Podcasts about Latinx

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

U.S. gender-neutral term for people of Latin American heritage

  • 3,034PODCASTS
  • 6,550EPISODES
  • 49mAVG DURATION
  • 5DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 26, 2021LATEST
Latinx

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Latinx

Show all podcasts related to latinx

Latest podcast episodes about Latinx

My History Can Beat Up Your Politics
Introducing "Smoke Screen: The Sellout"

My History Can Beat Up Your Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 14:51


Jose Huizar grew up in Boyle Heights – a working-class Latinx neighborhood in L.A. Eventually, he became their councilperson. He ran on promises of solidarity and community. And, for the most part, people trusted Huizar... until the day the FBI raided his home and offices, looking for evidence of corruption. The Feds would go on to say that Huizar led a criminal enterprise based in city hall. He stands accused of taking bribes from luxury developers as his constituents were displaced from their homes.  This season of Smoke Screen is a collaboration with grassroots media organization L.A. TACO. In this 9-part investigative series, journalist and host Mariah Castañeda investigates how Huizar got the power to do what he did, and how the community that raised him paid the price. Smoke Screen: The Sellout is available now wherever you get your podcasts. New episodes drop every Tuesday. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Smoke Screen: Fake Priest
Episode 1: The Gem of Boyle Heights

Smoke Screen: Fake Priest

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 38:45


As a working-class Latinx neighborhood in Los Angeles faces gentrification, residents are ready to fight to defend their turf. Mariachis lead a rent strike and ask their councilman Jose Huizar for help. But what they don't realize is that he's allegedly been taking bribes from developers building luxury housing right across the river, in downtown LA. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Shock Your Potential
Speak Faithfully for Greater Justice - Rev. Dr. Marcia Ledford

Shock Your Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 31:41


“It's up to us to fully self-actualize, and one of the greatest ways to do that is to be engaged in social justice action.”   Dr. Marcia Ledford Now more than ever, a wider and deeper understanding of the church's role in social and political life is needed. Many church leaders continue to work towards providing important platforms from which people can deal with political, social and economic matters, as well as the relations between the state and wider society. Our guest today, Rev. Dr. Marcia Ledford, has been working towards greater social justice by empowering people to act on social injustices faced by different groups. The Rev. Dr. Marcia Ledford's ministry is in Southwest Detroit's Latinx population—an international port with an aggressive regional ICE director. Dr. Ledford is a civil rights attorney representing society's most marginalized. An Episcopal priest, she holds a Master of Divinity from the Church Divinity School of the Pacific. She earned her Doctor of Ministry in political theology from Pacific School of Religion. Dr. Ledford founded Political Theology Matters, LLC, to help the faithful develop public theology mission and broadcast messaging for greater social justice. She is trained for community organizing through the Industrial Areas Foundation and volunteers with Michigan United. PTM is a for profit company but is also an altruistic or philanthropic enterprise. Dr. Ledford want to inspire people to do good--to shock their potential for justice. She believes that she needs to make a living ethically and via positive contributions to society. Engaging in political theology, speaking faithfully in public, for social justice, represents the culmination of her life's work and experiences. She is passionate about achieving greater social justice in American society. Her message's foundation in progressive Christian theology intersects with the US Constitution, especially the First Amendment. She brings humor, poignant stories, and inspiration in her conversations. She sparks dynamic, vital conversations about the most important issues of our time--protecting civil rights and our beloved constitution and democracy. In today's episode, our guest will talk about her journey towards advocating for social injustices. She will also elaborate more about spiritual resistance and what it entails. Social media handles: http://www.politicaltheologymatters.com/   https://www.facebook.com/politicaltheologymatters   https://linkedin/marcialedford   https://www.instagram.com/docledford   https://www.twitter.com/docledford   I write, speak, teach and preach to help people get better equipped to be faith based advocates in the public square for social justice. [3:32] Political theology is taking your faith formation and using that as a basis for calling out injustice and demanding greater equality across our social spectrum. [3:49] My mission came to be after my being absolutely appalled at what our archaic immigration laws are doing to Latino families in southwest Detroit. [4:43] We want to be sure and get our demands in with respect to pathways to citizenship. [5:45] Spanish, like the romance languages are all inflected, meaning that nouns can have a gender assigned to them. [6:51] The practice has been adapted to start saying Latin x, which is neutral, and is intended to include everybody. [7:07] This has been an ongoing effort to be more inclusive when terms from this inflected language are used. [7:30] When I was coming of age in the late 70s and early 80s, I came out as a lesbian. [10:09] I had been very involved in my church growing up and so I had a really difficult coming out process, at least, with my own personal struggle. [10:20] I felt like I had to choose between my faith and being who I was and this is very true even today. [10:44] I had to navigate the society as a lesbian which means that I couldn't access some things. [11:14] I recognize that my white privilege affords me certain benefits and give me opportunities that I wouldn't ordinarily have as a person of color. [11:56] I still was a second class citizen in many of the fundamental ways that we regard being an American. [12:14] Over time, I became more sensitive to the call to ministry that I had experienced from when I was a teenager. [12:32] I wasn't seeing women and I certainly wasn't seeing lesbians up at the pulpit in the altar but I finally agreed to go do this and be ordained and asked for help from the holy spirit. [12:44] I became ordained in the Episcopal Church, where I serve the Latin x community. [13:06] It was a combination of my love of the gospel, and my experience as a civil rights attorney, that really fueled this mission. [13:16] Even though I don't know exactly what it's like to be a person of color, I decided that if we didn't do anything about the ills, it wasn't going to stop. [14:06] I think sometimes people think that when a law is made that it's carved into stone. [15:35] Our Congress has the power to change those laws, and if they won't change them, then we need to put people in there who will. [16:27] The fact that all these voter suppression bills are pending throughout the country is an indicator that elected people know that they are in danger of being voted out for not doing the will of the people. [17:18] What I advocate for is the First Amendment which gives us a place to go where everybody can talk and not have to worry about slandering the crown. [19:03] I wanted to create a place for us to work stuff out and that means that our best chance of doing that is when as many voices come together as possible to say their piece. [19:52] By talking about it, we identify the problems and the issues, and we try to work out a solution that serves the majority of the people. [20:12] Once people realize that they can do it, then we have to instill confidence and provide tools and resources to get people basically off their doffs and go advocate for justice. [20:47] Commercial break. [21:17] The immigration issues affect our country on a national basis and so if immigration is something that you want to work on, you certainly can. [23:32] I really believe in what's called the spirituality of resistance. [23:48] Things bother us, but we feel like they are such big complex problems and I don't really know what to do about it. [24:01] We're all human beings and have a human connection to one another and therefore we got to have everybody. [24:29] The spirituality of resistance involves two things which are digging deep into yourself to determine what issues really bothers you, and finding a group that works on these issues to work with them. [25:23] It is one of the most empowering things I have ever experienced in my life, which is why I work with Michigan united. [26:19] If you feel like your representatives in the Congress are not doing what you want them to do, then you need to be in touch. [28:09] There's lots of ways to be involved even if you're super busy and feels overwhelming. [29:14] One of the mottos I try to live by is we don't get a dress rehearsal and it's up to us to fully self-actualize, and one of the greatest ways to do that is to be engaged in social justice action. [30:27] …………………..….. TopDog Learning Group, LLC is a leadership, change management, and diversity and inclusion consulting firm based in Orlando, FL, USA but with “TopDoggers” (aka consultants) throughout North America and beyond. They focus on training programs (both virtual and face-to-face), keynotes and “lunch and learns,” group and 1:1 coaching, and off-the-shelf solutions. One such solution is their Masterclass on The Top 3 Strategies to be Resilient in Times of Change. This thoughtful self-paced online training will guide you through three tactics you can immediately use to—not just survive—but thrive when change comes at you. Use the code RESIL50OFF for 50% off the program! Just go to https://bit.ly/3a5mIS6 and enter the code RESIL50OFF, in all capitals, to redeem your 50% off coupon. The link and code will be available in our show notes for easy access.

Racial Draft Podcast
Gettin All the FanDome We Can (Racial Draft S3 FCL/Supplemental Draft Weeks 3-4)

Racial Draft Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 147:08


This week's episode was packed, as Mike and Kia discussed two weeks of nerd news, including the meaty highlights from DC's FanDome event. It was a lot to take in, but thankfully their jaws were ready for the challenge. Joined by Carlos from the Latinx delegation, they found a way to handle it all. Then they cleansed their palates with discussion of the FCL scoring races and two weeks of Supplemental Draft picks. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/racial-draft-podcast/support

Women With Vision
9.11 Self- Reflect, Ask and Take Action with Patricia Mota

Women With Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 32:31


Patricia serves as the President & CEO for HACE, leading strategy, fundraising & development, professional leadership programs, and expanding organizational reach on a national scale. Patricia strives to engage experienced professionals as mentors and advisors to create a multi-generational network to support Latinx/a/o career growth.

A Quilting Life Podcast
Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories Exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston

A Quilting Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 49:38


In this episode Sherri has the pleasure to speak with Jeniffer Swope, curator of the "Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories" exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Jennifer shares information about the exhibition (which is currently up and running now) as well as a publication that can be purchased from the MFA's website. She then shares 8 different quilts that are being featured in the exhibition and speaks on the cultural and historical significance of each quilt. More information on this exhibition can be found below.Show Notes Blog Post: https://www.aquiltinglife.com/2021/10/a-quilting-life-podcast-episode-40-show-notes.html/Under the Tree (Quilt on the Wall): https://tidd.ly/3m4ZCBuPlaza (Quilt on the Table): https://tidd.ly/3prRvkyFabric of a Nation Exhibition Website (Where tickets can be purchased): https://www.mfa.org/exhibition/fabric-of-a-nationFabric of a Nation Publication: https://www.mfa.org/publication/fabric-of-a-nationFabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories InformationQuilts and coverlets, used in North America since the 17th century, have a unique capacity to tell stories. Their tactile making by hand and their traditional use in the home impart deeply personal narratives of their creators, and the many histories they express reveal a complex record of America. Upending expectations about quilt displays—traditionally organized by region, form or motif—Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories is a loosely chronological presentation that is divided into seven thematic sections and incorporates the perspectives of artists, educators, academics and activists.More than 50 works on view include remarkable examples by an under-recognized diversity of artistic hands and minds from the 17th century to today, including female and male, known and unidentified, urban and rural makers; immigrants; and Black, Latinx, Indigenous, Asian and LGBTQ+ Americans. Standouts include Pictorial Quilt (1895–98), an icon of the MFA's collection and one of only two known surviving quilts by Harriet Powers, an exceptional artist and storyteller born into slavery in 1837, and the recently acquired To God and Truth (2019), a vibrantly colorful and elaborately patterned work by contemporary artist Bisa Butler. While celebrating the artistry and intricacy of quilts and coverlets and the lives they document, the exhibition also invites visitors to consider the complicated legacies ingrained in the fabric of American life.Visit the A Quilting Life YouTube channel for more great video content: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmSR-jDR956ATQe30JHX87wEnjoy what you heard? Be sure to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts and your review could be read on the show! 

Actors With Issues, with Juan Ayala
69. Germain Arroyo (Netflix's Ratched)

Actors With Issues, with Juan Ayala

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 49:42


Television and film actor Germain Arroyo joins us on the show this week and talks about their experience start as a dancer and switching to acting, their frustrations with heavily stereotypical roles for Latinx in entertainment, and what it was like working with the iconic Sharon Stone (and killing off her character...) in the Netflix series 'Ratched'. Thanks for tuning in, don't forget to subscribe! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/actorswithissues/support

Latinx On The Rise
Dr. Javier Herrera | Covid in the Latinx Community

Latinx On The Rise

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 47:50


Dr. Javier Herrera gives us a look what is was like to learn about Covid. He shares how he learned the gravity of Covid and how he collaborated with other doctors nationwide to help treat his Covid patients. Dr. Herrera mostly serves the Latinx and black community. He reflects back at the beginnings of Covid. And thanks to On The Rise Media for this production:https://www.instagram.com/_ontherisem...​Follow me on Instagram | https://www.instagram.com/latinxontherise/Twitter | https://twitter.com/LatinxOnTheRiseYoutube | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdE7h1oL4Gs0RLoRlGAuX5w

Media Fuel
Episode 46 - "Are You Ready for the Revolution"

Media Fuel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 70:32


Follow us on Twitter and Instagram to stay updated!@mediafuelpodBig News!DC FandomMarvel NewsJohn Wick Prequel series?!  Cowboy Bepop teaserFright Nights 14-22Follow Us!@relsss Insta @relsarels Twitter @whyzeusy Insta & TwitterTags: Lations, gaming

The Impact Investing Podcast
38 - Accelerating investment into diverse emerging fund managers

The Impact Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 41:54


Today there is a growing recognition that we need to get far more capital into the hands of people who have been systematically excluded from entrepreneurship. Historically capital has disproportionately been allocated to a very narrow slice of entrepreneurs who are ivy league educated, white men. Meanwhile, women, people of colour, LGBTQ and Indigenous communities, and many others have been systematically excluded.And while today there is a growing number of funds, incubators, and accelerators that have been established to get capital into the hands of a much more diverse group of entrepreneurs, we still have a long way to go.According to RateMyInvestor and Diversity VC's second "Diversity in U.S. Startups" report, "VC-backed startups in the United States are still significantly male (89.3%), white (71.6%), based in Silicon Valley (35.3%) and Ivy-educated (13.7%)."Part of the problem is that those who allocate capital to entrepreneurs (e.g. fund managers) are still mostly represented by wealthy white men. According to our next guest's research, of the roughly $70 trillion of investment assets in the United States, just about 1% is managed by diverse asset managers.In this episode, we're joined by Bahiyah Yasmeen Robinson, Founder & CEO of VC Include. What distinguishes Bahiyah's efforts are that while others are focused on supporting diverse entrepreneurs, Bahiyah's efforts are focused on supporting diverse fund managers. Bahiyah's expertise in leading technology, investment, and social impact initiatives since the early 2000s culminated in her creating VC Include in 2018 to build platforms and programs for diverse emerging managers globally. VC Include was established to meet the market opportunity by building an ecosystem of women, Black, Latinx, Indigenous, and LGBTQ+ fund managers.During the episode, we discuss who and why certain groups of people get systematically excluded from the private equity industry, conscious vs unconscious bias, the moral imperative, structural inequalities, and how VC Include supports diverse emerging fund managers to overcome the hurdles that prevent them from raising and managing more capital.Resources from this episode:VC Include website, Twitter, and LinkedInGender Lens Investing In and By Private Market Funds, During the Global COVID-19 Pandemic: a View from Capital Connect written by Bahiyah and Suzanne Biegel

This Latina Needs Therapy Too
LEYENDA DE LA PASCUALITA

This Latina Needs Therapy Too

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 29:14


MWUAHAHAHA! Did you guys expect this?For this week's episode Jackie told us the Leyenda de La Pascualita from Chihuahua, Mexico. This alleged mummy made her first appearance on the 25th of March 1930, reportedly wearing a gown from the spring/summer collection. Locals were struck by how real La Pascualita looked and by her resemblance to the owner, Pascuala Esparza. Let us know what you think!

HealthCare UnTold
The UnTold Stories and Lessons Learned from the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake

HealthCare UnTold

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 42:03


Since the inception of the HealthCare Untold Podcast, I wanted to record an episode about Latinos' own version of the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake. When the earthquake hit, I was the Executive Director of Salud Para La Gente, a farmworker clinic in Watsonville, and what I experienced and witnessed first-hand during this ordeal was life changing.  These same feelings were sparked during the Covid-19 Pandemic as our podcast captured the voices and work of Latinos and others who stepped up and organized to provide the  support and services to those in need in LatinX communities around the country.It's been 32 years since the 1989 Loma Prieta staff and volunteers of  Salud Para La Gente  served over 10,000 people with medical and mental health services as well as with clothing, food and monetary support. This type of timely and life-saving support is exactly what our community organizations are doing around the country today, support all made possible by committed  staff, funders, donors, and volunteers.  This podcast episodes includes testimonials of those involved in response to the earthquake and a discussion with Dr. Sandra Hernandez, CEO of the California Healthcare Foundation, about the traditional phases of disaster management: preparedness, response and recovery. The lessons learned from today's responses  to the California Fires and Covid-19 Pandemic are the same: the importance of serving our most vulnerable communities with dignity and respect.As Mayor Oscar Rios shares the multiple improvements of Latinx civic leadership  since the earthquake 32 years ago in Watsonville, I can't help but wonder about the future for our communities post Covid-19. My experiences have shown over and again that when people come together to solve a crisis, we can permanently make the world a better place. This has become my central thesis and philosophy for public health as you will hear reflected in our podcast, HealthCare UnTold.       

The Rob Burgess Show
Ep. 204 - Jessica Ordaz

The Rob Burgess Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 45:26


Hello and welcome to The Rob Burgess Show. I am, of course, your host, Rob Burgess. On this, our 204th episodes, our guest is Jessica Ordaz. Jessica Ordaz is an Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado Boulder. She received her doctorate from the University of California Davis in American History. During the 2017-2018 academic year, Ordaz was the Andrew W. Mellon Sawyer Seminar postdoctoral fellow at the University of Washington, which focused on comparative racial capitalism. Her first book, "The Shadow of El Centro: A History of Migrant Incarceration and Solidarity," was released in March 2021. Her second project will explore the multifaceted history of veganism and plant based foods throughout the Americas, focusing on colonization, food politics, and social justice. This research will illuminate the wider and transnational history of Latinx veganism and how communities of color have engaged with questions of animal, human, and plant relations for centuries. A quick programming note: Her essay, which we discuss during the first part of this episode, is titled “The Detention and Deportation Regime as a Conduit of Death: Memorializing and Mourning Migrant Loss” and is included in the book “A Field Guide to White Supremacy” edited by Kathleen Belew and Ramón A. Gutiérrez, which will be published Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2021 by the University of California Press. Join The Rob Burgess Show mailing list! Go to tinyletter.com/therobburgessshow and type in your email address. Then, respond to the automatic message. Also please make sure to comment, follow, like, subscribe, share, rate and review everywhere the podcast is available, including iTunes, YouTube, SoundCloud, Stitcher, Google Play Music, Twitter, Internet Archive, TuneIn, RSS, and, now, Spotify. The official website for the podcast is www.therobburgessshow.com. You can find more about me by visiting my website, www.thisburgess.com.If you have something to say, record a voice memo on your smartphone and send it to therobburgessshow@gmail.com. Include “voice memo” in the subject line of the email. Also, if you want to call or text the show for any reason, the number is: 317-674-3547.

Lake Effect: Full Show
Thursday on Lake Effect: BLEST Hub, Milwaukee Muslim Film Festival, Festival City Symphony, 'Finding Loren' documentary

Lake Effect: Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 51:11


We learn about a tool that can help connect Black and LatinX youth in Milwaukee to education and job resources. Then, highlight some films to see this weekend at the sixth annual Milwaukee Muslim Film Festival. We learn about the Festival City Symphony's upcoming season. Plus, a new documentary tells the story of a fighter pilot downed over Italy, and his family finding the crash site 70 years later.

RaceMob - Running Together Podcast
Running for Mental Health and Tips for Building an Inclusive Community with Fernanda Perdomo-Arcienegas

RaceMob - Running Together Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 53:37


#71 - When we said that we wanted to celebrate Latin Heritage Month - Bertrand's face immediately lit up.  - I've got the perfect person - B said.We really couldn't do any better than Fernanda Perdomo-Arcienegas, the head of diversity, inclusion, and equality at San Jose State University.  At we're so lucky to book this busy community leader - still recovering from her bout with walking pneumonia.Wow - this passionate runner also got her start later in life, after the passing of her mother in Colombia.  We talk about the benefits of exercise for your mental health.  The importance of community - not only for motivation, and the social aspects - but also for safety.  And some coaching tips from the ultramarathoner and coach for San Jose Fit.We also talk about the importance of diversity, inclusion, and equality in all of our communities - and the local event that Fernanda is putting on in San Jose.  All of the show notes can be found online at racemob.com/podcast - including links to her event.  You won't want to miss this fun conversation.

Hyphenated with Joanna Hausmann and Jenny Lorenzo
Scary Latin American Folktales

Hyphenated with Joanna Hausmann and Jenny Lorenzo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 29:08


Joanna and Jenny tell each other scary stories from across Latin America, including El Silbón, El Sombrerón, La Sayona, La Planchada, and try to figure out what they say about our culture.

Tamarindo
Latinx-led Ocean Conservation with Azul

Tamarindo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 50:15


On this episode, we reflect on the end of Hispanic Heritage Month, talk about La Jenny 69,  and then learn about the Latinx environmental justice organization, Azul, and their work around protecting the ocean.   We speak to Marce Gutiérrez-Graudinš, the founder and Executive Director of Azul, a grassroots organization that works with Latinxs throughout the Americas to protect the ocean and coasts. Azul is the first U.S. organization devoted to elevating Latinx voices in marine conservation. Check them out and join their team at Azul.org and pick up a copy of their album here: https://azulrecords.bandcamp.com/album/en-el-mar       This episode is sponsored by ShopOfficely.com, the Latina-led small business bringing you the cutest women-sourced office supplies. Listeners of Tamarindo get 15% off of checkout using the code TAMARINDO (all caps). Follow them on instagram now: @Shop_Officely     Tamarindo podcast is the Latinx show where hosts discuss politics, pop culture, and how to balance it all con calma, hosted by Brenda Gonzalez and Ana Sheila Victorino. Join us as we delve into discussions on culture, politics, identity, representation, and life!    Brenda and  Ana Sheila are executive producers of Tamarindo podcast with production support by Mitzi Hernández and Augusto Martinez, of Sonoro Media. Jeff Ricards provides original music. If you want to support our work, please rate and review our show here. You can get in touch with us at www.tamarindopodcast.com     Follow Tamarindo on twitter @tamarindocastor on Instagram @Tamarindopodcast   Follow Brenda on twitter at @BrendaRicards   Follow AnaSheila on instagram @la_anasheila and twitter @Shelli1228

Brave Together
The Intersection of Latinx Culture & Disability

Brave Together

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 46:32


Today on the podcast we continue our series on culture and disability, exploring the intersection of Latinx culture, family norms, and multiple diagnoses. Angie and Terri invite us into their stories and discuss their experiences raising children with disabilities while navigating cultural assumptions. Angie is the facilitator of the We Are Brave Together San Diego support group, while Terri leads our virtual support group for Spanish-speaking moms. You can find Angie on IG at @angie_robinson619 and hear about her work on the SPEDMom Podcast. Brave Together Podcast is sponsored by BetterHelp, an organization working to make professional counseling accessible, affordable, convenient - so anyone can get help, anytime, anywhere from the world's largest network of licensed, accredited, and experienced counselors.  For a 10% discount off of your first month, visit www.betterhelp.com/wearebravetogether. 

Powerful Ladies Podcast
Episode 138: Leading with Representation & Organization for the Latinx Community with Brenda Gonzalez

Powerful Ladies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 44:17


I have the pleasure of sitting down with Brenda Gonzalez, founder, co-ceo and co-host of the Tamarindo Podcast - a Latinx empowerment podcast. We discuss the impact of Prop 187 in California and its impact on national politics.  We go down the rabbit hole of the origin of the term Hispanic.  And we talk about why representation, organization, AND access to source origin documents matter so much for every group to be counted, understood, and have fact based truths.

The Witch Wave
#78 - Lorraine Monteagut, Author of "Brujas: The Magic and Power of Witches of Color"

The Witch Wave

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 71:34


Lorraine Monteagut is a Cuban-Colombian writer born in Miami, Florida. She is the author of Brujas: The Magic and Power of Witches of Color. Lorraine holds a PhD in communication from the University of South Florida, where she began her research on bruja feminism and the reclamation of ancestral healing traditions. Inspired to the spiritual life by her great grandmother, who was an espiritista in Cuba, she facilitates astrology workshops and moon circles in her local community in Tampa, Florida.On this episode, Lorraine discusses the healing that comes with connecting to the magic of ancestors, the diversity of the Latinx witchcraft community, and how to decolonize spiritual research and practices.Pam also talks about the importance of honoring one's own ancestral magic, and answers a listener question about spell-casting for a new home.Our sponsors for this episode are VVITCH Digital, Temperance Home and Bar, The Path 365 by Suzie Newell, Wishcraft Goods, Mithras Candle, BetterHelp, Swandy's The Throne Room album, and The Spiral Bookcase

The Peaceful Parenting Podcast
020: Reparenting Ourselves: Being the Parents We Want To Be with Leslie Priscilla

The Peaceful Parenting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 48:01


How do we reparent ourselves, and what does it even mean to begin with? In this week's episode, I speak with Leslie Priscilla, a first generation non-Black Xicana with Rarámuri lineage. She is a mother to three biracial children and a certified Parent Coach with over 13 years of experience.    She shares with us her knowledge and insight on reparenting our own inner child so that we can show up and be the parents we've always wanted to be.   Listen in as we talk about:   The changes she's making to parenting in LatinX culture   What reparenting is and why our own healing is important Why reparenting ourselves can feel uncomfortable and disrespectful in relation to how we were raised The importance of self-compassion and tips to visualizing it How to break patterns of anger   Leslie shares her medicine by offering coaching, workshops, support and advocacy for Latinx/Chicanx families locally, nationally and internationally via Latinx Parenting. Leslie's vision is of a movement rooted in children's rights, social and racial justice, the individual and collective practice of nonviolence and reparenting, intergenerational and ancestral healing, cultural sustenance, and the active decolonization of oppressive practices in our families towards liberation.   Resources mentioned in this episode Free Parenting Reset Challenge Parenting From the Inside Out by Dan Siegel and Mary Hartzell    Connect with Leslie   On Instagram On Twitter Www.Latinxparenting.org       with Sarah Rosensweet   On Instagram On Facebook https://www.sarahrosensweet.com 

Salud
¡El Maestro De La Vida!

Salud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 84:24


El Maestro Oscar Moreno, hijo de inmigrantes, Williams college and NYU alumni joins us to talk about Latinos in the education system. Join us as we talk about Police Brutality, the educational system in America, the term LatinX, and we learn a little bit more about Cesar, since he's his childhood friend! Bienvenido, Oscar, el maestro de la vida! Follow Salud Podcast: @SaludPodcast l Jose Quintero l El Cesar Email & Business Inquiries: Saludpod@gmail.com Also we are very excited to announce that Salud Podcast has been featured in the Top 70 Latino Podcasts as #12. Go Check it out! Thank you! https://blog.feedspot.com/latino_podcasts/

Comadres y Comics Podcast
Episode 132: Teen Titans: Beast Boy Loves Raven

Comadres y Comics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 57:42


Please remember to rate and review our podcast on Itunes, CastBox or on our website! Please check out our Patreon and Youtube as well. CHISME DE LA SEMANA: Wonder Woman and Saga chisme. ON MY RADAR: DC Comic's Soul Plumbers # 1 BOOK REVIEW: TEEN TITANS: BEAST BOY LOVES RAVEN Art by: Gabriel Picolo Written by: Kami Garcia EN LA LIBRERIA: Collectors Annual #1-#6: Collectors Splendor! New Annual! The sixth Collectors print volume by cartoonist Eddie deAngelini is here! Collectors Annual #6: Collectors Splendor! AND MORE!!! http://kck.st/3FCHXJl JUNTOS Y FUERTES: Scout Comics is launching a Latinx imprint in partnership with the indie Los Angeles production company Mucho Mas Media SALUDOS: Crystal Gonzalez creator of In The Dark Comics inthedarkcomics.com Instagram: @comickpro inthedark.bigcartel.com On YouTube: @C0MICK On TikTok: @inthedarkcomics

Connections with Evan Dawson
Connections: The 2021 Rochester Latinx Agenda

Connections with Evan Dawson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 51:34


The Ibero-American Action League and Rochester Latinx leaders have released a 53-page document outlining their recommendations for how to address issues that impact Rochester's Latinx community. This hour, we discuss the 2021 Rochester Latinx Agenda and its priorities relating to diversity, equity, and inclusion. Our guests: Marlene Cortés , senior manager for the Language Access Program at the Empire Justice Center Sady Fischer, director of diversity, equity and inclusion for Excellus BlueCross BlueShield Angelica Perez-Delgado, CEO of Ibero-American Action League Anthony Plonczynski-Figueroa , co-founder of La Cumbre and Latinos United for Progress

Cafe con Pam Podcast
229 - Commitment and Dedication with Ruben Flores Martinez

Cafe con Pam Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 71:26


Listeners, we're back this week with Ruben Flores-Martinez.At age 13, Ruben and his family immigrated to the states from Guadalajara, Mexico. Unable to fulfill his dream of going to college for Computer Science due to his immigration status, Ruben began watching YouTube videos on coding and taught himself how to build websites and mobile apps. A few years later, his determination led him to develop CASHDROP, a mobile-first contactless commerce platform targeted at small business owners. Ruben represents less than 2.6% of LatinX founders who have received VC funding. To date, the app has raised $2.7 million in capital. Major investors include hospitality entrepreneur David Grutman, Youtube pioneer Michelle Phan, and Stalwart Silicon Valley investor and founder Cyan Banister.During our conversation, we talked about:Being an immigrantPoppy seed syndromeYouTube UniversityRaising capitalBeing a Latino founderThis  episode is brought to you by  MagicMindMagicMind is the world's first productivity drink.

The Latina Mom Legacy
3.23 Alexandra Alessandri - What Does a Writing Journey Look Like with Award Winning Bilingual Children's Book Author

The Latina Mom Legacy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 49:53


How does an award winning Colombian bilingual children's book author get inspired to write her books? How is this author honoring her heritage and experience of Año Viejo, being an immigrant child with limited English, and the leyendas of her native Colombia like the Madre Monte? In this episode, Latina mom, teacher, children's book author, and buñuelos lover, Alessandra Alesandri share's her journey as a writer. Join us as we talk about what inspired her to become a writer and take a closer look at 3 of her children's books that are paving the way for other Latinx writers. Plus, we'll talk about the struggles in raising a bilingual teenage son, life in Miami, and her words of wisdom for Latina moms, asi que no te lo pierdas! Guest Info & Recommendation Links from this episode: 3.23 Complete Show Notes List & Show Links Follow Alexandra Alessandri in IG @apalessandri Follow on Twitter @apalessandri Website: https://alexandraalessandri.com/ Empower Yourself: Get Janny's Free How to Raise a Bilingual Child Guide Here. Join our Private Raising Bilingual Kids Facebook Group Shop: Get 25% Off your first Mi Legasi Shop purchase with code: POD25 Let's Connect: Janny: Janny on Instagram: https://instagram.com/milegasi The Latina Mom Legacy on Instagram https://instagram.com/thelatinamomlegacy Facebook: https://facebook.com/milegasi Pinterest: https://pinterest.com/milegasi TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@mi_legasi Chisme: Join La Lista our Newsletter at Milegasi.com and always be in the know. Hey! Send me a DM on IG and tell me what you think about the show or use #thelatinamomlegacy so I know you're a mamamiga :) XOXO Janny --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thelatinamomlegacy/support

Draws in Spanish |  Conversations with Latinx Visual Artists and Designers
04: Venezuelan Illustrator, Natali Koromoto Martinez

Draws in Spanish | Conversations with Latinx Visual Artists and Designers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 30:32


In this episode, I sit down with Natali Martinez to uncover where she draws inspiration for her cute illustration style, how her Venezuelan roots influence her work and perspective, and exactly what goes into getting started with an online shop.Natali, who unexpectedly moved to Florida after Chavez took power in Venezuela, pursued a degree in animation only to realize she didn't have the patience for the field. After graduation, she took a leap of faith and moved with her friends to NYC, where she began her freelance career.During this time, she slowly began creating her own illustrations and developing her voice and style. Now, Natali has a loyal following of 180k Instagram followers who love her cute illustrations and buy into her world through prints, pins, apparel, and plushies.Natali is already working on her next big project by launching an apparel line with her partner later this year.Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, Stitcher, iHeartRadio, or on your favorite podcast platform.Topics Covered:Moving from Venezuela to the U.S.Starting her Small Business from ScratchRaising awareness of Latinx culture by depicting Latinx foods and dessertsWhat Inspires her Playful, Cute, and Unique StyleThe Pros and Cons of Working with ManufacturersTips for Starting Your Own Online ShopGuest InfoConnect with Natali on Instagram and check out her shop here.Bonus Links:More About MafaldaEarly Simpsons ColorsNatali's Spongebob IllustrationsSpecial OfferListeners of the podcast can get a free, undated weekly and monthly planner inspired by the show from our website here.Follow Me between Draws in Spanish episodes:Our WebsiteInstagramYoutubeTikTok

Break Things On Purpose
Leonardo Murillo

Break Things On Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 34:36


In this episode, we cover: 00:00:00 - Introduction  00:03:30 - An Engineering Anecdote  00:08:10 - Lessons Learned from Putting Out Fires 00:11:00 - Building “Guardrails” 00:18:10 - Pushing the Chaos Envelope  00:23:35 - OpenGitOps Project 00:30:37 - Where to Find Leo/Costa Rica CNCF Links: Weaveworks: https://www.weave.works GitOps Working Group: https://github.com/gitops-working-group/gitops-working-group OpenGitOps Project: https://opengitops.dev Github.com/open-gitops: https://github.com/open-gitops Twitter: https://twitter.com/murillodigital LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/leonardomurillo/ Costa Rica CNCF: https://community.cncf.io/costa-rica/ Cloudnative.tv: http://cloudnative.tv Gremlin-certified chaos engineering practitioner: https://www.gremlin.com/certification TranscriptJason: Welcome to the Break Things on Purpose podcast, a show about our often self-inflicted failures and what we learn from them. In this episode, Leonardo Murillo, a principal partner solutions architect at Weaveworks. He joins us to talk about GitOps, Automating reliability, and Pura Vida.Ana: I like letting our guests kind of say, like, “Who are you? What do you do? What got you into the world of DevOps, and cloud, and all this fun stuff that we all get to do?”Leo: Well, I guess I'll do a little intro of myself. I'm Leonardo Murillo; everybody calls me Leo, which is fine because I realize that not everybody chooses to call me Leo, depending on where they're from. Like, Ticos and Latinos, they're like, “Oh, Leo,” like they already know me; I'm Leo already. But people in Europe and in other places, they're, kind of like, more formal out there. Leonardo everybody calls me Leo.I'm based off Costa Rica, and my current professional role is principal solutions architect—principal partner solutions architect at Weaveworks. How I got started in DevOps. A lot of people have gotten started in DevOps, which is not realizing that they just got started in DevOps, you know what I'm saying? Like, they did DevOps before it was a buzzword and it was, kind of like, cool. That was back—so I worked probably, like, three roles back, so I was CTO for a Colorado-based company before Weaveworks, and before that, I worked with a San Francisco-based startup called High Fidelity.And High Fidelity did virtual reality. So, it was actually founded by Philip Rosedale, the founder of Linden Lab, the builders of Second Life. And the whole idea was, let's build—with the advent of the Oculus Rift and all this cool tech—build the new metaverse concept. We're using the cloud because, I mean, when we're talking about this distributed system, like a distributed system where you're trying to, with very low latency, transmit positional audio, and a bunch of different degrees of freedom of your avatars and whatnot; that's very massive scale, lots of traffic. So, the cloud was, kind of like, fit for purpose.And so we started using the cloud, and I started using Jenkins, as a—and figure it out, like, Jenkins is a cron sort of thing; [unintelligible 00:02:48] oh, you can actually do a scheduled thing here. So, started using it almost to run just scheduled jobs. And then I realized its power, and all of a sudden, I started hearing this whole DevOps word, and I'm like, “What this? That's kind of like what we're doing, right?” Like, we're doing DevOps. And that's how it all got started, back in San Francisco.Ana: That actually segues to one of the first questions that we love asking all of our guests. We know that working in DevOps and engineering, sometimes it's a lot of firefighting, sometimes we get to teach a lot of other engineers how to have better processes. But we know that those horror stories exist. So, what is one of those horrible incidents that you've encountered in your career? What happened?Leo: This is before the cloud and this is way before DevOps was even something. I used to be a DJ in my 20s. I used to mix drum and bass and jungle with vinyl. I never did the digital move. I used DJ, and I was director for a colocation facility here in Costa Rica, one of the first few colocation facilities that existed in the [unintelligible 00:04:00].I partied a lot, like every night, [laugh] [unintelligible 00:04:05] party night and DJ night. One night, they had 24/7 support because we were collocations [unintelligible 00:04:12], so I had people doing support all the time. I was mixing in some bar someplace one night, and I don't want to go into absolute detail of my state of consciousness, but it wasn't, kind of like… accurate in its execution. So, I got a call, and they're like, “We're having some problem here with our network.” This is, like, back in Cisco PIX times for firewalls and you know, like… back then.I wasn't fully there, so I [laugh], just drove back to the office in the middle of night and had this assistant, Miguel was his name, and he looks at me and he's like, “Are you okay? Are you really capable of solving this problem at [laugh] this very point in time?” And I'm like, “Yeah. Sure, sure. I can do this.”We had a rack full of networking hardware and there was, like, a big incident; we actually—one of the primary connections that we had was completely offline. And I went in and I started working on a device, and I spent about half an hour, like, “Well, this device is fine. There's nothing wrong with the device.” I had been working for half an hour on the wrong device. They're like, “Come on. You really got to focus.”And long story short, I eventually got to the right device and I was able to fix the problem, but that was like a bad incident, which wasn't bad in the context of technicality, right? It was a relatively quick fix that I figured it out. It was just at the wrong time. [laugh]. You know what I'm saying?It wasn't the best thing to occur that particular night. So, when you're talking about firefighting, there's a huge burden in terms of the on-call person, and I think that's something that we had experienced, and that I think we should give out a lot of shout-outs and provide a lot of support for those that are on call. Because this is the exact price they pay for that responsibility. So, just as a side note that comes to mind. Here's a lot of, like, shout-outs to all the people on-call that are listening to this right now, and I'm sorry you cannot go party. [laugh].So yeah, that's telling one story of one incident way back. You want to hear another one because there's a—this is back in High Fidelity times. I was—I don't remember exactly what it was building, but it had to do with emailing users, basically, I had to do something, I can't recall actually what it was. They was supposed to email all the users that were using the platform. For whatever reason—I really can't recall why—I did not mock data on my development environment.What I did was just use—I didn't mock the data, I actually used just to a copy of the production [unintelligible 00:07:02] the users. I basically just emailed everybody, like, multiple times. And that was very embarrassing. And another embarrassing scenario was, one day, I was working on a firewall that was local to my office, and I got the terminals mixed up, and I shut down not my local office firewall, but the one that was at the colocation facility. And that was another embarrassing moment. So yeah, those are three, kind of, self-caused fires that required fighting afterwards.Ana: The mock data one definitely resonates, especially when you're starting out in engineering career where you're just like, “Hey, I need to get this working. I'm trying to connect to pull this data from a production service,” or, “I'm trying to publish a new email, I want to see how it all goes out. Yeah, why not grab a copy of what actually usually is being used by my company and, like, press buttons here? Oh, wait, no, that actually is hitting a live endpoint? I did not know that.”Which brings me to that main question; what do you end up learning when you go through these fires? After you went through this incident that you emailed all of your customers, what is something that you learn that you got to take back.Leo: I learned how you have to pay attention. It's hard to learn without having gone through this experiences because you start picking up on cues that you didn't pick up in the past. You start seeing things that you didn't pay attention to before, particularly because you didn't know. And I'm pretty sure, even if somebody would have told me, “Don't do this,” or, “Don't do that. Be careful,” you still make those mistakes.There is certain things that you only achieve through experience. And I think that's one of the most important things that I realized. And I've actually see the analogy of that with my children. There's certain things that I, no matter how well I articulate, they will not learn until they go through those experiences of themselves. But I think that's one of the things that I'd argue, you ha—you will go through this, and it's—it's not okay, but it's okay.Everybody makes mistakes. You'll also identify whether—like, how supporting your team is and how supportive your—the organization you're working with is when you see the reaction to those errors. Hopefully, it wasn't something too bad, and ideally there's going to be guiderails that prevent that really, really bad scenario, but it's okay to make mistakes. You learn to focus through those mistakes and you really should be paying attention; you should never take anything for granted. There is no safety net. Period.So, you should never assume that there is, or that you're not going to make a mistake. So, be very careful. Another thing that I learned, how I can I work in my development environment. How different patterns that I apply in my development environment, how I now I'm very careful to never have, kind of like, production [x 00:10:11] readily available within my development environment. And also to build those guiderails.I think part of what you learn is all the things that could go wrong, might go wrong, so take time to build those guiderails. I think that's important. Like anything else that comes with seniority, when you have a task to accomplish, the task itself is merely a margin, only a percentage of what you really should consider to reach that objective. And a lot of the times, that means building protection around what you're asked, or thinking beyond that scope. And then leverage the team, you know? If you have people around you that know more, which is kind of great about community and collaboration. Like, being—don't—you're not alone.Ana: I love that you mentioned guardrails and guardrails being a way that you're able to prevent some of these things. Do you think something like chaos engineering could help you find those guardrails when you don't know that you don't have a guardrail?Leo: I think it definitely. The more complex your job, the more complex your architecture, the more complex of the solution you're building—and we've gotten in an increase in complexity over time. We went from monoliths to microservices to fully distributed architectures of services. We went from synchronous to asynchronous to event-driven to—like, there's this increase in complexity that is basically there for a reason because of an increase in scale as well. And the number of possible failure conditions that could arise from this hugely diverse and complex set of variables means that we've gotten to a point that likely always was the way, but now it's reached, again, and because of targets aligned with this complexity, new levels of scale, that there is currently more unknown unknowns than we've ever had.The conditions that you can run into because of different problem states of each individual component in your distributed architecture, brings up an orders-of-magnitude increase in the possible issues that you might run into, basically a point where you really have to understand that you have no idea what could fail, and the exercise of identifying what can fail. Or what are the margins of stability of your solution because that's, kind of like, the whole point, the boundaries? There's going to be a set of conditions, there's going to be a combination of conditions that will trigger your—kind of, will tip your solution beyond that edge. And finding those edges of stability can no longer be something that just happens by accident; it has to be premeditated, it has to be planned for. This is basically chaos engineering.Hypothesizing, given a set of conditions, what is the expected outcome? And through the execution of this hypothesis of increasing or varying scope and complexity, starting to identify that perimeter of stability of their solution. So, I guess to answer your question, yes. I mean, chaos engineering allows you to ide—if you think about that perimeter of stability as the guardrails around your solution within which have to remain for your solution to be stable, for instance, there goes—[unintelligible 00:13:48] chaos engineering. I was actually talking to somebody the other day, so I'm the organizer for the Costa Rica Cloud-Native Community, the chapter for [unintelligible 00:14:00], and I have this fellow from [unintelligible 00:14:04] who, he works doing chaos engineering.And he was talking to me about this concept that I had not thought about and considered, how chaos engineering can also be, kind of like, applied at a social level. What happens if a person xyz is not available? What happens if a person other has access to a system that they shouldn't have? All these types of scenarios can be used to discover where more guiderails should be applied.Jason: You know, you start to learn where the on-call person that's completely sober, maybe, is unavailable for some reason, and Leo comes and [crosstalk 00:14:45]—Leo: Right. [laugh]. Exactly. Exactly. That's what you have to incorporate in your experiment, kind of like, the DJ variable and the party parameter.Jason: It's a good thing to underscore as well, right? Back to your idea of we can tell our children all sorts of things and they're not going to learn the lesson until they experience it. And similarly with, as you explore your systems and how they can fail, we can imagine and architecture systems to maybe be resilient or robust enough to withstand certain failures, but we don't actually learn those lessons or actually know if they're going to work until we really do that, until we really stress them and try to explore those boundaries.Leo: Wouldn't it be fantastic if we could do that with our lives? You know, like, I want to bungee jump or I want to skydive, and there's a percentage of probability that I'm going to hit the ground and die, and I can just introduce a hypothesis in my life, jump, and then just revert to my previous state if it went wrong. It would be fantastic. I would try many, many things. [laugh].But you can't. And it's kind of like the same thing with my kids. I would love to be able to say, “You know what? Execute the following process, get the experience, and then revert to before it happened.” You cannot do that in real life, but that's, kind of like, the scenario that's brought up by chaos engineering, you don't have to wait for that production incident to learn; you can actually, “Emulate” quote-unquote, those occurrences.You can emulate it, you can experience without the damage, though, if you do it well because I think that's also part of, kind of like, there's a lot to learn about chaos engineering and there's a lot of progress in terms of how the practice of chaos engineering is evolving, and I think there's likely still a percentage of the population or of the industry that still doesn't quite see chaos engineering beyond just introducing chaos, period. They know chaos engineering from calling the Chaos Monkeys kill instances at random, and fix things and, you know, not in the more scientific context that it's evolved into. But yeah, I think the ability to have a controlled experience where you can actually live through failure states, and incidents, and issues, and stuff that you really don't want to happen in real life, but you can actually simulate those, accelerates learning in a way that only experience provides. Which is the beauty of it because you're actually living through it, and I don't think anything can teach us as effectively as living through [unintelligible 00:17:43], through suffering.Ana: I do also very much love that point where it's true, chaos engineering does expedite your learning. Not only are you just building and releasing and waiting for failure to happen, you're actually injecting that failure and you get to just be like, “Oh, wait, if this failure was to occur, I know that I'm resilient to it.” But I also love pushing that envelope forward, that it really allows folks to battle-test solutions together of, “I think this architecture diagram is going to be more resilient because I'm running it on three regions, and they're all in just certain zones. But if I was to deploy to a different provider, that only gives me one region, but they say they have a higher uptime, I would love to battle, test that together and really see, I'm throwing both scenarios at you: you're losing your access to the database. What's going to happen? Go, fight.” [laugh].Leo: You know, one thing that I've been mentioning to people, this is my hypothesis as to the future of chaos engineering as a component of solutions architecture. My hypothesis is that just as nowadays, if you look at any application, any service, for that application or service to be production-ready, you have a certain percentage of unit test coverage and you have a certain percentage of end-to-end coverage of testing and whatnot, and you cannot ignore and say I'm going to give you a production-ready application or production-ready system without solid testing coverage. My hypothesis is that [unintelligible 00:19:21]. And as a side note, we are now living in a world of infrastructure as code, and manifested infrastructure, and declarative infrastructure, and all sorts of cool new ways to deploy and deliver that infrastructure and workloads on top of it. My theory is that just as unit testing coverage is a requirement for any production-ready solution or application nowadays, a certain percentage of, “Chaos coverage,” quote-unquote.In other words, what percentage of the surface of your infrastructure had been exercised by chaos experiments, is going to also become a requirement for any production-ready architecture. That's is where my mind is at. I think you'll start seeing that happen in CI/CD pipelines, you're going to start seeing labels of 90% chaos coverage on Terraform repos. That's kind of the future. That I hope because I think it's going to help tremendously with reliability, and allow people to party without concern for being called back to the office in the middle of the night. It's just going to have a positive impact overall.Ana: I definitely love where that vision is going because that's definitely very much of what I've seen in the industry and the community. And with a lot of the open-source projects that we see out there, like, I got to sit in on a project called Keptn, which gets a chance to bring in a little bit more of those SRE-driven operations and try to close that loop, and auto-remediate, and all these other nice things of DevOps and cloud, but a big portion of what we're doing with Keptn is that you also get a chance to inject chaos and validate against service-level objectives, so you get to just really bring to the front, “Oh, we're looking at this metric for business-level and service-level objectives that allow for us to know that we're actually up and running and our customers are able to use us because they are the right indicators that matter to our business.” But you get to do that within CI/CD so that you throw chaos at it, you check that SLO, that gets rolled out to production, or to your next stage and then you throw more chaos at it, and it continues being completely repetitive.Leo: That's really awesome. And I think, for example, SLOs, I think that's very valuable as well. And prioritize what you want to improve based on the output of your experiments against that error budget, for example. There's limited time, there's limited engineering capacity, there's limited everything, so this is also something that you—the output, the results, the insights that you get from executing experiments throughout your delivery lifecycle as you promote, as you progress your solution through its multiple stages, also help you identify what should be prioritized because of the impact that it may have in your area budgets. Because I mean, sometimes you just need to burn budget, you know what I'm saying?So, you can actually, clearly and quantifiably understand where to focus engineering efforts towards site reliability as you introduce changes. So yeah, I think it's—and no wonder it's such a booming concept. Everybody's talking about it. I saw Gremlin just released this new certification thing. What is it, certified chaos engineer?Jason: Gremlin-certified chaos engineering practitioner.Leo: Ah, pretty cool.Jason: Yeah.Leo: I got to get me one of those. [laugh].Jason: Yeah, you should—we'll put the link in the [show notes 00:23:19], for everybody that wants to go and take that. One of the things that you've mentioned a bunch is as we talk about automation, and automating and getting chaos engineering coverage in the same way that test coverage happens, one of the things that you're involved in—and I think why you've got so much knowledge around automation—is you've been involved in the OpenGitOps Project, right?Leo: Mm-hm. Correct.Jason: Can you tell us more about that? And what does that look like now? Because I know GitOps has become this, sort of, buzzword, and I think a lot of people are starting to look into that and maybe wondering what that is.Leo: I'm co-chair of the GitOps Working Group by the CNCF, which is the working group that effectively shepherds the OpenGitOps Project. The whole idea behind the OpenGitOps Project is to come to a consensus definition of what GitOps is. And this is along the lines of—like, we were talking about DevOps, right?Like DevOps is—everybody is doing DevOps and everybody does something different. So, there is some commonality but there is not necessarily a community-agreed-upon single perspective as to what DevOps is. So, the idea behind the OpenGitOps Project and the GitOps Working Group is to basically rally the community and rally the industry towards a common opinion as to what GitOps is, eventually work towards ways to conformance and certification—so it's like you guys are doing with chaos engineering—and in an open-source community fashion. GitOps is basically a operating model for cloud-native infrastructure and applications. So, idea is that you can use the same patterns and you can use the same model to deploy and operate the underlying infrastructure as well as the workloads that are running on top of it.It's defined by four principles that might resonate as known in common for some with some caveats. So, the first principle is that your desired state, how you want your infrastructure and your workloads to look like is declarative. No, it's—you're not—there's a fundamental difference between the declarative and imperative. Imperative is you're giving instructions to reach a certain state. The current industry is just… defining the characteristics of that state, not the process by which you reached it.The current state should be immutable and should be versioned, and this is very much aligned with the whole idea of containers, which are immutable and are versioned, and the whole idea of the Gits, that if used… [unintelligible 00:26:05] if used following best practices is also immutable and versioned. So, your declared state should be versioned and immutable.it should be continuously reconciled through agents. In other words, it eliminates the human component; you are no longer executing manual jobs and you're no longer running imperative pipelines for the deployment component of your operation. You are allowing your [letting 00:26:41] agents do that for you, continuously and programmatically.And the fourth principle is, this is the only way by which you interact with the system. In other words it completely eliminates the human component from the operating model. So, for example, when I think about GitOps as a deployment mechanism, and for example, progressive delivery within the context of GitOps, I see a lot of… what's the word I'm looking for? Like, symbiosis.Jason: Yeah. Symbiosis?Leo: Yeah. Between chaos engineering, and this model of deployment. Because I think chaos engineering is also eliminating a human component; you're no longer letting humans exercise your system to find problems, you are executing those by agents, you are doing so with a declarative model, where you're declaring the attributes of the experiment and the expected outcome of that experiment, and you're defining the criteria by which you're going to abort that experiment. So, if you incorporate that model of automated, continuous validation of your solution through premeditated chaos, in a process of continuous reconciliation of your desired state, through automated deployment agents, then you have a really, really solid, reliable mechanism for the operation of cloud-native solutions.Ana: I was like, I think a lot what we've seen, I mean, especially as I sit in more CNCF stuff, is really trying to get a lot of our systems to be able to know what to do next before we need to interfere, so we don't have to wake up. So, between chaos engineering, between GitOps, between Keptn, [unintelligible 00:28:32] how is it that you can make the load of SRE and the DevOps engineer be more about making sure that things get better versus, something just broke and I need to go fix it, or I need to go talk to an engineer to go do a best practice because now those things are built into the system as a guardrail, or there's better mental models and things that are more accurate to real conditions that can happen to a system?Leo: Actually, I sidetracked. I never ended up talking more about the OpenGitOps Project and the GitOps Working Group. So, it's a community effort by the CNCF. So, it's open for contribution by everybody. You're all in the CNCF Slack, there is an OpenGitOps Slack channel there.And if you go to github.com/open-gitops, you'll be able to find ways to contribute. We are always looking to get more involvement from the community. This is also an evolving paradigm, which I think also resonates with chaos engineering.And a lot of its evolution is being driven by the use cases that are being discovered by the end-users of these technologies and the different patterns. Community involvement is very important. Industry involvement is very important. It would be fantastic and we're an open community, and I'd love to get to know more about what you're all doing with GitOps and what it means for you and how these principles apply to the challenges that your teams are running into, and the use cases that and problems spaces that you're having to deal with.Jason: I think that's a fantastic thing for our listeners to get involved in, especially as a new project that's really looking for the insight and the contribution from new members as it gets founded. As we wrap up, Leo, do you have any other projects that you want to share? How can people find you on the internet? Anything else that you want to plug?Leo: I love to meet people on these subjects that I'm very passionate about. So yes, you can find me on Twitter. I guess, it's easier to just type it, it's @murillodigital, but you'll find that in the show notes, I imagine. As well as my LinkedIn.I have to admit, I'm more of a LinkedIn person. I don't, I hope that doesn't age me or made me uncool, but I never figured out how to really work with Twitter. I'm more of a LinkedIn person, so you can find me there. I'm an organizer in the community in Costa Rica CNCF, and I run.So, for those that are Spanish speakers, I'm very much for promoting the involvement and openness of the cloud-native ecosystem to the Hispanic and Latin community. Because I think language is a barrier and I think we're coming from countries where a lot of us have struggled to basically get our head above water from lesser resources and difficult access to technology and information. But that doesn't mean that there isn't a huge amount of talent in the region. There is. And so, I run a—there's a recent initiative by the CNCF called cloud-native TV, which is we're ten shows that are streaming on Twitch.You go to cloudnative.tv, you'll see them. I run a show called Cloud Native LatinX, which is in Spanish. I invite people to talk about cloud-native technologies that are more cloud-native communities in the region.And my objective is twofold: I want to demonstrate to all Hispanics and all Latin people that they can do it, that we're all the same, doesn't matter if you don't speak the language. There is a whole bunch of people, and I am one of them that speak the language that are there, and we're there to help you learn, and support and help you push through into this community. Basically, anybody that's listening to come out and say these are actionable steps that I can take to move my career forward. So, it's every other Tuesday on cloudnative.tv, Cloud Native LatinX, if you want to hear and see more of me talking in Spanish. It's on cloudnative.tv. And the OpenGitOps Project, join in; it's open to the community. And that's me.Ana: Yes I love that shout-out to getting more folks, especially Hispanics and Latinx, be more involved in cloud and CNCF projects itself. Representation matters and folks like me and Leo come in from countries like Costa Rica, Nicaragua, we get to speak English and Spanish, we want to create more content in Spanish and let you know that you can learn chaos engineering in English and you can learn about chaos engineering in Spanish, Ingeniería de Caos. So, come on and join us. Well, thank you Leo. Muchisimas gracias por estar en el show de hoy, y gracias por estar llamando hoy desde Costa Rica, y para todos los que están oyendo hoy que también hablen español...pura vida y que se encuentren bien. Nos vemos en el próximo episodio.Leo: Muchas gracias, Ana, and thanks everybody, y pura vida para todo el mundo y ¡hagamos caos!Jason: For links to all the information mentioned, visit our website at gremlin.com/podcast. If you liked this episode, subscribe to the Break Things on Purpose podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or your favorite podcast platform. Our theme song is called, “Battle of Pogs” by Komiku, and it's available on loyaltyfreakmusic.com.

In the Foreground: Conversations on Art & Writing
“Becoming Belonged”: Roberto Tejada on the Political Project of Photography and Poetry

In the Foreground: Conversations on Art & Writing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 53:56


In this episode Caro Fowler (Starr Director, Research and Academic Program) speaks with Roberto Tejada, a poet and art historian who in a professor in the creative writing program and the department of art history at the University of Houston, Texas. We discuss the decade he spent immersed in the literary culture of Mexico City, including working with Octavio Paz and the historical layers of the colonial project with the built environment there. He describes the political project of poetry and photography and shares his perspective on the changing landscape of Latin American and Latinx art within the discipline of art history. Finally, Roberto describes the possibilities and limits of what he calls “border-thinking” and “becoming belonged,” as part of his enduring commitment to the idea of encounter as an ethical position, and as a way of moving beyond the predicaments of extraction. 

Gladiatrix! Hear me Roar!
The Self Mastery Conference hosted by The Dream Lab - A Woman of Color point of view with Malini Sarma

Gladiatrix! Hear me Roar!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 14:58


The Dream Lab hosted The Self Mastery Conference in NYC. Co Founders Audrey Diaz Robles and Sabrina Castillo hosted kicked off the show.They had a great lineup of speakers:Mariela De La Mora, Life leadership and business coach - Reclaiming your power as first genKarina F Daves, Life coach and podcast host - Building Boundaries BoldlyAnyellis Cordero, Career Coach and founder of POP - Unstuck yourselfMelissa Fernandez, Dancer + Fitness trainer - Dance breakCatalina Del Carmen, Business and Life Coach - Creating Big ResultsErika Cruz, Founder of Purpose Driven Latina - How TikTok helped me find my purpose and build a 6 figure businessRosa Garcia, founder of the I AM ME Movement, Restauranteur and Motivational Speaker - 2021 Limitless Award, For the woman who sees no limits for herself or her community - presented by IT CosmeticsJulissa Prado - Founder and CEO of Rizos Curls - Keynote

Abuelas en Acción: A Podcast for Our Common Good
Climate Equity for Latinx in Portland, Oregon

Abuelas en Acción: A Podcast for Our Common Good

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 26:01


Elizabeth Lopez-Hernandez, Climate & Health Equity Program Coordinator and Community Health Worker talks about climate equity.  She talks about the impact of climate change on Latinx and the importance of equitable climate action policies to protect all community members.Support the show (https://www.familiasenaccion.org/donate/)

Cafe con Pam Podcast
228 - Latina Equal Payday

Cafe con Pam Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 4:58


October 21, 2021 is the day a Latina would make $1 compared to an average non-Hispanic white man who'd make $1 on January 1. Latinas are still the most underpaid demographic in the United States. Jessica from The Wine and Chisme Podcast and I joined forces to create an experience in San Diego on October 22, and you are invited.Learn how we decided to make this event happen and why it is important for us to start spending our dollars on us. Register to Latina Equal Payday Experience Here Follow Cafe con Pam on all things socialInstagramFacebookhttp://cafeconpam.com/Join the FREE Cafe con Pam Challenge If you are a business owner, join us for Aligned MastermindJoin PowerSisters!  PowerSisters.ClubSubscribe, rate, review, and share this episode with someone you love!And don't ever forget to Stay Shining!

Houston Matters
The pandemic’s effect on Latinx youth, & the health of Galveston Bay (Oct. 18, 2021)

Houston Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 45:24


On Monday's Houston Matters: A new study from a University of Houston professor explores the impact the pandemic has had on Hispanic/Latinx youth from their perspective. It's a follow up to a study from the spring. We learn more. Also this hour: We get an update on the health of Galveston Bay and efforts to learn more about future industrial runoff risks. And we get an update on the Astros in the ALCS and other developments in sports.

Humans of Travel
MMGY Global's Danny Guerrero on Self-Acceptance and Profiling the Traveler of Tomorrow

Humans of Travel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 44:40


Danny Guerrero, the vice president of North America Strategy at MMGY Global, always knew he was different. But despite facing tremendous odds in his childhood — including years spent watching his father struggle with substance abuse and feeling out of place as a Latino at an all-white school in San Diego — Guerrero pushed forward on his journey of self-discovery and has since turned many of life's lemons into lemonade.  Guerrero's interests and experiences in public relations, multicultural marketing and brand strategy have propelled him to prominence in the travel industry. He's active in the Diversity, Inclusion and Equity (DEI) space, (winning an Outstanding Achievement Award from the World Travel & Tourism Council for Advancing Diversity and Inclusion in the Travel Industry earlier this year), and he's pioneered research for MMGY that places a lens on the needs of underrepresented groups — most recently, Black and Latinx travelers.  In this episode of Humans of Travel, Guerrero dives into his journey of cultural connection and self-acceptance. He opens up about being the first person in his family to go to a four-year university, the moment he confronted his sexuality, and how he used his interests in politics and tourism to propel his career forward.  He also talks about what's needed in the travel industry to make it a more welcoming and inclusive environment for all.  RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE Inroads: inroads.org MMGY Travel Intelligence: www.mmgyglobal.com  Future Leaders in Travel Retreat: www.futureleadersintravel.com Latinx Study: www.mmgyintel.com Danny's LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com  ABOUT YOUR HOST  Emma Weissmann is the Digital Managing Editor of TravelAge West, a print and online magazine for travel advisors based in the Western U.S. She is also the co-host of Trade Secrets, a podcast created with sister publication Travel Weekly.  TravelAge West also produces national trade publications Explorer and Family Getaways, as well as events including the Future Leaders in Travel Retreat, Global Travel Marketplace West, the WAVE Awards gala and the Napa Valley Leadership Forum.  ABOUT THE SHOW  TravelAge West's podcast, “Humans of Travel,” features conversations with exceptional people who have compelling stories to tell. Listeners will hear from the travel industry's notable authorities, high-profile executives, travel advisors and rising stars as they share the experiences — the highs and the lows — that make them human.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ellas
Providing a Latinx Lens in Film Criticism with Rosa Parra

Ellas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 81:51


How do you provide your perspective in the space that you occupy? In episode 65 of Ellas, I talk with Rosa Parra about providing her Latinx Lens in film criticism. Rosa is a Chicana Rotten Tomatoes-approved film critic, co-founder, and co-host of Latinx Lens (one of my favorite film podcasts). She is also a member of various critics associations and advocates for representation, diversity, and inclusion. Listen to this episode to discover the movies that inspired her to continue pursuing her science degree, sparked her interest to begin her film criticism journey and the one that pushed her to provide her much-needed Latinx lens in the industry.    Read the blog here -*-*-*- Follow Rosa! Follow Rosa on Twitter Follow Rosa on Instagram Follow Rosa on Letterboxd Listen to Latinx Lens Follow Latinx Lens on Instagram Follow Latinx Lens on Twitter Support Latinx Lens on Patreon Email Latinx Lens Check out Rosa's reviews on Rotten Tomatoes   Continue the conversation Website Instagram LinkedIn Check out our podcast services Advertise with Ellas Media Subscribe to our Newsletter Support Ellas on Buy Me a Coffee Our podcast theme song is from Sro Our music is from Epidemic Sound, start your free trial

PODSHIP EARTH
Latino Outdoors

PODSHIP EARTH

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 34:04


Our nation is becoming more diverse thanks to growth among Latinx, Asian and multiracial Americans. Diversity is our nation's single greatest strength. Nowhere is this more true than in California where the Latinx community is now the largest racial or ethnic group in the Golden State - representing 39% of the population. And yet, if you go to a national park or recreation area, the vast majority of visitors are white. Rather than get derailed by ridiculous racist tropes, like people of color don't like the outdoors, José González started Latino Outdoors as a way of meeting communities, families and individuals where they're at.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Insightful Babes Podcast
Leading Next Gen of Latinx Content Creators with JP Dominguez

Insightful Babes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 42:50


J.P. Dominguez is a passionate advocate for the success of young Latinos and for the use of technology and social media to share ideas. He graduated from Pepperdine University in 2010 with a bachelor's degree in Political Science and recently received his juris doctorate degree in law from the University of West Los Angeles. As the son of two immigrant parents, J.P. feels it is important to share with others the sacrifices our parents made and to help each other advance and find success. In 2012, J.P. launched Hazlo Media, a digital media company that amplifies brands and builds online audiences for businesses, media networks, and non-profits in the Latino community. The content created by Hazlo Media for radio, television, and digital media clients has been seen by millions. In 2016, J.P. worked with Univision news, providing opinion commentary during the 2016 Presidential Election. His political reaction videos amassed more than 50 million views during that election cycle. JP has a passion for bringing to life the stories of change-makers in the Latino community. In 2018, he began his podcast, Champions for Change, which profiles successful young Latinos who share insights into their journeys and how they themselves reached success. Recently, Hazlo Media has successfully launched its first digital online show called Outside the Box. A rapid fire opinion analysis show where 3 young Latino thought leaders analyze the latest breaking news and trends in our community. The weekly show has amassed over 600,000 views in 14 episodes during 1 year. OTB SHOW: https://www.instagram.com/otbshow/ www.facebook.com/otbshowtv Connect with J.P. Dominguez: https://www.instagram.com/jpdominguez/ --------- Connect with us the Insightful Babes: Conéctate con nosotras Las Insightful Babes: Email: insightfulbabescontact@gmail.com Website: https://www.weareinsightfulbabes.com www.instagram.com/insightfulbabes/ linktr.ee/Insightfulbabes Host: Maria Garibay - https://www.instagram.com/mariagaribay_/ Host: Diana Contreras - https://www.instagram.com/iammissdiana/

Hardball with Chris Matthews
Rep. Adam Schiff on Jan. 6 select committee addressing Steve Bannon defying subpoena

Hardball with Chris Matthews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 44:22


Joy Reid leads this episode of The ReidOut addressing an academic freedom fight of Texas-sized proportions: the educators on all levels under attack from many on the right. Plus, on Tuesday the Jan. 6 select committee will hold a vote to refer Steve Bannon for criminal charges of contempt, after Bannon refused to comply with their subpoena on Thursday. Rep. Adam Schiff joins The ReidOut to discuss. Then, we explore workers throughout the country unionizing and going on strike to make their voices heard. Next, Julián Castro and Joaquin Castro join us to share their American success story, as we celebrate Latinx achievement on the final day of National Hispanic Heritage Month. All this and much more in this this edition of The ReidOut on MSNBC.

Latinx On The Rise
Somos Latinx | Latinos | Latines with Silvia Foster Frau

Latinx On The Rise

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 42:02


Silvia Foster-Frau is a reporter for the Washington Post and we spoke about the complexity behind being a Latinx-American. Hispanic Heritage Month falls between two months, it's almost symbolic for the way most of us feel, "Ni de aquí, ni de alla." We are stuck in the in between of not being American enough to be American and not being Latinx enough to be Latinx. As Edward James Olmos said, "it's exhausting!" The amount of gatekeeping Latinx have to deal with throughout their life puts a heavy burden of limitations on us. From people with Latinx heritage who do not speak Spanish seen as less than, to people who cannot speak English also seen as less than. We are in a sliding scale of identity. All of these topics are explored in Silvia Foster-Frau and Rachel Hatzipanagos' Washington Post Article, Somos Latinos. Read it here: https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/interactive/2021/hispanic-heritage-month-2021/And thanks to On The Rise Media for this production:https://www.instagram.com/_ontherisem...​Follow me on Instagram | https://www.instagram.com/latinxontherise/Twitter | https://twitter.com/LatinxOnTheRiseYoutube | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdE7h1oL4Gs0RLoRlGAuX5wFollow Silvia on Twitter | https://twitter.com/SilviaElenaFF

LatinxAmerica's podcast
Cheryl Campos Talks About VCFamilia and Building a Community of Latinx Investors

LatinxAmerica's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 18:49


Cheryl Campos Talks About VCFamilia and Building a Community of Latinx Investors VCFamilia founding member Cheryl Campos talks about the future of the organization and how others can join and become active members.  VCFamilia is a community of 200+ Latinx investors supporting current & emerging VCs + founders - posting venture jobs, opportunities, and events.This is a second interview with Cheryl where we talk about her career advancement as an investor and other exciting opportunities in the pipeline for her and for the VCFamilia community.   https://www.vcfamilia.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/cherylcampos/

Let's Go Racing Family Podcast

Dare we say...another jam-packed episode. We have a lot to cover in this week's episode. Starting with life happenings (highs and lows) for our Let's Go Racing Family and how it impacted how we experienced racing the past 3 weeks. We discuss the Round of 12 (Las Vegas Motor Speedway, Talladega Superspeedway, and Charlotte Motor Speedway) and preview the Round of 8.   This episode is being released on the last day of National Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 - October 15), which celebrates the achievements and contributions of Hispanic and Latinx culture in America. To commemorate this month one last time, we interviewed NASCAR Marketing Communications Manager, Marielkis Salazar, who focuses her work on multicultural. Why is representation so important? Listen to learn more.  (01:09) Life Happens - our family dealt with highs and lows, the past 3 weeks and we discuss how we experienced NASCAR racing during this time with #RaceRecaps of South Point 400, YellaWood 500, and Bank of America Roval 400.  (05:32) How we found out about Bubba Wallace's historic race win at Talladega...not the way we would have drawn it up...but exciting nonetheless  (19:16) Listening to the Roval 400 on the radio - a unique way to listen to racing, with more racing fireworks between Kevin Harvick and Chase Elliott (33:16) Where is the NASCAR Cup Series going next week?  (34:42) Let's Go Racing Family Picks of the Week (#RacePicks): Autotrader EchoPark 500 at2 Texas Motor Speedway (October 17th)  (37:39) #6DegreesofNASCAR - Sebas connects Daniel Craig to NASCAR in less than 6 degrees of separation (40:35) National #HispanicHeritageMonth - we interview NASCAR Communications Manager, Marielkis Salazar to talk about why it's important for NASCAR to celebrate and recognize Hispanic/Latinx Culture Don't forget to send us your questions or comments: Letsgoracingfamily@gmail.com  Social Media: #LetsGoRacingFamilyPodcast #NASCARpodcast #FamilyPodcast  #LetsGoRacingFamily #RacingPodcast #RacingThroughLife #RacePicks #6DegreesofNASCAR #IamNASCAR #NASCAR #HispanicHeritageMonth Follow us on your favorite social media platforms:   - Facebook:  @LetsGoRacingFamily   - Instagram: @LetsGoRacingFamily  - Twitter: @LetsGoRacingFam  - TikTok: @LetsGoRacingFamily

Off Topic/On Politics
Where the NYC mayoral election stands

Off Topic/On Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 29:17


As Eric Adams and Curtis Sliwa hit the campaign trail in the final weeks before Election Day, NY1's Zack Fink, Juan Manuel Benítez and Bob Hardt analyze the state of the race and weigh in on what Sliwa, the Republican nominee, needs to do to improve his chances in a heavily Democratic city. They also spend some time talking about Latino politics. The community now represents almost 30% of the city's population, but a Latino candidate has never been elected to citywide office. Is it just a matter of time? Or is ideology more important than ethnic identity when it comes to such a diverse community?

TransLash Podcast with Imara Jones
Latinx Heritage Month

TransLash Podcast with Imara Jones

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 46:34


Host Imara Jones sits down to discuss the importance of Latinx trans identities in the fight for transgender rights overall with Jennicet Gutiérrez, National Organizer at La: Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement and Joela Rivera, Co-Founder of Stonewall Protests. For our TransJoy segment we revisit the vital of work of Trans Queer Pueblo in Arizona.With anti-trans violence and political backlash at all-time highs, award-winning journalist Imara Jones hosts this podcast where trans people and allies talk back about what matters most and discuss how to create a fairer world for all. Follow our guests on social media!Dagoberto Bailon: @dagoduagin (Instagram) @dagobertobailon (Twitter)Trans Queer Pueblo: @tqpueblo (Instagram) @tqpueblo (Twitter)Jennicet Gutiérrez: @jennicetguti (Instagram) @jennicetg (Twitter)Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement: @familiatqlm (Instagram) @familiatqlm (Twitter) Joela Rivera: @joelariveraaa (Instagram) TransLash Podcast is produced by Translash Media by Futuro Studios. Translash Team: Imara Jones, Oliver-Ash Kleine, Montana Thomas, and Yannick Eike Mirko. Our intern is Mirana Munson-Burke. Alexander Charles Adams does the sound editing for our show.Digital strategy by Daniela Capistrano. Music: Ben Draghi and also courtesy of ZZK records. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Hyphenated with Joanna Hausmann and Jenny Lorenzo
Why Making Friends As Adults Is So Hard

Hyphenated with Joanna Hausmann and Jenny Lorenzo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 31:36


Jenny and Joanna try to answer a listener's question about how to make new friends, discuss the differences between childhood and adult friendships, as well as how to avoid, and let go of, toxic people in your life.       

Hardball with Chris Matthews
Rep. Dean calls on Mark Meadows "to say absolutely everything he knows" on Jan. 6

Hardball with Chris Matthews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 44:21


Joy Reid leads this episode of The ReidOut with the apparent renewed effort by many on the American right to make sure Covid-19 is here to stay. Then, the House select committee on Jan. 6 today issued a new subpoena for records and testimony from one of the most controversial figures in Donald Trump's effort to steal the election and subvert our democracy: Jeffrey Clark, the former Justice Department official and Trump loyalist who tried to nullify the election results in Georgia and other states. Rep. Madeleine Dean joins The ReidOut to discuss. Plus, recent decisions by the Supreme Court and how they were made are putting the conservative majority on the defensive as the nation's highest court gets called out for playing politics. Finally, in "The Absolute Worst," Joy critiques Texas for passing a proposed map increasing the number of majority-White districts while decreasing Latinx- and Black-majority districts, despite people of color making up 95% of its population growth for a decade. All this and much more in this edition of The ReidOut on MSNBC.

Tamarindo
Discovering Your Energy Chupacabras

Tamarindo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 29:17


Tamarindo is taking a week off to recharge our pilas. So we invite you to revisit this episode to help you uncover your energy chupacabras and ways to reduce stress.  This first aired fall  2019, so you'll hear us talk about the Democratic debates...ah...remember when the only pandemic we had to worry about was Tr*mp? We learn why stress is not ALL bad but why it's also more harmful than we think. We recognize that many of the stressors BIPOC folks face, like financial stress or discrimination,  are not ones we can easily change without policy changes. That said, there are a few things we can do to start changing our relationship with stress like changing our mindset and discovering our #energychupacabras and what to do about them. We include a technique used by the stress management company @Baskandbeing You can learn more about them here https://baskandbeing.com/ Looking for Your Next Career Challenge? Thank you to Azul.org for supporting this episode. Azul is Latinx-led, and Latinx-serving organizations focused on ocean stewardship. They're doing great work and are growing their team with three roles that can be done fully remote! If you're interested, email them: info@azul.org Azul is looking to fill 3 positions in total: The Bilingual Communications Manager (Spanish) Chief of Staff and  Development Officer We will be back with a brand new episode October 20th. Gracias Amiguis y que descansen!   Tamarindo podcast is the Latinx show where hosts discuss politics, pop culture, and how to balance it all con calma, hosted by Brenda Gonzalez and Ana Sheila Victorino. Join us as we delve into discussions on culture, politics, identity, representation, and life!    Brenda and  Ana Sheila are executive producers of Tamarindo podcast with production support by Mitzi Hernández and Augusto Martinez, of Sonoro Media. Jeff Ricards provides original music. If you want to support our work, please rate and review our show here. You can get in touch with us at www.tamarindopodcast.com     Follow Tamarindo on twitter @tamarindocast or on Instagram @Tamarindopodcast   Follow Brenda on twitter at @BrendaRicards   Follow AnaSheila on instagram @la_anasheila and twitter @Shelli1228  

Folger Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare Unlimited
Shakespeare in Latinx Communities, with José Cruz González and David Lozano

Folger Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare Unlimited

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 36:13


Theater artists José Cruz González and David Lozano join us in this episode. Their conversation “On Making Shakespeare Relevant to Latinx Communities” appears in the new book Shakespeare and Latinidad. González and Lozano talk with Barbara Bogaev about adapting and translating Shakespeare, performing and directing it in ways that make it relevant to Latinx audiences, and whether the Bard has a place at theater companies working to carve out a space for Latinx voices. José Cruz González received the NEA Directing Fellowship in 1985 and the 2010 Kennedy Center National Teaching Artist Grant. His plays include American Mariachi, Sunsets & Margaritas, and The Astronaut Farmworker. He's also a professor of Theatre Arts at Cal State Los Angeles. David Lozano is Executive Artistic Director of Cara Mía Theatre in Dallas. In 2014, he was recognized by The Dallas Observer as one of six “Masterminds of Arts & Culture.” He co-wrote and directed Deferred Action and Crystal City 1969, which was named the “Best New Play of 2009” by The Dallas Morning News. Their chapter on “On Making Shakespeare Relevant to Latinx Communities” appears in Shakespeare and Latinidad, a collection of essays in the field of Latinx theatre, edited by Carla Della Gatta and Trevor Boffone. Shakespeare and Latinidad was published by Edinburgh University Press in June 2021. From the Shakespeare Unlimited podcast. Published October 12, 2021. © Folger Shakespeare Library. All rights reserved. This podcast episode, “I Understand Thee and Can Speak Thy Tongue,” was produced by Richard Paul. Garland Scott is the associate producer. It was edited by Gail Kern Paster. Ben Lauer is the web producer. Leonor Fernandez edits a transcript of every episode, available at folger.edu. We had technical help on this episode from Andrew Feliciano & Evan Marquart at Voice Trax West in Studio City, California, and Todd Cotham and Aaron Carpenter at fifty50studios in Dallas.

Smoke Screen: Fake Priest
Coming Soon: The Sellout

Smoke Screen: Fake Priest

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 3:10


Jose Huizar grew up in Boyle Heights – a working-class Latinx neighborhood in L.A. Eventually, he became their councilperson. And, for the most part, people trusted Huizar... until the day the FBI raided his home and offices, looking for evidence of corruption. The Feds would go on to say that Huizar led a criminal enterprise based in city hall. He stands accused of taking bribes from luxury developers as his constituents were displaced from their homes. This season of Smoke Screen is a collaboration with grassroots media organization L.A. TACO. In this 9-part investigative series, journalist and host Mariah Castañeda investigates how Huizar got the power to do what he did, and how the community that raised him paid the price. "The Sellout" drops October 26th. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Latino USA
From Locatora Radio: Faketinas

Latino USA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 44:33


Throughout the year, Latino USA will begin to feature podcasts from independent Latino and Latina creators as a way to shine a light on the work they do by passing the mic on to them. The first show we are featuring on our feed is Locatora Radio—an independent podcast based out of Los Angeles that blends humor, pop culture analysis and interviews with artists to engage listeners in nuanced discussions about feminism, sexual wellness, arts and culture for a modern Latinx audience. In this episode of Locatora, hosts Mala and Diosa dive into the topic of “Faketinas,” or a person without roots in Latin America who masquerades as Latinx in order to obtain jobs, scholarships, titles and opportunities meant for people of Latin American descent.

The Breakfast Club
Introducing: Exactly Amara - Afro Latinidad & Growing up in the Latinx generation

The Breakfast Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 43:50


Hey, Breakfast Club fans! Since you love this podcast, we think you might like this one as well. On Exactly Amara, reality star, model, singer and overall boss lady, Amara La Negra gets personal on just about everything! She discusses dating, sex, relationships, social media, plastic surgery, body positivity and everything in between! About this Episode: On her very first episode of Exactly Amara, Amara La Negra discusses the importance of representation, what it was like growing up and understanding her Afro Latinidad, and how she continues to advocate for Latinos. Amara, along with her co-host Stevey Newnez share their personal stories . They talk about the lack of Afro-Latino representation in the entertainment industry, and address the missed opportunity a film like In The Heights had to create roles and a true-to-life depiction of communities like Washington Heights. For more episodes go to: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/1119-exactly-amara-84301498/ Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com