Podcasts about Latinx

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

U.S. gender-neutral term for people of Latin American heritage

  • 3,772PODCASTS
  • 8,334EPISODES
  • 48mAVG DURATION
  • 4DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jul 1, 2022LATEST
Latinx

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022



    Best podcasts about Latinx

    Show all podcasts related to latinx

    Latest podcast episodes about Latinx

    Live Wire with Luke Burbank
    Daisy Hernandez and Wayne Coyne

    Live Wire with Luke Burbank

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 51:12


    Host Luke Burbank and announcer Elena Passarello celebrate the spirit of live performances; writer Daisy Hernández unpacks her latest book The Kissing Bug, a reportage-meets-memoir which outlines the impact of Chagas disease on Latinx communities; Wayne Coyne, frontman of The Flaming Lips, explains how to play a Covid-safe concert using space bubbles; and we hear a performance of their hit song "Do You Realize" from inside a bubble.

    Media Fuel
    Episode 71 - Women Running Hollywood

    Media Fuel

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 44:50


    Follow us on Twitter and Instagram to stay updated!@mediafuelpodMovie/TV NewsNetflixGoodbye to Old HollywoodSUCCESSION Madame WebBarbie First LooksSPOOKTOBER Follow Us!@relsss Insta @relsarels Twitter @whyzeusy Insta & TwitterTags: Lations, gaming

    LARB Radio Hour
    Natalia Molina's "A Place at the Nayarit: How a Mexican Restaurant Nourished A Community"

    LARB Radio Hour

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 44:24


    Kate Wolf and Eric Newman are joined by the historian and MacArthur Fellow Natalia Molina to discuss her most recent book, A Place at the Nayarit: How a Mexican Restaurant Nourished A Community. The book follows Molina's maternal grandmother, Doña Natalia Barraza, who immigrated to Los Angeles from Mexico in the 1920s and went on to open a series of restaurants. The most successful and longest lasting was the Nayarit, which opened on Sunset Blvd in Echo Park in 1951. The Nayarit served the ethnically diverse and historically progressive and queer neighborhood for over two decades. As Molina shows, it was a refuge for the city's Latinx community, many of whom were recent arrivals in the United States. At the Nayarit they “could come together for labor, leisure, and access to a ready-made social network,” and this act alone would shape the face of Los Angeles for years to come. Also, Orressa Moshfegh, author of Lapvona returns to recommend Dr. Mike Bechtle's The People Pleaser's Guide to Loving Others without Losing Yourself.

    LA Review of Books
    Natalia Molina's "A Place at the Nayarit: How a Mexican Restaurant Nourished A Community"

    LA Review of Books

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 44:23


    Kate Wolf and Eric Newman are joined by historian Natalia Molina to discuss her most recent book, A Place at the Nayarit: How a Mexican Restaurant Nourished a Community. The book follows Molina's maternal grandmother, Doña Natalia Barraza, who immigrated to Los Angeles from Mexico in the 1920s and went on to open a series of restaurants. The most successful and longest lasting was the Nayarit, which opened on Sunset Boulevard in Echo Park in 1951. The Nayarit served the ethnically diverse and historically progressive and queer neighborhood for over two decades. As Molina, a MacArthur Fellow, shows, it was a refuge for members of the city's Latinx community, many of whom were recent arrivals in the United States. At the Nayarit they “could come together for labor, leisure, and access to a ready-made social network,” and this act alone would shape the face of Los Angeles for years to come. Also, Ottessa Moshfegh, author of Lapvona, returns to recommend Dr. Mike Bechtle's The People Pleaser's Guide to Loving Others without Losing Yourself.

    Rightnowish
    Filmmaker Maya Cueva Focuses on Reproductive Rights and Immigration

    Rightnowish

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 18:38


    Maya Cueva makes documentary films that cover the heavy topics: immigration, reproductive justice and xenophobia. Her latest, On The Divide, follows the stories of three Latinx people whose lives interconnect through the last abortion clinic on the U.S./Mexico border. The film premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2021, and is available to stream free of charge through July 18, 2022 at POV. Cueva says her journey into professional storytelling began after covering current events at Youth Radio (now YR Media) as a teen. While attending Ithaca College in New York, she began work on her first film, The Provider, which follows Dr. Shannon Carr as she performs abortions in Texas in the midst of a heated battle for reproductive rights. She's also made Ale Libre, which follows reproductive rights organizer and undocumented activist Alejandra Pablos in her fight against deportation, and Only the Moon/ Solamente La Luna, an animated film about her father's immigration experience to the U.S. from Peru.

    Brown & Black
    Roe Reversal: Is this the beginning of America as an utterly fascist state? And how culpable will Hollywood be?

    Brown & Black

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 39:03


    Education Talk Radio
    THE LATINX ED TECH SUMMIT

    Education Talk Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 35:00


    THE LATINX ED TECH SUMMIT  Addressing Educational Technology and Needs for Underrepresented Rural Students in the Borderplex Region :El Paso, Texas, is one of the highest concentrated Hispanic areas (83%), with approximately (50%) of households still without broadband, and, in general, the Borderplex region and the immediate rural area outside of El Paso, already burdened with the challenges of the digital divide and inequity it created, suffered greatly during the pandemics…Hoping to  impact  the foundational design of the future of education with the LatinX EdTech Summit in El Paso on June 16, 2022.

    The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters
    The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters #426

    The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 90:40


    Callum and Harry discuss the Transgender Bill of Rights, the detrans wave, and Biden's Latinx oral historians.

    Hyphenated with Joanna Hausmann and Jenny Lorenzo

    Joanna and Jenny discuss the recent passing of Joanna's aunt, how different cultural rituals can help us process grief, what we can do to remember those we've lost, and the role spirituality can play in death.

    The Real News Podcast
    How Georgia's Latinx community is seeking to ‘out-organize' voter suppression

    The Real News Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 7:23


    Georgians went to the polls in record numbers during the May 24 primary ahead of the crucial 2022 midterm elections, despite renewed GOP efforts to suppress the votes of the state's communities of color. Passed in the wake of the 2020 elections, inspired in large part by former President Trump's baseless claims of election fraud, Georgia's SB 202 (the Election Integrity Act of 2021) is perhaps the most egregious example of Republicans' nationwide efforts to roll back voting rights through a flurry of restrictive voting laws. Such laws disproportionately impact people in low-income communities and communities of color, and they are being passed at a moment when the power of communities of color to shape election outcomes is rapidly increasing. Case in point: Georgia's Latinx community has grown by 30% over the past decade and now comprises 10% of the state's population. In this on-the-ground report for our special series “Defending Democracy in the 2022 Midterm Elections,” TRNN's Jaisal Noor and Jeffrey Moustache speak with organizers from the Georgia Alliance of Latino Elected Officials (GALEO), an advocacy group that helps Latinx voters unlock their political power, about how they are working to “out-organize voter suppression” by mobilizing and empowering the state's Latinx community.Read the transcript of this report: https://therealnews.com/how-georgias-latinx-community-is-working-to-out-organize-voter-suppressionPre-Production/Studio: Jaisal Noor, Jeffrey MoustachePost-Production: Jaisal Noor, Jeffrey Moustache, Cameron GranadinoThis story is part of a series that was made possible with the support of the Solutions Journalism Network, a nonprofit organization dedicated to rigorous and compelling reporting about responses to social problems.Help us continue producing radically independent news and in-depth analysis by following us and becoming a monthly sustainer: Donate: https://therealnews.com/donate-podSign up for our newsletter: https://therealnews.com/newsletter-podLike us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/therealnewsFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/therealnews

    Soundside
    A More Perfect Union: Latinx voting rights

    Soundside

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 50:37


    In this second episode of A More Perfect Union, reporters from Spokane Public Radio, Northwest Public Broadcasting, KUOW, and Humanities Washington explore Latinx voting rights and civic engagement in our region.

    Girl Behind the Hustle
    EP. 79 Margarita Arriagada Latinx Beauty Grant, Being Very You and Bringing Your Authentic Self to Spaces That You Occupy

    Girl Behind the Hustle

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 56:15


    What a pleasure it was to sit down with "The Godmother of Beauty" Margarita Arriagada. Before developing her beauty brand Valde Beauty, Margarita spent over a decade as Chief Merchant of Sephora. Valde Beauty was created to pay homage to her Mother's determination, courage and spirit with the name deriving from part of her Mother's last name. Every move Margarita has made with this brand has been very intentional, which is exactly what's needed to break in and stand out in a crowded market like the beauty industry. Valde is not the typical lipstick brand it is an experience and a gift to make each woman who holds it feel purposeful and encouraged to write their own destiny. You can immediately feel and see the difference when you hold the gold feather covered refillable vessel in your hands. Listen in as we chat about: The importance of bringing your whole self to spaces you occupy How Valde landed in Oprah's hands Taking Valde into the NFT space with the first ever beauty launch Funding and The Rising Latinx Beauty Grant Tools & Resources Mentioned Notion Abundance by Deepak Chopra Survivor Abortion Fund Here's how you can connect with Margarita Instagram | Valde Beauty | Twitter | Discord | Leave us a note or review | Subscribe to the podcast | Follow on Spotify You can find Girl Behind The Hustle on Instagram | Facebook | Website by Email at heygirl@girlbehindthehustle.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/girlbehindthehustle/message

    Tamarindo
    Career Tips with Laura Tejeda

    Tamarindo

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 42:22


    Today's minisode episode is with Laura Tejeda, the host of LA TACO LIVE where she explores LA Culture, news, politics, lifestyle and FOOD! Laura joins Brenda to talk about East LA, the food scene and answering listener career questions. We want to take a moment to address the overturn of Roe versus Wade. This decision stripped away the legal right to have a safe and legal abortion. Restricting access to comprehensive reproductive care, including abortion, threatens the health and independence of all  PEOPLE. This decision could also lead to the loss of other rights. To learn more about what you can do to help, go to podvoices.help or donate to abortion providers today.  Laura is a freelance writer for L.A. TACO and she is the founder of Instagram based page @hungryineastlos which began in 2016 in efforts to challenge gentrification in East LA and raise awareness to support family owned & people of color owned businesses.tam Laura has a Masters Degree in Higher Education and works with college students particularly in Equity & Social Justice based education.You can find her work here! We have some fun FREE or donation-based events, check them out here: tamarindopodcast.com/events Tamarindo podcast is the Latinx show where hosts discuss politics, pop culture, and how to balance it all con calma, hosted by Brenda Gonzalez and Ana Sheila Victorino. Join us as we delve into discussions on race, gender, politics, representation, and life!  Brenda and Ana Sheila are executive producers of Tamarindo podcast with production support by Mitzi Hernández and Augusto Martinez, of Sonoro Media. Jeff Ricards produced our theme song. If you want to support our work, please rate and review our show here. You can get in touch with us at www.tamarindopodcast.com Contribute to the show: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/tamarindopodcast1 Save 10% on your order of books from Latina-owned Xolo Books with the code TAMARINDO at checkout: xolobooks.com Follow Tamarindo on instragram @tamarindopodcast and on twitter at @tamarindocast  Follow Ana Sheila on instagram @la_anasheila and twitter @Shelli1228 Follow Brenda on twitter at @BrendaRicards

    Experiencing Financial Contentment with Dominique Henderson, CFP® | Get Better Results in Your Life
    CFFP #59 - Setting a Foundation for Financial Literacy for Generations to Come ft. Elois Joseph, MBA

    Experiencing Financial Contentment with Dominique Henderson, CFP® | Get Better Results in Your Life

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 32:16


    Welcome to another episode of the Conversations for Financial Professionals podcast where we are shaping the next generation of financial advice. Today we have Elois Joseph, MBA who is an accomplished financial services professional with an extensive career in brokerage operations, regulatory compliance, and exchange registration services.  She holds a MBA from  Northern Illinois  University and a BA in Journalism from  Columbia College Chicago.  Her career spans 20+ years; however, she could no longer resist the call to dedicate her expertise full-time to the Greenwood Project.   Over the last two years, Elois has harnessed her expertise to bolster the capacity of The Greenwood Project by creating a framework to expose and educate minority students to a world that they never knew existed. Consequently, the organization grew from serving 120 students and 8 firms in 2017 to 400+students and 50 partner firms in 2021. The Greenwood Project introduces Black and LatinX students to careers within the financial industry via paid summer internships, educational field trips and their summer institute for high school students. The organization was established five years ago by Elois and her husband, Bevon Joseph. Initially, the organization's mission was to introduce academically talented students from Chicago's under-resourced communities to opportunities within the financial industry. However, they have now expanded that mission to reach Black and LatinX youth nationwide.   In our discussion we talked about:  

    Creating a Family: Talk about Infertility, Adoption & Foster Care

    How can white parents raise anti-racist children in this time of violence against people of color and protests. We talk with Dr. Ann Hazzard, a clinical child psychologist who was on the faculty at Emory University in Atlanta and co-author of Something Happened in Our Town:  A Child's Story about Racial Injustice; and Dr. Joy Harris, a Full-time Lecturer at Princeton Theological Seminary and co-author of The ABCs of Diversity: Helping Kids (and Ourselves!) Embrace Our Differences.In this episode, we cover:Embrace Race.org. Founded by black and mixed race parents to provide resources for raising black children.One Talk at a Time https://www.caminoslab.org/onetalk Providing support for Latinx American, Asian American, African American, and Black youth and their families to have conversations about race and ethnicity. They have a separate section for Black, Asian, and Latinx parents.What is the difference between not being a racist and being anti-racist?What is wrong with saying and believing any of the following: "love will conquer all", “we are all one race-the human race", and “colorblind is best”.Tip 1. Talk about RaceRacism thrives in silence. Why are many white parents silent on raise in general and within our families?When do children start recognizes racial differences?When should white parents start talking to their kids about race?How to start the conversation? Fantastic resources:Diverse Book Finder https://diversebookfinder.org/books/The Brown Bookshelf highlights Black voices writing for young readers.The Conscious Kid https://www.theconsciouskid.org/  Tip 2: Acknowledging & Celebrating Racial DiversityWhy is it important to acknowledge and celebrate racial diversity?How to acknowledge and celebrate racial diversity?Tip 3: Recognize systemic/institutionalized racism and white privilegeWhat do we mean by systemic racism?What do we mean by white privilege?How early do kids start defaulting that things associated with being white are better than being black?How can parents address institutionalize racism with their children who will likely benefit from it?How do we help teach our kids to understand power inequity so they can name it, unpack it, and dismantle it when it happens in the real world.Tip 4: Talk about Violence Against People of Color and the Protests/ResistanceSomething Happened in Our Town:  A Child's Story about Racial Injustice How much should we share with our children? At what age should we talk with them about these hard topics or is it better to shield them from such “grown up” problems?Talk about How People Make Change in a democracy.Not a one-time conversation. Appropriate conversation for age and developmental level. Should young children watch the news and videos. This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on Support the show

    Debt-Free Latina
    The Most Wonderful Time of the Year

    Debt-Free Latina

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 12:47


    #041 - On this episode, as the second half of the year approaches, Mayra reviews a few things to keep in mind. Connect with Mayra at https://DebtFreeLatina.com  Follow Mayra on Instagram at @debtfree.latina and/or @mayra.alejandra.garcia

    Open Data Institute Podcasts
    A Provocation On Evidence From Dr Omar U. Flóres, Latinx In AI: Experimentalism/Ursula Le Guin

    Open Data Institute Podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 3:59


    Experimentalism/Ursula Le Guin roundtable: A Provocation On Valuation From Professor S Craig Watkins, University Of Texas At Austin. June 2022

    Writers Drinking Coffee
    Episode 157 – Scenes from a Latinx Restaurant

    Writers Drinking Coffee

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 31:27


    Dr. Natalia Molina joins us to talk about her latest book, A Place at the Narayit, a non-fiction historical account about her grandmother's restaurant opened in Los Angeles in the 1960s. It's a fascinating history of the region, both from the perspective of laws and statues designed to limit where immigrants could live, and a celebration of life and diversity that grew and flowered into a cultural space in the Echo Park neighborhood. … Continue...Episode 157 – Scenes from a Latinx Restaurant

    Racial Draft Podcast
    Agents of The Shield (Racial Draft S4 - Supplemental Draft Round 7 Recap)

    Racial Draft Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 148:28


    This week, Mike is joined by Carlos of the Latinx delegation to discuss nerd news, anti-heroes, America Chavez, and Racial Draft business for the week that was. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/racial-draft-podcast/support

    Refinitiv Sustainability Perspectives Podcast
    Bahiyah Yasmeen Robinson, Founder, VC Include, on driving change

    Refinitiv Sustainability Perspectives Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 25:11


    Bahiyah Yasmeen Robinson is a leader in technology, investment and social impact initiatives. In 2018, she founded VC Include, an ecosystem of women, Black, Latinx, Indigenous and LGBTQ+ fund managers and alternative investments. In this episode, Keesa Schreane chats to Bahiyah about launching VC Include, why triple bottom line investments have grown to create a framework for how we invest in a way that is good for people and planet, and how she is developing a holistic infrastructure and ecosystem to drive change at scale when it comes to delivering success for first-time fund managers and underrepresented managers. This week on The Green Room, we hear from Lisa Zelljadt, Senior Analyst in LSEG’s Carbon Research team. She explains the who, the what and the how of Carbon Markets and dives into the results of our Carbon Markets Survey.

    Brown Sound
    Oh Yuutz

    Brown Sound

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 57:00


    Join your favorite brown amigos as they are back again with a bonus episode. Pour yourself a nice drink or grab some snacks and get ready to laugh around con los chicx! The hosts speak from a Latinx and Indigenous perspective. Make sure to follow the Brown Sound Podcast on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/brownsoundpodcast Language lesson on this episode yúuc'na - poor thing - porbrecito

    Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology
    My White Coat Doesn't Fit

    Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 35:52


    “My White Coat Doesn't Fit” by Narjust Florez (Duma): a medical oncologist shares her story about exclusion, depression and finding her way in oncology as a Latina in medicine and oncology.   TRANSCRIPT Narrator: My White Coat Doesn't Fit, by Narjust Duma, MD (10.1200/JCO.21.02601) There I was, crying once again all the way from the hospital's parking lot to my apartment, into the shower, and while trying to fall asleep. This had become the norm during my internal medicine residency. For years, I tried hard every day to be someone else in order to fit in. It started with off-hand comments like “Look at her red shoes,” “You are so colorful,” and “You are so Latina.” These later escalated to being interrupted during presentations with comments about my accent, being told that my medical school training in my home country was inferior to my US colleagues, and being assigned all Spanish-speaking patients because “They are your people.” Some of those comments and interactions were unintentionally harmful but led to feelings of isolation, and over time, I began to feel like an outsider. I came to the United States with the dream of becoming a physician investigator, leaving behind family, friends, and everything I knew. Over time, I felt pigeonholed into a constricting stereotype due to my ethnicity and accent. Back home, I was one of many, but in this new setting, I was one of a few, and in many instances, I was the only Latina in the room. I was raised by divorced physician parents in Venezuela; my childhood years were often spent in the clinic waiting for my mother to see that one last patient or outside the operating room waiting for my father to take me home. The hospital felt like my second home, growing up snacking on Graham crackers and drinking the infamous hospital's 1% orange juice. “She was raised in a hospital,” my mother used to say. Sadly, that feeling of being at home in the hospital changed during medical training as I felt isolated and like I did not belong, making me question my dream and the decision to come to the United States. I remember calling my family and crying as I asked “Why did I leave?” “Why didn't you stop me from coming here?” and seeking permission to return home. I felt like I was disappointing them as I was no longer the vivid, confident young woman who left her home country to pursue a bright future. I remember one colleague, Valerie (pseudonym), from Connecticut. Valerie attended medical school in the United States, did not have an accent, and was familiar with the American health care system. She understood how the senior resident-intern relationship functioned, a hierarchy that continually confused me. Over the following weeks, I took a closer look at how my colleagues and other hospital staff interacted with Valerie. I noticed that people did not comment about her clothing or personality. She was “normal” and fit in. I remember my senior resident asking me, “Narjust, why can't you be more like Valerie?” Ashamed, I mumbled that I would try and then ran to the bathroom to cry alone. That interaction was a turning point for me; I got the message. I needed to change; I needed to stop being who I was to be accepted. As the years passed, I kept key pieces of my personality hidden, hoping I could earn the respect of my colleagues. I refrained from sharing my personal stories as they were different from those around me. I grew up in a developing country with a struggling economy and an even more challenging political situation. It was clear that we simply did not share similar experiences. When I sought help from my senior residents and attending physicians, my feelings were often minimized or invalidated. I was told that “residency is tough” and that I should “man up.” A few even suggested that I mold my personality to fit the box of what a resident physician was supposed to be. I slowly realized that my clothing changed from reds and pinks to greys and blacks because it was “more professional”; my outward appearance faded, as did my once bright sense of humor and affability. All these issues led to depression and an overwhelming sense of not belonging. A few months later, I was on antidepressants, but the crying in the shower continued. Rotation by rotation, I looked for a specialty that would help me feel like I belonged, and I found that in oncology. My mentor embraced my research ideas; my ethnic background or accent did not matter; we had the same goal, improving the care of our patients with cancer. I got to travel to national and international conferences, presented my research findings, and received a few awards along the way. From the outside, it looked like I was thriving; my mentor often called me a “Rising Star,” but in reality, I was still deeply depressed and trying to fit in every day. My career successes led me to believe that not being myself was the right thing to do. I felt isolated; I was trying to be someone I was not. A year later, I matched at my top choice oncology fellowship program; the program had the balance I was looking for between clinical care and research. This meant that I needed to move to the Midwest, further away from family, and to an area of the country with less racial and ethnic diversity. After 2 years on antidepressants and the 10 extra pounds that came with it, my white coat did not fit. My white coat felt like a costume that I would put on every day to fulfill the dream of being a doctor. I would often wake up in the middle of the night exhausted and depressed. I had all the responsibilities of a hematology/ oncology trainee and the additional full-time job of trying to fit in every day; I was using all my energy trying to be someone I was not. Regardless of my fears, I felt in my element when talking to patients and interacting with my cofellows. Despite having a different skin color and accent, I felt accepted by my patients with cancer. I remember when one of my patients requested to see me while in the emergency room because “Dr Duma just gets me.” She had been evaluated by the head of the department and attending physicians, but for her, I washer doctor. Tears of happiness accompanied my bus ride to see her; at that moment, I knew I was an oncologist, and oncology was the place I belonged. The next day, I realized that it was time to be myself: Narjust from Venezuela, a Latina oncologist who was her true self. I searched the bottom of my closet for the last piece of colorful clothing I had saved, a yellow dress. I put on that brightly colored dress for the first time in 5 years and finally felt comfortable being my authentic self; the yellow dress represented freedom and embraced the culture and colors I grew up seeing in my hometown. I finally understood that I brought something special to the table: my unique understanding of the challenges faced by Latinx patients and trainees, my advocacy skills, and my persistence to endure the academic grindstone. Psychotherapy was also an essential part of my recovery; I learned that happiness lived within me as a whole person—hiding my accent, cultural background, and past experiences was also hiding the light and joy inside me. Along the way, I found colleagues who faced the same challenges and validated that my experiences resulted from an environment that excludes the difference and values homogeneity. This route to self-discovery helped me find my calling to support others in situations similar to mine.3 I learned how to incorporate and celebrate my ethnicity in the world of academic oncology by teaching others the power of cultural humility, diversity, equity, and inclusion. Together with newfound friends and colleagues, I cofounded the #LatinasinMedicine Twitter community for those who face similar burdens during their training and careers. The #LatinasinMedicine community was created to share our stories, embrace our culture, and amplify other Latinas in medicine—to create connections that alleviate the sense of isolation that many of us have experienced and serve as role models to the next generation of Latinas in medicine. To help drive systemic change, I founded the Duma Laboratory, a research group that focuses on cancer health disparities and discrimination in medical education. Through research, the Duma Laboratory has shown that my experiences are not unique but rather an everyday reality for many international medical graduates and other under-represented groups in medicine. The Duma Laboratory has become a safe environment for many trainees; we seek to change how mentorship works for under-represented groups in oncology, with the hope that the isolation I felt during my training is not something that future physicians will ever have to endure. After years of depression and self-discovery, my white coat now fits. However, this is not your regular white coat; it has touches of color to embrace my heritage and the ancestors who paved the way for me to be here today. The face of medicine and oncology is changing around the world; young women of color are standing up to demonstrate the strength of our experiences and fuel the change that medical education needs. For all minority medical students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty, we belong in medicine even during those moments when our identity is tested. Through my journey, I learned that we can and must challenge the status quo. I hope to inspire others to join me in this path of advocating for diversity, equity, and inclusion because the time for change is now. I was finally free the moment I realized I could not be anyone else but myself, a proud Latina in medicine and oncology. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Welcome to JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology, brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, which offers a range of educational and scientific content and enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all of the shows including this one at podcast.asco.org. I'm your host, Lidia Shapira, Associate Editor for Art of Oncology and Professor of Medicine at Stanford. And with me today is Dr. Narjust Duma, Associate Director of the Cancer Care Equity Program and Medical Thoracic Oncologist at Dana Farber and an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. We'll be discussing her Art of Oncology article, ‘My White Coat Doesn't Fit.' Our guest has a consulting or advisory role with AstraZeneca, Pfizer, NeoGenomics Laboratories, Janssen, Bristol Myers Squibb, Medarax, Merck, and Mirati. Our guest has also participated in a speaker's bureau for MJH Life Sciences. Narjust, welcome to our podcast. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for the invitation and for letting us share our story. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It's lovely to have you. So, let's start with a bit of background. Your essay has so many powerful themes, the story of an immigrant in the US, the story of resilience, the story of aggression and bullying as a recipient of such during training, of overcoming this and finding not only meaning, but really being an advocate for a more inclusive and fair culture in the workplace. So, let's untangle all of these and start with your family. I was interested in reading that you're named after your two grandmothers, Narcisa and Justa. And this is how your parents, both physicians, Colombian and Dominican, gave you your name, and then you were raised in Venezuela. So, tell us a little bit about your family and the values that were passed on in your family. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for asking. Having my two grandmothers names is something that my mother put a lot of effort into. She was a surgery resident with very limited time to decide to do that. And I don't have a middle name, which is quite unique in Latin America, most people in Latin America have one or two middle names. So, my mother did that to assure that I will use her piece of art, which is my first name. But little does she know that my grandmothers were going to be such an important part of my life, not only because they're in my name, but also because I am who I am thanks to them. So, the first part of my name, Narcisa was my grandma who raised me and she gave me the superpower of reading and disconnecting. So, I'm able to read no matter where I am and how loud it can be and disconnect with the world. So, it is often that my assistants need to knock on my door two or three times so, I don't like being scared because I'm able to travel away. That was also very unique because you will find me in the basketball games from high school or other activities with a book because I was able to block that noise. But it also makes very uncomfortable situations for my friends that find it embarrassing that I will pull a book in the basketball game. And as I grow, thanks to the influence of my grandmothers, I always have these, how can I say, mixed situation, in which they were very old school grandmothers with old school habits and values, and how I'm able to modify that. My grandma told me that you can be a feminist, but you still take care of your house. You can still, you know, cook. And that taught me that you don't have to pick a side, there is no one stereotype for one or another. Because as my mother being a single mother and a surgeon, my parents divorced early on, told me, ‘Yes, I can be the doctor but I can also be the person that has more than a career that's able to have hobbies.' I love cooking, and when I'm stressed, I cook. So, I had a grant deadline a few weeks ago and I cooked so much that there was food for days. So, having the names of my grandmothers is very important because I have their values, but I have modified them to the current times. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Let me ask a little bit about reading. I often ask the guests of this podcast who have written and therefore I know enjoy reading and writing, what their favorite books are or what is currently on their night table. But I'm going to ask you a second question and that is what languages do you read in? Dr. Narjust Duma: I prefer to read in Spanish. I found that books in Spanish, even if it's a book that originated in English, have these romantic characteristics. And I often tell my editors, ‘Just take into account that I think in Spanish, and write in English'. Because I grew up with Gabrielle Garcia Marquez, and when he describes a street, that's a page of the little things that he describes. So, that's how I write and that's how I read in a very romantic, elaborate way. The aspects of realistic imagism, which is my favorite genre in literature, and there are so many Latin American and South American writers that I don't think that I am going to run out. And when I run out, I reread the same books. I have read all of Gabrielle Garcia Marquez's books twice, and Borges, too. It's the type of stories that allows you to submerge yourself and you imagine yourself wearing those Victorian dresses in the heat of a Colombian street, as you try to understand if, you know, Love in the Time of Cholera, if they were more in love with being in love or what it was happening in the story. And that just gives me happiness on a Sunday morning. Dr. Lidia Schapira: That's beautiful. I must confess that reading Borges is not easy. So, I totally admire the fact that you have managed to read all of his work. And I think that you're absolutely right, that magical realism is a genre that is incredibly fresh, and perhaps for the work that we do in oncology, it's a wonderful antidote in a way to some of the realities, the very harsh realities that we deal with on a daily basis. So, let me ask you a little bit about growing up in Venezuela in the 80s, 90s, early aughts. That must have been difficult. Tell us a little bit about that, and your choice of attending medical school. Dr. Narjust Duma: So, growing up in Venezuela, with a Colombian mother, it was quite a unique perspective because she was very attached to her Colombian roots. So, a lot of the things that happened in the house were very Colombian, but I was in Venezuela. So, it was a unique characteristic of being from a country but your family is not from there. So, my parents are not from Venezuela, my grandparents either, and I'm Venezuelan because I was born and raised there. So, that brought a unique perspective, right? The music that I played in my house was Colombian music, not Venezuelan music. So, my family migrated from Colombia to Venezuela due to the challenges in the early 80s with violence and the Medellin, due to the drug cartels. So, we moved to Venezuela for a better future. And growing up in the first years, Venezuela was in a very good position. Oil was at the highest prices. Economically, the country was doing well. I remember, in my early years, the dollar and the bolivar had the same price. But then little by little I saw how my country deteriorated, and it was very heartbreaking. From a place where the shells were full of food to a place now when there is no food, and you go to the supermarket, and many of them are close. And now you're only limited to buying certain things. And you used to use your federal ID that has an electronic tracking on how much you can buy because of socialism. So, you're only allowed to buy two kilograms of rice per month, for example, you're only allowed to buy this number of plantains. So, every time I go home, because Venezuela is always going to be my home, it doesn't matter where I am., I see how my country has lost pieces by pieces, which is quite very hard because I had a very good childhood. I had a unique childhood because I was raised in hospitals. But I had a childhood in which I will play with my friends across the street. We were not worried about being kidnapped. We were not worried about being robbed. That's one thing that children in Venezuela cannot do right now. Children of doctors – there's a higher risk of being kidnapped as a kid right now if your father is a doctor or your mother. So, my childhood wasn't like that. When I teach my students or talk to my mentees, I'm often selling my country, and saying that's not what it used to be. That's not where I grew up. But every year I saw how it no longer is where I grew up. That place doesn't exist, and sometimes, Lidia, I feel like my imagination may have to fill it out with more good things. But I think it was a good childhood. It's just that nobody in Venezuela is experiencing what I experienced as a kid. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, both parents were doctors and you chose to study medicine, was this just right out of high school? Dr. Narjust Duma: Even before high school, I found myself very connected to patients. So, since I turned 15, my father would give his secretary a month of vacation because that's the month that we fill in. So, I was the secretary for a month every summer since I was 15 until I was 20. That early exposure allowed me to like get to know these patients and they know I was the daughter, but I was also the secretary. So, I really cherished that. Growing up in my household, we're a house of service. So, our love language is acts of service. That's how pretty much my grandmas and my parents were. So, in order to be a physician, that's the ultimate act of service. I have wanted to be a doctor since I was 11. I think my mother face horrible gender harassment and sexual harassment as a female in the surgery in the early 80s, that she tried to push me away from medicine. Early on, when I was 11, or 12, being an oil engineer in Venezuela was the career that everybody should have, right? Like, people were going to the Emirates and moving to different parts of the world and were doing wonderful. So, my mother, based on her experience in the 80s, was pushing me away from it. She's like, ‘You can do other things.' My father always stayed in the back and said, ‘You can do what you want.' This is how our parents' experiences affect our future. If I wouldn't be this stubborn, I would probably be an oil engineer today, and I wouldn't be talking to you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, you went to medical school, and then after you graduated, what did you decide to do? Because when I look at what we know about the history there is I think you graduated in '09, and then the story that you write about sort of begins in '16 when you come to New Jersey to do training in the US, but what happened between '09 and '16? Dr. Narjust Duma: I started residency in 2013. '16 was my fellowship. So, going to medical school was one of the hardest decisions I made because right in 2003 and 2004 was a coup in Venezuela where part of the opposition took over the country for three days, and then the President of the time came back and the country really significantly destabilized after that coup. Most schools were closed. Entire private industries were closed for a month. And I think for some people, it's hard to understand what happened. Everything closed for a month, McDonald's was closed for a month. There was no Coke because a Coke company was not producing. Everything was closed. The country was just paralyzed. So, my mother and I, and my family, my father, took into account that we didn't know when medical school would resume in Venezuela. We didn't know if the schools would ever open again. I decided to apply for a scholarship and I left Venezuela at the age of 17 to go to the Dominican Republic for medical school. Very early on, I noticed that I was going to be a foreigner wherever I go because I left home. And since then, I think I became very resilient because I was 17 and I needed to move forward. So, that is what happened in 2004. I left everything I knew. I left for the Dominican. I do have family in the Dominican, but it was very hard because even if you speak the same language, the cultures are very different. And then I went to medical school in the Dominican and when I was in the Dominican Republic, I realized I really wanted to do science and be an advocate and focus on vulnerable populations with cancer. So, then I made the decision to come to the United States, I did a year of a research fellowship at Fred Hutchinson, and then I went to residency in 2013. Dr. Lidia Schapira: I see. And that's when you went to New Jersey, far away from home. And as you tell the story, the experience was awful, in part because of the unkindness and aggression, not only microaggression but outright bullying that you experienced. In reading the essay, my impression was that the bullying was mostly on two accounts. One was gender. The other was the fact that you were different. In this particular case, it was the ethnicity as a Latin or Hispanic woman. Tell us a little bit about that so we can understand that. Dr. Narjust Duma: I think what happened is that perfect example of intersectionality because we are now the result of one experience, we're the result of multiple identities. So many woman have faced gender inequalities in medicine, but when you are from a marginalized group, those inequalities multiply. I have an accent and clearly a different skin color. I grew up in a family in which you were encouraged to be your true self. My grandmothers and my mother said, ‘You never want to be the quiet woman in the corner because the quiet woman never generates change.' That's what they said, and I bet there are some who do. But that intersection of my identities was very challenging because I was seen as inferior just for being a woman and then you multiply being one of the few Latinas you are seen like you are less just because you are - it doesn't matter how many degrees or papers or grants you had done and all, I was the most productive research resident in my residency for two years in a row - but I would still be judged by my identity and not what I have produced, or what I do on my patients' experiences, which were great – the feedback from my patients. It's just because I was the different one. Dr. Lidia Schapira: When I hear your story about your origins, it seems to me that you came from a very capable loving family, and they basically told you to go conquer the world, and you did. And then you arrive and you're a productive successful resident, and yet, you are marginalized, as you say. People are really aggressive. Now that you've had some years that have passed, if you think back, what advice would you give that young Narjust? Dr. Narjust Duma: My number one advice, would be that, I will tell myself is that I belong, in many instances, I feel like I didn't belong. It makes me question all the decisions to that day because when you're doing a presentation, and I still remember like today, and you're interrupted by someone, just for them to make a comment about your accent, it really brings everything down to your core, like, 'Is my presentation not accurate? Is the information not all right? And why am I here? Why did I left everything I love to be treated like this?' Dr. Lidia Schapira: Of course. So, from New Jersey, you write in your essay that you really discover your passion for cancer research, and you land in a fellowship with a mentor who is encouraging, and things begin to change for you. Can you tell us a little bit about that phase of your training in your life where you slowly begin to find your voice in the state, that also where you crash, where you find yourself so vulnerable that things really fall apart? Dr. Narjust Duma: So, when I was a resident, I didn't know exactly - I was interested in oncology, but I wasn't sure if it was for me. So, Dr. Martin Gutierrez at Rutgers in Hackensack is the person who I cold emailed and said, ‘I'm interested in studying gastric cancer in Hispanic patients because I think that patients in the clinic are so young.' He, without knowing me or having any idea, he trusted me. We still meet. He still follows up with me. He encouraged me. I think him being a Latino made the experience better, too, because I didn't have to explain my experience to him. I didn't have to explain that. He understood because he went through the same things. And he's like, ‘I got you. Let's follow what you want to do.' He embraced who I was, and how I put who I was into my research. And thanks to Dr. Gutierrez, I'm at the Mayo Clinic as an international medical grad. So, finding a place in which my ideas were embraced was very important to allow me to stay in medicine because, Lidia, I can tell you several times, I decided to leave. I was very committed to finding something else to do or just being a researcher and leaving clinical medicine behind. So, when I went to Mayo, I still followed with that mentor, but I already knew what I wanted to do. I wanted to do cancer health disparities. I wanted to do inclusion and diversity. And that allowed me to develop the career I have now and is having that pathway because I, with my strong personality and everything else, faced this discrimination, and I can imagine for other trainees that may still be facing that or will face that in the future. So, I use the negative aspects to find my calling and do many things I have done after that. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Speaks to your strengths and your determination. Let's talk a little bit about the people who may also feel different but whose differences may not be so apparent. How do you now as an emerging leader, and as a mentor, make sure that you create an inclusive and safe environment for your younger colleagues and your mentees? Dr. Narjust Duma: One of the things that resulted was the founding of the Duma Lab, which is a research group that focuses on cancer, health disparities, social justice as a general, and inclusion in medical education. So, one of the things that I practice every day is cultural humility. I continue to read and remember the principles. I have them as the background on my computer at work. The number one principle in lifelong learning is that we learn from everyone and that we don't know everything and other people's cultures, and subculture, we learn their culture is rich. So, in every meeting, I remind the team of the principles of cultural humility when somebody is joining the lab. I have one-on-one meetings, and I provide information and videos about cultural humility because the lab has been created as an environment that's safe. We have a WhatsApp group that is now kind of famous - it's called The Daily Serotonin. The majority of the members of the lab are part of marginalized groups, not only by gender but race, religion, sexual and gender orientation. So, we created this group to share good and bads, and we provide support. So, a few weeks ago, a patient made reference to one of their lab member's body, the patient was being examined and that was quite inappropriate. The member debriefed with the group and we all provided insights on how she had responded, and how she should respond in the future. That's not only learning from the person that brought the scenario but anybody else feels empowered to stop those microaggressions and stop those inappropriate behaviors that woman particularly face during clinical care. So, cultural humility, and having this WhatsApp group that provides a place where, first, I remind everybody that's confidential, and a place in which anything is shared has been very successful to create inclusivity in the group. Dr. Lidia Schapira: You have such energy and I'm amazed by all of the things that you can do and how you have used social connection as a way of bringing people up. So, can you give our listeners perhaps some tips for how you view creating a flatter culture, one with fewer hierarchies that makes it safer for learners and for those who are practicing oncology? What are three quick things that all of us can do in our work starting this afternoon? Dr. Narjust Duma: The concept is that we all can be allies. And being an ally doesn't take a lot of time or money because people think that being an ally is a full-time job, it is not. So, the first one tip will be to bring people with you. Your success is not only yours. It's a success of your mentees. It's a success of your colleagues. So, don't see your success as my badge on my shoulder. It's the badge that goes on everyone. So, bring people in, leave the door open, not only bring them but leave the door open because when you do it helps the next generation. Two, little things make a difference. I'm going to give you three phrases that I use all the time. When you think somebody has been marginalized in a meeting, bring them up, it takes no time. For example, 'Chenoa, what do you think we can do next?' You're bringing that person to the table. Two, you can advocate for other women and minorities when they're easily interrupted in a meeting. This takes no time. ‘I'm sorry you interrupted Dr. Duma. Dr. Duma?' So, that helps. The third thing is very important. You can connect people. So, one of the things is that I don't have every skill, so I advocate for my mentees and I serve as a connector. I have a mentee that is into bioinformatics. Lidia, that's above my head. I don't understand any of that. So, I was able to connect that person to people that do bioinformatics. And follow up. My last thing is to follow up with your people because they need you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Well, I'm very glad that you're not an oil engineer in the Emirates. I'm sure your family is incredibly proud. I hope that you're happy where you are. We started a little bit about where you started, I'd like to end with your idea of where you imagine yourself 10 years from now? Dr. Narjust Duma: That is a question I don't have an answer prepared for. I guess my career development plans I think I want to be in a place where I look back and I can see that the careers of my mentees being successful. And I think that we measure my success based not on myself, I would measure my success in 10 years based on where my mentees are. And medical education is a more inclusive place. That will be the two things I want to see in 10 years. In the personal aspect, I don't know if we have art, don't know if we have those grants as long as my mentees are in a better place. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It has been such a pleasure to have this conversation. Thank you so much, Narjust. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Until next time, thank you for listening to this JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. If you enjoyed what you heard today, don't forget to give us a rating or review on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen. While you're there, be sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode of JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. This is just one of many of ASCO's podcasts. You can find all of the shows at podcast.asco.org. The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Narrator: My White Coat Doesn't Fit, by Narjust Duma, MD (10.1200/JCO.21.02601) There I was, crying once again all the way from the hospital's parking lot to my apartment, into the shower, and while trying to fall asleep. This had become the norm during my internal medicine residency. For years, I tried hard every day to be someone else in order to fit in. It started with off-hand comments like “Look at her red shoes,” “You are so colorful,” and “You are so Latina.” These later escalated to being interrupted during presentations with comments about my accent, being told that my medical school training in my home country was inferior to my US colleagues, and being assigned all Spanish-speaking patients because “They are your people.” Some of those comments and interactions were unintentionally harmful but led to feelings of isolation, and over time, I began to feel like an outsider. I came to the United States with the dream of becoming a physician investigator, leaving behind family, friends, and everything I knew. Over time, I felt pigeonholed into a constricting stereotype due to my ethnicity and accent. Back home, I was one of many, but in this new setting, I was one of a few, and in many instances, I was the only Latina in the room. I was raised by divorced physician parents in Venezuela; my childhood years were often spent in the clinic waiting for my mother to see that one last patient or outside the operating room waiting for my father to take me home. The hospital felt like my second home, growing up snacking on Graham crackers and drinking the infamous hospital's 1% orange juice. “She was raised in a hospital,” my mother used to say. Sadly, that feeling of being at home in the hospital changed during medical training as I felt isolated and like I did not belong, making me question my dream and the decision to come to the United States. I remember calling my family and crying as I asked “Why did I leave?” “Why didn't you stop me from coming here?” and seeking permission to return home. I felt like I was disappointing them as I was no longer the vivid, confident young woman who left her home country to pursue a bright future. I remember one colleague, Valerie (pseudonym), from Connecticut. Valerie attended medical school in the United States, did not have an accent, and was familiar with the American health care system. She understood how the senior resident-intern relationship functioned, a hierarchy that continually confused me. Over the following weeks, I took a closer look at how my colleagues and other hospital staff interacted with Valerie. I noticed that people did not comment about her clothing or personality. She was “normal” and fit in. I remember my senior resident asking me, “Narjust, why can't you be more like Valerie?” Ashamed, I mumbled that I would try and then ran to the bathroom to cry alone. That interaction was a turning point for me; I got the message. I needed to change; I needed to stop being who I was to be accepted. As the years passed, I kept key pieces of my personality hidden, hoping I could earn the respect of my colleagues. I refrained from sharing my personal stories as they were different from those around me. I grew up in a developing  country with a struggling economy and an even more challenging political situation. It was clear that we simply did not share similar experiences. When I sought help from my senior residents and attending physicians, my feelings were often minimized or invalidated. I was told that “residency is tough” and that I should “man up.” A few even suggested that I mold my personality to fit the box of what a resident physician was supposed to be. I slowly realized that my clothing changed from reds and pinks to greys and blacks because it was “more professional”; my outward appearance faded, as did my once bright sense of humor and affability. All these issues led to depression and an overwhelming sense of not belonging. A few months later, I was on antidepressants, but the crying in the shower continued. Rotation by rotation, I looked for a specialty that would help me feel like I belonged, and I found that in oncology. My mentor embraced my research ideas; my ethnic background or accent did not matter; we had the same goal, improving the care of our patients with cancer. I got to travel to national and international conferences, presented my research findings, and received a few awards along the way. From the outside, it looked like I was thriving; my mentor often called me a “Rising Star,” but in reality, I was still deeply depressed and trying to fit in every day. My career successes led me to believe that not being myself was the right thing to do. I felt isolated; I was trying to be someone I was not. A year later, I matched at my top choice oncology fellowship program; the program had the balance I was looking for between clinical care and research. This meant that I needed to move to the Midwest, further away from family, and to an area of the country with less racial and ethnic diversity. After 2 years on antidepressants and the 10 extra pounds that came with it, my white coat did not fit. My white coat felt like a costume that I would put on every day to fulfill the dream of being a doctor. I would often wake up in the middle of the night exhausted and depressed. I had all the responsibilities of a hematology/ oncology trainee and the additional full-time job of trying to fit in every day; I was using all my energy trying to be someone I was not. Regardless of my fears, I felt in my element when talking to patients and interacting with my cofellows. Despite having a different skin color and accent, I felt accepted by my patients with cancer. I remember when one of my patients requested to see me while in the emergency room because “Dr Duma just gets me.” She had been evaluated by the head of the department and attending physicians, but for her, I washer doctor. Tears of happiness accompanied my bus ride to see her; at that moment, I knew I was an oncologist, and oncology was the place I belonged. The next day, I realized that it was time to be myself: Narjust from Venezuela, a Latina oncologist who was her true self. I searched the bottom of my closet for the last piece of colorful clothing I had saved, a yellow dress. I put on that brightly colored dress for the first time in 5 years and finally felt comfortable being my authentic self; the yellow dress represented freedom and embraced the culture and colors I grew up seeing in my hometown. I finally understood that I brought something special to the table: my unique understanding of the challenges faced by Latinx patients and trainees, my advocacy skills, and my persistence to endure the academic grindstone. Psychotherapy was also an essential part of my recovery; I learned that happiness lived within me as a whole person—hiding my accent, cultural background, and past experiences was also hiding the light and joy inside me. Along the way, I found colleagues who faced the same challenges and validated that my experiences resulted from an environment that excludes the difference and values homogeneity. This route to self-discovery helped me find my calling to support others in situations similar to mine.3 I learned how to incorporate and celebrate my ethnicity in the world of academic oncology by teaching others the power of cultural humility, diversity, equity, and inclusion. Together with newfound friends and colleagues, I cofounded the #LatinasinMedicine Twitter community for those who face similar burdens during their training and careers. The #LatinasinMedicine community was created to share our stories, embrace our culture, and amplify other Latinas in medicine—to create connections that alleviate the sense of isolation that many of us have experienced and serve as role models to the next generation of Latinas in medicine. To help drive systemic change, I founded the Duma Laboratory, a research group that focuses on cancer health disparities and discrimination in medical education. Through research, the Duma Laboratory has shown that my experiences are not unique but rather an everyday reality for many international medical graduates and other under-represented groups in medicine. The Duma Laboratory has become a safe environment for many trainees; we seek to change how mentorship works for under-represented groups in oncology, with the hope that the isolation I felt during my training is not something that future physicians will ever have to endure. After years of depression and self-discovery, my white coat now fits. However, this is not your regular white coat; it has touches of color to embrace my heritage and the ancestors who paved the way for me to be here today. The face of medicine and oncology is changing around the world; young women of color are standing up to demonstrate the strength of our experiences and fuel the change that medical education needs. For all minority medical students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty, we belong in medicine even during those moments when our identity is tested. Through my journey, I learned that we can and must challenge the status quo. I hope to inspire others to join me in this path of advocating for diversity, equity, and inclusion because the time for change is now. I was finally free the moment I realized I could not be anyone else but myself, a proud Latina in medicine and oncology. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Welcome to JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology, brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, which offers a range of educational and scientific content and enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all of the shows including this one at podcast.asco.org. I'm your host, Lidia Shapira, Associate Editor for Art of Oncology and Professor of Medicine at Stanford. And with me today is Dr. Narjust Duma, Associate Director of the Cancer Care Equity Program and Medical Thoracic Oncologist at Dana Farber and an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. We'll be discussing her Art of Oncology article, ‘My White Coat Doesn't Fit.' Our guest has a consulting or advisory role with AstraZeneca, Pfizer, NeoGenomics Laboratories, Janssen, Bristol Myers Squibb, Medarax, Merck, and Mirati. Our guest has also participated in a speaker's bureau for MJH Life Sciences. Narjust, welcome to our podcast. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for the invitation and for letting us share our story. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It's lovely to have you. So, let's start with a bit of background. Your essay has so many powerful themes, the story of an immigrant in the US, the story of resilience, the story of aggression and bullying as a recipient of such during training, of overcoming this and finding not only meaning, but really being an advocate for a more inclusive and fair culture in the workplace. So, let's untangle all of these and start with your family. I was interested in reading that you're named after your two grandmothers, Narcisa and Justa. And this is how your parents, both physicians, Colombian and Dominican, gave you your name, and then you were raised in Venezuela. So, tell us a little bit about your family and the values that were passed on in your family. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for asking. Having my two grandmothers names is something that my mother put a lot of effort into. She was a surgery resident with very limited time to decide to do that. And I don't have a middle name, which is quite unique in Latin America, most people in Latin America have one or two middle names. So, my mother did that to assure that I will use her piece of art, which is my first name. But little does she know that my grandmothers were going to be such an important part of my life, not only because they're in my name, but also because I am who I am thanks to them. So, the first part of my name, Narcisa was my grandma who raised me and she gave me the superpower of reading and disconnecting. So, I'm able to read no matter where I am and how loud it can be and disconnect with the world. So, it is often that my assistants need to knock on my door two or three times so, I don't like being scared because I'm able to travel away. That was also very unique because you will find me in the basketball games from high school or other activities with a book because I was able to block that noise. But it also makes very uncomfortable situations for my friends that find it embarrassing that I will pull a book in the basketball game. And as I grow, thanks to the influence of my grandmothers, I always have these, how can I say, mixed situation, in which they were very old school grandmothers with old school habits and values, and how I'm able to modify that. My grandma told me that you can be a feminist, but you still take care of your house. You can still, you know, cook. And that taught me that you don't have to pick a side, there is no one stereotype for one or another. Because as my mother being a single mother and a surgeon, my parents divorced early on, told me, ‘Yes, I can be the doctor but I can also be the person that has more than a career that's able to have hobbies.' I love cooking, and when I'm stressed, I cook. So, I had a grant deadline a few weeks ago and I cooked so much that there was food for days. So, having the names of my grandmothers is very important because I have their values, but I have modified them to the current times. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Let me ask a little bit about reading. I often ask the guests of this podcast who have written and therefore I know enjoy reading and writing, what their favorite books are or what is currently on their night table. But I'm going to ask you a second question and that is what languages do you read in? Dr. Narjust Duma: I prefer to read in Spanish. I found that books in Spanish, even if it's a book that originated in English, have these romantic characteristics. And I often tell my editors, ‘Just take into account that I think in Spanish, and write in English'. Because I grew up with Gabrielle Garcia Marquez, and when he describes a street, that's a page of the little things that he describes. So, that's how I write and that's how I read in a very romantic, elaborate way. The aspects of realistic imagism, which is my favorite genre in literature, and there are so many Latin American and South American writers that I don't think that I am going to run out. And when I run out, I reread the same books. I have read all of Gabrielle Garcia Marquez's books twice, and Borges, too. It's the type of stories that allows you to submerge yourself and you imagine yourself wearing those Victorian dresses in the heat of a Colombian street, as you try to understand if, you know, Love in the Time of Cholera, if they were more in love with being in love or what it was happening in the story. And that just gives me happiness on a Sunday morning. Dr. Lidia Schapira: That's beautiful. I must confess that reading Borges is not easy. So, I totally admire the fact that you have managed to read all of his work. And I think that you're absolutely right, that magical realism is a genre that is incredibly fresh, and perhaps for the work that we do in oncology, it's a wonderful antidote in a way to some of the realities, the very harsh realities that we deal with on a daily basis. So, let me ask you a little bit about growing up in Venezuela in the 80s, 90s, early aughts. That must have been difficult. Tell us a little bit about that, and your choice of attending medical school. Dr. Narjust Duma: So, growing up in Venezuela, with a Colombian mother, it was quite a unique perspective because she was very attached to her Colombian roots. So, a lot of the things that happened in the house were very Colombian, but I was in Venezuela. So, it was a unique characteristic of being from a country but your family is not from there. So, my parents are not from Venezuela, my grandparents either, and I'm Venezuelan because I was born and raised there. So, that brought a unique perspective, right? The music that I played in my house was Colombian music, not Venezuelan music. So, my family migrated from Colombia to Venezuela due to the challenges in the early 80s with violence and the Medellin, due to the drug cartels. So, we moved to Venezuela for a better future. And growing up in the first years, Venezuela was in a very good position. Oil was at the highest prices. Economically, the country was doing well. I remember, in my early years, the dollar and the bolivar had the same price. But then little by little I saw how my country deteriorated, and it was very heartbreaking. From a place where the shells were full of food to a place now when there is no food, and you go to the supermarket, and many of them are close. And now you're only limited to buying certain things. And you used to use your federal ID that has an electronic tracking on how much you can buy because of socialism. So, you're only allowed to buy two kilograms of rice per month, for example, you're only allowed to buy this number of plantains. So, every time I go home, because Venezuela is always going to be my home, it doesn't matter where I am., I see how my country has lost pieces by pieces, which is quite very hard because I had a very good childhood. I had a unique childhood because I was raised in hospitals. But I had a childhood in which I will play with my friends across the street. We were not worried about being kidnapped. We were not worried about being robbed. That's one thing that children in Venezuela cannot do right now. Children of doctors – there's a higher risk of being kidnapped as a kid right now if your father is a doctor or your mother. So, my childhood wasn't like that. When I teach my students or talk to my mentees, I'm often selling my country, and saying that's not what it used to be. That's not where I grew up. But every year I saw how it no longer is where I grew up. That place doesn't exist, and sometimes, Lidia, I feel like my imagination may have to fill it out with more good things. But I think it was a good childhood. It's just that nobody in Venezuela is experiencing what I experienced as a kid. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, both parents were doctors and you chose to study medicine, was this just right out of high school? Dr. Narjust Duma: Even before high school, I found myself very connected to patients. So, since I turned 15, my father would give his secretary a month of vacation because that's the month that we fill in. So, I was the secretary for a month every summer since I was 15 until I was 20. That early exposure allowed me to like get to know these patients and they know I was the daughter, but I was also the secretary. So, I really cherished that. Growing up in my household, we're a house of service. So, our love language is acts of service. That's how pretty much my grandmas and my parents were. So, in order to be a physician, that's the ultimate act of service. I have wanted to be a doctor since I was 11. I think my mother face horrible gender harassment and sexual harassment as a female in the surgery in the early 80s, that she tried to push me away from medicine. Early on, when I was 11, or 12, being an oil engineer in Venezuela was the career that everybody should have, right? Like, people were going to the Emirates and moving to different parts of the world and were doing wonderful. So, my mother, based on her experience in the 80s, was pushing me away from it. She's like, ‘You can do other things.' My father always stayed in the back and said, ‘You can do what you want.' This is how our parents' experiences affect our future. If I wouldn't be this stubborn, I would probably be an oil engineer today, and I wouldn't be talking to you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, you went to medical school, and then after you graduated, what did you decide to do? Because when I look at what we know about the history there is I think you graduated in '09, and then the story that you write about sort of begins in '16 when you come to New Jersey to do training in the US, but what happened between '09 and '16? Dr. Narjust Duma: I started residency in 2013. '16 was my fellowship. So, going to medical school was one of the hardest decisions I made because right in 2003 and 2004 was a coup in Venezuela where part of the opposition took over the country for three days, and then the President of the time came back and the country really significantly destabilized after that coup. Most schools were closed. Entire private industries were closed for a month. And I think for some people, it's hard to understand what happened. Everything closed for a month, McDonald's was closed for a month. There was no Coke because a Coke company was not producing. Everything was closed. The country was just paralyzed. So, my mother and I, and my family, my father, took into account that we didn't know when medical school would resume in Venezuela. We didn't know if the schools would ever open again. I decided to apply for a scholarship and I left Venezuela at the age of 17 to go to the Dominican Republic for medical school. Very early on, I noticed that I was going to be a foreigner wherever I go because I left home. And since then, I think I became very resilient because I was 17 and I needed to move forward. So, that is what happened in 2004. I left everything I knew. I left for the Dominican. I do have family in the Dominican, but it was very hard because even if you speak the same language, the cultures are very different. And then I went to medical school in the Dominican and when I was in the Dominican Republic, I realized I really wanted to do science and be an advocate and focus on vulnerable populations with cancer. So, then I made the decision to come to the United States, I did a year of a research fellowship at Fred Hutchinson, and then I went to residency in 2013. Dr. Lidia Schapira: I see. And that's when you went to New Jersey, far away from home. And as you tell the story, the experience was awful, in part because of the unkindness and aggression, not only microaggression but outright bullying that you experienced. In reading the essay, my impression was that the bullying was mostly on two accounts. One was gender. The other was the fact that you were different. In this particular case, it was the ethnicity as a Latin or Hispanic woman. Tell us a little bit about that so we can understand that. Dr. Narjust Duma: I think what happened is that perfect example of intersectionality because we are now the result of one experience, we're the result of multiple identities. So many woman have faced gender inequalities in medicine, but when you are from a marginalized group, those inequalities multiply. I have an accent and clearly a different skin color. I grew up in a family in which you were encouraged to be your true self. My grandmothers and my mother said, ‘You never want to be the quiet woman in the corner because the quiet woman never generates change.' That's what they said, and I bet there are some who do. But that intersection of my identities was very challenging because I was seen as inferior just for being a woman and then you multiply being one of the few Latinas you are seen like you are less just because you are - it doesn't matter how many degrees or papers or grants you had done and all, I was the most productive research resident in my residency for two years in a row - but I would still be judged by my identity and not what I have produced, or what I do on my patients' experiences, which were great – the feedback from my patients. It's just because I was the different one. Dr. Lidia Schapira: When I hear your story about your origins, it seems to me that you came from a very capable loving family, and they basically told you to go conquer the world, and you did. And then you arrive and you're a productive successful resident, and yet, you are marginalized, as you say. People are really aggressive. Now that you've had some years that have passed, if you think back, what advice would you give that young Narjust? Dr. Narjust Duma: My number one advice, would be that, I will tell myself is that I belong, in many instances, I feel like I didn't belong. It makes me question all the decisions to that day because when you're doing a presentation, and I still remember like today, and you're interrupted by someone, just for them to make a comment about your accent, it really brings everything down to your core, like, 'Is my presentation not accurate? Is the information not all right? And why am I here? Why did I left everything I love to be treated like this?' Dr. Lidia Schapira: Of course. So, from New Jersey, you write in your essay that you really discover your passion for cancer research, and you land in a fellowship with a mentor who is encouraging, and things begin to change for you. Can you tell us a little bit about that phase of your training in your life where you slowly begin to find your voice in the state, that also where you crash, where you find yourself so vulnerable that things really fall apart? Dr. Narjust Duma: So, when I was a resident, I didn't know exactly - I was interested in oncology, but I wasn't sure if it was for me. So, Dr. Martin Gutierrez at Rutgers in Hackensack is the person who I cold emailed and said, ‘I'm interested in studying gastric cancer in Hispanic patients because I think that patients in the clinic are so young.' He, without knowing me or having any idea, he trusted me. We still meet. He still follows up with me. He encouraged me. I think him being a Latino made the experience better, too, because I didn't have to explain my experience to him. I didn't have to explain that. He understood because he went through the same things. And he's like, ‘I got you. Let's follow what you want to do.' He embraced who I was, and how I put who I was into my research. And thanks to Dr. Gutierrez, I'm at the Mayo Clinic as an international medical grad. So, finding a place in which my ideas were embraced was very important to allow me to stay in medicine because, Lidia, I can tell you several times, I decided to leave. I was very committed to finding something else to do or just being a researcher and leaving clinical medicine behind. So, when I went to Mayo, I still followed with that mentor, but I already knew what I wanted to do. I wanted to do cancer health disparities. I wanted to do inclusion and diversity. And that allowed me to develop the career I have now and is having that pathway because I, with my strong personality and everything else, faced this discrimination, and I can imagine for other trainees that may still be facing that or will face that in the future. So, I use the negative aspects to find my calling and do many things I have done after that. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Speaks to your strengths and your determination. Let's talk a little bit about the people who may also feel different but whose differences may not be so apparent. How do you now as an emerging leader, and as a mentor, make sure that you create an inclusive and safe environment for your younger colleagues and your mentees? Dr. Narjust Duma: One of the things that resulted was the founding of the Duma Lab, which is a research group that focuses on cancer, health disparities, social justice as a general, and inclusion in medical education. So, one of the things that I practice every day is cultural humility. I continue to read and remember the principles. I have them as the background on my computer at work. The number one principle in lifelong learning is that we learn from everyone and that we don't know everything and other people's cultures, and subculture, we learn their culture is rich. So, in every meeting, I remind the team of the principles of cultural humility when somebody is joining the lab. I have one-on-one meetings, and I provide information and videos about cultural humility because the lab has been created as an environment that's safe. We have a WhatsApp group that is now kind of famous - it's called The Daily Serotonin. The majority of the members of the lab are part of marginalized groups, not only by gender but race, religion, sexual and gender orientation. So, we created this group to share good and bads, and we provide support. So, a few weeks ago, a patient made reference to one of their lab member's body, the patient was being examined and that was quite inappropriate. The member debriefed with the group and we all provided insights on how she had responded, and how she should respond in the future. That's not only learning from the person that brought the scenario but anybody else feels empowered to stop those microaggressions and stop those inappropriate behaviors that woman particularly face during clinical care. So, cultural humility, and having this WhatsApp group that provides a place where, first, I remind everybody that's confidential, and a place in which anything is shared has been very successful to create inclusivity in the group. Dr. Lidia Schapira: You have such energy and I'm amazed by all of the things that you can do and how you have used social connection as a way of bringing people up. So, can you give our listeners perhaps some tips for how you view creating a flatter culture, one with fewer hierarchies that makes it safer for learners and for those who are practicing oncology? What are three quick things that all of us can do in our work starting this afternoon? Dr. Narjust Duma: The concept is that we all can be allies. And being an ally doesn't take a lot of time or money because people think that being an ally is a full-time job, it is not. So, the first one tip will be to bring people with you. Your success is not only yours. It's a success of your mentees. It's a success of your colleagues. So, don't see your success as my badge on my shoulder. It's the badge that goes on everyone. So, bring people in, leave the door open, not only bring them but leave the door open because when you do it helps the next generation. Two, little things make a difference. I'm going to give you three phrases that I use all the time. When you think somebody has been marginalized in a meeting, bring them up, it takes no time. For example, 'Chenoa, what do you think we can do next?' You're bringing that person to the table. Two, you can advocate for other women and minorities when they're easily interrupted in a meeting. This takes no time. ‘I'm sorry you interrupted Dr. Duma. Dr. Duma?' So, that helps. The third thing is very important. You can connect people. So, one of the things is that I don't have every skill, so I advocate for my mentees and I serve as a connector. I have a mentee that is into bioinformatics. Lidia, that's above my head. I don't understand any of that. So, I was able to connect that person to people that do bioinformatics. And follow up. My last thing is to follow up with your people because they need you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Well, I'm very glad that you're not an oil engineer in the Emirates. I'm sure your family is incredibly proud. I hope that you're happy where you are. We started a little bit about where you started, I'd like to end with your idea of where you imagine yourself 10 years from now? Dr. Narjust Duma: That is a question I don't have an answer prepared for. I guess my career development plans I think I want to be in a place where I look back and I can see that the careers of my mentees being successful. And I think that we measure my success based not on myself, I would measure my success in 10 years based on where my mentees are. And medical education is a more inclusive place. That will be the two things I want to see in 10 years. In the personal aspect, I don't know if we have art, don't know if we have those grants as long as my mentees are in a better place. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It has been such a pleasure to have this conversation. Thank you so much, Narjust. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Until next time, thank you for listening to this JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. If you enjoyed what you heard today, don't forget

    Dannylize This!
    Jose G.

    Dannylize This!

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 86:50


    Jose Gonzalez is a Voice over actor, wresting news analyst and motivational speaker. btw also my brother. We sat down to talk life, mindset and goal setting. we also talk about our childhood in Miami, and the origins of my stand up career.follow Jose_https://www.instagram.com/jose_g_official/follow me and support the podcast _https://linktr.ee/Dannylizethis

    HBO Max Movie Club
    Here Comes the Father of the Bride

    HBO Max Movie Club

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 34:25


    As part of the biggest HBO Max movie premiere to date, this epic remake of the 1991 classic “Father of the Bride" brings a tale as old as time to new heights. With the best in wedding traditions and tantrums, Matt is joined by comedian Danielle Perez, to break down this wedding day with a Latinx spin. Exploring the intergenerational compromise to uphold tradition while forging a new future, this all-star cast does not disappoint. This film plays on the classic sprawl of wedding hiccups and in-law encounters to discuss modern love and the universal fight for a say when planning the big day. For this father of the bride, letting go of his pride might be just as hard as letting go of his daughter.  Join the club for our next movie club meeting discussing “The Eyes of Tammy Faye.” Watch the WB Streaming Exclusive, “Father of the Bride” on HBO Max. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The Laura Flanders Show
    Militarization and Uvalde: the Context Media Coverage Omits

    The Laura Flanders Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 30:20


    Whether it's Buffalo, NY, Uvalde, TX or Philadelphia, PA — we are witnessing an unprecedented wave of terror at the muzzle of a gun. But all mass shootings are not covered in the same way. What determines the nature of the coverage? And what is the media getting wrong — or right — on gun violence reporting? In this episode, Laura Flanders welcomes back Mitra Kalita and Sara Lomax-Reese of URL Media, a network of independently owned and operated Black and Brown media outlets, for this month's “Meet the BIPOC Press.” Our returning guest Michelle García is a Texas-based journalist whose searing reporting in the aftermath of the Uvalde shooting honed in on the structures of militarization that devalue the lives of local residents.“I'm not here to humanize anybody. I'm here to understand what forces are dehumanizing people and to look that in the face.” - Michelle García“When you are surrounded by people, the adults, the politicians describing your home as a war zone, as unlivable and peddling images of violence —  does it not potentially normalize violence itself?” - Michelle GarcíaGuests:Michelle García, Journalist & AuthorS. Mitra Kalita (Co-Host), Co-Founder, URL MediaSara Lomax-Reese (Co-Host), Co-Founder, URL Media We are listener & viewer sponsored. Full episode notes including related articles and LFShow episodes to watch and/or listen to are posted at https://Patreon.com/theLFShow. Patreon Members receive access to the FULL UNCUT CONVERSATION. The show airs on 300+ Public Television households across the U.S., on over 40 community radio stations and as a podcast.

    Drinks and a Movie
    La Bamba (1987) with Nancy Sanchez

    Drinks and a Movie

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 65:22


    Watch this episode on YouTube https://youtu.be/sJB7SWMxrDoThis week I sit in the beautiful Monty Bar once again with prolific musical artist Nancy Sanchez to talk about Luis Valdez's 1987 Biopic 'La Bamba'.We chat about Nancy's music career, her influences, her experience playing with Los Lobos and recently opening for Ozomatli and how this film was a big part of her childhood.Follow her on Instagram @nancysanchezmusicAs always please share/rate/review/subscribe

    Benevolence
    Lessons from Encanto

    Benevolence

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 62:35


    On this episode of Benevolence, our bestie, Pamela Bultron-Carrion, joins us at the table once again to discuss the epic Disney movie, Encanto! We dissect each character from the film and discuss many family related messages portrayed throughout the movie. We discuss generational trauma that unfortunately is common in many Hispanic & Latinx families. We also talk about which character we most identify ourselves with! This is definitely an episode you do not want to miss! Make sure to follow us on Instagram @benevolencepodcast for more fun posts and videos. 

    Mucho Gusto Radio
    Conversando con Adriana Cruz, Fair Work Center.

    Mucho Gusto Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 40:21


    En este nuevo episodio de Mucho Gusto Radio, nos acompaña Adriana Cruz, quien viene a hablarnos sobre Fair Work Center y su trabajo que hacen en favor de los derechos de los trabajadores Latinx de el Estado de Washington. No te lo puedes perder. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/entre-hermanos/support

    Cafe con Pam Podcast
    On Following Your Path with Laura Tejeda

    Cafe con Pam Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 61:41


    Listeners, we're back this week with Laura Tejeda.Laura Tejeda is a lifelong East LA resident. She has a Masters Degree in Higher Education and works with college students, particularly in Equity & Social Justice based education. Laura is also a freelance writer for L.A. TACO and she is the founder of Instagram-based page @hungryineastlos which began in 2016 in efforts to challenge gentrification in East LA and raise awareness and support to family-owned & people of color owned businesses. Laura is host of LA TACO LIVE where she explores LA Culture, news, politics, lifestyle, and FOOD, with dynamic guests! During this episode we talked about:5:44 - Being 2nd gen on his dad's side17:38 - Her education journey19:14 - Going to college not knowing what's gonna come from it22:56 - Ivy League - do I belong here?24:30 - Representation32:49 - Her mentor and going grad school37:03 - Creativity39:45 - Welcoming things in life 45:21 - On Inspiration52:02 - Mental Health This  episode is brought to you by MagicMind is the world's first productivity drink.

    Social Media Therapy
    Sarah's Abortion Story on People With A Period | A New Segment on Social Media Therapy

    Social Media Therapy

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 42:54


    Person with a period is a segment on social media therapy, a podcast centered on explaining how our minds work on social media and destigmatizing mental health. With the recent overturning a Roe vs Wade, the implications for people with a period are far-reaching. The purpose of this segment on the podcast are to share the stories of those who have sought out an abortion or had an abortion and continuing to destigmatize abortions.This segment on the podcast serves as a platform for others to share their abortion stories and to help further the goal of bringing back safe, affordable abortion care for people with a period everywhere.A lack of abortion access directly affects our economical, mental, emotional, and physical lives. Eliminating safe, affordable abortion care disproportionately affects black women, people in poor regions, people in rural regions, and other minority groups like Latinx, Asian, and more.If you have an abortion story that you would like to share, please go to the link in my bio and fill out the form for “People with a Period.” From there I'll schedule a 30 minute conversation where you will have 30 minutes to share your abortion story. This is an open call to women, transgender persons, and young women Who have had to come face-to-face with choosing abortion. Sources: Gianna Melilla - The Hillhttps://thehill.com/changing-america/respect/accessibility/3535794-five-facts-about-abortion-you-should-know/Planned ParenthoodJessica Ravitz - CNN https://www.cnn.com/2019/02/06/health/late-term-abortion-explainer/index.html Submit your story: sarahapotter.com/personwithaperiod

    DriveThruHR - HR Conversations
    Managing Microaggressions at Work w/ Savina Perez of Hone

    DriveThruHR - HR Conversations

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 38:00


    Michael and Robin interview Savina Perez, co-founder and COO of L&D platform, Hone about how organizations can manage microaggressions without shaming. Savina speaks candidly, as a member of the Latinx and LGBTQ+ communities, about her own experiences with microaggressions and bias in and out of the workplace.  Savina has dedicated much of her professional life teaching strategies for staying open and curious and generous of other's behaviors and building workplace cultures around empathy and inclusion.  The discussion was lively and timely especially in light of recent divisions in society over race, religion, gender and sexuality. 

    The Takeaway
    Deep Dive: The U.S. Anti-Poverty and Labor Movement

    The Takeaway

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 56:32


    “We live in the United States, the richest country in the history of the world. And we have 140 million people who are poor or one health care crisis, one job loss, one storm, one tornado away from economic ruin.” - Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis, Co-Chair of the Poor People's Campaign Even before the excruciating weight of the COVID-19 pandemic, poverty rates rose for the first time in five years. In 2020, there were 3.3 million more people living in poverty than in 2019. Poverty rates rose among white and Hispanic Americans, and for the 1 in 5 Black Americans already living in poverty, there wasn't much room for the rate to go up. All were poorer in 2020 than the year before. A package of pandemic-era policies stemmed rising poverty in 2021; however, many of those temporary measures have expired as consumer prices continue to rise, leaving many American families and workers economically vulnerable. According to the Center on Poverty and Social Policy at Columbia University, the monthly child poverty rate increased from 12.1 percent in December 2021 to 17 percent in January 2022, the highest it's been since the end of 2020. Black and Latinx children experienced the largest increases in poverty rates. This 4.9 percent increase accounts for the nearly 3.7 million more children living in poverty after the Child Tax Credit ended. The monthly Child Tax Credit payments "buffered family finances amidst the continuing pandemic, increased families' abilities to meet their basic needs, reduced child poverty and food insufficiency, and had no discernable negative effects on parental employment." "I think one of the core themes of my work–across multiple sectors and fields–has been a focus on poverty. And the fact that poverty is not an ordained or natural system or condition, but a system of policy choices," says Dorian Warren, co-host of our Deep Dives, co-president of Community Change, and co-chair of the Economic Security Project.  The the experience of poverty is even more widespread than the official definition tells us. Yet, the perception of poverty remains contentious for many Americans. Research shows that Americans overwhelmingly identify themselves as 'middle-class,' even when they're not. Groups like Confronting Poverty have developed tools like the poverty risk calculator to help people better understand economic hardship and risk. Awareness is just one facet of the ongoing fight against poverty. The anti-poverty and low wage workers movement is leading “a national call for moral revival.”  On June 18, 2022 the Poor People's Campaign led a mass demonstration in Washington, D.C. Thousands of people from all over the country attended. Ahead of the march, we spoke with the Poor People's Campaign co-chairs Bishop William Barber and Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis, Director of Kairos Center for Religions, Rights and Social Justice at Union Theological Seminary. Dorian was there as well, both as an organizer and observer, covering the march for The Takeaway. In this Deep Dive, Dorian joins The Takeaway in critical conversation around today's anti-poverty and labor movement and the voices defining what economic, racial, and social justice can and should look like.   

    The Takeaway
    Deep Dive: The U.S. Anti-Poverty and Labor Movement

    The Takeaway

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 56:32


    “We live in the United States, the richest country in the history of the world. And we have 140 million people who are poor or one health care crisis, one job loss, one storm, one tornado away from economic ruin.” - Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis, Co-Chair of the Poor People's Campaign Even before the excruciating weight of the COVID-19 pandemic, poverty rates rose for the first time in five years. In 2020, there were 3.3 million more people living in poverty than in 2019. Poverty rates rose among white and Hispanic Americans, and for the 1 in 5 Black Americans already living in poverty, there wasn't much room for the rate to go up. All were poorer in 2020 than the year before. A package of pandemic-era policies stemmed rising poverty in 2021; however, many of those temporary measures have expired as consumer prices continue to rise, leaving many American families and workers economically vulnerable. According to the Center on Poverty and Social Policy at Columbia University, the monthly child poverty rate increased from 12.1 percent in December 2021 to 17 percent in January 2022, the highest it's been since the end of 2020. Black and Latinx children experienced the largest increases in poverty rates. This 4.9 percent increase accounts for the nearly 3.7 million more children living in poverty after the Child Tax Credit ended. The monthly Child Tax Credit payments "buffered family finances amidst the continuing pandemic, increased families' abilities to meet their basic needs, reduced child poverty and food insufficiency, and had no discernable negative effects on parental employment." "I think one of the core themes of my work–across multiple sectors and fields–has been a focus on poverty. And the fact that poverty is not an ordained or natural system or condition, but a system of policy choices," says Dorian Warren, co-host of our Deep Dives, co-president of Community Change, and co-chair of the Economic Security Project.  The the experience of poverty is even more widespread than the official definition tells us. Yet, the perception of poverty remains contentious for many Americans. Research shows that Americans overwhelmingly identify themselves as 'middle-class,' even when they're not. Groups like Confronting Poverty have developed tools like the poverty risk calculator to help people better understand economic hardship and risk. Awareness is just one facet of the ongoing fight against poverty. The anti-poverty and low wage workers movement is leading “a national call for moral revival.”  On June 18, 2022 the Poor People's Campaign led a mass demonstration in Washington, D.C. Thousands of people from all over the country attended. Ahead of the march, we spoke with the Poor People's Campaign co-chairs Bishop William Barber and Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis, Director of Kairos Center for Religions, Rights and Social Justice at Union Theological Seminary. Dorian was there as well, both as an organizer and observer, covering the march for The Takeaway. In this Deep Dive, Dorian joins The Takeaway in critical conversation around today's anti-poverty and labor movement and the voices defining what economic, racial, and social justice can and should look like.   

    Media Fuel
    Episode 70 - GUESS WHOS BACK

    Media Fuel

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 50:54


    Follow us on Twitter and Instagram to stay updated!@mediafuelpodMedia Fuel NewzMovie/TV/MusicFollow Us!@relsss Insta @relsarels Twitter @whyzeusy Insta & TwitterTags: Lations, gaming

    Life in Spanglish
    Understanding the Term Latinx

    Life in Spanglish

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 29:48


    In this episode Carolina and Honey delve into the term Latinx - do you use it? What are the pros and cons of the term and how does it impact their identities? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Mainstreet Halifax \x96 CBC Radio
    New bilingual e-book chronicles experiences of Hispanic-Latinx communities during pandemic

    Mainstreet Halifax \x96 CBC Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 14:06


    The creators of a new digital publication, that launched this week at the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21, explain why they want to create more publishing opportunities for Hispanic-Latinx writers in Atlantic Canada.

    Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
    Break the Bias with Linda Yvette Chávez

    Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 66:12


    Linda Yvette Chávez is a self-proclaimed “wholesome chola next door making chilaquiles out of chaos” and moreover, a Xicana woman making history. In the world of entertainment, she is an unrivaled powerhouse who is the co-creator, co-showrunner and executive producer of Netflix's hit series "Gentefied" (now in its second season). Through her creative ventures, Chávez has made it her mission to tell authentic Latinx stories and increase representation, not just in actors but through narratives and settings. The bold success of these efforts has won her critical acclaim and praise from audiences and writer's rooms alike. Named by Glamour magazine as “one of the top Latinas changing the game of representation in television,” Chávez will share her personal journey about breaking the bias and how she is inspiring future generations. SPEAKERS Linda Yvette Chávez Co-Creator, Co-Showrunner, and Executive Producer, Netflix's "Gentefied"; Twitter @lindayvette In Conversation with Michelle Meow Producer and Host, "The Michelle Meow Show" on KBCW TV and Podcast; Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors This program is generously supported by the Applied Materials Foundation's Generation Girl® initiative, inspiring girls to pursue their dreams.  In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on June 16th, 2022 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    I have SOMETHING to say!
    Episode #135: "I Have SOMETHING To Say" with special guests, Michael Pilato & Nancy Rosado

    I have SOMETHING to say!

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 46:42


    Art can connect and heal communities. In this episode of I HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY I talk with Michael Pilato, a globally recognized mural artist known for portrait murals and humanitarian efforts, and Nancy Rosado, a beloved community leader in Orlando, about the stories behind the images reflected in the mural entitled “Inspiration Orlando United”. Six years ago, after having learned of the death of 49 people and wounding of 53 others at the Pulse nightclub, Michael Pilato and fellow muralist Yuri Karabash moved to Orlando and began painting the mural, which currently measures a span of approximately 40 feet horizontally, in tribute to the victims, survivors, and families impacted by the events of that morning of June 12, 2022. Michael's goal was to create a personal, visual representation of the people that were part of the Pulse story and their loved ones. To achieve this, he networked with as many friends and families of both victims and survivors as he could locate, clearly understanding that it would take time to gain the trust of this now wounded community, a community that sat at the intersection of all that is LGBTQ+ and Latinx. Having tragically lost his own daughter a year prior, and feeling the need to help begin the healing process for those impacted by Pulse, he decided to use his daughter's college fund to create this project to honor the 49 lives lost. To complete the mural, Michael needs an estimated $15,000 for materials, a space to work in, and to transport additional panels which remain to be completed for the mural. These additional panels will include survivors who are in a better emotional space to share their story to be included in the mural, as well as the first responders and medical staff who worked tirelessly to save lives during that fateful day and in its aftermath. Your support will help Michael complete the mural by this upcoming October in time for Orlando's “Come Out With Pride” event. Please make your tax-exempt donation to SOS Orlando using the following link and we will make sure that it goes towards the completion and preservation of the “Inspiration Orlando United” mural: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=QUXTFLP82ML3A Your support will help preserve this important piece of art that is part of the collective memory and the pain of a community under attack – at the intersection of diversity, Hispanic heritage, LGBTQ+ identity, and the Puerto Rican diaspora – who demonstrated resilience by coming together in a moment of crisis, tragedy, and insurmountable loss. Learn about Michael's labor of love.

    Hear Me Now Podcast
    Overdoses and racial disparity

    Hear Me Now Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 38:41


    Host Seán Collins talks with Dr. Carlos Blanco, lead author of a perspective piece published June 16th in the New England Journal of Medicine titled, "Research to Move Policy — Using Evidence to Advance Health Equity for Substance Use Disorders."The authors note that, despite substantial efforts to address the epidemic of drug-overdose deaths in the United States, racial and ethnic disparities in treatment access and outcomes among patients with substance use disorders have widened. Rates of overdose deaths are rising faster in Black, Latinx, and American Indian and Alaska Native populations than in White populations.Dr. Blanco talks with Seán about barriers to the best care possible along with ways medicine can make that care available to all regardless of race and ethnicity...Carlos Blanco, M.D., Ph.D., MSDirector, Division of Epidemiology, Services, and Prevention ResearchNational Institute on Drug AbuseNational Institutes of HealthRockville, Md..Link to the piece in the New England Journal of Medicine: Research to Move Policy — Using Evidence to Advance Health Equity for Substance Use Disorders.   

    Northwestern Intersections
    How Storytelling is a Powerful Form of Advocacy with Rebecca Kling '07

    Northwestern Intersections

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 62:09


    It's empowering to tell your story, but even more so to empower others to share their own. As a student in Performance Studies at Northwestern and throughout her time at Piven Theatre Workshop, Rebecca Kling '07 gathered the tools of performance: movement, storytelling, adaption, audience, lighting. After graduation while in Tim Miller's paradigm shifting workshop at Link's Hall, "Charged Bodies", Kling understood how those tools could be applied internally: sharing her own personal narrative of transition and how she navigates the world as a trans-woman. She describes how at the time, she was the only trans-performer she knew of publicly speaking about her experiences; trans-folks were simply not visible the same way they are today with rise of social media and online communities. Through orchestrating talk-backs with the audience—opportunities for members to ask questions about trans-folks and their experiences—Kling realized the potential of performance to also serve as a tool to educate and advocate.  Kling also shares how there were very little resources for trans students during her time at Northwestern in the early 2000s. She was often sent off-campus to seek resources and did not have access to other members of the trans community. A lot has changed since she graduated in 2007. However, the baseline changes such as all-gender bathrooms, access to HRT, name changes and preferred pronouns, are just the beginning. Kling calls on allies to join the fight in advocating for meaningful and material changes that will allow trans- and gender non-conforming folks to feel validated and safe. Whether it's at your school, your job, or in your social circle. This call to action is especially crucial during a time when trans rights and bodily autonomy at large are being threatened. In this episode of Northwestern Intersections, Rebecca Kling shares how through performance studies she realized the radical power of telling your own story, and how she made the transition from performer to educator and activist. Cofounder of Better World Collaborative—a trans-, woman-, and Latinx-owned consultancy firm—she continues to use storytelling to help businesses, nonprofits, and the creative industry take authentic steps to linking their missions in equity and inclusion.   Links to Northwestern resources for trans-students and allies: · Northwestern Medicine Gender Pathways Program | Northwestern Medicine.  · All Gender Housing: Residential Services - Northwestern University · Queer @ NU: Multicultural Student Affairs - Northwestern University · Undergraduate Courses (2022-23): Gender & Sexuality Studies Program - Northwestern University · Center for Applied Transgender Studies · Out Network Evanston · Reimagining the GSRC: Campus Inclusion & Community - Northwestern University

    Hyphenated with Joanna Hausmann and Jenny Lorenzo
    How I Became A Simpsons Character with Tony Rodríguez

    Hyphenated with Joanna Hausmann and Jenny Lorenzo

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 30:07


    Jenny welcomes comedy performer Tony Rodríguez, who was recently cast as the new voice of Julio, the gay Latino character on THE SIMPSONS. On this Pride Month episode they discuss why queer representation in media is important, how Tony took a chance and landed the role of a lifetime, and Jenny's own history making casting on Hanna-Barbera's JELLYSTONE! 

    The Legal Gist
    Lift as you Climb: The First Latinx Editors-in-Chief of Columbia Law Review | Liliana and Jeff

    The Legal Gist

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 59:02


    The second episode focuses on Liliana Zaragoza and Jeff Rivas, the first Latina and Latino Editors-in-Chief of Columbia Law Review. Listen to how their families and shared Latinx identity have influenced their legal journeys. Gain insight into the gist of law review, from the write-on process to how Liliana and Jeff have utilized their platform as Editors-in-Chief to uplift diverse voices in a historically-privileged space. Listen to how CLR has opened up incredible opportunities for advancement in their legal journeys, from public interest work at NAACP LDF, academia, and clerkships to sports law and corporate law opportunities.

    Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning
    CASE STUDY: Ellie Mercado, Assistant Principal from Ossining, NY on ”Embedding Social and Emotional Learning with an Equity Lens”

    Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 56:05


    "Every child deserves a champion: an adult who will never give up on them, who understands the power of connection and insists they become the best they can possibly be." Rita Pierson, Educator. Watch this intervie