #podin on Twitter to help others discover Tea with Queen and J. podcast! COME TO AFROS & AUDIO VIRTUAL PODCAST FESTIVAL! Enter code AFAUTQJ21 for 25% off your ticket at https://www.afrosandaudio.com/podcastfestival WEBSITE Teawithqueenandj.com SOCIAL MEDIA Twitter: https://twitter.com/teawithqj @teawithqj Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/teawithqj/ @teawithqj Facebook: www.facebook.com/TeawithQueenandJ Tea with Queen and J. Tumblr: teawithqueenandj.tumblr.com TEAMAIL & SPONSOR INQUIRIES teawithqueenandj@gmail.com DONATE Paypal: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/teawithqj Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/teawithqj Queen's Amazon wishlist: https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/CXV9ZDWZ3PP9?ref_=wl_share J.'s Amazon wishlist: https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/1NP09USMPJ0TB?ref=cm_sw_em_r_wl_ip_VEVWdvdDDemm Send us snail mail: Tea with Queen and J. P.O. Box 1617 229 East 85th Street New York, NY 10028 This week's closing clip features Sylvia Scott featured on Advanced Style Official https://www.tiktok.com/@advancedstyleofficial/video/7027107364427795718 This episode was created, hosted, and produced by Naima Lewis Muhammad & Janicia Francis with editorial support from Candice Jones, social media & production support from Channél Jordan, and graphic design by Jo Caraballo Libations to our friend's Domingo, Tokunbo, and D. Sindayiganza who help keep this show running by paying and supporting Black women. Opening song by Ohene Cornelius Segment Music by Chad Milner

Love + Grit
Trey Brown & Mz. Icar

Love + Grit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 23:23


This episode features 15-year-old—yes 15-year-old —Trey Brown. The founder of SPERGO, a trendsetting streetwear and lifestyle brand, turned his passion for design and community into a six-figure company in only three years. One of the most sought-after youth speakers in the country, Brown has been featured on a billboard in Times Square, opened up two stores, received a key to the city and just received a deal on ABC's Shark Tank. Also on this episode is Mz. Icar, the woman behind a dope (and anonymous) art collective creating works that celebrate women, global Blackness and play. Comprised primarily of Black women artists specializing in different media, this collective's work has been recognized by the art community's most elite and is part of the Love + Grit Storefronts Project.

Suncoast Culture Club
Donovan Session and Shea Petersen of Urbanite Theatre's At the Wake of a Dead Drag Queen Join the Club

Suncoast Culture Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 35:42


Both are from Texas, both currently reside in Chicago, but currently, Donovan Session and Shea Petersen are starring in Urbanite Theatre's latest production, At the Wake of a Dead Drag Queen showing not through December 5. Take a listen to this Suncoast Culture Club podcast episode to learn more about their lives, this play, and the importance of understanding each other's worlds.Written by Terry Guest and directed by Damian Lockhart, this play presents us Courtney Berringers, who would like to welcome you to her wake! But—make no mistake—this ain't your grandma's funeral. At the Wake of a Dead Drag Queen is a one-act play about Blackness, southern queerness, and the fine art of drag. From African Gods and Goddesses to Trina and Whitney Houston, At the Wake thoughtfully uses storytelling, drama and drag to explore identity, illness, and the narratives we construct for ourselves. Come party at the wake. Bring your own heels!Get your tickets through Urbanite's website or through the Suncoast Culture Club's Calendar of Events page.Come along and join the club!• Urbanite Theatre Website & Facebook & Instagram & YouTube• Donovan Session LinkedIn & Instagram• Shea Petersen Website & Instagram• Siesta Key Beach Website & Facebook & Instagram• Lido Key Beach Website• St. Armand's Circle Website & Facebook & Instagram• Siesta Key Oyster Bar (SKOB) Website & Facebook & Instagram & Twitter & YouTube• Kahwa Coffee Website & Facebook & Instagram & Twitter• State College of Florida Music Program Website & Facebook & Instagram• SCF Theatre Program Website & Facebook Page & InstagramSupport the show (https://scf-foundation.org/suncoastcultureclub/)

Pedagogue
Episode 89: Louis M. Maraj

Pedagogue

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 21:41


In this episode, Louis M. Maraj talks about antiracist pedagogies and practices, theorizing and centering Blackness and Black feminism, and notions of Blackness in historically White institutions.

The Benjamin Dixon Show
11-09-21 | Double Standards: Justice and Grace for Whiteness. Perfection and Rigidity for Blackness

The Benjamin Dixon Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 133:43


11-09-21 | Double Standards: Justice and Grace for Whiteness. Perfection and Rigidity for Blackness

Live From My Office
The son of a sharecropper who got an education and then a PHD... in corn?

Live From My Office

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 46:59


In 40 years I have interviewed amazing people and heard great stories. I have to say that Robert J Jones life is one of the best examples ever of how - anything is possible! He's the son of a sharecropper who got an education and then a PHD...in corn?As a college professor and academic he also was a member of THE SOUNDS OF BLACKNESS and won 2 Grammys. Now as the Chancellor of the University of Illinois he's here with good news, and we could all use that!SHOW NOTESHonoring Chancellor Jones's agricultural past and present, we hope you will help these fine organizations. Support the Farm Foundation and the National 4-H Council however you can!Learn more about UofI and their record enrollment while other schools struggle Listen to The Sounds of Blackness features Robert Jones on their Grammy winning "The Evolution of Gospel" and hear their work here with Stevie Wonder on "Conversation Peace"Subscribe to Live From My Office on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.Follow Steve on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn.Win an ABT gift card by emailing me three of your friends emails who you think would like the show, and include your mailing address in the email. Check out the details here.Email the show with any questions, comments, or plugs for your favorite charity.

Soundcheck
Poet, Composer, Stutterer JJJJJerome Ellis Creatively Shapes Time

Soundcheck

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 39:05


Poet, sax player, electronic music producer, storyteller, and composer JJJJJerome Ellis is a stutterer. On his 2021 album The Clearing, he takes speech disfluency and considers how it affects one's experience of time. He explains “The Clearing” as that sense of unknowing in the moments where he is stuttering. It's a space, a pause of suspension that opens up unexpectedly – "like when you're hiking and suddenly you come to a clearing. You see the sun and take it all in, the light conditions, the plants, and how you might lose your path." The music on The Clearing uses hip hop drum sounds, deep bass, and experimental electronics, setting his 2020 essay, “The Clearing: Music, dysfluency, Blackness and time.” JJJJJerome Ellis' extraordinary achievement is in using the involuntary nature of The Stutter and then shaping his music to how “The Stutter presents him with a score.” In conversation, Ellis contrasts this 2021 release, The Clearing, with his series of sound installations, his “Fountains” – where he creates his own alternate time world in which there is a sense of relief, a respite from the interruption of flow. JJJJJerome Ellis offers live performances of works from his new album The Clearing, and shares how to say “I stutter” in Portuguese.  – Caryn Havlik Set List: “Loops of Retreat,” “Bend Back the Bow and Let the Hymn Fly” Watch "Loops of Retreat": Watch "Bend Back The Bow & Let The Hymn Fly":

Blackness and the Workplace
Final Thoughts With Jessica- Season Four

Blackness and the Workplace

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 18:27


Founder and CEO  Jessica Pharm gives an update about her personal life and accomplishments including the future of Blackness and the Workplace. Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/blacknessworkplace)

The Stoop
EP 57: Sounds of Blackness 2

The Stoop

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 23:42


It's back! Sounds of Blackness. What is a sound that embodies Blackness to you?  We've been asking high and low and the answers have us reflecting, laughing, tearing up and feeling absolute joy.  Today we take a sonic dip into sounds that embody Blackness. We also sit down with poet Nikki Giovanni ,and hear from many more about the sounds that move them.

The Digital Gumbo Podcast
The Reunited And It Feels So Good Episode

The Digital Gumbo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 89:42


For the first time in a long time, T. Petty, Idris Elbow and Nookie Bishop, Jr. get back on the mic at the same damn time! Topics on this episode include 2021 elections, a vaccine story from Idris, tiny penises (or is it “penii”?) and cigarettes. S.O.S.—Share our shit! All eps. here: https://digitalgumbo.simplecast.com Tell a friend ( or frenemy) about #thedigitalgumbopodcast today! Twitter: @thedigitalgumbo IG: @thedigitalgumbopodcast #thugmanchin #letsgomanchin

Democracy and Z
Episode 51: How Colorism Hurts

Democracy and Z

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 31:44


Straight-up racism is bad enough—but for many of us, colorism cuts even deeper. Maybe we were born with skin tones darker or lighter than those around us, making it hard to fit in, feel beautiful, or even to claim our own Blackness. Maybe we've seen how differently society treats people of color, based on skin tone… and how easy it is to turn those “preferences” on ourselves and our peers. It's not something anybody likes to talk about, but we'll never heal from colorism if we don't call it out. In this episode, we share some of our own experiences with shade-prejudice, within the Black community and beyond; consider where it all came from, and how we can grow past it. The podcasters: Cierra Britten (host), University of CincinnatiKylie Bridgeman, Walnut Hills H.S.Enock Sadiki, Aiken H.S.Tasnim Saad, Aiken H.S. Conversation recorded on Zoom Nov. 7, 2021 Learn more: Click here for a report on a recent Pew Research Center study of how colorism affects Latinx Americans. Click here for a look at colorism within the South Asian community. And here's an episode on colorism from the WGBH public affairs program Basic Black, recommended for anyone seeking a greater understanding around this topic.

The Digital Gumbo Podcast
The Nightmare Before Christmas Episode

The Digital Gumbo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 74:24


We are two-thirds of the way to one-hunnid episodes!  No tricks, just treats for episode 67.  T. Petty & Nookie Bishop.  Jr.  take on a wide range of news stories including the “Rust” movie set gun death, a “ghost” killed by her neighbors and trash ass liquor.  The Digital Gumbo Podcast is located at the intersection of  news, current events, race, politics—right next ro the liquor store.  Hosts Nookie Bishop, Jr. , T. Petty & Idris Elbow give you the 411 on some stories you may have heard about and some you probably haven't.  S.O.S. = Share Our Shit!  All eps. here: https://digitalgumbo.simplecast.com  Tell a friend ( or frenemy) about #thedigitalgumbopodcast today!  Twitter: @thedigitalgumbo IG: @thedigitalgumbopodcast

To The Best Of Our Knowledge
Decolonizing the Mind

To The Best Of Our Knowledge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 51:47


Colonization in Africa was much more than a land grab. It was a project to replace — and even erase — local cultures. To label them inferior. Music, arts, literature and of course language. In other words, it permeated everything. So how do you undo that? How do you unlearn what you've been forced to learn? In this hour, produced in partnership with the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes (CHCI) and Africa is a Country — we learn what it means to decolonize the mind. Original Air Date: March 20, 2021 Guests: Adom Getachew — Simon Gikandi — Ngugi wa Thiong'o Interviews In This Hour: Reckon with the Past To Decolonize the Future — Reclaiming the Hidden History of Blackness — Never Write In The Language of the Colonizer

To The Best Of Our Knowledge
Decolonizing the Mind

To The Best Of Our Knowledge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 51:47


Colonization in Africa was much more than a land grab. It was a project to replace — and even erase — local cultures. To label them inferior. Music, arts, literature and of course language. In other words, it permeated everything. So how do you undo that? How do you unlearn what you've been forced to learn? In this hour, produced in partnership with the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes (CHCI) and Africa is a Country — we learn what it means to decolonize the mind. Original Air Date: March 20, 2021 Guests: Adom Getachew — Simon Gikandi — Ngugi wa Thiong'o Interviews In This Hour: Reckon with the Past To Decolonize the Future — Reclaiming the Hidden History of Blackness — Never Write In The Language of the Colonizer

The Biblical Mind
Reading the Bible While Black: The Crucial Perspective of the Black Church (Esau McCaulley)

The Biblical Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 39:02


"Blackness is a part of American culture." Too often American Christianity is equated with white Christianity, while expressions of Black Christianity are overlooked. Continuing our series "By the Oppressed, to the Oppressed: How the Marginalized Church Reads Scripture," Esau McCaulley, author of Reading While Black, explains how American Black history has given Black Christians an important lens through which to understand Scripture, and how power can actually be a distorting lens. When people hear biblical interpretations they might have missed because of their own experiences, the narrative can change.  Show notes: 0:27 When we misunderstand what we see and hear 3:08 Black Bible reading 6:33 Expressions of Black Christianity 11:36 Distorting the influence of power 16:03 The "Slave Bible"  23:48 Suffering and biblical interpretation 27:14 The use of the Bible in the Civil War 28:24 We need a fuller range of interpretations  34:33 Reevaluating your theological perspective Show notes by Dominique LaCroix Credits for the music TBM podcast: hebraicthought.org/credits.  

The Takeaway
Deep Dive with Dorian Warren: Passing

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 59:26


This month, "Passing," a new film by writer and director Rebecca Hall premieres on Netflix.  Adapted from Nella Larsen's 1929 Harlem Renaissance novel of the same name, "Passing" is shot in black and white. It's a complex film likely to revive old debates and provoke new conversations around unresolved and still unspoken meanings of race, class, gender, power, identity, and resistance. For this week's Deep Dive, Melissa and co-host Dorian Warren use the film as a jumping off point to explore the thorny questions raised by the concept of passing. Joining Melissa and Dorian to discuss her film and her family's history with passing is Rebecca Hall. Adding context on the history of passing is Allyson Hobbs, associate professor of U.S. History and the Director of African and African American Studies at Stanford University and author of "A Chosen Exile." Karla Holloway, James B. Duke Distinguished Professor Emerita of English at Duke University and author of Legal Fictions and A Death in Harlem: A Novel , discusses how race has been socially constructed over time. Brit Bennett, author of "The Vanishing Half," explains how she explored colorism in her 2020 novel. Lauren Michele Jackson, assistant professor of English at Northwestern University and a contributing writer at The New Yorker, discusses the idea of "Blackfishing," which is when white people and even more notably white women, attempt transgressing racial boundaries by adopting a performance of Blackness through darkening their skin excessively, wearing hairstyles and clothing trends that have been pioneered by Black people. Bliss Broyard, author of the award-winning memoir, "One Drop: My Father's Hidden Life- A Story of Race and Family Secrets," talks about finding out in her mid twenties that her father had passed as white for most of his life. And finally, Dean Moncel, a freelance writer based in Switzerland and Aryah Lester, deputy director of the Transgender Strategy Center, join the show to discuss the ways passing emerges around gender and sexuality.  

The Takeaway
Deep Dive with Dorian Warren: Passing

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 59:26


This month, "Passing," a new film by writer and director Rebecca Hall premieres on Netflix.  Adapted from Nella Larsen's 1929 Harlem Renaissance novel of the same name, "Passing" is shot in black and white. It's a complex film likely to revive old debates and provoke new conversations around unresolved and still unspoken meanings of race, class, gender, power, identity, and resistance. For this week's Deep Dive, Melissa and co-host Dorian Warren use the film as a jumping off point to explore the thorny questions raised by the concept of passing. Joining Melissa and Dorian to discuss her film and her family's history with passing is Rebecca Hall. Adding context on the history of passing is Allyson Hobbs, associate professor of U.S. History and the Director of African and African American Studies at Stanford University and author of "A Chosen Exile." Karla Holloway, James B. Duke Distinguished Professor Emerita of English at Duke University and author of Legal Fictions and A Death in Harlem: A Novel , discusses how race has been socially constructed over time. Brit Bennett, author of "The Vanishing Half," explains how she explored colorism in her 2020 novel. Lauren Michele Jackson, assistant professor of English at Northwestern University and a contributing writer at The New Yorker, discusses the idea of "Blackfishing," which is when white people and even more notably white women, attempt transgressing racial boundaries by adopting a performance of Blackness through darkening their skin excessively, wearing hairstyles and clothing trends that have been pioneered by Black people. Bliss Broyard, author of the award-winning memoir, "One Drop: My Father's Hidden Life- A Story of Race and Family Secrets," talks about finding out in her mid twenties that her father had passed as white for most of his life. And finally, Dean Moncel, a freelance writer based in Switzerland and Aryah Lester, deputy director of the Transgender Strategy Center, join the show to discuss the ways passing emerges around gender and sexuality.  

New Books in Literary Studies
Habiba Ibrahim, "Black Age: Oceanic Lifespans and the Time of Black Life" (NYU Press, 2021)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 70:32


Although more than fifty years apart, the murders of Emmett Till and Trayvon Martin share a commonality: Black children are not seen as children. Time and time again, excuses for police brutality and aggression—particularly against Black children— concern the victim “appearing” as a threat. But why and how is the perceived “appearance” of Black persons so completely separated from common perceptions of age and time? Black Age: Oceanic Lifespans and the Time of Black Life (NYU Press, 2021) posits age, life stages, and lifespans as a central lens through which to view Blackness, particularly with regard to the history of transatlantic slavery. Focusing on Black literary culture of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, Habiba Ibrahim examines how the history of transatlantic slavery and the constitution of modern Blackness has been reimagined through the embodiment of age. She argues that Black age—through nearly four centuries of subjugation— has become contingent, malleable, and suited for the needs of enslavement. As a result, rather than the number of years lived or a developmental life stage, Black age came to signify exchange value, historical under-development, timelessness, and other fantasies borne out of Black exclusion from the human. Ibrahim asks: What constitutes a normative timeline of maturation for Black girls when “all the women”—all the canonically feminized adults—“are white”? How does a “slave” become a “man” when adulthood is foreclosed to Black subjects of any gender? Black Age tracks the struggle between the abuses of Black exclusion from Western humanism and the reclamation of non-normative Black life, arguing that, if some of us are brave, it is because we dare to live lives considered incomprehensible within a schema of “human time.” Brittney Edmonds is an Assistant Professor of Afro-American Studies at UW-Madison. I specialize in 20th and 21st century African American Literature and Culture with a special interest in Black Humor Studies. Read more about my work at brittneymichelledmonds.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in African American Studies
Habiba Ibrahim, "Black Age: Oceanic Lifespans and the Time of Black Life" (NYU Press, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 70:32


Although more than fifty years apart, the murders of Emmett Till and Trayvon Martin share a commonality: Black children are not seen as children. Time and time again, excuses for police brutality and aggression—particularly against Black children— concern the victim “appearing” as a threat. But why and how is the perceived “appearance” of Black persons so completely separated from common perceptions of age and time? Black Age: Oceanic Lifespans and the Time of Black Life (NYU Press, 2021) posits age, life stages, and lifespans as a central lens through which to view Blackness, particularly with regard to the history of transatlantic slavery. Focusing on Black literary culture of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, Habiba Ibrahim examines how the history of transatlantic slavery and the constitution of modern Blackness has been reimagined through the embodiment of age. She argues that Black age—through nearly four centuries of subjugation— has become contingent, malleable, and suited for the needs of enslavement. As a result, rather than the number of years lived or a developmental life stage, Black age came to signify exchange value, historical under-development, timelessness, and other fantasies borne out of Black exclusion from the human. Ibrahim asks: What constitutes a normative timeline of maturation for Black girls when “all the women”—all the canonically feminized adults—“are white”? How does a “slave” become a “man” when adulthood is foreclosed to Black subjects of any gender? Black Age tracks the struggle between the abuses of Black exclusion from Western humanism and the reclamation of non-normative Black life, arguing that, if some of us are brave, it is because we dare to live lives considered incomprehensible within a schema of “human time.” Brittney Edmonds is an Assistant Professor of Afro-American Studies at UW-Madison. I specialize in 20th and 21st century African American Literature and Culture with a special interest in Black Humor Studies. Read more about my work at brittneymichelledmonds.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies