Podcasts about Indiana University

University system, Indiana, U.S.

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Latest podcast episodes about Indiana University

The Rob Burgess Show
Ep. 236 - Jonathan Fowler [LVI]

The Rob Burgess Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2023 262:26


Hello and welcome to The Rob Burgess Show. I am, of course, your host, Rob Burgess. On this our 236th episode, our returning guest is Jonathan Fowler. Jonathan is the all-time most frequent guest of The Rob Burgess Show. You first heard Jonathan Fowler on Episode 2, Episode 10, Episode 20, Episode 21, Episode 29, Episode 30, Episode 31, Episode 32, Episode 34, Episode 35, Episode 43, Episode 48, Episode 51, Episode 56, Episode 64, Episode 74, Episode 83, Episode 92, Episode 102, Episode 103, Episode 104, Episode 105, Episode 106, Episode 107, Episode 108, Episode 109, Episode 111, Episode 114, Episode 115, Episode 116, Episode 119, Episode 126, Episode 127, Episode 133, Episode 137, Episode 140, Episode 146, Episode 147, Episode 149. Episode 153, Episode 156, Episode 158, Episode 160, Episode 162, Episode 164, Episode 167, Episode 168, Episode 169, Episode 172, Episode 173, Episode 174, Episode 179, Episode 180, Episode 181, and Episode 185. And on Episodes 82 and 216, Jonathan was a guest along with fellow regular guest Ash Burgess. Jonathan graduated with a BA in history from Indiana University in 2006. He is an unabashed left-wing political junkie. He has lived and worked in South Korea for over 10 years, trying to help the citizens of that great nation, hopefully, "talk pretty one day." Subscribe to my newsletter: http://tinyletter.com/therobburgessshow Follow on Mastodon: https://newsie.social/@therobburgessshow Check out my Linktree: https://linktr.ee/therobburgessshow

A Scary State
Indiana's Indiscretions

A Scary State

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2023 106:47


We make it full circle with this Indiana episode because Indiana was the first episode Kenzie appeared in! Lauren tells the head-scratching mystery surrounding Clarence Roberts, who may be the only person ever to die twice. Then, Kenzie shares the disappearance and murder of Jill Behrman, a young woman whose case may have been questionably solved. You may need to take notes to keep up with this episode!--Follow us on Social Media and find out how to support A Scary State by clicking on our Link Tree: https://instabio.cc/4050223uxWQAl--Have a scary tale or listener story of your own? Send us an email to ascarystatepodcast@gmail.com! We can't wait to read it!--Thinking of starting a podcast? Thinking about using Buzzsprout for that? Well use our link to let Buzzsprout know we sent you and get a $20 Amazon gift card if you sign up for a paid plan!https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1722892--Works cited!https://docs.google.com/document/d/1dkbhgrpfkd1Gfofa5j5jF288ingC22hvB0DdYDnZlIA/edit?usp=sharing --Intro and outro music thanks to Kevin MacLeod. You can visit his site here: http://incompetech.com/. Which is where we found our music!

As I Live and Grieve
Grief and Young Adults, with John David Anderson

As I Live and Grieve

Play Episode Play 57 sec Highlight Listen Later Sep 26, 2023 31:24


Summary:Tweens and teens can have a difficult time with grief as they understand the concept of loss, but have many questions about what comes after? Does anything come after? As parents and grandparents we would like nothing better than to have stock answers, but oftentimes we have the same questions. Our guest today, John "David" Anderson, has written several books with loss and grief in a plot both suitable for and recommended for ages 8-14, that may help with this issue. Listen in...Notes:John David Anderson is an American writer of middle-grade fiction. His works include Finding Orion, Ms. Bixby's Last Day, Stowaway, One Last Shot, Riley's Ghost, and numerous others.  Anderson attended Indiana University, where he received an undergraduate degree in English literature, and the University of Illinois, where he received a master's degree in the same. He is a full-time writer and frequent presenter at schools across the country. His books have been featured on many state and library reading lists.Contact:www.asiliveandgrieve.cominfo@asiliveandgrieve.com Facebook:  As I Live and Grieve Instagram:  @asiliveandgrieve To Reach David:Website: http://www.johndavidanderson.org/Email: johndavidandersonauthor@gmail.comCredits: Music by Kevin MacLeod Support the show

Sports Rush with Brett Rump
Hour 1: Nathan Baird

Sports Rush with Brett Rump

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2023 51:40


Brett is joined in Hour 1 today by Nathan Baird who covers the Ohio State Buckeyes for Clevleand.com! We bring in Nathan today to get the rundown of the Ohio State – Notre Dame game from the weekend that saw a fantastic and close game that came down to a game winning drive for the Buckeyes right at the end that stunned the Fighting Irish. However, Brett first wants to get Nathan's thoughts on something that happened after the game, with Ohio State coach Ryan Day being rather animated and calling out his doubters in his post-game interview. Brett then gets Nate's thoughts on the Ohio State win, where the team looked good, but also where the team still has areas that they need to improve upon if they want to look like a team that can compete with any national power in the country. We hear from Nathan about the play-calling and whether or not it has become predictable, and about some of the things that can be cleaned up this season in order to allow the offense to flourish more and score more points. Also in the Hour, Brett recaps an exciting Friday night football game between the Homestead Spartans and the Snider Panthers, Indiana University struggles with… Akron? And a fun weekend of NFL recapped. All that and more!!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The New York Mystery Machine
Episode 106: "NY Woman Goes Missing in IN: Searching for Lauren Spierer"

The New York Mystery Machine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2023 51:19


Lauren Spierer was a vibrant 20-year-old student born and raised in Scarsdale, New York but studying at Indiana University. She was a vibrant girl with many people who loved her. Her friends and family described her as a kind, smart, and safe person. On June 3, 2011, Lauren would go missing after a night out with friends. Where did she go? Who is responsible for her going missing? Available wherever you stream podcasts! Be sure to Subscribe, Rate, & Review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Audible! Support the show by becoming a sponsor on our Patreon: ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠www.Patreon.com/NYMysteryMachine⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ Buy NY Mystery Machine Tees: ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠www.BelowTheCollar.com/NYMysteryMachine⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ Don't forget to follow us on all the socials: Instagram: ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠@NYMysteryMachine⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ | TikTok: ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠@NYMysteryMachine⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ | X: ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠@NYMysteries⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ | Facebook: ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠@NYMysteryMachine⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS: BARKBOX: Use the link ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠www.barkbox.com/NYMysteryMachine⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ to get a Free Extra Month of BarkBox (valued at $35) when you sign up for multi-length plans. HUNT A KILLER: Receive 20% off your first Hunt a Killer subscription box at www.HuntAKiller.com with the code NYMYSTERYMACHINE at checkout!

Apologetics Profile
Episode 199: Responding to the Mormon Missionary Message [Part 1] with Cory Miller and Ross Anderson

Apologetics Profile

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2023 40:32


A slammed door in the face of Latter-Day Saint missionaries is justification for any Mormon that the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints is the only true church in possession of the only true "restored gospel." But for Christians who extend kindness, compassion, and the love of Christ to missionaries who come to their doorstep, the experience can be life-changing for young LDS missionaries.This week and next on the Profile, president of Watchman Fellowship James K. Walker sits down with former LDS and authors Corey Miller and Ross Anderson to discuss their new book, Responding to the Mormon Missionary Message. It is a short but helpful and encouraging volume with contributing Christians who are all former Mormon missionaries.Corey Miller, Ph.D., was born in Utah as a seventh-generation Mormon. His ancestor was a polygamist and one of Joseph Smith's bodyguards. Miller is president and CEO of Ratio Christi (ratiochristi.org), a campus apologetics evangelism ministry on 125 campuses. He has four graduate degrees and taught nearly 100 college courses in philosophy and religion at places such as Purdue and Indiana University. He and his family reside in Indiana.Ross Anderson was born in Utah and was raised LDS. After leaving Mormonism as a young adult, he earned a Master of Divinity degree and a Doctor of Ministry degree. Anderson has served as a church planter and pastor in Utah for four decades. He taught at Salt Lake Theological Seminary and served as a denominational church planting director for the region. Ross is currently a teaching pastor at Alpine Church. He and his wife, Sally, are parents to five adult children.Related Links: Free links to some of our most popular podcasts on Mormonism, access to some of our key LDS articles and our free, 4-page Watchman Fellowship Profile on the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints: Watchman Fellowship articles on Mormonism: watchman.org/LDS Watchman Fellowship Profile on the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints: watchman.org/Mormonism Apologetics Profile podcast What Is the Gospel? with Mormon apologist Scott Gordon and Christian apologist James Walker (YouTube):  watchman.org/GordonWalker  Additional ResourcesFREE: We are also offering a subscription to our 4-page bimonthly Profiles here: www.watchman.org/Free.PROFILE NOTEBOOK: Order the complete collection of Watchman Fellowship Profiles (over 600 pages -- from Astrology to Zen Buddhism) in either printed or PDF formats here: watchman.org/notebook. SUPPORT: Help us create more content like this. Make a tax-deductible donation here: www.watchman.org/give.Apologetics Profile is a ministry of Watchman Fellowship For more information, visit www.watchman.org © Watchman Fellowship, Inc.

MARGARET ROACH A WAY TO GARDEN
A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach – Sept 25, 2023 – Ross Gay on the Garden’s Delights

MARGARET ROACH A WAY TO GARDEN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2023 27:36


The words joy and delight figure prominently in writer Ross Gay's work – and so do moments he spends in his garden, and descriptions of his relationship to plants. Is that a coincidence -- that the garden is a main character in his books, books with the titles “Inciting Joy,” and “The Book of Delights,” and the latest, “The Book of (More) Delights”? As a longtime gardener who finds both joy and delight in my life outdoors, I don't think so. It's no surprise to me at all that from garlic and sweet potato harvest times to devouring a fresh fig from a friend's tree, Ross Gay finds himself positively delighted. I wanted you to meet Ross and his work, and hear about what he's up to in his Indiana garden. Gay's four books of poetry and three of essays have won him much praise. He teaches writing at Indiana University in Bloomington, too, where he also gardens.

Author Stories - Author Interviews, Writing Advice, Book Reviews
Cozy And Whimsical Rom-Coms With Meg Cabot | SCC 119

Author Stories - Author Interviews, Writing Advice, Book Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2023 40:33


Enchanted to Meet You: A Witches of West Harbor Novel The Princess Diaries Meg Cabot is a #1 New York Times bestselling author of books for both adults and tweens/teens. Born in the year of the Fire Horse (a notoriously unlucky astrological sign) and raised in Bloomington, Indiana, Meg also lived in Grenoble, France and Carmel, California (the setting for her bestselling Mediator series) before moving to New York City after graduating with a bachelor's degree in fine arts from Indiana University. After working for ten years as an assistant residence hall director at New York University (an experience from which she occasionally draws inspiration for her best-selling Heather Wells mystery series), Meg wrote the Princess Diaries series, which was made into two hit movies by Disney. While over 25 million copies of Meg's nearly 80 published books have been sold in 38 countries, Meg's most proud of the letters she's received from fans thanking her for helping them to overcome their “dislike of reading.” Some of Meg's fan favorites include the 1-800-Where-R-You? series (which has been reprinted under the title Vanished and was made into the Lifetime series called Missing), as well as All-American Girl and Avalon High (on which an original Disney Channel movie was based), and several books told entirely in emails and text messages (Boy Next Door/Boy Meets Girl/Every Boy's Got One). A fourth book told in this format, The Boy is Back, was published by HarperCollins in 2017. Meg's first ever adult book in the Princess Diaries series, Royal Wedding, was published in 2015, along with a new Princess Diaries series for younger readers, From the Notebook of a Middle School Princess, which Meg also illustrated. The 4th book in the Middle School Princess Series, Royal Crown, was published in August of 2018, as well as paperback editions of the 2nd and 3rd editions series. Remembrance, the 7th and first adult book in the Mediator series, became available in 2016, along with a novella titled Proposal. In 2020, Meg signed a franchise deal with Netflix for screen rights to The Mediator series, along with writer/director Sarah Spillane and media powerhouse Debra Martin Chase. In 2019, Meg authored a Black Canary graphic novel for DC Zoom for middle-grade readers with illustrator Cara McGee, and also launched a new adult contemporary series set on the fictional Little Bridge Island in the Florida Keys. While each book in the series focuses on a different couple and their sometimes humorous, sometimes serious struggles, all guarantee a Happily Ever After (with plenty of sunshine and margaritas). The latest, No Words, debuted in September 2021. And finally, Meg has written Quarantine Princess Diaries, a new novel for adults in The Princess Diaries series, was released in March of 2023! 10% of Meg's proceeds from the sale of this book will go to real life royal Princess Mabel van Oranje of the Netherlands' charity to end child marriage www.vowforgirls.org.  Meg Cabot (her last name rhymes with habit, as in “her books can be habit forming”) currently lives in Key West, Florida with her husband and various cats. If you see her husband, please do not tell him that he married a fire horse, as he has not figured it out yet. When you click a link on our site, it might just be a magical portal (aka an affiliate link). We're passionate about only sharing the treasures we truly believe in. Every purchase made from our links not only supports Dabble but also the marvelous authors and creators we showcase, at no additional cost to you.

Locked On Hoosiers - Daily Podcast On Indiana Hoosiers Football & Basketball
Indiana Hoosiers offer 2025 prospects Braylon Mullins, Nate Ament

Locked On Hoosiers - Daily Podcast On Indiana Hoosiers Football & Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2023 28:09


The Indiana Hoosiers men's basketball team continues to remain active on the recruiting front with offers to 2025 prospects Braylon Mullins and Nate Ament. The Big Ten also released its men's basketball schedule on Tuesday with IU having a tough finish to the season. On today's episode of Locked on Hoosiers (@LO_Hoosiers), Jacob Rude (@JacobRude) looks at the two newest players to receive scholarships. Mullins received his on an unofficial visit to Bloomington while Ament is a top-25 prospect in the 2025 class. Trent Sisley remains a priority for Woodson and his staff as they visited him ahead of his visit to Indiana University this weekend. Top-50 2024 prospect Zania Socka-Nguemen also was on campus last weekend for Teri Moren and the women's team. The show wraps by looking at the Big Ten schedule and how things shook out for the Hoosiers, including a tough finish to the season against Michigan State. The toughest stretch of the season will come at the start of Big Ten play with games against UConn, Kansas, Michigan, Maryland and Auburn among others. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! DoorDash Get fifty percent off your first DoorDash order up to a twenty-dollar value when you use code lockedoncollege at checkout. Limited time offer, terms apply.  Betterhelp This podcast is sponsored by BetterHelp.If you're thinking of starting therapy, give BetterHelp a try. Visit BetterHelp.com/lockedoncollege today to get 10% off your first month.  Birddogs Go to birddogs.com/lockedoncollege or enter promo code LOCKEDONCOLLEGE for a free water bottle with any purchase. You won't want to take your birddogs off we promise you. Jase Medical Save more than $360 by getting these lifesaving antibiotics with Jase Medical plus an additional $20 off by using code LOCKEDON at checkout on jasemedical.com. Athletic Brewing Go to AthleticBrewing.com and enter code LOCKEDON to get 15% off your first online order or find a store near you! Athletic Brewing. Milford, CT and San Diego, CA. Near Beer. Gametime Download the Gametime app, create an account, and use code LOCKEDONCOLLEGE for $20 off your first purchase. LinkedIn LinkedIn Jobs helps you find the qualified candidates you want to talk to, faster. Post your job for free at LinkedIn.com/LOCKEDONCOLLEGE. Terms and conditions apply. FanDuel Make Every Moment More. Right now, NEW customers can bet FIVE DOLLARS and get TWO HUNDRED in BONUS BETS – GUARANTEED. Visit FanDuel.com/LOCKEDON to get started. FANDUEL DISCLAIMER: 21+ in select states. First online real money wager only. Bonus issued as nonwithdrawable free bets that expires in 14 days. Restrictions apply. See terms at sportsbook.fanduel.com. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-GAMBLER or visit FanDuel.com/RG (CO, IA, MD, MI, NJ, PA, IL, VA, WV), 1-800-NEXT-STEP or text NEXTSTEP to 53342 (AZ), 1-888-789-7777 or visit ccpg.org/chat (CT), 1-800-9-WITH-IT (IN), 1-800-522-4700 (WY, KS) or visit ksgamblinghelp.com (KS), 1-877-770-STOP (LA), 1-877-8-HOPENY or text HOPENY (467369) (NY), TN REDLINE 1-800-889-9789 (TN) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Ag+Bio+Science
BONUS: A revival in food entrepreneurship

Ag+Bio+Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2023 18:33


From her days as a dance major at Indiana University to the possibility of opening up her own aerial yoga studio, creativity and an entrepreneurial spirit runs through Rachel Klein's veins. This week, the co-founder and CEO of Revival Food Company, joins us to walk through her journey as a food entrepreneur, how the company has grown and scaled to date and what it's like to be an Indiana startup.  Rachel also talks about her gut check moment of choosing to grow Revival Food Company instead of staying small, the challenges of being a female founder and connecting with Walmart to get her products into 1,000 stores in 2020. Revival is focused on bringing new energy to the market, so what's next? Rachel talks about the future of her company and what consumers can expect as she continues to grow (hint: it's well beyond nut butters).  Revival Food Company was a finalist for the Rally Innovation Conference In-Prize Pitch Competition. To learn more, click here. 

The Well Seasoned Librarian : A conversation about Food, Food Writing and more.
Paul Fehribach (Big Jones Cookbook/Midwestern Food) Well Seasoned Librarian Podcast Season 12 Episode 17

The Well Seasoned Librarian : A conversation about Food, Food Writing and more.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2023 27:26


Bio: Paul FehribachBig Jones Born and raised in Jasper, Indiana, Paul Fehribach's small-town upbringing instilled in him a passion for heritage recipes. His summers were filled with fishing, hunting, foraging for mushrooms and helping in the garden at his grandparents' farmhouse. Fond memories of working alongside his mother in the kitchen and cooking from family heirloom recipes resulted in an appreciation for fresh, seasonal ingredients and a love for traditional cooking. As the executive chef and co-owner of Big Jones in Chicago, he showcases his homespun-style of cooking and commitment to finding and preserving historic foods of the American South. Chef Paul is a graduate of Indiana University's Jacob School of Music in Bloomington, Indiana. Following graduation, he served as the executive chef at Chapman's Restaurant & Bar where he further explored cooking with local and organic ingredients and heirloom seeds. In the early 1990s, he joined the opening group of Laughing Planet Café in downtown Bloomington before moving to Chicago in 1996. He transitioned to the front of house while working at restaurants Hi Ricky Asian Noodle Shop in Deerfield, Ill. and finally Schubas Tavern & Harmony Grill. By 2008, Paul was ready to return to the kitchen. He branched out on his own with the opening of his restaurant Big Jones. His regionally-inspired fare with Cajun, Creole, Lowcountry and Appalachia influences has garnered both local and national acclaim, including Best New Restaurant by Chicago Magazine. With a focus on utilizing seasonal heirloom crops, he actively supports co-ops, small farmers and frequents Chicago's Green City Market. When not hard at work in the kitchen, Paul volunteers for the Healthy Schools Campaign aMnd Chicago Public Schools' "Go for the Gold" campaign to promote healthy eating in schools and combat childhood obesity. Midwestern Food (New Book!) https://amzn.to/3ZrJnjW The Big Jones Cookbook: Recipes for Savoring the Heritage of Regional Southern Cooking https://amzn.to/3Lw0yLs Big Jones Restaurant: https://bigjoneschicago.com/ If you follow my podcast and enjoy it, I'm on @buymeacoffee. If you like my work, you can buy me a coffee and share your thoughts

The Heart of Giving Podcast
Indiana University Lilly School of Philanthropy Focuses on Leadership

The Heart of Giving Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2023 35:39


In this week's episode, our guest is Cindy M. Lott, Clinical Professor of Philanthropic Studies; Director, Professional Doctorate of Philanthropic Leadership; Stead Policy Fellow. Listen now as Cindy shares the details of new, exciting developments at Indiana University's Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Have questions/comments/suggestions? Email us at mdebnath@give.org. Don't forget to follow or subscribe and leave a comment on iTunes.

Family Life Church
Trusting God

Family Life Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2023 40:05


Thanks for listening! You can find us on social media at:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/familylifebtown/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/familylifebtownWatch our past services on YouTube!https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCN3I9rk7-k6mGVoPNS2S3GwShare this podcast with someone you know. If you would like to give, or visit us, please visit our website at thefamilylife.org. 

Family Life Church
The Psalmist Saw a Shepherd

Family Life Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2023 33:25


Thanks for listening! You can find us on social media at:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/familylifebtown/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/familylifebtownWatch our past services on YouTube!https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCN3I9rk7-k6mGVoPNS2S3GwShare this podcast with someone you know. If you would like to give, or visit us, please visit our website at thefamilylife.org. 

WebTalkRadio.net » Enlightenment of Change
305. Morris J. Elstien – Introductions That Grow Your Business by Paying it Forward

WebTalkRadio.net » Enlightenment of Change

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2023 36:37


Connie's motivational quote for today is by – Nicole Snow, “A small business is an amazing way to serve and leave an impact on the world you live in.” When I started my career 40 years ago, I had no network. I didn't even know why I needed to build a network of people who I could get to know and ultimately be able to help them.  Wow, what an incredible journey of learning why people matter so much in business and why showing up in a caring and loving way matters!   My guest and I will explore this topic of understanding why paying forward generates new business opportunities and provide an introduction from Presidents and Owners of Companies like Magic.  You have the power to create this type of dynamic relationship by giving first?  Yup, that's it, just giving first!    The Organization that we talked about today is Camp Kids are Kids Chicago.(Link: https://campkidsarekids.org/donate/). Every year our camp gives kids who are undergoing cancer treatment a chance to experience camp in an Urban environment. This year two major hotels, The Palmer House and The Drake will give up rooms to support campers, siblings and the Doctors, Nurses, Counselors and Staff who will stay with our kids and give of their services for free. Hotel furniture will be removed, bunk beds installed and campers and their support team will have an opportunity to experience Camp.    YouTube: https://youtu.be/sPCTaJhzQC8   About Morris J. Elstien:  Most of his business career has been in Chicago. After attending Indiana University, his three first positions were with Owens Illinois, Kraft Foods, and Maremont Corporation. He became a consultant in the Direct Mail Industry and eventually became President for 13 years. He took a leap of faith and took on a position with no pay but 33 and a 3rd percent ownership. He bought out his partners after a year and a half, grew the Company to 87 employees, and sold it 16 years ago.  Morris recently started MorrieConnect, teaching Presidents/Owners and C-Suites his methodology of paying it forward.   How to Get In Touch with Morris J. Elstien:  Email: morrie@morrieconnect.com Website:   http://www.morrieconnect.com/   Contact Connie! LinkTree: https://linktr.ee/conniewhitman Download Free Communication Style Assessment: www.whitmanassoc.com/csa All-Star Community:  https://changingthesalesgame.mykajabi.com/All-Star-Community Enlightenment of Change Facebook group: tinyurl.com/EOCFacebookGroup   Subscribe to the Enlightenment of Change podcast on your favorite podcast streaming service or YouTube.  New episodes post every week - listen to Connie dive into new sales and business topics or problems you may have in your business.  

Locked On Hoosiers - Daily Podcast On Indiana Hoosiers Football & Basketball
Indiana Hoosiers double-digit underdogs vs. Louisville, Michael Penix reflects on IU

Locked On Hoosiers - Daily Podcast On Indiana Hoosiers Football & Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2023 29:11


The Indiana Hoosiers will head into Saturday's game at Lucas Oil Stadium against the Louisville Cardinals as double-digit underdogs. Michael Penix reflected on his time in Bloomington with IU recently and didn't paint the Hoosiers in the greatest light. On today's episode of Locked on Hoosiers (@LO_Hoosiers), Jacob Rude (@JacobRude) gives all the last-minute details on Indiana University's third game of the season. The latest betting odds from FanDuel have them as a double-digit underdog as they look for a third win all-time in their series with Louisville. Cam Camper looks set to potentially play in the game after leaving early against the Indiana State Sycamores last week after practicing this week. Tayven Jackson's elevation to starting quarterback will be worth noting while IU's defense against Jawhar Jordan will be a matchup worth monitoring. The show wraps by looking at a recent interview Penix did with Yogi Roth of Pac-12 Network in which he discussed his time with Indiana. Penix spoke about his ACL injury, the recovery in 2021 and the mental struggles he had that year. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Jase Medical Save more than $360 by getting these lifesaving antibiotics with Jase Medical plus an additional $20 off by using code LOCKEDON at checkout on jasemedical.com.  Athletic Brewing Go to AthleticBrewing.com and enter code LOCKEDON to get 15% off your first online order or find a store near you! Athletic Brewing. Milford, CT and San Diego, CA. Near Beer. Gametime Download the Gametime app, create an account, and use code LOCKEDONCOLLEGE for $20 off your first purchase. LinkedIn LinkedIn Jobs helps you find the qualified candidates you want to talk to, faster. Post your job for free at LinkedIn.com/LOCKEDONCOLLEGE. Terms and conditions apply. eBay Motors Keep your ride-or-die alive at ebay.com/motors. eBay Guaranteed Fit only available to US customers. Eligible items only. Exclusions apply. FanDuel Make Every Moment More. Right now, NEW customers can bet FIVE DOLLARS and get TWO HUNDRED in BONUS BETS – GUARANTEED. Visit FanDuel.com/LOCKEDON to get started. FANDUEL DISCLAIMER: 21+ in select states. First online real money wager only. Bonus issued as nonwithdrawable free bets that expires in 14 days. Restrictions apply. See terms at sportsbook.fanduel.com. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-GAMBLER or visit FanDuel.com/RG (CO, IA, MD, MI, NJ, PA, IL, VA, WV), 1-800-NEXT-STEP or text NEXTSTEP to 53342 (AZ), 1-888-789-7777 or visit ccpg.org/chat (CT), 1-800-9-WITH-IT (IN), 1-800-522-4700 (WY, KS) or visit ksgamblinghelp.com (KS), 1-877-770-STOP (LA), 1-877-8-HOPENY or text HOPENY (467369) (NY), TN REDLINE 1-800-889-9789 (TN) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Locked On Hoosiers - Daily Podcast On Indiana Hoosiers Football & Basketball
Indiana Hoosiers coach Mike Woodson visits Boogie Fland, Jalen Haralson

Locked On Hoosiers - Daily Podcast On Indiana Hoosiers Football & Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2023 33:08


Indiana Hoosiers basketball head coach Mike Woodson is jet-setting around the country to visit a number of prospects from Jalen Haralson and Darius Adams to Boogie Fland. The women's basketball team and Teri Moren also hosted a pair of recruits in Lauren Hurst and Nevaeh Caffey this weekend as well. On today's episode of Locked on Hoosiers (@LO_Hoosiers), Jacob Rude (@JacobRude) dives into the latest on the recruiting trail in the weekly Recruiting Wednesday show. With stops at La Lumiere for Haralson and Adams before heading to New York to see Fland, Woodson and his coaching staff and remaining active in recruiting. IU offered a new prospect in top-15 prospect Tyler Jackson out of Overtime Elite in Atlanta, GA. One of the top point guards in the 2025 class, Jackson is the latest top-20 recruit for Indiana University to get involved with. The show wraps by looking at the visits of Hurst and Caffey to Bloomington this weekend. Grace Berger also wrapped up her first season in the WNBA with the Indiana Fever by being selected to the AP All-Rookie team alongside teammate Aliyah Boston. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Jase Medical Save more than $360 by getting these lifesaving antibiotics with Jase Medical plus an additional $20 off by using code LOCKEDON at checkout on jasemedical.com.  Athletic Brewing Go to AthleticBrewing.com and enter code LOCKEDON to get 15% off your first online order or find a store near you! Athletic Brewing. Milford, CT and San Diego, CA. Near Beer. Gametime Download the Gametime app, create an account, and use code LOCKEDONCOLLEGE for $20 off your first purchase. LinkedIn LinkedIn Jobs helps you find the qualified candidates you want to talk to, faster. Post your job for free at LinkedIn.com/LOCKEDONCOLLEGE. Terms and conditions apply. eBay Motors Keep your ride-or-die alive at ebay.com/motors. eBay Guaranteed Fit only available to US customers. Eligible items only. Exclusions apply. FanDuel Make Every Moment More. Right now, NEW customers can bet FIVE DOLLARS and get TWO HUNDRED in BONUS BETS – GUARANTEED. Visit FanDuel.com/LOCKEDON to get started. FANDUEL DISCLAIMER: 21+ in select states. First online real money wager only. Bonus issued as nonwithdrawable free bets that expires in 14 days. Restrictions apply. See terms at sportsbook.fanduel.com. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-GAMBLER or visit FanDuel.com/RG (CO, IA, MD, MI, NJ, PA, IL, VA, WV), 1-800-NEXT-STEP or text NEXTSTEP to 53342 (AZ), 1-888-789-7777 or visit ccpg.org/chat (CT), 1-800-9-WITH-IT (IN), 1-800-522-4700 (WY, KS) or visit ksgamblinghelp.com (KS), 1-877-770-STOP (LA), 1-877-8-HOPENY or text HOPENY (467369) (NY), TN REDLINE 1-800-889-9789 (TN) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Animal Behavior Podcast
S3E8 Maren Vitousek on Stress in Tree Swallows and Motherhood in Academia

The Animal Behavior Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2023 62:33


In this week's episode, Maren Vitousek joins the show to talk about stress and her work in tree swallows. She starts by describing what stress is and what it is not. Matthew and Maren talk about the development of the stress response and its long-term implications. Then Maren's talk about the tree swallow project that she co-directs and what her lab has learned from studying stress in these animals.After the break, they talk about Maren's experience as a mother of three in academia. Maren describes her experience becoming a mother at three different career stages, the costs that mothers pay in academia, and what cultural and policy changes can be made to make academia more parent-friendly.This week's Two-Minute Takeaway comes from Mary Woodruff (@MaryJWoodruff), a PhD Candidate in the Rosvall Lab at Indiana University. She uses behavior and physiology to understand how wild birds are coping with climate change. Learn more about Mary's work here.Del Giudice, M., Buck, C. L., Chaby, L. E., Gormally, B. M., Taff, C. C., Thawley, C. J., ... & Wada, H. (2018). What is stress? A systems perspective. Integrative and Comparative Biology, 58(6), 1019-1032. https://academic.oup.com/icb/article/58/6/1019/5094765Credits: The Animal Behavior Podcast is created by a team of animal behavior researchers and audio professionals. Come meet us here! We receive production support from the Cornell Broadcast studio directed by Bert Odom-Reed, and financial support from the Animal Behavior Society.

Locked On Hoosiers - Daily Podcast On Indiana Hoosiers Football & Basketball
Tayven Jackson makes statement as Indiana Hoosiers win in blowout

Locked On Hoosiers - Daily Podcast On Indiana Hoosiers Football & Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2023 31:33


Tayven Jackson made a big statement in the ongoing quarterback competition as the Indiana Hoosiers football team won in a rout against Indiana State on Friday night. With the QB competition ongoing, Jackson outplayed Brendan Sorsby and made his case to Tom Allen to be the starting quarterback moving forward. On today's live episode of Locked on Hoosiers (@LO_Hoosiers), Jacob Rude (@JacobRude) recaps IU's dominant win over the Sycamores. Jackson racked up nearly 250 yards of offense and led Indiana University on numerous long scoring drives. Jaylin Lucas and Josh Henderson anchored a dominant performance on the ground for Indiana as they finished with five rushing touchdowns. Omar Cooper had a breakout performance with over 100 yards receiving. The show wraps by discussing the defense, which was led by Andre Carter and Lanell Carr on top of Nic Toomer's interception. The special teams represented the lone frustrating part of the night with a number of head-scratching penalties. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Birddogs Go to birddogs.com/lockedoncollege or enter promo code LOCKEDONCOLLEGE for a free water bottle with any purchase. You won't want to take your birddogs off we promise you. Nutrafol Take the first step to visibly thicker, healthier hair. For a limited time, Nutrafol is offering our listeners ten dollars off your first month's subscription and free shipping when you go to Nutrafol.com/men and enter the promo code LOCKEDONCOLLEGE.  Athletic Brewing Go to AthleticBrewing.com and enter code LOCKEDON to get 15% off your first online order or find a store near you! Athletic Brewing. Milford, CT and San Diego, CA. Near Beer. Betterhelp This podcast is sponsored by BetterHelp.If you're thinking of starting therapy, give BetterHelp a try. Visit BetterHelp.com/lockedoncollege today to get 10% off your first month. Gametime Download the Gametime app, create an account, and use code LOCKEDONCOLLEGE for $20 off your first purchase. LinkedIn LinkedIn Jobs helps you find the qualified candidates you want to talk to, faster. Post your job for free at LinkedIn.com/LOCKEDONCOLLEGE. Terms and conditions apply. eBay Motors For parts that fit, head to eBay Motors and look for the green check. Stay in the game with eBay Guaranteed Fit. eBay Motors dot com. Let's ride. eBay Guaranteed Fit only available to US customers. Eligible items only. Exclusions apply. FanDuel Make Every Moment More. Right now, NEW customers can bet FIVE DOLLARS and get TWO HUNDRED in BONUS BETS – GUARANTEED. Visit FanDuel.com/LOCKEDON to get started. FANDUEL DISCLAIMER: 21+ in select states. First online real money wager only. Bonus issued as nonwithdrawable free bets that expires in 14 days. Restrictions apply. See terms at sportsbook.fanduel.com. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-GAMBLER or visit FanDuel.com/RG (CO, IA, MD, MI, NJ, PA, IL, VA, WV), 1-800-NEXT-STEP or text NEXTSTEP to 53342 (AZ), 1-888-789-7777 or visit ccpg.org/chat (CT), 1-800-9-WITH-IT (IN), 1-800-522-4700 (WY, KS) or visit ksgamblinghelp.com (KS), 1-877-770-STOP (LA), 1-877-8-HOPENY or text HOPENY (467369) (NY), TN REDLINE 1-800-889-9789 (TN) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Two Designers Walk Into a Bar
Bonus Episode: Nostalgia and Marketing: A Conversation with Kate Christensen

Two Designers Walk Into a Bar

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2023 53:39


Today we have a special guest we've welcomed into the bar. We reached out to Kate Christensen after reading an article she wrote for the website Marketing Brew about marketing and nostalgia. We thought “Marketing and nostalgia? Hey, that's us!” Kate is currently on the faculty at Indiana University. She's produced movies for Disney, TV shows for Sony, and is very aware of pop culture through both her background and ongoing research. We talk about toys, food and childhood memories among many, many topics. And, of course, the movie Airplane! comes up. So grab your favorite feel-good drink and join us as we jump into our conversation with Kate. - - - - - Visit our full episode page for the video of our conversation, show notes, the visual examples we discuss, additional links and more! https://www.twodesignerswalkintoabar.com/episodes/bonus-episode-marketing-and-nostalgia - - - - - Have a question or idea for Todd and Elliot? Send a note to hello@twodesignerswalkintoabar.com and we promise to read it. After that it's anyone's guess. - - - - - Visit https://www.twodesignerswalkintoabar.com/merch to have a look at stuff we've made for listeners just like you and support us on Patreon for subscriber-only extras. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sex and Psychology Podcast
Episode 222: From KitKat to Berghain, Inside Berlin’s Sex Clubs

Sex and Psychology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2023 34:08


What's the first thing that comes to mind when you think about the city of Berlin, Germany? There's a good chance that you pictured a kinky nightclub. It's estimated that as many as 1 in 3 visitors to Berlin goes specifically for these clubs. In today's show, we're going to explore how Berlin became a hub for kinky nightlife and discuss what it's actually like inside two of Berlin's most famous spots, the KitKat Club and Berghain. We'll also take a look at how consent works in a sex club and give you some pro-tips on getting into Berlin's clubs because they're known as being notoriously difficult to enter. I am joined once again by Jeff Mannes, a social scientist, speaker, tour guide, sex educator, and freelance writer living in Berlin. Since 2018, he has been running his critically acclaimed guided tour "Berlin's History of Sex" in Augmented Reality. This year, he launched additional guided tours on "The Story of Berlin's Clubs" and "Berlin's Queer & Trans History." Some of the topics we discuss in this episode include: What role did the Berlin wall play in leading the city to become a nightlife hotspot? What could someone expect to see or experience if they visited KitKat or Berghain? What is a dark room, and why are they so common in Berlin and across Europe? How does consent work in sex club and group sex environments? How do Berlin's clubs deal with privacy when everyone has a smartphone? To learn more, check out Jeff's Berlin Guide website for information on all of his tours. Thank you to our sponsors! Expand your sexual horizons with Beducated! Featuring more than 100 online courses taught by the experts, Beducated brings pleasure-based sex ed directly into your bedroom. Enjoy a free trial today and get 40% off their yearly pass by using my last name - LEHMILLER - as the coupon code. Sign up now at: https://beducate.me/pd2336-lehmiller Support sex science by becoming a friend of the Kinsey Institute at Indiana University. Visit kinseyinstitute.org to make a donation to support ongoing research projects on critical topics. You can also show your support by following the Kinsey Institute on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: Precision Podcasting (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.

Earth Eats: Real Food, Green Living
The farm bill isn't just about farming [replay]

Earth Eats: Real Food, Green Living

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2023 51:00


“In terms of what is being discussed right now, I would say the $1.2 trillion dollar elephant in the room is SNAP. And so, the 2023 Farm Bill is estimated to be the most expensive farm bill in US history, over the course of 10 years worth of outlays.” This week on the show we're talking about the importance of the upcoming Farm Bill.  Our guest is Shellye Suttles, agriculture economist at the O'Neill School for Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University.

That's So Hindu
For Hindus the natural world is more than sacred, its embodied Divinity itself | Prof. David Haberman

That's So Hindu

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2023 33:38


In this episode we speak with Prof. David Haberman from Indiana University about his extensive work documenting how Hindus bring trees, stones, and mountains into their religious worship.Buy the books we discuss: People Trees, Loving Stones Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Can You Hear Me?
Generative AI Threats to Brands and Leaders

Can You Hear Me?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2023 29:13


Meet our GuestSiddharth 'Sid' BoseSid Bose is a Partner at Ice Miller and the chair of Ice Miller's Technology, Privacy and Cyber Risk Practice. As an attorney with an information systems and security background, Sid counsels clients on various cybersecurity, privacy, and compliance issues, that range from building up foundational programs, to data breach and incident response counseling, to handling complex legal and regulatory matters. Sid is also an adjunct professor at the Indiana University, Maurer School of Law. Sid teaches at the IU Cybersecurity Clinic on risk management and preparedness in pressing local, national, and global initiatives.Reading ResourcesFederal Bureau of Investigation [Public Service Announcement] - Malicious Actors Manipulating Photos and Videos to Create Explicit Content and Sextortion Schemes - LINKReuters - Tech experts see rising threat of GenAI deepfakes, FBI warns of "generative adversarial networks" - LINKFintech - Ai in the crosshairs: FBI's stark warning of emerging threats from hackers - LINK-Generative Artificial Intelligence has allowed users to quickly create content that is helping them complete tasks more quickly and efficiently. But it doesn't take too deep a dive to determine that AI can also be used in ways that could harm a company or an executive. In this edition of “Can You Hear Me?”, co-hosts Rob Johnson and Eileen Rochford welcome tech and cyber risk attorney Sid Bose from Ice Miller to discuss “Generative AI Threats to Brands and Leaders.”

The Hoosier Hysterics Podcast
MACKENZIE HOLMES

The Hoosier Hysterics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2023 130:36


Everybody's All-American Mackenzie Holmes is back for her swan song at Indiana University and the record books will never be the same. Mack reflects on both her and the program's unprecedented growth since being recruited out of Maine by Coach Moren, and how her teammates past and present have been such a meaningful part of her historic journey. And yet there is so much work to be done, as nothing less than another Big Ten title and finally a trip to the Final Four will satisfy this incredible young woman.WE LOVE MACK!!!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Circuit
AI/IN/IU | The Benefits of Launching a Startup in Indiana: Folia

The Circuit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2023 22:08


Our four-part miniseries focused on Artificial Intelligence, its place within Indiana's tech sector, and Indiana University's role in driving innovation in the AI space. In this episode, Merillat Flowers sits down with Ravi Bhatt Founder and CEO of Folia and BranchfireRavi talks about why he moved to Indiana to launch his company, the advantages of being an entrepreneur in a college town, and what it means to be a founder in the time of AI.

Artifice
Ep. 156: Langston Collin Wilkins

Artifice

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2023 103:10


Langston Collin Wilkins, PhD is folklorist, ethnomusicologist, and writer based in Madison, WI. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Folklore and Afro-American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Wilkins is the author of Welcome to Houston: Hip Hop Heritage in Hustle Town, which was released through the University of Illinois Press in August of 2023. His research interests include African American folklife, African American music, urban folklore, car culture and public folklore. Dr. Wilkins is a native of Houston, Texas and received his PhD from Indiana University's Department of Folklore & Ethnomusicology in 2016. He also holds a master's degree in African American and African Diaspora Studies from Indiana University and a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Wilkins' work has also appeared in the Journal of Folklore Research, The Washington Post, Houston Chronicle, and several other publications. From 2019-2022, Dr. Wilkins served as the Director of the Center for Washington Cultural Traditions, a public program that seeks to document and preserve the traditional culture of Washington state. Prior to this, he served the state of Tennessee though positions at the Tennessee Arts Commission and Humanities Tennessee. Dr. Wilkins is currently an executive board member of the American Folklore Society. Langston Collin Wilkins's Substack newsletter: https://langstonwilkins.substack.com Purchase Welcome 2 Houston: Hip Hop Heritage in Hustle Town: https://www.press.uillinois.edu/books/?id=p087295 IG: https://www.instagram.com/southsidesupervillain/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/StreetFolkLCW Threads: @southsidesupervillain

The Amazing Cities and Towns Podcast
We Can't Give Up; How California is Dealing with Housing with Carolyn Coleman

The Amazing Cities and Towns Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2023 32:36


This episode of the Amazing Cities and Towns Podcast sponsored by Bearing Advisors, Jim Hunt interviews Carolyn Coleman, the Executive Director of the CA League of Cities. ·       A candid conversation about the housing crisis in California. ·       And, much more 7 Steps to an Amazing City: 1.     Attitude 2.     Motivation 3.     Attention to Detail 4.     Zing 5.     Inclusiveness 6.     Neighborhood Empowerment 7.     Green Awareness   Thanks for listening and look forward to having you join us for the next episode. Links Mentions During Show: ·       www.AmazingCities.org ·       www.AmazingCities.org/podcast to be a guest on the podcast   About Carolyn Coleman   Carolyn Coleman brings over 25 years of experience as a leader and an advocate in the public and private sectors to her role as executive director and CEO of the League of California Cities, the largest and oldest organization representing California's cities and towns and their leaders. Under her leadership, Cal Cities advances policies to expand local control through education and advocacy to enhance the quality of life for all Californians.   She joined Cal Cities in December 2016 after a decade with the National League of Cities (NLC) in Washington, D.C., as senior executive and director of federal advocacy. A national organization, NLC advances policies at the federal level that expand local control and provide resources for local programs. During her tenure at NLC, she oversaw the organization's advocacy efforts and worked closely with city leaders from across the country and the 49 state municipal leagues to protect and promote local interests in matters before Congress, within the White House, and in the courts.   Prior to NLC, Coleman served as deputy mayor for the city of Indianapolis, Indiana, where she led the mayor's initiatives involving public works, economic and community development, parks and recreation, and neighborhood services. She previously practiced law and held marketing leadership positions in the private sector. In addition to her professional endeavors, Coleman serves on the board of trustees of the University of Indianapolis and on the dean's cabinet at the McGeorge School of Law. She also serves on the NLC and the California Foundation on the Environment and the Economy boards of directors, as well as the Public Policy Institute of California's Statewide Leadership Council.   She holds a law degree from Indiana University and a degree in business administration from the University of Kansas.    About Your Host, Jim Hunt: Welcome to the “Building Amazing Cities and Towns Podcast” … The podcast for Mayors, Council Members, Managers, Staff and anyone who is interested in building an Amazing City.   Your host is Jim Hunt, the author of “Bottom Line Green, How American Cities are Saving the Planet and Money Too” and his latest book, “The Amazing City - 7 Steps to Creating an Amazing City”   Jim is also the former President of the National League of Cities, 27 year Mayor, Council Member and 2006 Municipal Leader of the Year by American City and County Magazine.   Today, Jim speaks to 1000's of local government officials each year in the US and abroad.   Jim also consults with businesses that are bringing technology and innovation to local government.   Amazing City Resources: Buy Jim's Popular Books: ·       The Amazing City: 7 Steps to Creating an Amazing City:   https://www.amazingcities.org/product-page/the-amazing-city-7-steps-to-creating-an-amazing-city   ·       Bottom Line Green: How America's Cities and Saving the Planet (And Money Too)  https://www.amazingcities.org/product-page/bottom-line-green-how-america-s-cities-are-saving-the-planet-and-money-too   FREE White Paper: ·       “10 Steps to Revitalize Your Downtown”  www.AmazingCities.org/10-Steps   Hire Jim to Speak at Your Next Event: ·       Tell us about your event and see if dates are available at www.AmazingCities.org/Speaking   Hire Jim to Consult with Your City or Town: ·       Discover more details at https://www.amazingcities.org/consulting   Discuss Your Business Opportunity/Product to Help Amazing Cities: ·       Complete the form at https://www.amazingcities.org/business-development   A Special Thanks to Bearing Advisors for the support of this podcast:  www.BearingAdvisors.Net   Jim Hunt of The Amazing Cities  

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Oncology, Etc. – Dr. Patricia Ganz' Evolutionary Treatment Of The Whole Patient

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2023 35:39


There was time during the early 70's when the field of oncology began to take hold where the singular focus was to extend the patient's life. In this ASCO Education podcast, our guest was one of the first to challenge that notion and rethink methods that focused the patient's QUALITY of life. Dr. Patricia Ganz joins us to describe her transition from cardiology to oncology (6:00), the moment she went beyond treating the disease and began thinking about treating the WHOLE patient (10:06) and the joy of the increasing numbers of patients who survive cancer (21:47).  Speaker Disclosures Dr. David Johnson: Consulting or Advisory Role – Merck, Pfizer, Aileron Therapeutics, Boston University Dr. Patrick Loehrer: Research Funding – Novartis, Lilly Foundation, Taiho Pharmaceutical Dr. Patricia Ganz: Leadership - Intrinsic LifeSciences  Stock and Other Ownership Interests - xenon pharma,  Intrinsic LifeSciences, Silarus Therapeutics, Disc Medicine, Teva,  Novartis, Merck. Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline, Abbott Laboratories Consulting or Advisory Role - Global Blood Therapeutics, GSK, Ionis, akebia, Rockwell Medical Technologies, Disc Medicine, InformedDNA, Blue Note Therapeutics, Grail Patents, Royalties, Other Intellectual Property - related to iron metabolism and the anemia of chronic disease, Up-to-Date royalties for section editor on survivorship Resources If you liked this episode, please follow the show. To explore other educational content, including courses, visit education.asco.org. Contact us at education@asco.org. TRANSCRIPT  Disclosures for this podcast are listed on the podcast page.   Pat Loehrer: Welcome to Oncology, Etc., an ASCO Education Podcast. I'm Pat Loehrer, Director of Global Oncology and Health Equity at Indiana University.  Dave Johnson: And I'm Dave Johnson, a Medical Oncologist at the University of Texas Southwestern in Dallas. If you're a regular listener to our podcast, welcome back. If you're new to Oncology, Etc., the purpose of the podcast is to introduce listeners to interesting and inspirational people and topics in and outside the world of oncology. Pat Loehrer: The field of oncology is relatively new. The first person treated with chemotherapy was in the 1940s. Medical oncology was just recognized as a specialty during the 1970s. And while cancer was considered by most people to be a death sentence, a steady growth of researchers sought to find cures. And they did for many cancers. But sometimes these treatments came at a cost. Our next guest challenged the notion that the singular focus of oncology is to extend the patient's duration of life. She asked whether an oncologist should also focus on addressing the patient's quality of life.  Dave Johnson: The doctor asking that question went to UCLA Medical School, initially planning to study cardiology. However, a chance encounter with a young, dynamic oncologist who had started a clinical cancer ward sparked her interest in the nascent field of oncology. She witnessed advances in cancer treatment that seemingly took it from that inevitable death sentence to a potentially curable disease. She also recognized early on that when it came to cancer, a doctor must take care of the whole patient and not just the disease.  From that point forward, our guest has had a storied career and an incredible impact on the world of cancer care. When initially offered a position at the West LA VA Medical Center, she saw it as an opportunity to advance the field of palliative care for patients with cancer. This proved to be one of her first opportunities to develop a program that incorporated a focus on quality of life into the management of cancer. Her work also focused on mental, dietary, physical, and emotional services to the long-term survivors of cancer.  That career path has led to many accomplishments and numerous accolades for our guest. She is a founding member of the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship, served as the 2004 Co-chair of ASCO's Survivorship Task Force, and currently directs UCLA's Cancer Survivorship Center of Excellence, funded in part from a grant from Livestrong. Our guest is Dr. Patricia Ganz. Dr. Patricia Ganz: It's great to be with both of you today. Dave Johnson: We always like to ask our guests a little about their background, where they grew up, a little about their family. Dr. Patricia Ganz: Yes. I grew up in the city of Beverly Hills where my parents moved when I was about five years old because of the educational system. Unlike parts of the East Coast, we didn't have very many private schools in Los Angeles, and so public education was very good in California at that time. So I had a good launch and had a wonderful opportunity that many people didn't have at that time to grow up in a comfortable setting. Dave Johnson: Tell us about your mom. I understand she was a businesswoman, correct? Dr. Patricia Ganz: Yes, actually, my parents got married when my mom was 19 and my dad was 21. He was in medical school at the University of Michigan. His father and mother weren't too happy with him getting married before he could support a wife. But she worked in a family business in the wholesale produce business in Detroit. One of six children, she was very involved with her family in the business. And they were married, and then World War II started, my father was a physician in the military, so she worked in the family business during the war. After finally having children and growing up and being in Beverly Hills, she sat back and was a homemaker, but she was always a bit restless and was always looking for something to do. So wound up several years later, when I was in my early teens, starting a business with one of my uncles, an automobile parts business. They ultimately sold it out to a big company that bought it out.  Pat Loehrer: Where did your father serve in World War II? Dr. Patricia Ganz: He was actually D-Day Plus 21. He was in Wales during the war. They had to be stationed and moved down into the south before he was deployed. I have my parents' correspondence and letters from the war. He liberated some of the camps. Actually, as I have learned about the trauma of cancer and post-traumatic stress that happens in so many people, our military veterans, most recently, I think he had post-traumatic stress. He didn't talk very much about it, but I think liberating the camps, being overseas during that time, as it was for that silent generation, was very profound in terms of their activities.   He wound up practicing medicine, and Los Angeles had a practice in industrial medicine, and it was a comfortable life. He would work early in the morning till maybe three or four in the afternoon and then go to the gym, there were moonlighting physicians who worked in the practice. But I kind of saw an easy kind of medicine, and he was always very encouraging and wanted me to go into medicine -- that I could be an ophthalmologist or a radiologist, good job for a woman. But I didn't really see the tough life of some of the internists and other people who were really working more 24/7, taking care of patients in the way medicine used to be practiced. Dave Johnson: Yeah. So you were interested in, early in your career, in cardiology. Could you tell us about that, and then a little bit more about the transition to oncology?  Dr. Patricia Ganz: I went away to college, I went to Harvard Radcliffe and I came home during the summers. And was interested in doing something during the summer so I actually in a pediatric cardiology research laboratory as a volunteer at UCLA for a couple of summers between my freshman and sophomore year then my sophomore and junior year. And then I actually got a California Heart Association Fellowship between my junior and senior year in college.  And this pediatric cardiology lab was very interesting. They were starting to give ketamine, it had an identification number, it wasn't called ketamine. But they were giving it to children in the cardiac cath lab and then were very worried about whether it would interfere with measuring the pressures in the heart. So we had intact dogs that had catheters implanted in the heart, and the drug would be given to the animals and we would then measure their pressures in the heart.  That cardiology experience in 1970, the summer between my first and second year of medical school, the Swan-Ganz catheter was being tested. I worked at Cedars that summer and was watching them do the various studies to show the value of the catheter. And so by the time I was kind of finishing up medical school, I'd already invested all this time as an undergraduate. And then a little bit when I was in medical school and I kind of understood the physiology of the heart, very exciting. So that's kind of where I was headed until we started my internship. And I don't know if any of you remembered Marty Cline, but he was the oncologist who moved from UCSF to Los Angeles to start our hem-onc division. And very exciting, a wonderful bedside teacher.   And so all of a sudden, I've never been exposed to oncology and this was very interesting. But at the same time, I was rotating through the CCU, and in came two full-arrest patients, one of whom was a campus cop who was very obese, had arrested at his desk in the police station. And we didn't have emergency vehicles to help people get on campus at that time. This was 1973 or 1974, something like that. And he came in full arrest, vegetable. And then another man had been going out of his apartment to walk his dog and go downstairs, and then all of a sudden his wife saw him out on the street being resuscitated by people. And he came in also in full arrest.   So those two experiences, having to deal with those patients, not being able to kind of comfort the families, to do anything about it. As well as taking care of patients in my old clinic who had very bad vascular disease. One man, extremely depressed with claudication and angina, all of a sudden made me feel, “Well, you know what? I'm not sure I really want to be a cardiologist. I'm not sure I like the acute arrest that I had to deal with and the families. And also, the fact that people were depressed and you couldn't really talk to them about how serious their disease was.” Whereas I had patients with advanced cancer who came in, who had equally difficult prognoses, but because of the way people understood cancer, you could really talk about the problems that they would be facing and the end-of-life concerns that they would have.  So it was all of those things together that made me say, “Hmm.” And then also, Pat, you'll appreciate this, being from Indiana, we were giving phase II platinum to advanced testicular cancer patients, and it was miraculous. And so I thought, “Oh my gosh, in my lifetime, maybe cancer is going to be cured! Heart disease, well, that's not going to happen.” So that was really the turning point.   Pat Loehrer: When many of us started, we were just hoping that we could get patients to live a little bit longer and improve the response rate. But you took a different tack. You really looked at treating the whole patient, not just the disease. That was really a novel approach at the time. What influenced you to take that step forward? Dr. Patricia Ganz: Well, it was actually my starting– it was thought to be in a hospice ward. It would turn out it was a Sepulveda VA, not the West LA VA, but in any case, we have two VAs that are affiliated with UCLA. And it was an intermediate care ward, and there was an idea that we would in fact put our cancer patients there who had to have inpatient chemotherapy so they wouldn't be in the acute setting as well as patients who needed to travel for radiation. Actually, the West LA VA had a hospice demonstration project. This is 1978. It's really the beginning of the hospice movement in England, then in Canada, Balfour Mount at Montreal and McGill was doing this. And so I was very much influenced by, number one, most of our patients didn't live very long. And if you were at a VA Hospital, as I was at that time, you were treating patients with advanced lung cancer, advanced colon cancer, advanced prostate cancer, other GI malignancies, and lung cancer, of course. So it was really the rare patient who you would treat for curative intent.  In fact, small cell lung cancer was so exciting to be treating in a particularly limited small cell. Again, I had a lot of people who survived. We gave them chemo, radiation, whole brain radiation, etc. So that was exciting. This was before cisplatin and others were used in the treatment of lung cancer. But really, as I began to develop this ward, which I kind of thought, “Well, why should we wait just to give all the goodies to somebody in the last few weeks of life here? I'm treating some patients for cure, they're getting radiation. Some of them are getting radiation and chemo for palliation.” But it was a mixed cancer ward. And it was wonderful because I had a team that would make rounds with me every week: a pharmacist, a physiatrist, a psychologist, a social worker, a dietitian. This was in 1978 or ‘79, and the nurses were wonderful. They were really available to the patients. It wasn't a busy acute ward. If they were in pain, they would get their medication as soon as possible. I gave methadone. It was before the days of some of the newer medications, but it was long-acting. I learned how to give that. We gave Dilaudid in between if necessary. And then we had Brompton solution, that was before there was really oral morphine.  And so the idea was all of these kinds of services should really be available to patients from the time of diagnosis until death. We never knew who was going to be leaving us the next few days or who was going to be living longer and receiving curative intent. We had support groups for the patients and their families. It was a wonderful infrastructure, something that I didn't actually have at UCLA, so it was a real luxury. And if you know the VA system, the rehabilitation services are wonderful. They had dental services for patients. We had mostly World War II veterans, some Korean, and for many of these individuals, they had worked and lived a good life, and then they were going to retire and then they got cancer. So this was kind of the sadness. And it was a suburban VA, so we had a lot of patients who were in the San Fernando Valley, had a lot of family support, and it was a wonderful opportunity for me to learn how to do good quality care for patients along the continuum.  Dave Johnson: How did you assemble this team? Or was it in place in part when you arrived, or what? Nobody was thinking about this multidisciplinary approach?  Dr. Patricia Ganz: I just designed it because these were kind of the elements that were in a hospice kind of program. And I actually worked with the visiting nurses and I was part of their boards and so forth. And UCLA didn't have any kind of hospice or palliative care program at that time. But because the VA infrastructure had these staff already, I didn't have to hire them, you didn't have to bill for anything. They just became part of the team. Plus there was a psychiatrist who I ultimately began doing research with. He hired a psychologist for the research project. And so there was kind of this infrastructure of interest in providing good supportive care to cancer patients. A wonderful social worker, a wonderful psychologist, and they all saw this patient population as very needy, deserving, and they were glad to be part of a team.  We didn't call it a hospice, we called it a palliative care unit. These were just regular staff members who, as part of their job, their mission was to serve that patient population and be available. I had never been exposed to a physiatrist before. I trained at UCLA, trained and did my residency and fellowship. We didn't have physiatry. For whatever reason, our former deans never thought it was an important physical medicine, it wasn't, and still isn't, part of our system. Pat Loehrer: Many decisions we make in terms of our careers are based on singular people. Your dad, maybe, suggesting going into medicine, but was there a patient that clicked with you that said, "Listen, I want to take this different direction?" Or was it just a collection of patients that you were seeing at the VA? Is there one that you can reflect back on? Dr. Patricia Ganz: I don't know if you all remember, but there was something called Consultation Liaison Psychiatry where, in that time, the psychiatrist really felt that they had to see medical patients because there were psychological and sometimes psychiatric problems that occurred on the medical ward, such as delirium. That was very common with patients who were very sick and very toxic, which was again due to the medical condition affecting the brain. And so I was exposed to these psychiatrists who were very behaviorally oriented when I was a resident and a fellow, and they often attended our team meetings in oncology on our service, they were on the transplant service, all those kinds of things. So they were kind of like right by our side.  And when I went to the VA, the psychiatry service there also had a couple of really excellent psychiatrists who, again, were more behaviorally focused. Again, you have to really remember, bless her heart, Jimmie Holland was wonderful as a psychiatrist. She and Barrie Cassileth were the kind of early people we would see at our meetings who were kind of on the leading edge of psychosocial oncology, but particularly, Jimmie was more in a psychiatric mode, and there was a lot of focus on coping. But the people that I began to work with were more behaviorally focused, and they were kind of interested in the impact of the disease and the treatment on the patient's life and, backwards, how could managing those kinds of problems affect the well-being of the patient. And this one psychiatrist, Richard Heinrich, had gotten money from the VA, had written a grant to do an intervention study with the oncology patients who I was serving to do a group intervention for the patients and their families. But, in order to even get this grant going, he hired a project manager who was a psychologist, a fresh graduate whose name was Anne Coscarelli, and her name was Cindie Schag at that time. But she said, "I don't know much about cancer. I've got to interview patients. I've got to understand what's going on." And they really, really showed me that, by talking to the patient, by understanding what they were experiencing, they could get a better handle on what they were dealing with and then, potentially, do interventions. So we have a wonderful paper if you want to look it up. It's called the “Karnofsky Performance Status Revisited.” It's in the second issue of JCO, which we published; I think it was 1984.  Dave Johnson: In the early 90s, you relocated back to UCLA. Why would you leave what sounds like the perfect situation to go back to a site that didn't have it? Dr. Patricia Ganz: Okay, over that 13 years that I was at the VA, I became Chief of the Division of Hem-Onc. We were actually combined with a county hospital. It was a wonderful training program, it was a wonderful patient population at both places. And we think that there are troubles in financing health care now, well, there were lots of problems then. Medicaid came and went. We had Reagan as our governor, then he became president, and there were a lot of problems with people being cared for. So it was great to be at the VA in the county, and I always felt privileged. I always had a practice at UCLA, which was a half-day practice, so I continued there, and I just felt great that I could practice the same wherever I was, whether it was in a public system, veteran system, or in the private system.   But what happened was, I took a sabbatical in Switzerland, '88 to '89. I worked with the Swiss International Breast Cancer Consortium group there, but it was really a time for me to take off and really learn about quality of life assessment, measurement, and so forth. When I came back, I basically said, "I want to make a difference. I want to do something at a bigger arena." If I just continue working where I am, it's kind of a midlife crisis. I was in my early 40s, and my office was in the San Fernando Valley at the VA, but my home was in West Los Angeles. One day I was in UCLA, one day I was at the VA, one day I was at the county, it was like, "Can I practice like this the next 20 years? I don't know that I can do this. And I really want to have some bigger impact.” So I went to Ellen Gritz who was my predecessor in my current position, and I was doing my NCI-funded research at UCLA still, and I said, “Ellen, I really would like to be able to do research full time. I really want to make a difference. Is there anything available? Do you know of anything?" And she said, "Well, you know, we're actually recruiting for a position that's joint between the School of Public Health and the Cancer Center. And oh my goodness, maybe I can compete for that, so that's what I did. And it was in what was then the department called Health Services, it's now called Health Policy and Management. I applied, I was competing against another person who I won't name, but I got the position and made that move.  But again, it was quite a transition because I had never done anything in public health, even though UCLA had a school of public health that was right adjacent to the medical school. I had had interactions with the former dean, Lester Breslow, who I actually took an elective with when I was a first-year medical student on Community Medicine. So it kind of had some inklings that, of what I was interested in. I had actually attendings in my medical clinic, Bob Brook, a very famous health policy researcher, Sheldon Greenfield. So I'd been exposed to a lot of these people and I kind of had the instinctive fundamentals, if you will, of that kind of research, but hadn't really been trained in it. And so it was a great opportunity for me to take that job and really learn a lot and teach with that.  And then took, part of my time was in the cancer center with funding from the core grant. And then, within a year of my taking this position, Ellen left and went to MD Anderson, so all of a sudden I became director of that whole population science research group. And it was in the early ‘90s, had to scramble to get funding, extramural funding. Everybody said to me, "How could you leave a nearly full-time position at the VA for a soft money position?" But, nevertheless, it worked out. And it was an exciting time to be able to go into a new career and really do things that were not only going to be in front and center beneficial to patients, but to a much larger group of patients and people around the world.  Pat Loehrer: Of all the work that you have done, what one or two things are you most proud of in terms of this field? Dr. Patricia Ganz: Recognizing the large number of people who are surviving cancer. And I think today we even have a more exciting part of that. I mean, clearly, many people are living long-term disease-free with and without sequelae of the disease. But we also have this new group of survivors who are living on chronic therapy. And I think the CML patients are kind of the poster children for this, being on imatinib or other newer, targeted agents over time, living with cancer under control, but not necessarily completely gone. And then melanoma with the immunotherapy, lung cancer, all of these diseases now being converted to ones that were really fatal, that are now enjoying long-term treatment.   But along with that, we all know, is the financial toxicity, the burdens, and even the ongoing symptoms that patients have. So the fact that we all call people survivors and think about people from the time of diagnosis as potentially being survivors, I think was very important. And I would say that, from the clinical side, that's been very important to me. But all of the work that I was able to do with the Institute of Medicine, now the National Academy of Medicine, the 2013 report that we wrote on was a revisit of Joe Simone's quality of care report, and to me was actually a very pivotal report. Because in 2013, it looked like our health care system was in crisis and the delivery of care. We're now actually doing a National Cancer Policy Forum ten-year follow-up of that report, and many of the things that we recommended, surprisingly, have been implemented and are working on. But the healthcare context now is so much more complicated.  Again, with the many diseases now becoming rare diseases, the cost of drugs, the huge disparities, even though we have access through the Affordable Care Act and so forth, there's still huge disparities in who gets care and treatment. And so we have so many challenges. So for me, being able to engage in the policy arena and have some impact, I think has been also very important to me. Dave Johnson: 20 years ago, the topic of survivorship was not that common within ASCO, and you led a 2004 task force to really strengthen that involvement by that organization, and you also were a founding member of the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship. I wonder if you might reflect on those two activities for us for a moment. Dr. Patricia Ganz: In 1986, Fitzhugh Mullen, who in 1985 had written a really interesting special article for the New England Journal called "Seasons of Survivorship" - he was a young physician when he was found to have a mediastinal germ cell tumor and got very intensive chemotherapy and radiation therapy and survived that, but realized that there was no place in the healthcare system where he could turn to to get his questions answered, nor get the kind of medical care that was needed, and really wrote this very important article. He then, being somebody who was also kind of policy-oriented and wanting to change the world, and I would say this was a group of us who, I think went to college during the Vietnam era - so did Fitz - and we were all kind of restless, trying to see how we could make a difference in the world and where it was going.   And so he had this vision that he was going to almost develop an army of survivors around the country who were going to stand up and have their voices heard about what was going on. Of course, most people didn't even know they were a survivor. They had cancer treatment, but they didn't think about themselves as a survivor. And so he decided to get some people together in Albuquerque, New Mexico, through a support group that he had worked with when he was in the Indian Health Service in New Mexico. And there were various people from the American Cancer Society, from other support organizations, social workers, and a couple of us who are physicians who came to this meeting, some Hodgkin survivors who had been treated at Stanford and were now, including a lawyer, who were starting to do long term late effects work. And we gathered together, and it was a day and a half, really, just kind of trying to figure out how could a movement or anything get oriented to try and help patients move forward.  So that's how this was founded. And they passed the hat. I put in a check for $100, and that was probably a lot of money at that time, but I thought, well, this is a good investment. I'll help this organization get started. And that was the start. And they kind of ran it out of Living Beyond Cancer in Albuquerque for a few years. But then Fitz, who was in the Washington, DC. area decided they weren't going to be able to get organizations all over the country organized to do this, and they were going to have to do some lobbying. So Ellen Stovall, who was a Hodgkins survivor living in the Washington area, beginning to do policy work in this area, then became the executive director and took the organization forward for many years and championed this, got the Office of Cancer Survivors established at the NCI in the 1990s, and really did a lot of other wonderful work, including a lot of the work at the Institute of Medicine. She was very involved with the first Quality of Care report and then ultimately the survivorship report, the Lost and Transition report in 2005, 2006, I was on that committee. So that was really how things were evolving.  And by that time, I was also on the ASCO board, 2003 to 2006. And so all of these things were kind of coming together. We had 10 million survivors. That was kind of an important note and a lot of diseases now - lymphoma, breast cancer, multi-agent therapy had certain benefits, but obviously toxicities. We lived through the horrible time of high-dose chemotherapy and transplant for breast cancer in the ‘90s, which was a problem, but we saw a lot of toxicities after that. And so there were people living after cancer who now had sequelae, and the children obviously had been leading the way in terms of the large number of childhood cancer survivors. So this was this idea that the children were kind of the canary in the coal mine. We saw them living 20, 30 years later after their cancer diagnosis, and we were now beginning to see adults living 10, 15, 20 years later, and we needed to think about these long-term and late effects for them as well. Dave Johnson: I'm glad you mentioned Fitz's article in the New England Journal that still resonates today, and if listeners have not read it, "Seasons of Survivorship" is a worthwhile five-minute read.  What do you think the most pressing issues and challenges in cancer survivorship care today?  Dr. Patricia Ganz: Many people are cured with very little impact. You can think of somebody with T1 breast cancer maybe needing endocrine therapy for five years, and lumpectomy radiation. That person's probably not going to have a lot that they're going to be worried about. But if they're a young breast cancer patient, say they're 35 or 40, you're going to get five years of ovarian suppression therapy. You're going to be put into acute menopause. You're going to lose bone density. You're going to have cardiac risk acceleration. You may have cognitive changes. You may have also problems with cognitive decline later. I mean, all of these things, the more intense treatments are associated, what we're really thinking about is accelerated aging. And so a lot of what I've been studying the last 20-25 years in terms of fatigue and cognitive difficulties are related to neuroinflammation and what happens when somebody has intensive systemic therapy and that accelerated process that's, again, not everyone, but small numbers of patients, could be 10-15-20%. So I worry a lot about the young patients. So I've been very focused on the young adult population who are treated intensively for lymphoma, leukemia, and breast. And that's, I think, something that we need to be looking out for.  The other thing is with the newer therapies, whether it's immunotherapy or some of the targeted therapies, we just don't know what the late effects are going to be. Where we're very schooled now in what the late effects of radiation, chemo, and surgery could be for patients, we just don't know. And another wonderful part of my career has been to be able to do quality-of-life studies within the Clinical Trials Network. I've been affiliated with NSABP, I was SWOG previously, but NSABP is now NRG Oncology doing patient-reported outcomes and looking at long-term outcomes in clinical trials. And I think we're going to need this for all of these new agents because we have no idea what the long-term toxicities are going to be. And even though it's amazing to have people surviving where they wouldn't have been, we don't know what the off-target long-term effects might be. So that's a real challenge right now for survivorship.  And the primary care doctors who we would want to really be there to orchestrate the coordinated care for patients to specialists, they are a vanishing breed. You could read the New England Journal that I just read about the challenges of the primary care physician right now and the overfilled inbox and low level of esteem that they're given in health systems. Where are we going to take care of people who really shouldn't be still seeing the oncologist? The oncologist is going to be overburdened with new patients because of the aging of the population and the many new diagnoses. So this is our new crisis, and that's why I'm very interested in what we're going to be looking at in terms of a ten-year follow-up report to the 2013 IOM report. Dave Johnson: The industry-based trials now are actually looking at longer-term treatment. And the trials in which interest is cancer, we cut it down from two years of therapy down to nine weeks of therapy, looking at minimizing therapy. Those are difficult trials to do in this climate today, whereas the industry would just as soon have patients on for three to five years worth of therapy as opposed to three to five months. Talk a little about those pressures and what we should be doing as a society to investigate those kinds of therapies and minimizing treatments. Dr. Patricia Ganz: Minimizing treatments, this is the place where the government has to be, because we will not be able to do these de-escalation studies. Otherwise, there will be countries like the UK, they will be able to do these studies, or other countries that have national health systems where they have a dual purpose, if you will, in terms of both financing health care and also doing good science. But I think, as I've seen it, we have a couple of de-escalation trials for breast cancer now in NRG Oncology, which is, again, I think, the role that the NCTN needs to be playing. But it's difficult for patients. We all know that patients come in several breeds, ones who want everything, even if there's a 1% difference in benefit, and others who, “Gee, only 1 out of 100 are going to benefit? I don't want that.” I think that's also the challenge. And people don't want to be denied things, but it's terrible to watch people go through very prolonged treatments when we don't know that they really need it for so long.  Dave Johnson: Pat and I both like to read. I'm wondering if there's something you've read recently that you could recommend to us. Dr. Patricia Ganz: It's called A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles. I do like to read historical fiction. This one is about a count at the time of the Bolshevik Revolution who then gets imprisoned in a hotel in Moscow and how constrained his life becomes, but how enriched it is and follows him over really a 50-year period of time and what was happening in the Soviet Union during that time. And of course, with the war in Ukraine going on, very interesting. Of course, I knew the history, but when you see it through the drama of a personal story, which is fictional, obviously it was so interesting.   My husband escaped from Czechoslovakia. He left in '66, so I had exposure to his family and what it was like for them living under communism. So a lot of that was interesting to me as well.  Dave Johnson: Thank you for joining us. It's been a wonderful interview and you're to be congratulated on your accomplishments and the influence you've had on the oncology world.  We also want to thank our listeners of Oncology, Etc., and ASCO Educational Podcast where we will talk about oncology, medicine and beyond. So if you have an idea for a topic or a guest you'd like us to interview, by all means, email us at education@asco.org. To stay up to date with the latest episodes and explore other ASCO educational content, please visit education.asco.org. The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions.  Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.    

Case Interview Preparation & Management Consulting | Strategy | Critical Thinking
608: Leading Consumer Products Groups at the World's Largest Media Companies, Leading Disney Stores Worldwide, Time Management, Biggest Lessons Learned While at Disney (with Former President of Disney Stores Worldwide Jim Fielding)

Case Interview Preparation & Management Consulting | Strategy | Critical Thinking

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2023 59:20


Welcome to an interview with the author of All Pride, No Ego: A Queer Executive's Journey to Living and Leading Authentically, Jim Fielding, where he delivers an inspirational leadership story told from the perspective of an out and proud LGBTQ+ executive. In the book, you'll explore a call-to-action for authentic servant leadership that encourages people to own their truth and bring out the best in themselves and their communities. Jim Fielding is a respected retail and media industry veteran whose expertise combines storytelling, product innovation, merchandising, and consumer experiences. Jim currently serves as a partner at Archer Gray, an independent media company, and president of its Co-Lab Division. Having led consumer products groups at the world's largest media companies, including Disney, Dreamworks, and Twentieth Century Fox, Jim has built diverse cultures and visionary teams that excelled in competitive global markets. He served as president of Disney Stores Worldwide for four years, transforming its global consumer experience. He also served as CEO of Claire's Stores, Inc., a leading jewelry and accessories retailer.  Jim's early experience spanned leading global retail companies, from The Gap to Lands' End. He mastered all aspects of vertical specialty retail, including supply chain, product design, store operations, and visual merchandising.  An active community leader and philanthropist, Jim serves on the board of directors for the Indiana University Foundation and was a founding member of the Dean's Council for the Hamilton Lugar Global and International School. Jim is a founder of the Queer Philanthropy Circle, the nation's premier fundraising and advocacy group for the queer community. He also participates in the Women's Philanthropic Leadership Circle and the Black Philanthropy Circle.  Jim has served as a board member for GLSEN, Make-A-Wish International, and American Red Cross, as well as an executive-in-residence for IU Ventures and Indiana University's Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. He has endowed several scholarships at IU to support overseas study, international internships, and advocacy leadership training.    Jim lives in Atlanta with his partner, Joseph, and their dogs, Cricket and Olive. In the summers, you will find them in Leland and Northport, Michigan. Get Jim's book here: https://rb.gy/ax3aj All Pride, No Ego: A Queer Executive's Journey to Living and Leading Authentically. Jim Fielding. Here are some free gifts for you: Overall Approach Used in Well-Managed Strategy Studies free download: www.firmsconsulting.com/OverallApproach McKinsey & BCG winning resume free download: www.firmsconsulting.com/resumepdf Enjoying this episode? Get access to sample advanced training episodes here: www.firmsconsulting.com/promo