Podcasts about Segregation

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  • 1,328PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about Segregation

Show all podcasts related to segregation

Latest podcast episodes about Segregation

Lucy's Record Shop
Buckley's Record Shop (feat. Randy Fox)

Lucy's Record Shop

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 43:32


In 2019, music writer Randy Fox discovered a long-forgotten nugget of info - sixteen years before Lucy's opened its doors at 1707 Church Street in Nashville it was home to another record store called Buckley's. Randy has an insatiable curiosity and an unbridled enthusiasm for music and history, so this story has lots of twists and turns. It starts in Kentucky and his discovery of the Sex Pistols and the Ramones in college, zigs into the history of mid-20th century radio and record shops, and zags to the use of urban planning as a tool for white supremacy. Chock full. Enjoy! Randy Fox grew up in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky and now lives in Nashville, Tennessee. Currently managing editor of The Madisonian and an Editor-at-Large for The East Nashvillian, his writing has also appeared in Vintage Rock, Country Music, Record Collector, Journal of Country Music, Nashville Scene and many other publications. He is the author of Shake Your Hips: The Excello Records Story, a history of the renowned Nashville-based blues, soul and gospel record label. He is also a co-founder, President, and Program Director of independent, freeform radio station WXNA 101.5 FM in Nashville, where he hosts the weekly programs, Randy's Record Shop and the Hipbilly Jamboree. Episode Music: Lambchop - So I Hear You're Moving (Intro) Deford Bailey - Davidson County Blues Slim Harpo - Shake Your Hips Etta James - Seven Day Fool (Live at the New Era Club I'm Going to Sit at the Welcome Table / "We Shall Not Be Moved" - The Nashville Sit-in Story: Songs and Scenes of Nashville Lunch Counter Desegregation (Smithsonian Folkways Recordings) Additional Mentions/Links: Shake  Your Hips: The Excello Records Story by Randy Fox “The Emperor of Grooves,” by Randy Fox, The East Nashvillian “Love at 33 1/3: Reflections on a Year of Writing About Record Stores,” by Randy Fox, The Nashville Scene Rock 'n' Roll High School (1979) movie review - Sneak Previews with Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel WXNAfm.org One Mile North by Campbell Haynes (Belmont Law Review, Volume 8, Issue 1: 2020) The Highway to Segregation by Sabre J. Rucker (Masters Thesis, Vanderbilt University, 2016) “Racist planning shaped our city; conscientious planning can help undo its mistakes,” By Adrien Weibgen, New York Daily News Harvey's Nashville Sells 39¢ Singles, Billboard, May, 5, 1962 Randy's Record Shop. Ernie's Record Mart. Dot Records DJ Gene Nobels  The Children by David Halberstam JeffersonStreetSound.com Fisk University, Meharry Medical College, Tennessee Agricultural & Industrial State University (now Tennessee State University) Diane Nash, Rev.James Lawson, Congressman John Lewis, Bernard Lafayette, C.T. Vivian, Rip Patton Night train to Nashville: Music City Rhythm and Blues 1945–1970, Country Music Hall of Fame, Michael Gray & Daniel Cooper, curators. Cover Photo of Randy Fox, Scott Greenwalt Photography PLAYLISTS & RADIO SHOWS The Best of Excello Records The Excello Story, Vol. II (1955 - 1957) The Excello Records Story, Vol. I (1952 - 1955) Randy's Record Shop (Randy's Radio Show) - Mondays, 7:00am–9:00am CT, Archive and Live on WXNAFM.org Hipbilly Jamboree! (Randy's Radio Show) - Sunday 3 - 5 PM Archive and live on WXNAfm.org Follow us / Say helloInstagram: @lucysrecordshopTwitter: @lucysrecordshop Facebook: /lucysrecordshop This show is part of We Own This Town, a podcast network of original entertainment and documentary content. You can find more info at the official site at WeOwnThisTown.Net and on Facebook, Instagram, & Twitter.

Laymen's Cup Podcast
EP307: Segregation within the Body

Laymen's Cup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 68:08


People within the Body of the Church can fill separated from each other. How do we repair that separation?  You can support the show at Buymeacoffee.com/laymenscup If you are listening on iTunes, please subscribe and leave a review. Laymen on iTunes If you have comments or questions for us, you can email us at laymenscup@gmail.com. Find us on YouTube by searching for LaymensCup. Make sure to subscribe and hit the notification bell! We are on Facebook at www.facebook.com/laymenscup. You can also follow us on Instagram and Twitter @laymenscup. It is always our hope to get the Gospel out to as many people as possible and you can help us by sharing the show. Word of mouth is the greatest way we will get the show out to the masses. Thank you. Please pray for us, as we are praying for you. Kemp, Wes, Shaun, Bob, and Ann Our Sponsors Candee Land Creations Navigating Neverland with Amy Carolina Furniture Mart

Elite Expert Insider
Writing The Book Sandra's Syndrome with Mark Merkley

Elite Expert Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 18:07


Jenn Foster and Melanie Johnson co-owners of Elite Online Publishing, interview Mark Merkley about his upcoming book Sandra's Syndrome   and how he has had to overcome his own prejudices within religion. Mark Merkley is an author and retired university instructor. He has a MA and BA in Organizational and Interpersonal Communication from Brigham Young University. Mark was trained formally as a technical writer and has recently delved into the world of creative writing. He believes that humor within creative storytelling possesses greater emotional opportunity to provide readers personal understanding of characters and their experience with complex issues. Learn More Here Sandra is a Mormon girl, but this story is not about Mormons. It is about an explosive secret, racial bigotry, superstition, and bias toward uncommon people-a mixture with the power to transform humanity. Sandra's Syndrome gives readers a beloved heroine at a time when humankind needs one like never before. June 8, 1978, a historic date for an entire church that attempted to end racism. For Sandra, it was the first day of battle to end separation and segregation for all special children of God ... and you won't believe the miraculous conclusion. Learn More Here

Black Girls Talk Sports
Louise Fulton: a Black Woman Bowling Trailblazer

Black Girls Talk Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 4:00


Host Rekaya Gibson pays tribute to Louise Fulton, an American professional bowler. In 1964, she won the Professional Women's Bowling Association's Princeton Open, becoming the first African American to win a professional bowling title. Also, Fulton was the first African American bowler inducted into the United States Bowling Congress Hall of Fame in 2001. #blackbowler #blackwomenbowlers #keepitsporty Mentioned in this episode: Marjorie Mitchell, professional bowler  Meadow Lanes Bowling Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania  City of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania  Podcast Items of Interest: Listen and Support Black Girls Talk Sports Podcast - https://www.blackgirlstalksports.com Join our Facebook Group (Women only) @BlackGirlsTalkSports Follow us on Instagram @BlackGirlsTalkSportsPodcast Download BGTS Android App for free in the Google Play Store https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.blackgirlstalksports.android.girls Podcast Sponsor: Food Temptress Cookbook Store – https://www.foodtemptress.com Sources: Louise Fulton and Marjorie Mitchell Papers and Photographs, 1982-2010, MSS 897, Thomas and Katherine Detre Library and Archives, Senator John Heinz History Center. historicpittsburgh.org/islandora/object/pitt%3AUS-QQS-mss897/viewer United States Bowling Congress. (2022). Louise Fulton. bowl.com/usbc-hall-of-fame/hall-of-famers/louise-fulton Wiggins, D. K., & Swanson, R. A. (Eds.). (2016). Separate Games: African American Sport behind the Walls of Segregation. University of Arkansas Press. doi.org/10.2307/j.ctt1f89v0m

Then Again with Ken and Glen
E118 Segregation in the New South

Then Again with Ken and Glen

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 34:14


Segregation and its role in America, especially the American South, after the civil war is complicated and complex. Segregation was present in schools, churches, housing, and transportation. It was a part of daily life, but perhaps many do not understand the nuances and complexities that accompanied it. In this podcast, Marie speaks to Dr. Chris Caplinger, Assistant Professor of History at Georgia Southern University, about segregation in the New South from 1860-1914. This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People
Racism and Segregation in the Music Industry

Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 53:40


Michael Motta, is a former executive in the record business. He was instrumental in breaking open the careers of musicians like Snoop Dogg, Beastie Boys, Megadeath and Bonnie Raitt. After years in the business, he realized it was treacherous to his health and left after achieving major success. He also saw the systemic racism and inequality of music airtime, radio station resources. Listen to his story in this conversation on race. Today he is the regional manager of Mayweather Boxing and Fitness in Los Angeles, CA, USA. Michael considers himself a “a man for all nations.” He is African, Sicilian, Cuban, and Jewish. Raised in the Bronx by four strong Black women, he  learned to be a strong Black man. Key topics: [5:00] How he was bullied by different groups because of his skin color, not being white enough for the white kids and not dark enough for the Black kids. [7:12] Incredibly, Michael just two years ago that he is fifty-one percent Jewish. Hear how he found his Jewish father and a sister he didn't know he had. However before finding that out, he always had connections to Jewish people, and his son's mother is Jewish. [16:12] What made him finally decide to leave the music industry- Motta breaks down the systemic racism of the music industry and the segregation of the radio stations. [20:53] We talk some of our favorite genres of music along with artists we love [29:06] • White kids who listen to hip-hop but don't care about the politics, and still act racist towards people of color.They spend money on the music but don't understand history or the message. • Where to find conscious rap and hip-hop since it's not played on commercial radio or given airplay [34:50] • His experience in college at a mostly Jewish school [38:55] • What it's like being Black with light skin. How he wasn't accepted in different places and what he did to survive. [40:44] Race and racism and how it's about fear [41:37] Why he's bothered by gentrification and it's impact on non-white communities. [45:35] Solutions and suggestions to end racism and actions we can all take Guest BioA 20-year industry veteran, Michael hails from the Bronx and is of Black, Hispanic and Caucasian heritage.  He earned a scholarship to Brandeis where he played varsity basketball and then went on to earn an MBA at Boston College.  Mike is an accomplished martial artist, boxer and strength and conditioning coach – as well as an expert on nutrition counseling and healthy living -- all skills he attributes to his ability to combat stage four prostate cancer.  Prior to his fitness career Mike was an accomplished record industry executive and was head of promotion and marketing for four record labels, executive vice president for several film companies and is an accomplished screen writer.  He's the proud father of one son, Nick. Host Bio Simma Lieberman, The Inclusionist helps leaders create inclusive cultures. She is a consultant, speaker and facilitator and the host of the podcast, “Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People.” Contact Simma@SimmaLieberman.com Go to www.simmalieberman.com and www.raceconvo.com for more information Simma is a member of and inspired by the global organization IAC (Inclusion Allies Coalition) 

Opportunity Starts at Home
Episode 38 - Segregation, Gentrification, and Fair Housing with Lance Freeman

Opportunity Starts at Home

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 32:10


In this episode we talk with Dr. Lance Freeman, the Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor of City and Regional Planning & Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Freeman joins us to discuss how growing up in New York City spurred his interest in housing policy, the historical context of segregated living patterns in US cities, how the government contributed to those patterns, the emergence of gentrification in urban development, and the specific policies that can better promote affordable housing and integration.

Redeye
Digital book shares the teachings of Tla'amin elder Elsie Paul (encore)

Redeye

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 28:11


Born in 1931, Tla'amin elder Elsie Paul was raised by her grandparents on their ancestral territory just north of Powell River on the Sunshine Coast of BC. As her adult life unfolded against a backdrop of colonialism, she drew strength from the teachings she had learned. She now passes on those teachings to all who visit a new interactive book published by Ravenspace. We talk with one of the co-creators of the book, Elsie Paul's grandson, Davis McKenzie in July 2020. The book is still available here: http://publications.ravenspacepublishing.org/as-i-remember-it/index

Building Abundant Success!!© with Sabrina-Marie
Episode 2280: Clifton Taulbert ~ Pulitzer Prize Nominated Author & Entrepreneur on Community Connections & Lasting Success

Building Abundant Success!!© with Sabrina-Marie

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 26:32


"Your Growth Mindset Defines Your Perceptions & Your Actions"“Your will to succeed remains one of your greatest assets.”Clifton-Taulbert He is best known for his books Once Upon a Time When We Were Colored and Eight Habits of the Heart: Embracing the Values that Build Strong Communities.According to Clifton L. Taulbert, noted author and entrepreneur businessman, he could have failed had he not encountered community builders and entrepreneurial thinkers early on in his life. Taulbert was born on the Mississippi Delta during the era of legal segregation where he completed his secondary education. Though opportunities were few and barriers were plentiful, Taulbert managed to dream of being successful, not knowing the shape that success would take. Today Taulbert is the President and CEO of the Freemount Corporation (a human capital development company) serving clients nationally and internationally-Fortune 500 Companies, small businesses, federal agencies, professional organizations, community colleges and K-12 leadership. Additionally, entrepreneur Taulbert is the President and CEO of Roots Java Coffee-an African-American owned national coffee brand, importing coffee from Africa. To pass his life lessons along, Taulbert shares his entrepreneurial journey with others as a Thrive15.com mentor.He is a Generational Bridge of Segregated Times to Integrated Times Today.In "The Invitation," Clifton Taulbert returns to the themes of "Once Upon a Time When We Were Colored," his award-winning book and the source of a major motion picture. This new memoir chronicles Taulbert's transformative experience of a supper invitation to a former plantation house in Allendale, South Carolina, where the successful adult confronts his childhood memories and wrestles with the legacies of slavery and segregation that demand to be acknowledged in his present circumstances.Transported back to a setting that looks and feels like the cotton fields and shotgun shacks of his childhood, Taulbert finds himself expected to cross racial barriers that no "colored" man could have broached without dire consequences. "The Invitation" is the story of the man and the little boy inside him wrestling with a past they both know so well, and of stepping into a future that is still being determined.Taulbert has authored thirteen books, several of which are foundational to his consulting philosophy: Eight Habits of the Heart and Who Owns the Ice House-Eight Life Lessons from an Unlikely Entrepreneur [Who Owns the Ice House is part of a Kauffman Foundation sponsored education initiative to expose the impact of the entrepreneurial mindset at all levels] and more recently, Shift Your Thinking: Win Where You Stand and The Invitation-living beyond the lingering lessons of race and place. Taulbert's Eight Habits has become foundational to his work on leveraging community as an asset in the workplace, and garnered him an invitation to address members of the United States Supreme Court as a personal guest of former Supreme Court Justice, Sandra Day O'Connor.Clifton L. Taulbert is a trustee of the University of Tulsa has been recognized international by the Sales and Marketing Academy of Achievement, the Library of Congress, the NAACP, Rotary International as a Paul Harris Fellow and has been a recipient of the Jewish Humanitarian of the Year Award and the Richard Wright Literary Award. The Freemount Corporation is located in Tulsa, Oklahoma.© 2022 All Rights Reserved© 2022 Building Abundant Success!!Join Me on ~ iHeart Radio @ https://tinyurl.com/iHeartBASSpot Me on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/yxuy23baAmazon ~ https://tinyurl.com/AmzBAS

The Homance Chronicles
Episode 195: Hoes of History: Roberta Flack

The Homance Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 37:36


Nicole digs into Roberta Flack's past and uncovers way more than expected. She was saying fuck y'all and doing her own thing since she was a kid. Despite being a black woman living in the south during times of segregation, she managed to go to Howard University at only 15-years-old and teach herself how to play the piano. She continued to go against the grain by marrying a white man and having a child with him. Then, after her divorce she ended up marrying a man much younger than her. She's been the epitome of standing up for what you believe in, women's rights, and love is love.  Send us your Hoes of History recommendations to homancepodcast@gmail.com. Follow us!  IG: @homance_chronicles FB Closed Group: The Homance Chronicles - A Judgment Free Zone https://linktr.ee/homance    

Rocky Mountain Christian Church
Blessed are the Pure in Heart

Rocky Mountain Christian Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022


What's up church. How we doing? It's good to see all of you here. It Frederick. Good to see all of you at Nyah. Good to have all of you online. Just say this. I did one of those baptisms. That's the fastest changing I've ever done in my entire life. I it was, it was fun cuz I knew a couple of those kiddos and so I just wanted to be out there and see both of them get baptized and I cut it a little short on time, so. Alright. We're good. Everybody settle down or Sean settle down and we're ready to go. So I want you to get to Matthew chapter five. We've been there for six weeks. If you're just kind of showing up today, we've been there for six weeks and going through this series called Jesus manifesto where we've been kind of tracking through the beginning of the sermon on the Mount. And so the beginning of the sermon on the Mount, it's called to be attitudes and there are eight of them and we're in number six and number six says this, Jesus just makes a statement. He says blessed or blessed. You could say, I've got my king James going on. Blessed are the pure in spirit are pure in heart for, they will see God blessed are the pure in heart for, they will see God. It's interesting. I think no matter if you're sitting at NIWA, you're sitting right here in the room at Fred or you're online. There's nobody that kind of says, what does it mean? Like pure, pure in heart or purity. When we talk about relationships, like we talk about relational purity. I think every single person gets it now guys, interesting thing this year is my 25th anniversary with my wife, Jen. Pretty cool. Right? And it's all, all 25 years have been marital bliss. I mean, that's what, I don't know what she would say, but no marriages can be difficult. Can it, but, but I tell you this man, the commitment and being together for 25 years and the things that we've gone through and seen, and then just how sweet, you know, as you grow and you mature things just get better when you're working on things, man. It's good. But when we talk about relational purity in the context of those 25 years, I don't think anybody's confused what that looks like. Like when we sit here right now, we would say, okay, that means that Sean only has eyes for Jen. Right? We talk about the context of relational purity. It means she's the one I pursued. There's not other interests. Like my eyes, aren't wandering to other things. We just moved in this new community or a new neighborhood north side of Firestone and it's got a pool and our kids go down the pool. We don't normally go down the pool hardly at all, but I'll go down and play with the kids a little bit, whatever, but let's say we did. Let's say Jen and I went down to the pool and we just kind of hung out on a couple lawn chairs. Kids are playing in the pool. We're having a good time. We're taking in some rays and let's say an attractive young female walks by. And let's say that I did this, took the sunglasses man. What would happen in that moment? Like my wife would probably, after she slapped the snot outta me, right? She would look at me and say, what are you looking at? Because when we talk about relational purity, ma'am relational purity starts with us having eyes for one person. Right? And when, when we have wandering eyes, nothing good happens from that. Like you just know in the context of relationships, when somebody has wandering eyes just constantly and consistently, and there's always an issue of that, man, we alone relationally that can lead to all kinds of stuff. Even biblically. It talks about in relationships that wandering eyes lead to lust, wandering eyes lead to this one big word that we can talk about. We all know adultery, right? Purity and relationships means I have eyes for one. Now. It's interesting. When we talk about relational purity, we get it. But let's step back for a second. When we go into what Jesus is talking about, he says blessed of the pure and heart he's talking about spiritually there. So what does it mean to have spiritual purity? It's interesting to note that when you go to scripture and you just look throughout scripture, it's very similar. Like the language that is used for spiritual purity and spiritual impurity is the same. Basically. If you go through the new Testament, the new Testament writers say, here's what Jesus said. They repeat that. Then they add their own color to that and say relational purity is having eyes for one, having eyes for God. Relational impurity is having wandering eyes or a wandering heart. And it talks about it in the context uses the same exact words. When it gets to impurity, it says wandering hearts lead to things and it use the same exact language leads to lust for the desires of this world, leads to cheating, uses that word and it uses the big one adultery now alt tree, Matthew chapter five, verse eight, Jesus nails it out. And he says blessed to the pure heart for, they will see God blessed to the pure heart because they have eyes for God and for God only. So my question to you would be who do you have eyes for? Who do you have eyes for spiritually speaking? Where are your eyes trained to look? Because here's what you know. And it's exactly why my wife would. I only have eyes for her, but if that happened, my wife would look at me and say, what are you looking at? Because what she knows is our, our hearts have a tendency to follow what our eyes are focused on. And it's the same spiritually. You know, this, your heart has a tendency to follow what your eyes are focused on. So who do you have eyes for? Again? Jesus says blessed to the pure hearts for, they will see God when you read the Bible is seriously clear. It is abundantly clear. You cannot miss this. Jesus cares deeply about your heart. Like when we think about the thing that Jesus cares about most it is your heart. Why? Because your heart reflects your true character. Everything you say, everything, you do, everything. You think everything about you comes out of the overflow of your heart. And because of that, the Bible says you gotta guard. It proves 4 23 says, guard your hearts, bubble, all else, guard your heart for everything you do flows from it. And what is in your hearts will come out through every part of your life. And the interesting thing is Jesus cares about your heart. Here's what he says is Jesus came to change your heart, not just your conduct. You see what most of us feel like is is that the Christian life or the spiritual life is a list of a code of conduct. That if we do these things, God will bless us and God will take care of us. Here's what you need to understand is the spiritual life like purity of heart, keeping our eyes on God. It's not just a code of conduct. God cares less about your conduct. He cares more about the condition of your heart. We could say it this way. God cares less about your sin and more about the condition of your heart. And he might sit there and say, whoa, I thought God really cared about sin and hated sin. He does. But he actually cares more of the condition and the attitude and the direction of your heart than he cares about what you actually do. And there's so many evidences of that in scripture you take David, how could David be a man after God's own heart? David King, David who committed adultery and murder. He didn't just go like this. He went there and God said, you know what? David did mess up. But David confessed, he came back to God and God said, you know what? David from the beginning has always had a heart that no matter what he did wrong, he's always come back to me for some of us that might be helpful in the moment to know that God cares less about your sin. And he cares more about the condition of your heart. So not just who are your eyes trained to look back, but where is your heart? What is your heart connecting with when it's spiritually? Now it's interesting when Jesus talks about this idea of caring less about your sin and more about the condition of your heart, he actually uses a word. There's, there's a word later in the passage that we've just talked about. He actually uses the word adultery and here's an interesting thought Jesus would not be okay. Like it wouldn't be okay with him. If there was just, let's say in our tri towns area, in the Nyah area, Longmont area, let's say on the front range, if there were no acts of adultery and we're like, that would be good, man. Not some of you like I've seen that in my family. That would be really good. Jesus would not be satisfied with that. And he says it in Matthew chapter five versus 27, 28, he says, you've heard it said you shall not commit adultery. So he's acknowledging that's 10 commandments, right? But what's the 10 commandments. It's a code of conduct. What's the B attitudes. It's deeper issues of the heart in talking about character. He says, you've heard it said you should not commit adultery. But I say to you raise the bar that everyone who looks at a woman lustfully has already committed adultery in their heart because Jesus knows that our heart goes to what our eyes are focused on. So what's in our heart will come out through our actions ultimately. So Jesus says I'm not waiting all the way down to line to the symptoms of what's already into your heart. When they come out, I'm concerned with your heart right now because your heart is gonna do some things. If there is negative in there, if there's sinful in there, it's gonna come out through your life and it will hurt you. And Jesus says, man, I am the only one that can help you get past that and experience a different life. Man, Jesus is deeply concerned with our heart for Samuels Samuels 16 seven says, man, looks at the outward appearance, but the Lord looks at the hearts. Man, Jesus did not come into our world just to try to fix a few bad habits. Jesus came into our world to fix some broken hearts and to give us new hearts that could change the world we live in. So what Jesus mean, bless her to the pure heart for, they will see God. What does he mean by a pure heart? Now we talked about eyes only for God, but let's, let's go a little bit deeper. What's Jesus actually talking about. It's interesting in James chapter four, James is the brother of Jesus. If you didn't know that and James chapter four versus four through 10, we'll just kind of go through it. He uses some of the same language. So just listen with me and we're gonna read it. You don't have to go there cause I'm gonna read it in a different version. We're gonna read it in the message, which is a paraphrase. It's not actually a translation, but it's a paraphrase. And it's right down the lines of what Jesus is saying right here. Here's how he says it. James four, four through six, he says, you're cheating God. And that that's pretty pointed. He says, you're cheating. God. If all you want your own way, flirting with the world, every chance you get, you end up enemies of God and his way. And do you suppose that God doesn't care? The proverb has it. He's a fiercely jealous lover. I mean, just notice the language we've already talked about. He said, GE Jesus, God is like, he is after you. He can't keep his eyes off of you. You're the only thing in his sights. He's pursuing you. He loves you. He wants what's best for you. He is a fiercely jealous lover. And what's he jealous of is you going toward other competing things because he knows it's not best. What happens is we go through those things and we do those things. And we end up on the backside going, dang, that wasn't best. God's saying, I'm trying to save you from that. He says, he's a fiercely jealous lover. And what he gives in love is far better than anything else you will ever find message. Version says, you're cheating God. The new international version, which we usually use says you adulterous people and he's talking to church people. If you're sitting here today and you never committed your life to Christ, man, you just, you can listen, but this isn't pointed toward you because you haven't made that commitment to him. You're not in that relationship with him. And I think you should be. And I think the best comes out of that. And we tell you how to do that. But, but he's talking to Christians and he says, you adulterous people. And he's not talking about people who are breaking their marriage vows. He's talking about everyone whose heart is divided from commitment to the world and commitment to God. People who have wandering eyes that they're going after all of these other things that are leading them away from God. Only one thing can have our focus. And James is talking about this idea of a pure heart, same thing as Jesus. And what's interesting about it is he takes a little bit different take when James talks about purity of heart, he's talking about the issue and the idea of wholeness. So think the word integrity for a second. We know how we would describe integrity, but let me give you some history. The word integrity actually comes from the word integer. Like if you won't go all the back to like your math days, like way back, like I can't even remember those days, but you wanna go all the way back to school, age stuff. And you think about math, man. You know what an integer is or an integer it's, it's a whole number, right? It means some of you just like, oh yeah, I forgot that. Right? It's a whole number. It's it's not a decimal. It's not a fraction. It's the idea of something not being part, but being the whole, you see, that's where we get our word integrity. Now what's interesting is you don't, let's take it a step further. You don't just get the word integrity from that word. You also get the word integration. Now think about this. Let's just track this for a second. You and I, we know what segregation is. Segregation is when you take people or things and you divide them by their differences. And we know from history, that's not good. What integration is is no matter what our differences are, no matter what the parts of the whole, no matter if we have different ideas, different thoughts, different backgrounds, different skin colors, different gifts, different. We don't segregate those things. Integration is bringing all those things together in one huge human family, right? And we would say that's best because we learn from each other. And at the core of who we are, we're all the same. We are created in the image of God. That's integration. So think about it this way. A lot of people, they segregate their lives. Think it of it like a pie. They take their life and they segregate it into different slices of the pie. And that's what James is talking about right here. He's saying, we just say, you know, here's my church friends and here's my work friends and here's my school friends and here's my party friends and here's my family life. And here's my work life. And here's my sports life. And here's my hobby life. And here's my secret life. Don't want anybody to know about. And we segregate all those different parts as what happens in most people's lives is as they flow through those different parts of the pie, they're different in each of those places. Like, I'll be honest. Like there's probably today. There's some of you sitting here and feeling a little bit because you know, you walk in and you say hi to the church family. Like, Hey, what's up? How's it going guys? Everything's good. And going, and you're heading out tomorrow or Friday night. And if somebody sees you with those friends, not that you shouldn't have those friends, but it's a different action and attitude and language and everything else between this place and that place, somebody that stand up and we worship. And then we sleep around on Monday. And what James is saying is, dude, that's cheating on God. He's saying integrity is not the parts of the pie. That's not integration. He's saying integrity is the filling that goes through the whole pie. Like your life. That's what we're supposed. You wanna talk about purity of heart. It's keeping our eyes focused on one thing and making sure that one things fills every parts of the pie for us. Then when you're hanging with your church friends and you're hanging with your work friends and you're hanging with your family and you're hanging with your sports buddies or, or your ladies now, whatever it might be, there is a similarity to all of those things that invades it. And we can say, yes, my eyes are still on God. And for some of us, we kind of sit back and we're like, no, I, I don't know if that would really be true. And what James is saying is, man, we've got to integrate God into every part of our life. And that is purity of heart. And that is something beautiful. So big question is like, how do we do that? Like how do we create purity heart? Can I just stop for a second and say this? You can't. You're like great, Sean. That was really helpful today. really appreciate that. No, you just need to understand. I need to understand. We all need to understand that purity of heart is not something you achieve. It is something you receive. Let me say that again. Purity of heart is not something you achieve. It is something that you receive. Like we know the story of scripture. What Jesus did is he came here to a world of people who'd segregated. Their life messed up their life. That sin was as they had taken their eyes off of God, we've wondered. And each and every one of us, we have sinned for all of sin and fall short of the glory of God, Roman chapters three verse 23 says it. And there had to be something paid for that impurity because what impurity does is it distance us from God, just like sitting there. If I were to do this, man, my wife, her heart is gonna go P it's the same thing with God. Sin separates us from God. But what Jesus did on the cross is he came and he, because he could not keep his eyes off of you. He pursued you. You're the one thing he kept his eyes on. And he said, I love these people so much that I'm gonna come. And I'm the only perfect one. The only one with purity of heart. And he came and he allowed that pure heart and life and soul and body to be crucified on a cross. And what he says is for you and me, is that because he was the one who was perfect enough to pay that penalty. Then he was the one that was able to give, to give that freedom to anyone who asked man, guys, purity of heart. There's so much good. And we're gonna talk about it in a second, but there's so much good impurity of heart. It clears our, our, the spiritual blindness away from us. It brings us closer to God. It feels good. It is good. It leads us toward good. And the only way you receive that is by asking Jesus Christ to be your Lord and savior and people who ask Jesus Christ to be their Lord and savior have placed their belief in him. They've said, I want to change my life. They have confessed him as their savior. And just like you saw today, man, they pledge their life to him as they get baptized. And it's the picture of the death, the burial and the resurrection of Jesus. And you should do that. And you're like, is that easy? All I gotta do is say, I need him and Jesus, would you be my savior? And would you forgive me and, and pray and ask him to be a part of my life and then step into those waters. And because of your faith receive forgiveness in the holy spirit, it's that easy? Here's the deal. Tomorrow's the fourth. We're gonna celebrate independence. You know what? You oughta celebrate the 24th of July when we're at Anderson farms and doing Rocky at the farm. Talk about that a little bit later, but we're gonna have a baptism service that day, man. You just show up and you'll be ready and you should come forward that day because God's saying, Hey, I'm ready to start a new journey and I'm ready to purify your heart and make some changes in you. Now purity of heart cannot be achieved. There's nothing you can do to create purity in your life, but it can be pursued. Like for us, we, we have to, you need to understand like Jesus gives it to us. And then it begins this journey of pursuing deeper purity and deeper understanding of him. And so you might say right now, Sean, what do I do? Well, first you accept him is your savior. Second thing you do is simply this. It is the idea of James talks about in verse seven through 10, he says this. He says, so let God work. His will in you yell aloud no to the devil and watch him make himself scarce. Say a quiet yes to God. And he will be there in no time. Quit dabbling in sin, Abilene, sin, purify your inner life. Quit playing the field hit bottom, cry your eyes out. The fun of games are over. Get serious, get really serious. Get down on your knees. Excuse me, before the master. It's the only way that you'll get back on your feet. So what James is talking about in the NIV, it just says it. Plainly James is talking about the beginning of really pursuing purity is the word confession getting down on knees admitting before God crying out to God and saying, yes, this is in my life. It is the beginning of this idea of confession. Augustine famous church. Historians said it this way. He says the confession of bad works is the beginning of good works. Amen. I love that. The confession of bad works is the beginning of good works. Confession is the idea it's it's like this confession is like detoxification for your spirit. Like that's what God's saying. He said, there's stuff in there. There's impurities in there. And even though I have forgiven the consequences of your sin, there's stuff that you're allowing to be in your life that we need to get out. And there is something freeing about this idea, a confession first John, one nine says if we confess our sins to God, he will keep his promise and do what is right. He will forgive our sins and purify us from all our wrongdoing. Now, now catch this. The word confession is the same idea. It's it's, it's actually made of two Greek words. So the word confession in English is made of two Greek words. One that means to speak. And the other means to see. So what the idea of confession is is that we speak the same about our sin, that God sees about our sin. We speak the same about our sin as God speaks about our sin. Cuz a lot of times what we do is man, we try to just give, like, we try to give excuses about it and here's what happened or I wouldn't have, or, or we try to bargain with God and say, God, man, if, if you'll just forgive this thing I'll never do it again. We try to do all those different things. And what God's saying is would you just look at this thing though? Same way I look at it, sin a sin. It's not a FAPA it's not a mess up it's sin. And if we will look at our sin and say, God, it is this, I lied, I cheated. I was disingenuous. I've been angry. And I've had an issue with anger. I keep going along with the crowd at school and following them. I did this. I did, man. If we just, you know what, God's not up there doing, he's not on someone. Yep. What he's doing, he's saying, okay, let's take that one. Let's set aside. Let's take that one. Let's set it aside because you know what Jesus paid for that on the cross. But what's good for your heart is when you admit it to me. And what I can do is I come in and I begin cleaning up your heart. And you know, this is true because you've done this before. Sometimes when you have something with somebody and you've done and you just finally, you just have to get it out and you just say it to 'em and say, I'm sorry, I did this. And they're like, oh man, thanks for telling me. And you just feel this weight off your shoulders. Now sometimes you do that with people and they say, you did what God never does that. God never does that. He's like, I already know. And I already paid and what's good for your heart is to get out off of your chest, man. You really want to get close to God and you really want to start the purification process in your life. Here's what I would encourage you to do is I'd encourage you just to admit it. I'd encourage you to sit down with a pad and paper this week and in your prayer time, just pray and say, God, just show me the things that are taking my eyes off of you. Where are my eyes wondering? And then when he gives you something, write it down. So don't mean it's gonna be really quick. You're gonna have a list, right? You're gonna, but here's what I want you to do. I want you to write first John one nine over each one or over the whole list. The idea that simply says that when I confess my sin, he is faithful and just, and he forgives me of all unrighteousness. The confession of bad works is the beginning of good works. Now it's not just, that's not the only thing we can do. When we begin to unload things. When we begin to detoxify our body, what do we do? Normally with our bodies, we begin to re purify it. We begin to put healthy things into our body, right? So confession is the first step to really pursuing purity. But then the second step is that we begin filling up with what is good. We replace the bad with good things and what happens. And what's interesting about that is how good we actually feel. And then what begins to come out of our life because of what good is coming into our life. Like our eyes, follow our heart, follows what our eyes are focused on. When you begin focusing on God, what begins to come out of your life becomes the things of God. Luke chapter six, verse 45 says a good man brings good things outta the good stored up in their heart. And an evil man brings evil out of the evil, stored up in their heart for out of the mouth for the mouth, speaks what the heart is full of. Man, here's a good health principle. You are what you eat. You are what you eat. If you eat a dozen donuts a day, you're gonna turn into a big donut, right? Amounts, just life. On the other hand, spiritually speaking, if you fill up with God, what you will become is you will become a more purified version of what he created you to be. And people will begin to notice. And man, when we live in that place where eyes wander from God, we always feel it. And it comes around and, and in the moment the pleasure might be, feel good. But the aftermath, we all know the aftermath feels horrible. A couple months ago. I, I, I shared this a little bit, but a couple months ago, my daughter, she challenged me. She said, dad, father's day is two months away. And she said, I wanna do this. I think you should do this with me. Let's go. No desserts, no sugary stuff, no extra stuff. Let's just do this for two months in rock and roll. And I was all good. And I was in because six days a week, I eat really good because my wife and our house like the rules are we eat good. And so I just follow. But on Sunday, Sunday around my house for dad is called Sunday fun. Nobody tells me what to eat. Like I watched a show that I want, you can judge me, whatever. I got my show at the end of the night, it's like a long day crazy day. You're gonna judge me. I watch walking dead. That's my show. You're like, oh my gosh, I cannot go to his church. He watched walking dead. No I do. I do. And I sit there and you, my wife will walk out and she will just look at me and shake her head because I will have a pile of candy bar rappers, guys. It's not one candy bar rapper. It's like a pile of candy bar rappers. I'm like, I'm just catching up from the week. My wife, my daughter asked me, she said, dad, can we do this? Can we just go all the way through? You know? And to two months. And I was like, yes. And every Sunday I, it was just killing me. But the crazy thing is I was feeling good. I will walk into work on Monday going, oh man, on Mondays, I'm walking in. I'm like, it's a Monday. Let's go. Let's get after this thing. And I was feeling great. Father's day got there guys. I have never eaten so many calories in my entire life. I pounded, like, I think for my like body type and whatever, it's like, you know, 3000 calories, a little under you know, a day is good for that. And if you're active I'm I swear it had to be like 7,000 calories. I pounded so many things either was brownies. And you know what I felt, I felt horrible in the moment. I was like, these turtle brownies my wife makes, or on my birthday, she makes that father's day. She makes that it was awesome. Six hours later, I'm dying. And it's the same thing, what we run through. And, and we're like half the time in life. We're like, yep. Sunday is God's day, but is Friday fun day and a Saturday fun day. And then we come back around, we try to clean up and God's saying, no, no, no, here's the deal. If you're following me, I know what's best for you. And I've got things that I wanna feed you in scripture and in worship. And in all those things in Christian community, biblical fellowship with other people, I wanna feed you that stuff. And here's what happens when we engage with that on a regular basis, we feel great. There's those moments where we step back in and we go back into our old ways and we feed ourselves that just things that are not good and it feels terrible guys, what God is calling us to do. He says, you will never be sinless, but you can sin less. We can security in our life with God, James chapter four verse eight says draw near to God and he will draw near to you. It's what he talks about. He says, you begin to put godly things into your body and what will happen in your life is good. Things will begin to come out and it will feel good. And other people will notice the changes and say, that looks good. And I want some of that. And what's going on with you. And some of you will say, yeah, you got all that Christian. Some of some people have friends will say you got all that Christian stuff and whatever, but in the inside they're going, they got something I'm not ready for it yet, but it looks good. And I think God wants that for us. Scripture goes on and just talks about this idea of the blessed or the pure and heart. But it says the eyes, the lamp of the body, if your eyes are good and your whole body will be full of light, like there is a light that comes into our body through the good things of God. That just feels so good. Do you realize that there's a promise that's associated with every one of the be attitudes like God says, Hey, blessed to the pure in heart. So we pursue purity. We, we give our lives to Christ. We confess our sins. We start putting good things of God into our life. But he says this, when that happens, there's a blessing that happens that bless her to the pure and heart for they will. What, see God. And what's he talking about there? What he's talking about is that they may not see God. Literally what he's saying is they're gonna see God active in their daily life because the good things they're putting in and the good things that are coming out, there's still gonna be things that rock our world, but we're gonna start to see how God's working in those things. And he takes difficulty and he makes them good. And we just watch how God's available and there for us and pursuing us and only having eyes for us. I've told this story before, when I was 19 years old, I had a torn retina tore about 50% off the back of my eye. I went into surgery. I had surgery. There was a lot of trauma to my eye, even after the surgery I get out. And I remember taking the patch off my eye and man, guys, I could barely see. There was so much trauma in my eye was bloodshot. There was people look at my eye and like, whoa, there was so much blood. And on the inside, from my perspective, you could see it from the outside. But from the inside, all I could see was this big red liquidy glob that was going on. They put this big bubble in my eye to hold the outside of my eye up so they could laser back the down the retina. And when that thing started to dissipate, it became like a thousand bubbles in there. and so all I could see was just this big red glob of bubbles and all of that. And you know what happened over time, it began to dissipate and the redness began to go away and then the bubbles went away and then I could begin to see, but it was blurry. And then I went to the doctor and they gave me prescription for contacts. And then they gave me glasses and I put those glasses on for the first time. And I was like, there is a whole nother world out there, spiritually speaking, what purity does for us. It clears the blinders that sin puts in front of our eyes. It clears the spiritual blinders that that keep us from being able to see God and puts in this prescription where we begin to be able to look around and say, I see God there. I saw God there today. I saw 'em there yesterday. I know I'm gonna see them there tomorrow. I am seeing things I've never seen before. And my question to you is when's the last time you saw God, Because If you're not seeing them Sienna, you might teach to just question your heart a little bit, because God's not hiding from you. The deal is this God in our lives, he says, I will never leave you. I will never forsake you. I will always be with you. He is right here by your side, in the pure times, in the IUR times in all of it. And he's saying I've got something better for you. And if you would just clear your spiritual eyes, if you would just pursue purity, you'll find out I'm there. And when you find out I'm there and we partner together, man, there's nothing we can't beat together. When's the last time you saw God. If you're not seeing him, it may be a heart problem. It may not be a God problem. I think we get it with our minds. That's why we show up here today. But the problem is, is a lot of times we get it with our minds, but we don't take it to the depth of our heart. So we show up here and there when we need and we get on our knees when we need Inter Bennett says that it's the longest journey you ever taken. Your lifetime is the 18 inches between your head and your heart. Every person in here, every person over there, every person out there online, you know that that's why you're watching, but do you know it here? And when you find it here, man, you will find God and you will find a whole different world. Let's pray father, for those of us today that just need to confess some things. Maybe it's just a little too big, even for us, just to even just sit down and know how to even say it to you, father. I pray that they'll hit our prayer teams up front at each campus after no there's no judgment. We've all been there. We've all prayed those prayers and ask for help, praying in those prayers. And I pray they would for the person online father, I pray that they just get down on their knees and just ask for forgiveness for some things. And the father for us, I pray. We pursue purity. And when we pursue purity, Lord, I pray. You would show yourself to us. I pray that we'd see you, father. I pray that we would pursue as a church. Just putting the good things of you and of this place into our lives on a consistent basis. I pray, we'd even check on in on somebody that we know is struggling and, and needs this. But's not here, but it's a part of our family. They're just not, I pray. We'd reach out to them. And the father I pray is we as a, a community of believers would go out and we will live pure lives, integrated lives in every area of our life. And that people would see it, that they would want it. And more people would come to you and experience the goodness of following you. God, we love you. We are so grateful for your grace. It's in Jesus name that we pray. Amen.

Nick and Russ Don't Know Anything!
Removing All Rights - OPPRESSION

Nick and Russ Don't Know Anything!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 26:57


What happens with a branch of the government strips all of the rights of the majority? They break the society, 1984 is upon us. They want us to be subservient, mindless workers . Roe v Wade - gonePolice Accountability - goneClean Air Act - gone...Next Gay Rights, Contraception, Interracial Marriage, Segregation, Meat Inspection...you name it...its going way. It will be easier to die and harder to vote in this country.VOTE BLUE in 2022!

The Leading Voices in Food
E173: Power & Benefit on the Plate in Durham NC

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 52:30


So why is the food history of a community so important? And can Durham's food history be applied to other places? Who owns land, who can grow food and make a living doing so, and who has access to food, any food, least of all healthy food? The answers are deeply influenced by historical policies and practices. These in retrospect, clearly exacerbated, supported, and even created food related calamities, the dual burden communities face of both food insecurity and diet related chronic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. Understanding these practices is important in creating change. And in understanding that conditions imposed on neighborhoods rather than personal failings of residents explain what we see today. This is a story about Durham, North Carolina. These days, Durham is famous as one of the South's foodiest towns and known for its award-winning chefs, thriving restaurant scene, and reverence for even the most humble foods served with down-home charm. But Durham, just like the rest of North Carolina, like other states and other countries, has discouraging any high rates of food insecurity. This is juxtaposed to high rates as well of obesity, diabetes, and other diet-related chronic diseases. It is helpful of course, to know how things are now, but a more complex and highly important question is how we got here. Enter history. What can be learned from a detailed historical analysis, in this case of Durham, and how relevant is this information to other places?   The Duke World Food Policy Center worked with historian, Melissa Norton to write a report titled, "Power and Benefit On The Plate The History of Food in Durham, North Carolina". This recording is an abridged version of that report and features documented historical quotes from the relevant periods in history as read by contemporary voices.   Let's go back to the beginning. Durham, North Carolina is the ancestral home of the Occaneechi, the Eno, the Adshusheer and the Shocco indigenous peoples. Before European colonizers came, land was not something that people owned. Instead land and its natural resources were shared so that everyone could benefit.   “To our people land was everything, identity, our connection to our ancestors, our pharmacy, the source of all that sustained us. Our lands, were where our responsibility to the world was enacted, sacred ground. It belonged to itself. It was a gift, not a commodity. It could never be bought or sold.”  Robin Kimmerer, Potawatomi Nation.   Durham's tribes and clans supported themselves through hunting, foraging and communal farming. They managed the habitat for fish, fowl and other wild animal populations. They used controlled fires to clear land, had complex farming irrigation systems and created a network of roads for trade and exchange. When European settler colonists came into North Carolina life for indigenous people changed dramatically. At first, they taught colonists how to forage and clear land, what to plant and how to care for crops. The colonists came to North Carolina believed that they had the spiritual, political and legal blessing of Pope Alexander the sixth through the doctrine of discovery. This decree labeled indigenous peoples as subhuman because they were not Christian and treated their land as available for the taking.   “The Indians are really better to us than we are to them. They always give us rituals at their quarters and take care we are armed against hunger and thirst. We do not do so by them, generally speaking, but let them walk by our doors hungry and do not often relieve them. We look upon them with scorn and disdain and think them little better than beasts in humane shape. Though if we're examined, we shall find that for all our religion and education, we possess more moralities and evil than these savages do not.” John Lawson, English settler colonist in North Carolina, 1709.   Settlers forced native people off ancestral homelands and took possession of the stolen land and its resources. As a result, many indigenous people left to join other tribes, some hid in order to remain in the area. And some were forced into assimilation programs or enslaved and shipped to the Caribbean.   Going back to the early colonial settlers, most were small scale farmers who grew corn, fruits and vegetables and commodities such as tobacco, wheat, and cotton for their own use or to barter. As farms grew from the 1500s through the 1800s, colonists brought West African people by force to use as free farm labor. West Africans brought seeds from their homelands and foods such as hibiscus, yams and sweet potatoes, watermelon and bananas and millet, okra and sorghum became a permanent part of the Southern food culture. Food was an essential connection to home, to community and resiliency. Indigenous and enslaved African people interacted and exchanged practical and cultural traditions.   “My name is Alex Woods. I was born in 1858. In slavery time I belonged to Jim Woods. My Missus name was Patty Woods. They treated us tolerable fair. Our food was well cooked. We were fed from the kitchen of the great house during the week. We cooked and ate at our home Saturday nights and Sundays. They allowed my father to hunt with a gun. He was a good hunter and brought a lot of game to the plantation. They cooked it at the great house and divided it up. My father killed deer and turkey. All had plenty of rabbits, possum, coons and squirrels.” Alex Woods   In 1854, the development of the North Carolina railroad transformed agricultural markets. The farming economy shifted from fruits, vegetables, and grains toward large scale cash crops, such as tobacco. The railroad stop in Durham became the center of the city. By the time the civil war began in 1861, nearly one out of three people in Durham county were enslaved. A quarter of the area's white farmers legally owned enslaved people. Cameron Plantation was the largest plantation in the state with 30,000 acres and 900 enslaved people.   To be self sufficient, create security and build wealth. People needed to own land. The federal government passed the homestead act of 1862 to create new land ownership opportunities. As a result in the west 246 million acres of native people's land were deeded to 1.5 million white families.   That same year, the federal government also passed the moral act. This established North Carolina State University in Raleigh as a land grant university to teach white students practical agricultural science, military science and engineering. 29 years later in 1891, North Carolina Agriculture and Technology University in Greensboro was established to serve black students, but the institutions were never funded equally.   In 1865, the civil war ended at Bennett Place in Durham with the largest surrender of Confederate troops. Reconstruction occurred in the subsequent years from 1865 to 1877. During this time, Durham struggled with its own political, social and economic challenges. One of which were the circumstances faced by formerly enslaved people who were freed with no land, no jobs, no money and no citizenship rights. Historians estimate that more than a million freed black people in the country became sick for malnutrition, disease and near starvation. And tens of thousands of people died.   Listen to the words of Martha Allen, a young black woman at the time.   “I was never hungry till we was free and the Yankees fed us. We didn't have nothing to eat, except heart attack and Midland meat. I never seen such meat. It was thin and tough with a thick skin. You could boil it all day and all night and it couldn't cook. I wouldn't eat it. I thought it was mule meat. Mules that done been shot on the battlefield then dried. I still believe it was mule meat. Them was bad days. I was hungry most of the time and had to keep fighting off them Yankee mans.” Martha Allen   In the years after the war, a few people had cash, but landowners still needed farm labor, poor farmers and families of all races struggled. Landowners began hiring farm labor through share cropping and tenant farm contracts.   “The Negros have as their compensation, a share of the crops that shall be raised one third part of the wheat, corn, cotton, tobacco, syrup, peas, sweet potatoes and pork. But the seed wheat is to be first passed back to the said Cameron, the hogs to be killed or pork shall be fattened out of the corn crop before division. The said Cameron is to have the other two thirds of said crops.” Cameron share cropping contract 1866.   Sharecroppers work plots of farmland, and then received a fraction of the crop yield for themselves as payment. For newly freed black people. Many of whom worked the same land, lived in the same housing and worked under the close supervision of the same overseers sharecropping felt like slavery under another name.   In 1868 and 1877 North Carolina passed the landlord tenant acts, which legalized the power imbalance between landowners and sharecropping farmers. For poor farmers there was simply no way to get ahead. And so-called black codes, laws enacted throughout the south in the 1860s and beyond denied black people the right to vote, to serve on juries or to testify in court against white people. With tenant farming, workers paid rent to landowners and kept all the proceeds from the crops.   “We lived all over the area because we were tenant farmers, very poor living on the land of the owner who was of course, white. We used his mules and he paid for the seed and the tobacco and the stuff that we planted. Of course, as I look back now, I know how they cheated us because we never had anything.” Theresa Cameron Lyons, 1868, on growing up in a black tenant farming family in Durham County.   North Carolina politics during this time was dominated by white supremacist ideology and by efforts to keep blacks from voting and from holding political office. In 1896, the US Supreme Court ruled that separate but equal treatment of blacks was legally permissible. This created the legal basis of racial apartheid known as Jim Crow. From 1896 to 1964 Jim Crow laws imposed racial segregation on nearly all aspects of life, including schools, transportation, and public facilities. These laws institutionalized economic, educational and social disadvantages for black and indigenous people, such court sanction exclusion combined with violence and intimidation from white people created severely hostile living conditions for North Carolina's black people. As a result, registered black voters in North Carolina plummeted from 126,000 in 1896 to only 6,100 in 1902.   As the year 1900 dawned, more than half of the US population were farmers or lived in rural communities. Durham County was still largely farmland, but there was incredible urban growth in the early decades of the 1900s. This too had an impact on Durham's food and the community.   Demand for tobacco and textile factory workers was growing in Durham. Although only white workers could work in the textile factories. Both black and white migrants found work in Durham's Liggett Myers and American tobacco factories. Black workers had the lowest pay, most backbreaking jobs in the factories and were paid less than the white workers.   Outside the factories black women had more job opportunities than black men, but as cooks and domestic servants. And they also held some administrative positions. As people traded farm life for the city, they had to adjust to a new way of life. This meant living off wages in the new cash economy and the crowded close quarters of urban living.   Textile mill owners in the East Durham Edgemont and West Durham areas built subsidized mill villages to provide housing for white workers close to the factories. Each mill village had its own churches, schools, recreation centers, and stores.   “Yeah, it was a complete store. They'd have very few wise work in the mills. They would have a man that went out in the morning, they'd call it taking orders. He'd go to all the houses and the woman of the house and tell him what she wanted. He'd bring it back in time to be cooked and served up for what they called dinner, which is of course lunch. And he'd go do the same thing in the afternoon. Have it back in time for a good supper.”  Zeb Stone, 1915, a white business owner from West Durham, North Carolina.   Many textile workers had grown up on farms and knew how to garden and raise chickens, pigs, or even cows in their yards. Families preserved extra garden produce and meals for the winter. Home canning became popular and increased during World War I and later in World War II, as food shortages meant rations for canned food. The federal government urged people to rely on produce grown in their own gardens called victory gardens and to share resources with neighbors.   Six predominantly black neighborhoods developed in Durham, along with black churches, schools and businesses, people form close relationships with each other. And even though the yards were often small, many black people also maintained gardens, kept chickens until the local government banned livestock in the city limits in the 1940s. Buying from black businesses meant investing in the whole black community. Community leaders preached how each dollar spent would flow in a wheel of progress throughout black Durham. Neighborhood grocers were owned by and for people who lived in black neighborhoods, here's what longtime Durham state representative Henry Mickey Michelle has to say about growing up in the Hayti area of Durham.   “We didn't have to go across the tracks to get anything done. We had our own savings and loans bank, our own insurance company, our own furniture store, our own tailors, barber shops, grocery stores, the whole nine yards.” Durham state representative Henry Mickey Michelle   Black and white farmers came to Durham's urban areas to sell fresh produce on street corners and created popup farm stands throughout the city. Many came to Hayti, Durham's largest black neighborhood and to the center of black commerce that was dubbed Black Wall Street. Durham established the first official farmer's market then called a curb market in 1911 to connect county farmers with urban consumers.   The federal government helped farmers stay informed of developments in agriculture, home economics, public policy, and the economy. The Smith Lever Act of 1914 launched cooperative extension services out of the land grant universities. In 1914 extension services for Durham County's white people began and services for black communities started in 1917, hoping to draw young people into farming.   Segregated schools in Durham offered agriculture training. Programs for the future farmers of America served white students and new farmers of America programs served black students.   By 1920 farmers comprised 50% of the population in Durham County outside the city core. Nearly half of these were tenant farmers. Arthur Brody, a black man who made his home in Durham had this to say about his family's experience.   “My granddaddy had 50 acres of land. They said he was working for this white family and the man took a liking to him. And back then land was cheap. And that man told him, Robert, what you ought to do is buy an acre of land every month. He gave him $12 a month. So he bought an acre of land a month, a dollar a month for a year. And he bought that farm with 52 acres of land in it. And he built his house out of logs. I remember that log house just as good I can.” Arthur Brody   Black families were beginning to acquire farmland. Although black owned farms were generally smaller and on less productive land than white owned farms. At its peak in 1920, 26% of farms nationally were owned by black farmers.   The shift to industrialized agriculture concentrated on just a few crops, created new pressures for farmers, especially small scale farmers who were already struggling with the depressed economy, depleted soil, outdated farming tools and the constant demand for cash crops, black and white farmers alike struggled with a lack of fair credit and chronic indebtedness. Here is what the Negro Credit Unions of North Carolina had to say about the farm credit system in 1920.   “Perhaps the greatest drawback to the average poor farmer, struggling for a foothold on the soil and trying to make a home for himself and family in the community is the lack of capital. If he buys fertilizer on time, borrows money or contracts to be carried over the cropping season, it is usually at such a ruinous rate of interest that few ever get out from under its painful influence. The man who owns a small farm as well as he who rents one has long been victimized by the credit system.” Negro Credit Unions of North Carolina brochure   In Durham, life still followed the seasonal cycles of farming. There were special times for communal rituals, such as berry picking, corn shucking and peach canning. Mary Mebane described growing up in a black farming community in Northern Durham County in this way.   “Berry picking was a ritual, a part of the rhythm of summer life. I went to bed excited. We didn't know whose berries they were. Nobody had heard about the idea of private property. Besides the berries wild, free for everybody. The grown people picked up high and the children picked low. We children ate them on the spot, putting purple stained fingers into our mouths, creating purple stained tongues while the grown people wiped sweat and dodged bumblebees.” Mary Mebane   Many black Durhamites joined in the great migration of black people to cities in the North and Western parts of the country. More than 6 million black people left the South between 1917 and 1970. Those who stayed found themselves caught between traditional farming culture and an increasingly modernized urban world and black farmers had the further burden of discrimination in federal farm lending programs, which hampered their ability to sustain, adapt and expand their farming.   In the 1930s, the country was grappling with a great depression and the dust bowl. The textile industry was hit hard by the reception and white textile factory workers struggled. Families survived on cheap fat back, flower beans and their own homegrown produce. Through bouts of unemployment or underemployment. Hunger was never far off. Durham's black working class occupied the bottom rung of the economic ladder even before the great depression. Poverty and food insecurity increased to such an extent that black Durhamites were six times more likely to develop pellagra than whites in 1930. Pellagra is a disease caused by niacin deficiency. It was the leading cause of death in the city after tuberculosis. Nurses counseled Durham's black residents to eat green vegetables and fresh milk, but they were told that economics not lack of knowledge led to poor eating habits.   As one black patient remarked: “We would like to do everything you say, but we just haven't got the money.”   During the great depression, the food situation became so desperate that the Federal Emergency Relief Administration and the Works Progress Administration and charities such as the Red Cross began distributing food relief. The supplies staved off hunger to some extent, but black and white residents were both complaining the food wasn't what they would normally eat. Here an unemployed white textile worker in East Durham described his family's struggle with the emergency relief rations during the great depression.   “I go around to the place that the WPA distributes commodities and the last time they gave me four packs of powdered skim milk, five pounds of country butter, three pounds of navy beans, 24 pounds of flour. That was grand flour to mix awful bread. I've tried every way I could think of to cook it. And it ain't been able to do anything with it yet. That stuff just ain't fitting for a dog to eat, but I have to use everything I get. One of the boys gets up early every morning and goes out and picks berries for breakfast. They with butter do make the flour eat a lot better. He wants to pick some for preserves, but we can highly get sugar for our needs right now. But there is something about us that keeps us hoping that in some way, the future will take care of itself.” Unemployed white textile worker in Durham during the Depression   Over time federal, state and local Durham aid efforts shifted toward training and getting people new jobs, but black men and women did not get the same opportunities as Durham's white residents. In 1933, the federal government passed the agriculture adjustment act later known as the farm bill. This legislation raised market prices and paid farmers to rest soils depleted from intensive farming. But this created new problems for small farmers already struggling to survive. Davis Harris reflects on the changes these policies caused in the black farming community of Northern Durham County.   “The federal government started paying farmers to put their soil in what they called the soil bank. At the time the US was producing more grain than they needed. So they asked farmers in order to preserve the land and soil, if they could just let the soil rest. And if you did that for 10 years, the people like me growing up who got public jobs, it was difficult to go back to the farm because you get accustomed to getting paid every month. And to go back to once a year was difficult, almost impossible. And then the farmer's equipment gets obsolete and the facilities get obsolete and there is no help. So I see that as a turning point because you've lost all your resources, your equipment, your facilities, and your workforce, and the farmers are 10 to 12 years older. So a lot of the farmers had to get public jobs so they can get enough credit to draw social security.” Davis Harris   Black land owners also contended with private property laws that put them at a very real disadvantage. Black families had little reason to trust institutions and were far less likely to have a will than white families. So when a property owner died without a legal will, their property passed to all their direct heirs as partial shares. A form of ownership transfer called heirs property. Over several generations property ownership became increasingly unclear as dozens or even hundreds of heirs could own a small share. Heirs were then more vulnerable to land speculators and developers through a legal process called partition action. Speculators would buy off the interest of a single heir. And just one heir, no matter how small their share, and this would force the sale of entire plot of land through the courts. Black farm ownership peaked between 1910 and 1920, and then dropped dramatically due to the changing farm economy, discrimination and coercive means. From 1910 to the 1930s, the total number of farms in Durham declined dramatically. But black farmers lost their land at more than twice the rate of white farmers.   Willie Roberts, a black Durham County mechanic and farmer was interviewed in the 1930s and had this to say about the tensions of the time: “We got some mean neighbors around here. They hate us 'cause we own, and we won't sell. They want to buy it for nothing. They don't like for colored people to own land. They got a white lady, Ms. Jones on the next farm to say that I attacked her. I hope to be struck down by Jesus if I said or did anything she could kick on, it's all prejudiced against a colored family that's trying to catch up with the whites. They hated my father because he owned land and my mother because she taught school and now they're trying to run us off, but we're going to stay on.”   In 1942, many young men were serving in world war II and black agricultural laborers were leaving farms as part of the great migration to Northern and Western states. So the federal government enacted the Bracero Program to address severe farm labor shortages. This allowed contract laborers from Mexico into the country to fill the labor gap. Where you live, determines where you buy food and what food is available. And Durham's black urban residents were grappling with Jim Crow laws and with segregation.   “In all licensed restaurants, public eating places and weenie shops where persons of the white and colored races are permitted to be served with and eat food and are allowed to congregate. There shall be provided separate rooms for the separate accommodation of each race. The partition between such rooms shall be constructed of wood, plaster or brick or like material, and shall reach from the floor to the ceiling…” The code of the city of Durham, North Carolina, 1947, C13 section 42.   Segregation and racial discrimination meant that opportunities for home ownership, loans, and neighborhood improvements favored white people, discriminatory policies and practices also impacted access to nutritious foods and to restaurants and resentment was building.   A black woman recalls her childhood experiences during this time: “When I was a child, the Durham Dairy was a weekly stop on Sunday evenings as part of our family drive, we would park, go into the counter and then return to the car with our ice cream. After my father finished his, we would drive around Durham while the rest of us finished our ice cream. I had no idea as a young child that the reason we took that ice cream to the car was because the Durham Dairy was segregated and being an African American family we were not allowed to eat our ice cream on the premises. I was shocked to learn as an adult how my parents had been so artful in sparing this ugly truth from me and my younger siblings.”   As early as the 1920s, Durham's white homeowners had to agree to racial covenants on their suburban home and land deeds, such covenants explicitly prevented black ownership and restricted black residents in homes, except for domestic servants. This practice was legal until 1948. The National Association of Real Estate Boards code of ethics at that time directed real estate agents to maintain segregation in the name of safeguarding, neighborhood stability and property values. The industry practice known as steering remained in effect until 1950.   “A realtor should never be instrumental in introducing in a neighborhood members of any race or nationality whose presence will clearly be detrimental to property values in the neighborhood…” National Association of Real Estate Boards code of ethics   The great depression stimulated the country's new deal, social safety net legislation, including the social security act of 1935, which offered benefits and unemployment insurance. The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 set a national minimum wage and the National Labor Relations Act of 1935 created the right for workers to organize. However, agricultural and domestic workers positions held predominantly by black people during the 1930s were specifically excluded from these programs, losing out on both fair pay and labor protections.   Historian Ira Katznelson wrote extensively about the impact of these policy decisions on the country's African Americans: “Southern legislators understood that their region's agrarian interests and racial arrangements were inextricably entwined. By excluding these persons from new deal legislation it remained possible to maintain racial inequality in Southern labor markets by dictating the terms and conditions of African American labor.”   The federal government also recognized home ownership as one of the best ways to stabilize the economy and expand the middle class. The homeowner's loan corporation, a government sponsored corporation created as part of the new deal developed city maps and color coded neighborhoods according to lending risks, these maps became the model for public and private lending from the 1930s on. In Durham and elsewhere, red lines were drawn around black, mixed race and the poorest white neighborhoods, the effects of redlining now close to a century old had profound effects that are still felt to this day. Over time these maps discourage investment in home ownership and also business development in these areas ringed in red and encouraged and supported these things in white neighborhoods.   By defining some areas as too risky for investment lending practices followed, poverty was exacerbated and concentrated and housing deserts, credit deserts and food deserts became a predictable consequence. Redlining maps also shaped lending practices for the GI Bill Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944. The GI Bill made mortgages available to World War II veterans with little or no down payment. And with very low interest rates. The aim was to create financial stability and the accumulation of generational wealth for those who would serve the country through home ownership. However, most homes were in suburban neighborhoods, primarily financed by the federal government. Between redlining lending practices and real estate covenants restricting black buyers, home ownership simply wasn't possible for the vast majority of the 1 million plus black World War II veterans. Between 1935 and 1968, less than 2% of federal home loans were for black people. The GI Bill also did not issue home loans on Indian reservations, which excluded many Native American veterans.   In the late 1950s, Durham received federal money for a local urban renewal program to clear slums and blighted areas through the Housing Act of 1949. The city chose to demolish a large section of the Hayti area, the city's largest and most prominent black neighborhood and home to most black owned businesses. This changed everything. City officials cited the poor physical conditions of Hayti as the reason for demolition. The land was then used to build North Carolina highway 147, a freeway connector.   Louis Austin editor of the Carolina Times wrote in 1965: "The so-called urban renewal program in Durham is not only the biggest farce ever concocted in the mind of moral man, but it is just another scheme to relieve Negroes of property."   Hayti's destruction included a significant part of the neighborhood's food infrastructure, such as grocery stores and restaurants. What was once a thriving and resilient food economy where wealth remained in the community became a food desert.   Nathaniel White, formerly a Hayti business owner in Durham had this to say about the destruction of the Hayti neighborhood: “Well, I think we got something like $32,000 for our business. As I look back on it now, if you're going to drive a freeway right through my building, the only fair thing to do is to replace that building. In other words, I ought to be able to move my equipment and everything into a building. If they do it like that, you will be able to stand the damage. Now, the highway department has a replacement clause in their building, but the urban renewal had what they call fair market value, and that won't replace it. And that's where the handicap comes. Just say, you give them $32,000 that probably would've bought the land or whatever, but it wouldn't put the building back and everything like that.”   In the 1950s, Durham built federally funded housing projects for low income families. But by the late 1960s, public housing in the city was almost exclusively for black people and clustered in existing black neighborhoods. This further reinforced patterns of residential segregation, Durham's lunch counters and restaurants became rallying points during the civil rights movements. North Carolina's first protest was at Durham's Royal ice cream restaurant in 1957.   Virginia Williams, a young black woman at the time was a member of the Royal Ice Cream Nine who staged the protest: “None of it made any sense, but that had been the way of life. And that's the way the older folk had accepted it. And so I guess I was one of them who thought, if not us, who, if not now, when. So the police officers came and they asked us to leave. I remember one of them asking me to leave and I asked for ice cream. And he said, if you were my daughter, I would spank you and make you leave. And then I said, if I was your daughter, I wouldn't be here sitting here being asked to leave.”   In 1962, more than 4,000 people protested at Howard Johnson's Ice Cream Grill in Durham. The struggle to desegregate eateries intensified in 1963, when protesters organized sit-ins at six downtown restaurants on the eve of municipal elections, hundreds of people were arrested and protestors surrounded the jail in solidarity. And in the weeks that followed more than 700 black and white Durhamites ran a full page ad in the Durham Herald newspaper. They pledged to support restaurants and other businesses that adopted equal treatment to all, without regard to race. The mounting public pressure resulted in mass desegregation of Durham Eateries by the end of 1962, ahead of the 1964 federal civil rights act that legally ended segregation.   Although civil rights wins brought about new political, economic and social opportunities for black people, desegregation didn't help black businesses. They suffered economically because black people began to explore new opportunities to shop outside their neighborhoods, but white people didn't patronize black owned businesses in turn.   In 1964, the federal government passed the Food Stamp Act as a means to safeguard people's health and wellbeing and provide a stable foundation for US agriculture. It was also intended to raise levels of nutrition among low income households. The food stamp program was implemented in Durham County in 1966. A decade later the program was in every county in the country.   From 1970 through the 1990s, urban renewal continued to disrupt and reshape Durham central city. As both white and middle class black residents left central Durham for suburban homes, banks and grocery stores disappeared. Textile and tobacco factory jobs were also leaving Durham for good. Thousands of workers became unemployed and the domino effect on home ownership, businesses and workplaces disrupted much of Durham's infrastructure and its community life.   From 1970 through the 1980s, the availability of home refrigerators and microwaves also changed how families stored and cooked their food. Durham already had higher numbers of working women than the national average. As a result, convenience foods, foods from restaurants, prepared meals at grocery stores and microwavable foods from the freezer were in demand.   Like many Americans, Durham residents had become increasingly disconnected from farming and food production, both physically and culturally. Food corporations now used marketing in the media to shape ideas about what to eat and why. The food system became dominated by increasing corporate consolidation and control. And by large scale industrial agriculture emphasizing monoculture. Corporations were fast gaining political and economic power and used their influence to affect trade regulations, tax rates, and wealth distribution.   In the 1980s, the federal government passed legislation that boosted free market capitalism, reduced social safety net spending and promoted volunteerism and charity as a way to reduce poverty and government welfare. These policies negatively impacted Durham's already historically disadvantaged populations. Nonprofit organizations began to emerge to deal with the growing issues of hunger and food insecurity and nonprofit food charity became an industry unto itself. More than 80% of pantries and soup kitchens in the US came into existence between 1980 and 2001.   The H-2A Guest Worker Program of 1986 allowed agricultural workers to hire seasonal foreign workers on special visas who were contracted to a particular farm, but workers did not have the same labor protections as US citizens.   That same year, the US launched the war on drugs to reduce drug abuse and crime. Low income communities were disproportionately targeted when Durham's housing authority paid off duty police officers to patrol high crime areas, particularly public housing developments. Hyper policing, drug criminalization, and logger sentencing for drug related offenses caused incarceration rates to rise steadily. Durham's jail and prison incarceration rates from 1978 to 2015 rose higher than anywhere else in North Carolina.   Here is an excerpt from an interview with Chuck Omega Manning, an activist and director of the city of Durham's welcome program. “Being totally honest, high incarceration rates for people of color is very detrimental to our health. Even in the Durham County Jail, you have a canteen that's run through a private company who only sell certain things like oodles of noodles that are not healthy. And then in prisons, you don't get to eat vegetables unless it's part of your dinner. And even then it's oftentimes still not healthy because of how it's cooked. But if you don't work in the kitchen, you don't get to decide, you just get it how it comes and you pray over it and eat it. But then over time, people get institutionalized in the system. And when they return home, they continue to eat the same way because they're used to it. And the financial piece only enhances that because you have individuals coming home, looking for employment, trying to do something different. And there are just so many barriers even with food stamps. So it almost feels like you're being punished twice. And it's very depressing.”   In the 1990s, Durham wanted more investment in the downtown area. Instead of the factory jobs of the past, the downtown area shifted to offer low paying service jobs and high paying jobs in research and technology. Wealthy newcomers were called urban pioneers and trailblazers and purchase properties in historically disinvested city areas.   Low wage workers today cannot afford new housing prices in Durham, in most cases, or to pay the increasing property taxes. Many people are losing their homes through when increases, evictions and foreclosures. Gentrification has also changed which food retailers exist in the local food environment. Sometimes this creates food mirages where high quality food is priced out of reach of longtime residents.   The North American Free Trade Agreement NAFTA of 1994 also changed Durham and North Carolina. Farmers from Mexico and Central America driven out of business by the trade agreement immigrated to places like North Carolina, looking for agricultural and construction jobs. Durham's Latino population grew from just over 2000 in people to 1990, to nearly 40,000 in 2014, one out of three Durham public school students was Latino in 2014. Today, 94% of migrant farm workers in North Carolina are native Spanish speakers.   In 1996, the federal government made changes to the nation's food assistance security net. It dramatically cut SNAP benefits, formerly known as food stamps and limited eligibility to receive benefits and the length of benefits. In Durham, SNAP benefit participation rate decreased by 14% between 1997 and 2001 despite a 2% increase in the poverty rate.   Durham's Latino Credit Union opened in 2000 at a time when three quarters of Latinos did not bank at all. Over the next 20 years, Latinos developed and operated restaurants, grocery stores and services across Durham. This provided the Latino population with culturally resident food, community gathering spaces and jobs.   Processed foods had become a central part of the American diet by the early two thousands. And the vast majority of food advertising promoted convenience foods, candies, and snacks, alcoholic beverages, soft drinks and desserts. In addition, companies did and still do target black and Hispanic consumers with marketing for the least nutritious products contributing to diet related health disparities, affecting communities of color.   During the great recession of 2007 to 2009, job losses, wage reductions and foreclosure crisis increased the number of people struggling to afford and access enough nutritious food. As a result, SNAP participation rose dramatically in Durham.   In 2008, the farm bill included language about food deserts for the first time. A food desert was defined as a census track with a substantial share of residents who live in low income areas and have low levels of access to a grocery store or to healthy affordable foods in a retail outlet. Today some scholars describe such places as areas of food apartheid. This recognizes the outcomes of past policy decisions that disinvested in disadvantaged populations and locations, the cumulative effects of living under food apartheid have profound impacts on the health, wellbeing, and life expectancy of people of color and the poor.   Here's an excerpt from an interview with Latonya Gilchrist, a Durham county community health worker: “I've suffered a lot in this body for a lot of people it's genetic, but I feel like, and this is my personal feeling based on what I've experienced and my whole family. It's the role of food deserts and the cost of food, not being able to have a community grocery store and what I'll say for Northeast Central Durham or the East Durham area where I grew up, we always had corner stores that sold everything we didn't need. And very little of what we did need. Back when I was a child growing up, potato chips cost 16 cents a bag, and you could get potato chips all day long and all night long, and people could get beer and wine in the neighborhood, but you couldn't find fruits and vegetables until my daddy started selling them on a truck. So diseases come about genetically, but it's increased or enhanced through living in poor poverty stricken neighborhoods.”   Durham foreclosure spiked during the great recession of 2008 and were disproportionately located in historically black neighborhoods. Owners in high poverty neighborhoods have been targeted for high cost subprime loans by lenders through a practice known as reverse redlining. As neighborhoods gentrify and longtime residents get displaced, there is an increasing spatial disconnect between services and amenities and those who utilize them and need them the most. Food, housing and retail gentrification are closely intertwined.   Here's an excerpt from an interview with Eliazar Posada, community engagement advocacy manager of El Centro in Durham: “Gentrification is affecting a lot of our community members and not just affecting the youth, but also the families, unless we can find ways to subsidize housing or find a way to make gentrification not so dramatic for some of our community members. The youth are not going to be staying in Durham if their parents can't stay.”   Durham's people of color and low income people overall have disproportionately high incidents of diabetes. In a 2016 survey in the Piedmont region, 16% of respondents with household incomes, less than $15,000 reported having diabetes compared to only 6% of residents with household incomes of more than $75,000. By 2017 black patients were 80% more likely than white patients to have diabetes in Durham.   In Durham County in 2019, the average hourly wage for food preparation and serving jobs was $10.83 cents an hour or $22,516 annually before taxes. Such wages are all been impossible to live on without government assistance. The fair market rent for a two bedroom housing unit in Durham in 2018 was $900 a month or about $10,800 a year.   Food inequality is a lack of consistent access to enough food for a healthy, active life is caused by poverty, the cost of housing and healthcare and unemployment and underemployment. It is also impacted by the interrelated forces of home and land ownership, political power, economic resources, structural racism, gender oppression, and labor rights. Durham's communities continue to build community solidarity and mutual aid as people lend money, time and other resources trying to make sure everyone can access adequate and healthy food.   In a remarkable feat of resilience the Occaneechi band of the Saponi Nation was awarded official recognition by North Carolina in 2002, following 20 years of organizing and sustained advocacy. They purchased a 250 acre plot of land just outside of Durham County and planted an orchard of fruit bearing trees for collective tribal use. This is the first land that the tribe has owned collectively in more than 250 years.   Durham's black farmer's market emerging from 2015 to 2019 is also a testament to community building through food. The market supports local black farmers and makes healthy eating attainable for individuals living in some of Durham's food apartheid areas. Market organizers are challenging social norms, classism and racism, and believe that healthy living should be possible for everyone.   So why is the food history of a community so important? And can Durham's food history be applied to other places? Who owns land, who can grow food and make a living doing so, and who has access to food, any food, least of all healthy food? The answers are deeply influenced by historical policies and practices. These in retrospect, clearly exacerbated, supported, and even created food related calamities, the dual burden communities face of both food insecurity and diet related chronic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. Understanding these practices is important in creating change. And in understanding that conditions imposed on neighborhoods rather than personal failings of residents explain what we see today.   A few pieces of this history are specific to Durham, the role of tobacco and textiles, for instance, but most of the fundamental influences on the economic and food conditions are broad social attitudes and practices around race and poverty. And from federal, economic, agriculture and housing policies that have affected urban rural areas in every corner of the country, there is hope from local ingenuity to change food systems and from people in local, state and federal policy positions who are working to reverse inequality and to re-envision the role of food in supporting the physical and economic wellbeing of all people, learning from the past is really important in these efforts.

SAGE Sociology
City & Community - A Downside of Increasing Human Capital: The Role of Higher Education in Poverty Segregation in U.S. Cities

SAGE Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 16:19


Authors Bryant Crubaugh discusses his article, "A Downside of Increasing Human Capital: The Role of Higher Education in Poverty Segregation in U.S. Cities," published in the June 2022 issue of City & Community.

Nick and Russ Don't Know Anything!
ROE v WADE - Be Prepared!

Nick and Russ Don't Know Anything!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 44:25


Roe v Wade is gone. Healthcare rights to all women in the US are gone, they are coming for Gay Rights, Contraception, and Bedroom Privacy next. We no longer live in a Free America. We went live on TikTok.

KNPR Features
Nevada's Brown Decision

KNPR Features

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 4:24


After much debate, segregation in Nevada Schools came to an end over a century ago. Here's Senator Richard Bryan with Nevada Yesterdays.

The Integrated Schools Podcast
Race, Class, and Power in Our Schools: Mark and Max from School Colors

The Integrated Schools Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 62:21


Largely considered to be one of the most diverse places in the world, Queens is heralded by its residents for the multitudes of ethnicities, languages, cultures and ways of life that exist there. But diversity isn't the whole story, especially not in District 28. Mark and Max are back with Season 2 of School Colors. Season 1 was set in Central Brooklyn and focused on gentrification, Black self determination, and dug deep into the history of Bedford-Stuyvesant. Season 2 finds Mark and Max in Queens and School District 28, a district with a very distinct North side and South side- the further North you go, the fewer Black people there are. Once again, School Colors does a deep dive on the history in order to tell a story that will feel familiar to people from around the country. LINKS: Code Switch from NPR - featuring School Colors Season 2 Season 1 of School Colors The Brooklyn Movement Center S5E19 - ICYMI: School Colors - Mark and Max on our show from 2020 School Colors Season 1, Episode 6 - Mo' Charters Mo' Problems The Neighborhood Unit: Schools, Segregation, and the Shaping of the Modern Metropolitan Landscape - Ansley Erickson and Andrew Highsmith Episode 5 of the Nice White Parents on District 15's Diversity Plan Miseducation Podcast's new season - Keeping Score If you'd like to support this work, we'd be grateful if you went to our Patreon and became a supporter. Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us podcast@integratedschools.org. The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits. Music by Kevin Casey.

New Books Network
Anne Gray Fischer, "The Streets Belong to Us: Sex, Race, and Police Power from Segregation to Gentrification" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 73:04


Anne Gray Fischer speaks about her path to and through research, including how sex workers informed her analysis of policing and state violence, the role of law enforcement in struggles over economic development, and the intellectual and practical factors of research design. Men, especially Black men, often stand in as the ultimate symbol of the mass incarceration crisis in the United States. Women are treated as marginal, if not overlooked altogether, in histories of the criminal legal system. In The Streets Belong to Us: Sex, Race, and Police Power from Segregation to Gentrification (UNC Press, 2022)--a searing history of women and police in the modern United States--Anne Gray Fischer narrates how sexual policing fueled a dramatic expansion of police power. The enormous discretionary power that police officers wield to surveil, target, and arrest anyone they deem suspicious was tested, legitimized, and legalized through the policing of women's sexuality and their right to move freely through city streets. Throughout the twentieth century, police departments achieved a stunning consolidation of urban authority through the strategic discretionary enforcement of morals laws, including disorderly conduct, vagrancy, and other prostitution-related misdemeanors. Between Prohibition in the 1920s and the rise of broken windows policing in the 1980s, police targeted white and Black women in distinct but interconnected ways. These tactics reveal the centrality of racist and sexist myths to the justification and deployment of state power. Sexual policing did not just enhance police power. It also transformed cities from segregated sites of urban vice into the gentrified sites of Black displacement and banishment we live in today. By illuminating both the racial dimension of sexual liberalism and the gender dimension of policing in Black neighborhoods, The Streets Belong to Us illustrates the decisive role that race, gender, and sexuality played in the construction of urban police regimes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in American Studies
Anne Gray Fischer, "The Streets Belong to Us: Sex, Race, and Police Power from Segregation to Gentrification" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 73:04


Anne Gray Fischer speaks about her path to and through research, including how sex workers informed her analysis of policing and state violence, the role of law enforcement in struggles over economic development, and the intellectual and practical factors of research design. Men, especially Black men, often stand in as the ultimate symbol of the mass incarceration crisis in the United States. Women are treated as marginal, if not overlooked altogether, in histories of the criminal legal system. In The Streets Belong to Us: Sex, Race, and Police Power from Segregation to Gentrification (UNC Press, 2022)--a searing history of women and police in the modern United States--Anne Gray Fischer narrates how sexual policing fueled a dramatic expansion of police power. The enormous discretionary power that police officers wield to surveil, target, and arrest anyone they deem suspicious was tested, legitimized, and legalized through the policing of women's sexuality and their right to move freely through city streets. Throughout the twentieth century, police departments achieved a stunning consolidation of urban authority through the strategic discretionary enforcement of morals laws, including disorderly conduct, vagrancy, and other prostitution-related misdemeanors. Between Prohibition in the 1920s and the rise of broken windows policing in the 1980s, police targeted white and Black women in distinct but interconnected ways. These tactics reveal the centrality of racist and sexist myths to the justification and deployment of state power. Sexual policing did not just enhance police power. It also transformed cities from segregated sites of urban vice into the gentrified sites of Black displacement and banishment we live in today. By illuminating both the racial dimension of sexual liberalism and the gender dimension of policing in Black neighborhoods, The Streets Belong to Us illustrates the decisive role that race, gender, and sexuality played in the construction of urban police regimes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Sex, Sexuality, and Sex Work
Anne Gray Fischer, "The Streets Belong to Us: Sex, Race, and Police Power from Segregation to Gentrification" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books in Sex, Sexuality, and Sex Work

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 73:04


Anne Gray Fischer speaks about her path to and through research, including how sex workers informed her analysis of policing and state violence, the role of law enforcement in struggles over economic development, and the intellectual and practical factors of research design. Men, especially Black men, often stand in as the ultimate symbol of the mass incarceration crisis in the United States. Women are treated as marginal, if not overlooked altogether, in histories of the criminal legal system. In The Streets Belong to Us: Sex, Race, and Police Power from Segregation to Gentrification (UNC Press, 2022)--a searing history of women and police in the modern United States--Anne Gray Fischer narrates how sexual policing fueled a dramatic expansion of police power. The enormous discretionary power that police officers wield to surveil, target, and arrest anyone they deem suspicious was tested, legitimized, and legalized through the policing of women's sexuality and their right to move freely through city streets. Throughout the twentieth century, police departments achieved a stunning consolidation of urban authority through the strategic discretionary enforcement of morals laws, including disorderly conduct, vagrancy, and other prostitution-related misdemeanors. Between Prohibition in the 1920s and the rise of broken windows policing in the 1980s, police targeted white and Black women in distinct but interconnected ways. These tactics reveal the centrality of racist and sexist myths to the justification and deployment of state power. Sexual policing did not just enhance police power. It also transformed cities from segregated sites of urban vice into the gentrified sites of Black displacement and banishment we live in today. By illuminating both the racial dimension of sexual liberalism and the gender dimension of policing in Black neighborhoods, The Streets Belong to Us illustrates the decisive role that race, gender, and sexuality played in the construction of urban police regimes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Gender Studies
Anne Gray Fischer, "The Streets Belong to Us: Sex, Race, and Police Power from Segregation to Gentrification" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 73:04


Anne Gray Fischer speaks about her path to and through research, including how sex workers informed her analysis of policing and state violence, the role of law enforcement in struggles over economic development, and the intellectual and practical factors of research design. Men, especially Black men, often stand in as the ultimate symbol of the mass incarceration crisis in the United States. Women are treated as marginal, if not overlooked altogether, in histories of the criminal legal system. In The Streets Belong to Us: Sex, Race, and Police Power from Segregation to Gentrification (UNC Press, 2022)--a searing history of women and police in the modern United States--Anne Gray Fischer narrates how sexual policing fueled a dramatic expansion of police power. The enormous discretionary power that police officers wield to surveil, target, and arrest anyone they deem suspicious was tested, legitimized, and legalized through the policing of women's sexuality and their right to move freely through city streets. Throughout the twentieth century, police departments achieved a stunning consolidation of urban authority through the strategic discretionary enforcement of morals laws, including disorderly conduct, vagrancy, and other prostitution-related misdemeanors. Between Prohibition in the 1920s and the rise of broken windows policing in the 1980s, police targeted white and Black women in distinct but interconnected ways. These tactics reveal the centrality of racist and sexist myths to the justification and deployment of state power. Sexual policing did not just enhance police power. It also transformed cities from segregated sites of urban vice into the gentrified sites of Black displacement and banishment we live in today. By illuminating both the racial dimension of sexual liberalism and the gender dimension of policing in Black neighborhoods, The Streets Belong to Us illustrates the decisive role that race, gender, and sexuality played in the construction of urban police regimes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books in History
Anne Gray Fischer, "The Streets Belong to Us: Sex, Race, and Police Power from Segregation to Gentrification" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 73:04


Anne Gray Fischer speaks about her path to and through research, including how sex workers informed her analysis of policing and state violence, the role of law enforcement in struggles over economic development, and the intellectual and practical factors of research design. Men, especially Black men, often stand in as the ultimate symbol of the mass incarceration crisis in the United States. Women are treated as marginal, if not overlooked altogether, in histories of the criminal legal system. In The Streets Belong to Us: Sex, Race, and Police Power from Segregation to Gentrification (UNC Press, 2022)--a searing history of women and police in the modern United States--Anne Gray Fischer narrates how sexual policing fueled a dramatic expansion of police power. The enormous discretionary power that police officers wield to surveil, target, and arrest anyone they deem suspicious was tested, legitimized, and legalized through the policing of women's sexuality and their right to move freely through city streets. Throughout the twentieth century, police departments achieved a stunning consolidation of urban authority through the strategic discretionary enforcement of morals laws, including disorderly conduct, vagrancy, and other prostitution-related misdemeanors. Between Prohibition in the 1920s and the rise of broken windows policing in the 1980s, police targeted white and Black women in distinct but interconnected ways. These tactics reveal the centrality of racist and sexist myths to the justification and deployment of state power. Sexual policing did not just enhance police power. It also transformed cities from segregated sites of urban vice into the gentrified sites of Black displacement and banishment we live in today. By illuminating both the racial dimension of sexual liberalism and the gender dimension of policing in Black neighborhoods, The Streets Belong to Us illustrates the decisive role that race, gender, and sexuality played in the construction of urban police regimes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in African American Studies
Anne Gray Fischer, "The Streets Belong to Us: Sex, Race, and Police Power from Segregation to Gentrification" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 73:04


Anne Gray Fischer speaks about her path to and through research, including how sex workers informed her analysis of policing and state violence, the role of law enforcement in struggles over economic development, and the intellectual and practical factors of research design. Men, especially Black men, often stand in as the ultimate symbol of the mass incarceration crisis in the United States. Women are treated as marginal, if not overlooked altogether, in histories of the criminal legal system. In The Streets Belong to Us: Sex, Race, and Police Power from Segregation to Gentrification (UNC Press, 2022)--a searing history of women and police in the modern United States--Anne Gray Fischer narrates how sexual policing fueled a dramatic expansion of police power. The enormous discretionary power that police officers wield to surveil, target, and arrest anyone they deem suspicious was tested, legitimized, and legalized through the policing of women's sexuality and their right to move freely through city streets. Throughout the twentieth century, police departments achieved a stunning consolidation of urban authority through the strategic discretionary enforcement of morals laws, including disorderly conduct, vagrancy, and other prostitution-related misdemeanors. Between Prohibition in the 1920s and the rise of broken windows policing in the 1980s, police targeted white and Black women in distinct but interconnected ways. These tactics reveal the centrality of racist and sexist myths to the justification and deployment of state power. Sexual policing did not just enhance police power. It also transformed cities from segregated sites of urban vice into the gentrified sites of Black displacement and banishment we live in today. By illuminating both the racial dimension of sexual liberalism and the gender dimension of policing in Black neighborhoods, The Streets Belong to Us illustrates the decisive role that race, gender, and sexuality played in the construction of urban police regimes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

Derate The Hate
Episode 114: Is Hate Being Taught To Our Children? Group Conversation on the book "STAMPED" by Ibram X. Kendi & Jason Reynolds

Derate The Hate

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 67:31


Is hate being taught to our children in the public, and some private schools? A couple months ago my cousin brought to my attention a book that his 8th grade daughter had been assigned for a book review in her NW Iowa school. I was familiar with some of the toxicity that Ibram X. Kendi had been spreading, but I was not aware that his material was being used in our public school system, much less that it was being taught to 8th graders, and even younger. "Stamped" Racism, Antiracism and YouThis was not a book I had read, and I admittedly did not want to spend the money on it, but I didn't feel it would be right if I discussed it on my show without doing so. In the beginning, authors Ibram X Kendi and Jason Reynolds define in their terms, segregationists, assimilationists, and antiracists. For the remainder of the book, they use their version of revisionist history to attribute every perceived disparity and/or racial inequity since the beginning of time to "white privilege", segregationist whites, weak black assimilationists, or just the evils of white racism. To discuss this book, that again was assigned to my cousin's 8th grade daughter in a public school in NW Iowa, I invited to the conversation Yael Levin of No Left Turn in Education, Tony Kinnett of The Chalkboard Review, Moshe Levy (volunteer with FAIR) and author of a recently published article on "Stamped for Kids" on FAIR's Substack, and my cousin Chad.Nobody's life has ever been made better by convincing them they are a victim, and books such as "STAMPED" is nothing more than propaganda that is used to create a perpetual victim class in the name of diversity, equity and inclusion. This type of material, when used as learning material for young impressionable minds, drives a solid wedge of division and confusion into a space that should be focusing on unity and civility. Do not miss this conversation!What have you done today to make your life a better life? What have you done today to make the world a better place? The world is a better place if we are better people, and that begins with each of us leading a better life. Be kind to one another, be grateful for everything you've got, and make each and every day the day that you want it to be!Please follow The Derate The Hate podcast on Facebook, MeWe, Instagram, Twitter . Subscribe to us wherever you enjoy your audio. Please leave us a rating and feedback. Send me a message on any media platform or subscribe directly from our sites. Let us know about someone you think should be on our podcast, and if we book them for a conversation, I'll send you a free gift! Not on social media? You can share your thoughts directly with me at wilk@wilksworld.comI look forward to hearing from you!Please check out our affiliates page by clicking HERE!

Better Regulate Than Never
E 93 When It is Good to Rebel

Better Regulate Than Never

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 33:20


I am not saying this because I am a rebel, but there are times when it is good to rebel against ideas, systems, and rules. Yes, young people, I am giving you permission to fight the system, sometimes! Find out what I mean in this week's episode.

Locked On Vikings - Daily Podcast On The Minnesota Vikings
How Segregation Impacted The Minnesota Vikings

Locked On Vikings - Daily Podcast On The Minnesota Vikings

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 32:19


On today's show, I want to tell a few stories about wide receivers on the Vikings - in particular, Black ones. Gene Washington, and his experience on the Vikings wasn't quite as romantic as you may think. I also want to talk about Cris Carter and Randy Moss, and how they navigated the ever pressure-filled world of being a highly visible Black athlete. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Blue Nile Make your moment sparkle with jewelry from Bluenile.com, and LOCKED ON SPORTS listeners get $50 off purchases of $500 or more using code LOCKEDON. WANT MORE DAILY MINNESOTA VIKINGS CONTENT? Follow & Subscribe to the Podcast on these platforms…

Our Mothers Ourselves
For Father's Day. Talmadge Everett King Sr.: "If Your Father Builds a Wooden House...."

Our Mothers Ourselves

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 39:39


Two years ago, to mark Father's Day, I sat in the closet I'm sitting in now (which you can see only in your mind's eye), and had an extraordinary conversation with Dr. Talmadge E. King, Jr., a world-renowned lung specialist who is dean of the Medical School at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. King and I talked about his father, Talmadge King Senior, who was born in 1922 in the segregated south.  I loved our conversation, and it seems fitting to post the interview today, on June 19th, 2022. Mr. King, who died in 2018, would be 100 this year.Talmadge Senior was so beloved a member of the community in Darien, Georgia that the town recruited him as the first Black police officer when the police force was first integrated.He instilled in his five children a sense of doing better with each successive generation. He offered a simple metaphor: "If your father builds a wooden house, it's your responsibility to build a brick house." 

CERTIFIED MAMA'S BOY with Steve Kramer

Certified Mama's Boy Merch is NOW AVAILABLE! Shop now Become a Certified Fan! Help support the podcast! Vote for “Certified Mama's Boy” in the Podcast Magazine Hot 50 Listen to my other podcast, “Kramer and Jess Uncensored”! Get FREE motivational texts from my Mom! Mama Texts   On Today's Show: So this is (almost) 40... Segregation seems crazy to me ASK MY MOM: Non traditional  Today's Quote: “My happiness grows in direct proportion to my acceptance, and in inverse proportion to my expectations.” Michael J. Fox   Our Amazing Partners: COZY EARTH Cozy Earth's Premium Bamboo Products Reduce Humidity Allowing For A Perfect Night's Rest. Learn How Cozy Earth Creates It's Lightweight And Breathable Products.Superior Softness. Hypoallergenic Bedding. 100 Night Guarantee. Free Of Chemicals & Dyes. Use code CERTIFIEDMAMASBOY40 for 40% off BETTER HELP I want you to start living a happier life today. As a listener, you'll get 10% off your first month by visiting BetterHelp.com/Kramer Join over 1 million people taking charge of their mental health. Again, that's BetterHelp.com/kramer ATHLETIC GREENS Athletic Greens is an all-in-one health drink with 75 vitamins, minerals, and whole food-sourced ingredients to help support your body's nutritional needs across multiple critical areas of health, including energy, immunity, recovery, gut health, digestion, hormonal and neural support, and healthy aging. Athleticgreens.com/kramer Love You Forever! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WHRO Reports
Norfolk set to erect monument to end of Massive Resistance

WHRO Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 1:01


Norfolk was among the Virginia cities that closed their schools rather than integrate them after Brown V. Board of Education struck down racial segregation in education. That story and others will be told via a new public art instillation.

This Day in History Class
Thurgood Marshall is nominated as justice to the U.S. Supreme Court - June 13th, 1967

This Day in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 11:33


David Feldman Show
A Riot of Evidence, Episode 1346

David Feldman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 406:39


Today's show focuses primarily on Thursday's televised hearings conducted by the United States House Select Committee on the January 6 Attack. The big takeaway is new and overwhelming evidence that January 6 was an inside job and that Representative Scott Perry, Republican of Pennsylvania and Representative Andy Biggs, Republican of Arizona along with several other Republican members of congress conspired to overturn the election and then, after January 6th, asked Donald Trump for a presidential pardon before he left office.  Guests With Time Codes (00:25) David Does the News: January 6 goes Prime Time; (1:04:07) "USA of Distraction" written and performed by Professor Mike Steinel (1:11:37) Prof. Sheryll Cashin (author of "White Space, Black ‘Hood: Opportunity Hoarding and Segregation in the Age of Inequality") Sheryl Cashin is Professor of Law at Georgetown University, where she teaches Constitutional Law, Race and American Law, and other subjects. She is an active member of the Poverty and Race Research Action Council, she's written commentaries for The Washington Post, Salon, The Root, and other media, and she is a contributing editor for Politico. Professor Cashin writes about race relations and inequality in America, and she is the author of Loving: Interracial Intimacy in America and the Threat to White Supremacy, Place Not Race, The Failures of Integration, and White Space, Black Hood: Opportunity Hoarding and Segregation in the Age of Inequality (1:39:04) Scott Dikkers (founding editor, "The Onion" and "The AV Club") Scott Dikkers is the founder of TheOnion.com and the #1 New York Times bestselling author of over 30 books, including “How to Write Funny.” He is the recipient of the Thurber Prize for American Humor, a Peabody, and too many Webby Awards to count. He can be seen on his weekly comedy show Scott Dikkers Around. (2:04:40) The Herschenfelds: Dr. Philip Herschenfeld (Freudian psychoanalyst), and Ethan Herschenfeld (his new comedy special "Thug, Thug Jew" is streaming on YouTube) (2:38:00) Emil Guillermo (host of the PETA Podcast, and columnist for The Asian American Legal Defense And Education Fund) w/ Kathy Guillermo (SVP of Laboratory Investigations Department at PETA) (3:11:36) The Rev. Barry W. Lynn (Americans United for Separation of Church and State) w/ Kate Vlach (Policy Director at the DC Attorney General. Formerly: Law Clerk @ ACLU Reproductive Freedom Project, Policy Associate @ NARAL Pro-Choice America) (4:12:39) The Professors And Mary Anne: Professors Mary Anne Cummings, Jonathan Bick, Adnan Husain, Ann Li, other PhDs PLUS: ASMR for your eyeballs - Kitchen ASMR with Joe in Norway - Shop ASMR with Dave in PA (5:22:34) Professor Harvey J. Kaye ("FDR on Democracy") and Alan Minsky (executive director of Progressive Democrats of America) We livestream here on YouTube every Monday and Thursday starting at 5:00 PM Eastern and go until 11:00 PM. Please join us! Take us wherever you go by subscribing to this show as a podcast!

The_C.O.W.S.
The C. O. W. S. w/ Anna Blatto: Payton S. Gendron and the History of White Terrorism in Buffalo

The_C.O.W.S.

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022


The Context of White Supremacy welcomes Anna Blatto. A graduate of the University of Buffalo with degrees in Sociology and Urban and Public Policy, Blatto is a part-time research associate for Partnership for the Public Good (PPG). Blatto is a White Woman. While in college, Blatto authored the 2018 report: A City Divided: A Brief History of Segregation in Buffalo. The report details a long deliberate, effort on the part of people classified as White to mistreat and subjugate black residents of west New York. This information helps explain the region where Payton Gendron hunted and killed ten black people at an east Buffalo Tops grocery store. We'll discuss the reasons why black people in Buffalo were victims of White Terrorism decades before Gendron was born. We'll be sure to ask Blatto what she knows about the previous White Terrorist to target black people at an east Buffalo Tops grocer, Joseph G. Christopher. Blatto used a few silos worth of metaphors to describe White Supremacy - including how it becomes "harry" contemplating punishments for Whites abuse of non-white people. Blatto also had the audacity to discuss "affirmative action" as if she, New York Governor Kathy Hochul, Hillary Clinton and other White Women aren't the greatest beneficiaries of so called Affirmative Action "handouts." And she had the nerve to accuse Gus of not discussing her 2018 report within the context of the May 2022 east Buffalo massacre. #WhitePeopleCantBeIgnorantAboutRacism #LetsGoBuffalo #JosephGChristopher #OJSimpson #TheCOWS13 INVEST in The COWS – http://paypal.me/TheCOWS Cash App: https://cash.app/$TheCOWS CALL IN NUMBER: 720.716.7300 CODE: 564943#

Black Talk Radio Network
The C.O.W.S. w/ Anna Blatto: Payton S. Gendron and the History of White Terrorism in Buffalo

Black Talk Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 199:00


Monday, June 6th 8:00PM Eastern/ 6:00PM Pacific https://www.blacktalkradionetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/Town-Hall-Buffalo-and-segregation-wgrz.com_.mp4 The Context of White Supremacy welcomes Anna Blatto. A graduate of the University of Buffalo with degrees in Sociology and Urban and Public Policy, Blatto is a part-time research associate for Partnership for the Public Good (PPG). Blatto is a White Woman. While in college, Blatto authored the 2018 report: A City Divided: A Brief History of Segregation in Buffalo. The report details a long deliberate, effort on the part of people classified as White to mistreat and subjugate black residents of west New York. This information helps explain the region where Payton Gendron hunted and killed ten black people at an east Buffalo Tops grocery store. We'll discuss the reasons why black people in Buffalo were victims of White Terrorism decades before Gendron was born. We'll be sure to ask Blatto what she knows about the previous White Terrorist to target black people at an east Buffalo Tops grocer, Joseph G. Christopher. Blatto used a few silos worth of metaphors to describe White Supremacy - including how it becomes "harry" contemplating punishments for Whites abuse of non-white people. Blatto also had the audacity to discuss "affirmative action" as if she, New York Governor Kathy Hochul, Hillary Clinton and other White Women aren't the greatest beneficiaries of so called Affirmative Action "handouts." And she had the nerve to accuse Gus of not discussing her 2018 report within the context of the May 2022 east Buffalo massacre. #JoesphGChristopher #PaytonGendron #22CaliberKiller #OJSimpson INVEST in The COWS – http://paypal.me/TheCOWS Invest in The C.O.W.S. - https://cash.app/$TheCOWS CALL IN NUMBER: 720.716.7300 CODE 564943# The C.O.W.S. Radio Program is specifically engineered for black & non-white listeners - Victims of White Supremacy. The purpose of this program is to provide Victims of White Supremacy wit

Black Talk Radio Network
The C.O.W.S. w/ Anna Blatto: Payton S. Gendron and the History of White Terrorism in Buffalo

Black Talk Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022


Monday, June 6th 8:00PM Eastern/ 6:00PM Pacific https://www.blacktalkradionetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/Town-Hall-Buffalo-and-segregation-wgrz.com_.mp4 The Context of White Supremacy welcomes Anna Blatto. A graduate of the University of Buffalo with degrees in Sociology and Urban and Public Policy, Blatto is a part-time research associate for Partnership for the Public Good (PPG). Blatto is a White Woman. While in college, Blatto authored the 2018 report: A City Divided: A Brief History of Segregation in Buffalo. The report details a long deliberate, effort on the part of people classified as White to mistreat and subjugate black residents of west New York. This information helps explain the region where Payton Gendron hunted and killed ten black people at an east Buffalo Tops grocery store. We'll discuss the reasons why black people in Buffalo were victims of White Terrorism decades before Gendron was born. We'll be sure to ask Blatto what she knows about the previous White Terrorist to target black people at an east Buffalo Tops grocer, Joseph G. Christopher. Blatto used a few silos worth of metaphors to describe White Supremacy - including how it becomes "harry" contemplating punishments for Whites abuse of non-white people. Blatto also had the audacity to discuss "affirmative action" as if she, New York Governor Kathy Hochul, Hillary Clinton and other White Women aren't the greatest beneficiaries of so called Affirmative Action "handouts." And she had the nerve to accuse Gus of not discussing her 2018 report within the context of the May 2022 east Buffalo massacre. #JoesphGChristopher #PaytonGendron #22CaliberKiller #OJSimpson INVEST in The COWS – http://paypal.me/TheCOWS Invest in The C.O.W.S. - https://cash.app/$TheCOWS CALL IN NUMBER: 720.716.7300 CODE 564943# The C.O.W.S. Radio Program is specifically engineered for black & non-white listeners - Victims of White Supremacy. The purpose of this program is to provide Victims of White Supremacy with constructive information and suggestions on how to counter Racist Woman & Racist Man. Phone: 1-605-313-5164 - Access Code 564943# Hit star *6 & 1 to enter caller cuee2

I SEE U with Eddie Robinson
I SEE U, Episode 3: The Tulsa Opera[tion] [Encore]

I SEE U with Eddie Robinson

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 51:52


Scholars have labeled the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921 as one of the most horrific incidents of racial violence in U.S. history. But why has that history remained under wraps for so long? Historian Dr. Karlos Hill of the University of Oklahoma; and Scott Ellsworth, author of “The Ground Breaking,” shed light on the disaster. And with this racial attack as a backdrop, host Eddie Robinson chats with acclaimed violinist, Daniel Roumain, about the real reason why he was fired from a special centennial concert hosted by Tulsa Opera. The Opera's artistic director, Tobias Picker, also makes a guest appearance and responds to Roumain's accusations with some surprising revelations.

News Beat
Racism Kills: Segregation's Role in Buffalo Massacre

News Beat

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 24:46


On May 14, an 18-year-old white supremacist armed with an assault rifle and wearing body armor livestreamed his massacre of 10 Black people at a Tops supermarket in Buffalo, New York. Ten days later, another 18-year-old slaughtered 19 children and two adults at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. While investigators scramble for motivations behind the latter, those of the accused mass murderer in the Buffalo shooting are crystal clear: He wanted to kill as many African Americans as possible, and researched Upstate New York neighborhoods, and that particular Tops, to do so. This mini-episode examines how America's systemic racism played a role.  News Beat is a multi-award-winning podcast brought to you by Morey Creative Studios and Manny Faces Media. Audio Editor/Sound Designer/Producer/Host:Manny Faces Editor-In-Chief/Producer: Chris Twarowski Managing Editor/Producer: Rashed Mian Episode Art: Jeff Main Executive Producer: Jed Morey Support the show: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?token=EYkdQRkbZ6vNTGfNSGWZjx7_15orqqDl8vkmrAg3TkxLprft1OguFwxlheC3tAkNd-KVPG&country.x=US&locale.x=US See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

From My Standpoint
Episode 055: Is It Acceptable? (PART III — Segregation)

From My Standpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 17:43


In this episode, we will discuss the topic of “segregation.” It is alive and well in our society, but can you see it? Do you support it? Is it acceptable to you or not? In this five-part series, we will tackle some of those taboo topics, some of those politically incorrect topics, some of those topics that do matter but we often shy away from out of fear, threats, ignorance, and, sometimes, blindness. Topics such as: Segregation, Critical Race Theory, BLM, Pride, Color Power, American, God, and others. Throughout this five-part series, you will have the opportunity to decide for yourself if what we discuss is acceptable to you or not? It is a simple “yes,” or “no.” NOTES: This podcast uses these sounds from freesound: sound 1 by (LadyImperatrix) (https://freesound.org/s/573921/) sound 2 by dr_skitz (https://freesound.org/s/353925/) Sound 3 by dr_skitz (https://freesound.org/s/353925/) Sound 4 by deleted_user_2104797 (https://freesound.org/s/325281/)   Patriotic Intro Music: Ultimate Victory https://www.videvo.net/royalty-free-music-track/ultimate-victory-30s/232836/ Intro/Outro Bumper Music: Evening Melodrama Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ The Wisdom of Dad Joke Music: The Curtain Rises Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

The Capitol Pressroom
A city divided by decades of de facto segregation

The Capitol Pressroom

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 11:36


May 25, 2022 - Investigative Post editor Jim Heaney discusses the policies in Buffalo that have led to the de facto segregation of New York second largest city.

Talking Headways: A Streetsblog Podcast
Episode 111: Mondays at The Overhead Wire - A Safe Place to Bee

Talking Headways: A Streetsblog Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 54:04


This week on Mondays we're joined by Jerome Horne of TransitCenter to share thoughts on Amazon deliveries, new bus networks in Boston, Segregation by Design's visualizations, and new infrastructure technical assistance and housing plans from the White House. The News Visualizing the legacy of America's racist urbanism - Fast Company Ethics of next day delivery - Guardian Boston's bus plan - WBUR Housing supply action plan - White House Infrastructure Technical Assistance Guide - White House Safe Streets for All Grant Program - USDOT Puppies and Butterflies Bee Bus Stops - BBC      

Densely Speaking
S2E10 - Special Series on History and Urban Economics - Part II

Densely Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 69:04


Special Series on History and Urban Economics - Part II This episode is the second in a series based on a forthcoming special issue on Urban Economics and History, to be published in the journal Regional Science and Urban Economics. It contains a series of short conversations with multiple authors. Guests: Brian Beach is Assistant Professor of Economics at Vanderbilt University and Dan Bogart is Professor of Economics at the University of California Irvine. Robert Margo is Professor of Economics at Boston University. Alexander Whalley is Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Calgary Haskayne School of Business. Katherine Eriksson is Associate Professor of Economics at the University of California Davis and Allison Shertzer is Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Pittsburgh. Papers Discussed in Today's Episode: Water Infrastructure and Health in U.S. Cities by Brian Beach. Infrastructure and Institutions: Lessons from History by Dan Bogart. Industrialization and Urbanization in Nineteenth Century America by Jeremy Atack, Robert Margo, and Paul Rhode. 150 Years of the Geography of Innovation by Michael Andrews and Alexander Whalley. Immigrants and Cities during the Age of Mass Migration by Katherine Eriksson and Zachary Ward. Zoning and Segregation in Urban Economic History by Allison Shertzer, Tate Twinam, and Randy Walsh. Follow us on the web or on Twitter: @denselyspeaking, @jeffrlin, @greg_shill. Hosts: Jeff Lin and Greg Shill. Producer: Schuyler Pals. Our theme music is by Oleksandr Koltsov. Sounds from Ambience, London Street by InspectorJ. The views expressed on the show are those of the participants, and do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, the Federal Reserve System, or any of the other institutions with which the hosts or guests are affiliated.

Louisiana Anthology Podcast

470. We talk to Dr. Stacey Simmons about her post "Enough!" "I have always had big ideas. I have always tried to solve big problems. In 2002, I completed a PhD in Urban Studies with a focus on modern day witch hunts. I examined how communities use local and national media to craft stories with archetypal good guys and bad guys in order to get information out there that fits the dominant social narrative.  I completed my research after spending several years in the entertainment industry. I also am a member of a religious minority and know how easy it is to be turned into a pariah. In getting a PhD, my intention was to either work in academia, or work for a network in Los Angeles or an  international media market offering a new perspective on the intersections of human geography and media representation."This week in Louisiana history. May 21, 1958. Segregation of New Orleans Street Cars ended. This week in New Orleans history. Beulah Ledner Opens a New Bakery. May 21, 1970. Beulah Levy Ledner, born into a Jewish family in St. Rose, Louisiana, opened a bakery in New Orleans in 1933. She became very successful after creating her "Doberge cake" adapted from the famous Hungarian/Austrian Dobos Cake, a cake made of nine génoise cake layers filled with buttercream and topped with a hard caramel glaze. The doberge cake is based on a recipe originating in Alsace-Lorraine. Ledner replaced the buttercream filling of the Dobos Cake with a custard filling and iced the cakes with buttercream and a thin layer of fondant. This week in Louisiana. Mudbug Madness Festival May 27-29, 2022 11:00 am - 11:00 pm 101 Crockett St Shreveport, LA 71101 Mudbug Madness was started on what began in 1984 as a two-day street festival in downtown Shreveport is now one of Louisiana's largest and most popular Cajun festivals, featuring renowned Cajun, Zydeco, Blues and Jazz artists, mouth-watering Cajun cuisine, raucous contests, and fun for all ages. Now a three-day festival held each Memorial Day weekend, Mudbug Madness is nationally recognized as one of the Southeast Tourism Society's Top 20 Events and the American Bus Association's Top 100 Event in the nation. Amenities: Cash Only, Family Friendly, Handicapped Accessible, Free Parking. View Website Phone: 318-226-5641 Postcards from Louisiana. Lauren Sturm.Listen on iTunes.Listen on Google Play.Listen on Google Podcasts.Listen on Spotify.Listen on Stitcher.Listen on TuneIn.The Louisiana Anthology Home Page.Like us on Facebook.