Podcasts about Minor

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 3,354PODCASTS
  • 6,050EPISODES
  • 35mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 16, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Minor

Show all podcasts related to minor

Latest podcast episodes about Minor

The Way Community Church
More Than Minor - Jonah

The Way Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 38:24


October 10, 2021 Pastor Tim Broton

The Way Community Church
More Than Minor - Joel

The Way Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 40:31


October 3, 2021 Pastor Tim Broton

The Way Community Church
More Than Minor - Hosea

The Way Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 42:09


September 26, 2021 Pastor Tim Broton

The Tom and Curley Show
Hour 1: Philly has become the first big city to ban minor traffic stops said to criminalize ‘driving while Black'

The Tom and Curley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 32:50


Veteran Seattle firefighter empties locker after city denies vaccine exemption - AUDIO  // Philly has become the first big city to ban minor traffic stops said to criminalize ‘driving while Black' // Seattle Kraken Fans Officially Initiated into the NHL After Violent Brawl with Nashville Predators Crowd - AUDIO  // Adele Wrote Her Latest Album ‘30' During a Divorce. Others Have Chronicled Breakups in Song. - AUDIO // Why Millennials and Gen Z Hate Boomers, and What To Do About It. - AUDIO  // Using Your House for a Movie or TV Set Can Be Lucrative but Also Disruptive   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Conservative Circus w/ James T. Harris
The Left Goes After Rogan But Praises Couric. Inflation Is Seen Has A Minor Setback For Biden. Shatner and Bezos Attacked For Wasting Money In Space.

The Conservative Circus w/ James T. Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 123:21


The Left has their eye on Joe Rogan and must go after his beliefs. Meanwhile Katie Couric deliberately changed the words of Ruth Bader Ginsburg! Inflation is still on the rise but it is all part of Biden's plan! William Shatner and Jeff Bezos attacked for venturing into space rather than spending Earth money.

Learn Jazz Standards Podcast
Quick Win: Tasty Minor Bebop Altered Lick

Learn Jazz Standards Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 10:06


Today I'm going to show you a tasty jazz lick that's going to make you sound like a bebop pro over minor 2-5-1 chord progressions. Listen to episode 291 In this episode: 1. What's a minor 2-5-1 2. How to get that bebop sound 3. What a Minor Bebop Altered Lick sounds like 4. What makes this lick so great 5. What are target notes 6. Importance of 3rds 7. Importance of 7ths 8. The altered notes 9. Tips for learning the altered lick Important Links 1. Subscribe to the Podcast - Apple Podcasts - Spotify 2. Learn Jazz Standards the Smart Way 3. LJS Inner Circle Membership

Ellissinema Podcast
Episode 177: The Suspicious Death of a Minor (Morte Sospetta Di Una Minorenne) - Arrow Video release

Ellissinema Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 21:05


Part III and final installment in the Sergio Martino Giallo Collection. The final of Martino's six gialli, The Suspicious Death of a Minor. Starring Claudio Cassinelli, Adolfo Caruso, Massimo Girotti, Mel Ferrer, Lia Tanzi, Patrizia Castaldi, and more. Produced by Luciano Martino. Music by Luciano Michelini. Screenplay by Ernesto Gastaldi and Sergio Martino. Directed by Sergio Martino.

Number One With A Bullet
1968 - "Fire" by The Crazy World of Arthur Brown

Number One With A Bullet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 60:19


On another (yes, another) installment of Number Two With A Bullet, Andrew and Dan dive headlong into the wacky embarrassing world of British psychedelic rock. They learn about the dangers of drugs, fire, and hanging out with Pete Townshend. Also, they talk about the Bond movie. Minor spoilers ensue.

Clearer Thinking with Spencer Greenberg
Major and minor scales of consciousness (with Andrés Gomez Emilsson)

Clearer Thinking with Spencer Greenberg

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 78:14


Should pleasure and pain be measured on logarithmic scales? How might such a scale affect utilitarian calculations? How do harmonic energy waves in the brain correspond to states of (or intensities of) consciousness? What sorts of conclusions can we draw about brain states given the resolutions and sampling rates of tools like fMRI, EEG, and MEG? What is the symmetry theory of homeostatic regulation, and how does it connect to pleasure and pain? Are uncomfortable or confused mental states computationally useful to us? To what extent can the concepts of musical consonance and dissonance map onto energy states in the brain? Andrés Gomez Emilsson has a Master's Degree in Psychology with an emphasis in computational models from Stanford and a professional background in graph theory, statistics, and affective science. Andrés was also the co-founder of the Stanford Transhumanist Association and first place winner of the Norway Math Olympiad. His work at QRI ranges from algorithm design, to psychedelic theory, to neurotechnology development, to mapping and studying the computational properties of consciousness. Andrés blogs at qualiacomputing.com.

Paddle N' Fin
S4E270 Bass, Kayak, & Beers- Not Your Average Rookie. Special Guest Ewing Minor.

Paddle N' Fin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 47:37


We continue with our Angler Spotlight segments heading into the end of the season and on this episode we got the Ewing Minor. His 2021 debut season for the Hobie B.O.S. is the stuff most of us can only dream of. With 2 second place finishes and one dominating performance at Lake Hartwell, Ewing sits in the pole position for the AOY race. Will the pressure of having the biggest name in the sports nipping at his heel finally get the young rookie? Waypoint TV- https://waypointtv.com Patreon-https://www.patreon.com/paddlenfin Podcast & Website- www.paddlenfin.com YouTube- https://www.youtube.com/paddlenfin Email- paddlenfin@gmail.com Social Media- @paddlenfin Yak Gadget- www.yakgadget.com Pelican Professional- www.pelican.com Rocktown paddlesports - rocktownadventures.com JigMasters Jigs- https://jigmasters.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S25E17 - How to be a Leader Across Language and Cultural Barriers, with Mark Delaney

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 29:10


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonathanhwestover/) talks with Mark Delaney about how to be a leader across language and cultural barriers. See the video here: https://youtu.be/FnfUYPQzc-k.  Mark Delaney (https://www.linkedin.com/in/markbdelaney/) graduated from the University of Maryland with a BA in English and Minor in Leadership Studies. Upon graduating, he commisisoned as an officer in the US Army. Over the course of three deployments, he led cross-functional teams doing humanitarian work in Syria, developed readiness training for bases in Iraq, and advised senior officers in the Saudi military.  After 8 years in the Army Mark left the military to pursue an entrepreneurial path. Experiencing the challenges of entering back into civilian life, he started a website and podcast to help other veterans navigate the difficult journey. Currently, he is working on his MBA at the University of Virginia Darden School of Business while developing a software program to improve how veterans re-enter civilian life.    Check out Dr. Westover's new book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/bluerthanindigo.  Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/leadershipalchemy.  Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/hci-magazine.  Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/performance_management_podcasts/  Ranked #6 Workplace Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/workplace_podcasts/  Ranked #7 HR Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/hr_podcasts/  Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/talent_management_podcasts/  Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/personal_development_podcasts/  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/leadership_podcasts/

New Books in Literature
Sarah Minor, "Slim Confessions: The Universe as a Spider or Spit" (Noemi Press, 2021)

New Books in Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 57:31


Today I interview Sarah Minor, a brilliant and exciting author and artist. Minor has written a new book that looks into—in fact, I might even say sinks us or maybe slathers us in—slime. And if that sounds more disgusting than appealing, that's one of the many wonders of slime that Minor reveals: yes, slime grosses us out and yet its grossness somehow comes curiously close to desire. Slime features in immensely popular genres our culture loves and loathes, like horror movies and pornography. Slime has its own online communities. Slime even comes from outer space and lands on the earth as "gelatinous meteors." Slime, once you start looking for it, shows up in spaces where we experience birth and death, where bodies connect and boundaries dissolve. Minor's book is called Slim Confessions: The Universe as a Spider or Spit (Noemi Press, 2021), which is a title that slimes together unexpected things, and I start our conversation by asking her about it. Here's my chat with the warm and wonderfully un-slimy Sarah Minor. Eric LeMay is on the creative writing faculty at Ohio University. He is the author of five books, most recently Remember Me. He can be reached at eric@ericlemay.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

New Books Network
Sarah Minor, "Slim Confessions: The Universe as a Spider or Spit" (Noemi Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 57:31


Today I interview Sarah Minor, a brilliant and exciting author and artist. Minor has written a new book that looks into—in fact, I might even say sinks us or maybe slathers us in—slime. And if that sounds more disgusting than appealing, that's one of the many wonders of slime that Minor reveals: yes, slime grosses us out and yet its grossness somehow comes curiously close to desire. Slime features in immensely popular genres our culture loves and loathes, like horror movies and pornography. Slime has its own online communities. Slime even comes from outer space and lands on the earth as "gelatinous meteors." Slime, once you start looking for it, shows up in spaces where we experience birth and death, where bodies connect and boundaries dissolve. Minor's book is called Slim Confessions: The Universe as a Spider or Spit (Noemi Press, 2021), which is a title that slimes together unexpected things, and I start our conversation by asking her about it. Here's my chat with the warm and wonderfully un-slimy Sarah Minor. Eric LeMay is on the creative writing faculty at Ohio University. He is the author of five books, most recently Remember Me. He can be reached at eric@ericlemay.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

SharePoint Maven Podcast
Major vs. Minor Versions in SharePoint Online

SharePoint Maven Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 17:53


In Episode # 78 of the SharePoint Maven podcast, I introduce you to the wonderful feature called Version History. Specifically, I explain the difference between Major and Minor versions as well as explain the various use cases for both. BLOG REFERENCES https://sharepointmaven.com/major-vs-minor-versions-in-sharepoint-online/ (Major vs. Minor Versions in SharePoint Online) NEED HELP? Want to confidently navigate SharePoint and Microsoft 365? https://academy.sharepointmaven.com/ (Enroll in my revamped On-Demand SharePoint and Microsoft 365 Academy) FREE RESOURCES Get access to https://sharepointmaven.com/ (free resources, live training & On-Demand courses), and get the help you need to properly set up and implement SharePoint TIPS IN YOUR INBOX https://sharepointmaven.com/newsletter-signup/ (Bi-Weekly newsletter) FOLLOW ME https://facebook.com/sharepointmaven (Facebook) https://www.instagram.com/sharepointmaven/ (Instagram) https://twitter.com/gregoryzelfond (Twitter) https://linkedin.com/company/sharepoint-maven (LinkedIn) https://www.pinterest.com/sharepointmaven (Pinterest) https://www.youtube.com/c/sharepointmaven (YouTube)

Sports As A Weapon Podcast
28 | Unionizing Minor League Baseball and MLB Postseason with Tipping Pitches

Sports As A Weapon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 83:15


It's October, which means postseason baseball! This week, Miguel had three guests on the podcast to talk playoff baseball and the topic of unionizing minor league baseball players. Miguel was excited to welcome Alex Bazeley and Bobby Wagner, who hosts one of our favorite podcasts, the Tipping Pitches Podcast (@tipping_pitches). Miguel was also joined on the podcast by comrade Justin Williams of the Redspin Sports Podcast. First, Miguel asked Bobby and Alex about their podcast and what inspired them to start it. Miguel also asked Bobby and Alex about their "unionize the minor leagues" t-shirts and the National Question of Baseball:  What would it look like to nationalize the national pastime?   Additionally, Miguel, Justin, Alex, and Bobby drive deep (into left field) and discuss unionizing minor league baseball players, the #FairBall protest, the upcoming labor negotiations between the MLB owners and MLPA, and predict if the players and MLBPA will strike for the first time since 1994-95. Lastly, they discuss the MLB postseason and weigh in on who they think will be awarded the MVP and Cy Young for the NL and AL. Note: Originally recorded on October 1, 2021. Unfortunately, you already know the Blue Jays and Mariners didn't make it to October, and the Cardinals and Yankees lost the wild card. But it was still a great episode, and I suggest you listen, trust me.   Miguel gives you his Molotov MVPs for episode 28, minor league right-handed Pitcher Kieran Lovegrove, and the Jersey Shore BlueClaws and Brooklyn Cyclones, minor league players. Finally, Miguel ends the podcast with another Chicana/o Sports History segment. This week, he highlights current Mexican and Chicano Major League Baseball Players playing this October in the Postseason.Miguel Garcia produced this episode. Sports As A Weapon is now part of the @Anticonquista Collective Network. Check out Anticonquista on YouTube and Instagram!Be sure to listen/subscribe to the Sports As A Weapon Podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, Deezer, or wherever you get your podcasts.Follow us on:Twitter: @sportsasaweaponFacebook: fb.com/sportsasaweaponpodcastInstagram: @sportsasaweaponpodcastVisit our website: www.sportsasaweapon.comLinks: Listen to Tipping Pitches on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Can a union fix this? Minor leaguers say poverty-level pay, poor housing are driving a 'mental health crisis.'(ESPN) Phillies, Mets minor leaguers protest pay by wearing #FairBall wristbands (The Athletic) Be mindful of why you're seeing leaks from MLB collective bargaining (Marc Normandin) Baseball's Predatory Loan Firms Give Us a New Lake Monster

The Opperman Report
Lauren Boebert Husband Indecent Exposure to Minor

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 74:33


The Opperman Report'
Lauren Boebert Husband Indecent Exposure to Minor

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 74:33


That Was Genius
Minor Lion-Based Surgery (Feats of Survival week) - That Was Genius Episode 125

That Was Genius

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 56:11


Well we nearly didn't make this one (Tom's mic broke). But we survived and we're back with an episode all about feats of survival! Tom's up first this week, with the parallel tales of H.M. Stanley and Dr David Livingstone, whose lives collided with the famous greeting, "Dr Livingstone, I presume"? Next, Sam's been looking at survival from a great number of feet, rather than feats, with a dive into high-altitude ballooning and space skydiving! Next week's episode is a patron exclusive all about security! Find it at patreon.com/thatwasgenius Subscribe and listen to us! Apple Music // Podbean // Overcast // Stitcher // TuneIn // Spotify Welcome to That Was Genius: Two blokes. An immature sense of humour. And 10,000 years of human civilisation. A weekly podcast looking at the weirder side of history. Join Sam Datta-Paulin (he likes history and lives in Britain) and Tom Berry (he also likes history and used to live in New Zealand but is now in the UK as well), for a weekly reflection on the bold, the brilliant... And the downright strange. From bizarre events and stories to equally odd inventions, barely a day goes by without something incredible (or incredibly stupid) happening around the world. We upload new episodes every Wednesday night/Thursday morning (UK time). Check us out on Facebook (and our Facebook group for memes and fun), Instagram, Twitter and via our website, and please do subscribe to us and leave us a review if you like what you hear!

Your Path to Nonprofit Leadership
126: Finding the Resources You Need as a Nonprofit Leader (Stephanie Minor)

Your Path to Nonprofit Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 50:22


126: Finding the Resources You Need as a Nonprofit Leader (Stephanie Minor)SUMMARYThe best nonprofit leaders embrace the concept of life-long learning because they know they must stay on top of the issues that face their organization and the sector in which it operates.  Managing issues of fundraising and philanthropy, human resources, mental health, diversity, equity & inclusion, strategic planning, finance, human resources and countless other topics can easily become overwhelming for a nonprofit leader. Fortunately, there are resources available to help you, and in episode #126 of the Path Podcast, Stephanie Minor offers a gold mine of ideas and specific advice about where to find them. Stephanie works with hundreds of nonprofit leaders through her NPO Centric organization, and has taken the time to understand the challenges you are likely facing right now, and has proactively developed resources to help.ABOUT STEPHANIEStephanie Minor is a veteran fundraising professional, nonprofit executive, and strategic development coach whose proven fundraising strategies have won big grants and gifts for important and impactful nonprofit causes. She joined NPO Centric as its Director in 2019, where she advances the work of nonprofits through capacity building and technical assistance. Stephanie started her professional career as a communicator and social media strategist after earning a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Cal State San Bernardino. Through her own firm, Premiere Designs, LLC, she planned, developed, and executed successful integrated social media and website content strategies for a variety of clients, including organizations in the nonprofit sector. In 2015, she was offered an opportunity to serve on the staff of Martha's Village & Kitchen, one of the largest providers of homeless services in the Coachella Valley and Riverside County. As the director of development, she launched a successful $5 million capital campaign, and became the executive vice president of the organization. She also won the “Best Pitch” award through the RAP Foundation's 2018 Desert Fast Pitch competition for nonprofits. Through her powerful 3-minute pitch about the plight of homeless children in California, she was awarded a donation of $20,000 toward the creation of a space in the residential unit of Martha's Village & Kitchen exclusively for homeless children. EPISODE TOPICS & RESOURCES Erik Hanberg's book The Little Book of BoardsLearn more about NPO Centric and how it can help your nonprofit leadershipReady for a Mastermind?  Apply Today!

Greater Than Code
253: Reframing the Value of Open Source with Jen Weber

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 54:25


00:47 - Jen's Superpower: Being Optimistic * Recognizing Negative Loops * Intentionality & Prioritization * Preventing Security Vulnerabilities 10:13 - Working On Open-Source Projects vs Commercial Software/Products * Gathering Feedback (RFCs) * Baby Steps = Big Impact 12:57 - Major vs Minor Releases * Semantic Versioning * Deprecation Warnings * Advanced Notice * Incremental Rollouts 18:45 - RFC / Feedback Processes * Dealing with Contradictory Feedback * Reaching Consensus * Visionary Leadership * Additions 23:25 - The Ember Core Team (https://emberjs.com/teams/) * ~30 People * Funding * LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/) (Corporate Sponsorship) * Consultants & Consultancies * Volunteers 26:31 - Doing Open Source Better * Sponsor Company (Time) * Knowledge Sharing * Framing Work As How It Values Contributors * Reframing How We Think About Open Source Sustainability (i.e. Company-Wide Open Source Work Days) * Frame Value to Company * Frame Value to Users * Frame Value to Engineering Teams * Attitude Shifts 39:56 - Participation Encouragement & Engagement Tips * Use The Buddy System * Having Well-Scoped Issues * Increasing Levels of Challenge (Subtle Cheerleading) * Help People Spin Up Quickly 46:00 - Widening the Pool of Participants * Being Easy to Reach * Social Media Activity * Working In The Open 47:36 - UX-Driven Design (User Experience-Driven Design) Reflections: Damien: Perspective of those impacted. Sponsors, users, etc. Arty: What it's like to work on a big open source project and the challenges we face. Jen: Exploring small-project lifecycles. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: ARTY: Hi, everyone and welcome to Episode 253 of Greater Than Code. I am Artemis Starr and I am here with my fabulous co-host, Damien Burke. DAMIEN: And we are here with our fabulous guest, Jen Weber. Jen Weber is a member of the Ember.js core team and is a senior software engineer at ActBlue Technical Services. Jen loves open source, rapid prototyping, and making tech a more welcoming industry. Jen, thank you so much for being here. Welcome to the show. JEN: Thank you so much for having me. DAMIEN: So you should have gotten an email preparing you for the first and most difficult part of every appearance on Greater Than Code. Are you ready for this? JEN: I am. 
DAMIEN: What is your superpower and how did you acquire it? JEN: All right. So I did get that email and I've been thinking about those for the last couple of days. I think my superpower is being able to imagine the ways that things can go well. DAMIEN: Wow. That's very special. JEN: Thank you. DAMIEN: How did you acquire that? JEN: So I used to be very good at imagining all of the ways that things can go badly. Those are still the patterns that my mind walks whenever I'm confronted with a challenge, but someone gave me some advice. I was recounting to them all of the ways that things could go badly, they were like, “What would it look like if things went well?” I've been trying to build that as a muscle and a skill anytime I'm working on a new project, or something hasn't gone well, something's already gone badly, and I'm trying to figure out what to do next. I found that helped me open up to more creative thinking. ARTY: I really think that is a superpower and in order for things to go well, for us to manifest good things toward a good direction, we have to be able to see the steps to get there, imagine ourselves walking in that direction to be able to do it. And if we're caught in a loop of worrying about all the things that are going to go wrong, anticipating those things going wrong, then it's like we're going to be waiting for him and doing things that help bring those things that we don't want into being. So if you find yourself in this mode, it sounds like this is something that you struggled with and learned this adaptive skill to break out of this pattern. So what kind of things do you do? Like, do you tell yourself things or ask yourself certain questions, or how do you snap out of that mode and get to a better place where you're thinking about things in a positive frame? JEN: Sure. I think for me, the first step is just recognizing when I'm in that negative loop and accepting that it's my first reaction, but that doesn't need to be my conclusion to my thought process. If I'm working on let's say, there's a real-world challenge. Just to give an example as part of my work on the Ember core team, I might think about how do I engage the community and announce that there's going to be this new version of Ember? If I imagine things going badly, I imagine like, “O, wow, nobody even retweets it a single time,” and if I imagine things going well, I think like, “Wow, it's this big moment in tech.” And if it was a big moment in tech, what would have the involved people done to get to that successful end point and trying to work backwards from that to connect the dots. It takes some intentionality, it takes having enough rest, it takes not being over-caffeinated to be able to unlock that kind of thinking. DAMIEN: But it sounds so powerful, especially as an engineer, or as an advocate. It's like because we're in the role of making things into what we want them to be, which is things going well, right? JEN: Yeah, and it's a little different than a wishful thinking, I would say, because you're still thinking in order for things to go, well, you have to overcome challenges, you have to solve problems, you have to prioritize, there's going to be difficult moments. So you're not just dreaming that this good feature is going to come into existence, but actually figuring out what are the nuts and bolts, and pieces, like, what are the ingredients to that recipe? When we think and reflect on that, how can we take those ingredients and apply them to right now to get where we want to go? ARTY: So you take that vision and then work backwards and translate that to actual action. These are things that we can do right now to walk the path of getting where we want to go. JEN: Mm hm, and it might take you somewhere totally different direction. It might be very different by the time you're done. But usually, you can figure out a few things here and there that are steps in the right direction, and the right direction could be one of many different directions. ARTY: Do you find yourself ever getting disappointed that things don't go the way you envisioned? JEN: Oh yeah, for sure. [laughter] Yeah, and I think that's a little bit part of the rollercoaster of being involved in software. Like every single day is a series of things going a little different than you thought they would. You read the code; you think it's going to go a certain way. You're wrong; you change your plan. You have this idea of a direction you're going to go, you've thought about what are the successful steps to get there, and then you end up in the wrong corner and you have to go back to the drawing board and surviving those cycles is just part of what we do. ARTY: So does that superpower help you escape those feelings of disappointment then? JEN: Oh yeah, I think so because not that I have some way to see the future, but more that I have tools for helping to figure out what my next step could be. ARTY: So then you're always focused back on action. JEN: Mm hm. ARTY: And how can I take what I learned and this vision of what a good direction would be, taking these new data points and things into account, and then reimagine and translating that back into action. JEN: Yeah. ARTY: I think that qualifies as a superpower. DAMIEN: Yeah, I think about it, I guess because I was writing code this morning, and so often, when you're writing – when I'm writing code at least, it's like oh, the phrase was “defensive programming” from a long time ago. How can this go wrong? What happens if this is nil? What happens if some evil guy in a black hat comes in and tries to do something here? And what I've had to learn and still need to remind myself of is the good case. What is it that we're doing good for our users, or whoever else the code touches? What are they trying to accomplish and what experience are we trying to create for them? And so, both, as an engineer and a product manager, just being able to ask that question and see an answer on a small scale on a feature in stories, super important. JEN: Yeah, and even if you're thinking of that adversarial aspect where it's like, you're trying to think through all of the security risks that are involved in developing some software, you can still use this thinking to your advantage. What would a successful future be where somebody tries to exploit that vulnerability and they fail? You've got them. What are the things you built? What are the strategies and habits that that team had? What is the monitoring and infrastructure that resulted in successfully preventing this, or that problem from occurring? DAMIEN: It's not only a useful strategy and also, feels really good. JEN: Mm hm. DAMIEN: That's great. ARTY: I like that, though just thinking from a standpoint of just vulnerability, or even a case where things go “wrong,” in the case that you do have somebody hacking your system, or trying to exploit some vulnerability, what's the logging and information infrastructure? What does that story look like where even though these things are happening, we're prepared, we have the right things in place to give us visibility into what's going on, and be able to catch it and address it quickly. Like what do all those things look like such that we're ready to go and can still have a success story, even in the case of these challenges that come up? DAMIEN: That sounds connected to something, I think we want to talk about today, which is what goes well when you get a major library upgrade, what does that look like? JEN: Yeah. I've been thinking about this a lot lately; informed by two things. So one is that I'm involved in an Ember, which is a frontend JavaScript framework, and we're getting ready to do a 4.0 major release. So going through all of those exercises to have preparedness all comes back to how do we do this, or what do our users need, what are the resources that are missing? That's one thing on my mind and the other is that I've recently updated some dependencies in the apps that I work in and had a hard time. What can I learn for myself about what to do differently? What can I learn that might be takeaways for library maintainers? What can I share with my coworkers and my collaborators to make this easier next time? ARTY: What's it like working on an open source project and how does that feel different? What are the different aspects of that from working on a commercial product versus something in the open source community? JEN: There's a couple of pieces. The biggest one is that when you're working in your own code base, you have at least a fuzzy picture of what the product is, what the constraints are, how many users there are, and the things that the developers on your team generally know and the things that they don't know. You have all this information that would help you inform how do I roll out some new, big feature, or something like that. When you're working at open source, your universe of possible products, developers, and users is huge. Like, you could never write down a list of all the ways that somebody is going to be using that software and so, it becomes really different than having a set of well-defined products requirements; we want to get from point A to point B. It's like, we need to give everybody a path forward even though they're using this tool in all these different ways. To do that, a lot of effort goes into gathering feedback from other people in the community. So we use a process called RFCs, or Requests for Comments where someone says, “Hey, I think this would be a good feature. Hey, I think this thing should be removed, or deprecated,” and you have to get feedback. Because we can't imagine all the ways ourselves that someone could use this feature, or tool and then once there's consensus amongst the core team, then something can move forward. But everything goes through a lot of iteration as part of that process. So the overall progress can sometimes feel slow because you have to think through all of this extra weight—the weight of depending on thousands and thousands of developers and billions of users on you to make the right decision. It means you can't just “Oh, let's just merge this breaking change and I'll make this breaking change and I'll just post on Slack to everybody like, ‘Hey, watch out. I just changed this one thing. I documented it here. Good luck.'” You can't really quite pull that lever in the same way, but when you do have a step forward, it's a step forward for all of these apps, for all of these projects, for all of their users and so, little baby steps can still translate into really big impact. ARTY: So when you have something that's a major release in that context, like a major release of Ember versus a minor release. How are those different? What kind of things do you do in major releases? JEN: Yeah, that's a good question. So I'll just provide a little bit of background information on this vocabulary that we're using for anyone who's listening in. A lot of projects follow semantic versioning, which is a set of rules that a lot of projects agree to follow that if you ever see a version number that's like 4.2.1.—oftentimes, that's semantic versioning and action in the first number—is for major releases and a major release is one that has a breaking change. So that means that I make a change in that code base. I would expect that other people would have to change the code in their own apps and they would be forced to go through that—make that change—in order to upgrade to that version for the library I'm working on. Minor is usually used for features. Patch, the last one, is used for bug fixes and internal refactors, things like that. Not all projects follow in the same way. Some projects have time-based cycles where they say, “Oh, we do a major release every six months,” or something like that. But for us major releases are breaking changes and the things that are different about them is that we have to give people a path forward to get to the next version. That could include putting some deprecation warnings, any code that's going to get removed or change any API that are going to shift in the next major version. We want to let people know, with a little warning, if they're using those older syntaxes, or APIs, whatever's going to be removed. We also want to try to give a lot of advanced notice about what's going to change, or be removed via blog posts, things like having a help channel set up maybe that's just for those upgrades. When it's time to actually do the major release, we try to make it boring. This is something that I would like to see happen across the rest of the JavaScript ecosystem. It does seem to be catching on more, which is that when you do a major version release, all it does is it removes the things that need to be removed. You make your breaking changes and that's it, and then in follow-up releases is when you add in all the new features. So let's say, some API is just the old way of doing things. It doesn't match up with a new rendering engine, or something like that. You're going to want to remove the old thing and then incrementally work to roll out these big splashy, new, exciting features. So maybe your exciting release is actually going to be 4.1, or 4.2, or 4.3. This has a couple benefits. It lets your major releases be a little less risky because you're not just removing code and then adding new code at the same time. It lets people not be as overwhelmed like, “Oh, first I have to deal with all of these things that are removed, or changed and then now I also have to learn this whole new way of thinking about how to write my app using this tool.” It lets you take little baby steps towards doing things in a different way. DAMIEN: Does this mean, in an ideal scenario, that if you don't have any deprecation warnings—if you're taking care of all the deprecation warnings—then your major release can go – you can upgrade some next major version without a code change. JEN: Yeah, that's the dream. DAMIEN: It does sound like a dream. JEN: Yeah, and it's not always perfect, but it's an important pathway towards including more people and participating in upgrades, app maintenance, and creating sustainable code bases so you don't have to follow the Twitter, the blog post, and be checking the JavaScript subreddit just to keep up on with what's going on. You're not going to be surprised by big sweeping changes. So coming back to this experience I had with upgrading a different library recently, I was upgrading major Jest versions and was very surprised to see that there were a ton of breaking changes in a changelog and I got a little bit frustrated with that. And then I went back and I read the blog posts and I saw a blog post from 2 years ago saying, “These are the things that we are doing, this is what is happening,” and that was great, but I wasn't doing Jest tests 2 years ago and so, I missed all of that. Can we use the code base itself to connect those dots, make those suggestions, and guide people towards the work that they do? DAMIEN: If they put those deprecation warnings in 2 years ago, you would've had 2 years to make those changes. JEN: Yeah. DAMIEN: And then when you finally upgraded, it would have been a dream, or have been painless. JEN: Yeah, and maybe they're there. Maybe there are some and I just need to pass the debug flag, or something. Hopefully, there's nobody who's shouting at their computer. But there's this one thing that we put it in the console log output, or something. It's possible I overlooked it but. DAMIEN: I want to rewind a little bit back to the challenge of dealing with a product that is used in so many contexts by so many people, like Ember is, and the RFC process. The first thing I thought of when you mentioned that is what do you do with contradictory feedback? Surely, you must have hundreds of engineers who say, “You have to get rid of this,” and hundreds who say, “No, this has to stay.” How does the core team manage that? JEN: Yeah. So I think the most important piece is the contradictory feedback needs to be considered. So it's not just like, “Oh, let's collect these comments as annual feedback forms,” or anything like that. [chuckles] This isn't like, “Oh, let's do some natural language processing on these comments to figure out if the sentiment is positive, or negative.” [chuckles] None of that stuff you have to actually read through them and think what could I do using this new feature to help meet this person's needs, or what's at the heart of the objection that they're making? If someone is saying, “This doesn't work for my team,” and entering that process with a willingness to iterate. In the end, we can't make everybody happy all the time, or no RFC would ever get moved forward. There's always going to be a point where you have to prioritize the pros and cons, and ultimately, the decision comes down to reaching consensus amongst the core team members. So being able to say, as a group, “We believe that the feedback has been considered. We believe that the iterations have been incorporated, the people's concerns have been addressed,” or “We're going to work to create tools that think that problem be not a problem for them,” and find a way to move forward with whatever the proposal is. Or sometimes, the proposals don't move forward. Sometimes, they get closed. ARTY: Is the work you end up choosing to do primarily driven by this feedback process, or do you have some visionary leadership within the core team that drives a lot of things forward that aren't necessarily coming via feedback? JEN: That's a good question. I think it's a little bit of both. So certainly, a lot of RFCs have come from the community and from people asking like, “Hey, can we have this better way of doing things? I have an idea.” And then other times, you do have to have that visionary leadership. So to give an example, we have just started doing – well, I shouldn't say just started doing that. I think it's been like 2 years now. We have started doing this process called additions where if there's a big splashy set of cool features that are meant to be used together, we give it a name. That's separate from the breaking changes process, ideally. We can create nice, new splashy sets of features without breaking people's apps and trying to design that experience isn't something that you can just piecemeal through RFCs waiting for feedback to come through. There were quite a few members of the core team that designed a new way of building Ember apps that was better aligned with focusing on HTML as the core of building for the web and focusing on JavaScript features as opposed to requiring developers to know and understand the special API syntaxes. You can just write JavaScript classes instead of needing to understand what an Ember object is. So aligning ourselves more with the skills that everybody, who works in the web, has at least a little bit of. That took a lot of brainstorming, a lot of planning, and ultimately, introducing those things still follows an RFC process. Somebody still has to say, “Here's the thing we want to change, or do, or add. Here's the greater vision for it.” But to get that big picture look still requires the big thinking. So the core team, I don't even know how much time. They must've spent countless hours trying to hash out those details. ARTY: How big is the core team? JEN: So there's several core teams. Though when you say the core team as a whole encompasses people who work on the data layer, the command line tools, the learning tools, and then the framework itself. I want to say, could look this up, it's like upwards of 30 people, I think. ARTY: Wow. JEN: I can get you the exact number later, [chuckles] but everyone's pulling out their different area of domain and so, all of those teams also have to coordinate around these major releases because we want to make sure the work that we're doing is complimentary. If we do the framework improvements, but we don't fix up the docs, we're not on the good path for a successful release. ARTY: Are people working on this stuff full-time? Are people funded, or doing this in their free time, or how does that work? Because there's this big picture challenge of we have this ideal of community sourced, open source projects, and then the realities of trying to fund and support that effort bumps up to constraints of needing to make a living and things and these sorts of difficulties. How do y'all manage that? JEN: It's a mixture. So the Ember project is fortunate to have a major player—LinkedIn—that uses Ember and so, some of the core team members, their work on Ember is part of their LinkedIn work because of the frameworks doing well, then LinkedIn projects that are going to be doing well. There's also a number of people who are consultants, or who run consultancies that do Ember work, they're involved. Their voice is an important part of making sure that again, we're serving a variety of apps, not just ah, this is this tool that's just for the LinkedIn websites. But it's like, they've seen so many different kinds of apps; they're working on so many different kinds of apps right now. And then there's people who help out on more of a volunteer basis. So I've been in my past work, it was at a different job. It was part of my job responsibilities to participate on the framework core team. These days, I'm more of a volunteer and I mostly help organize other volunteers—people who want to do some professional development to learn, people who want to network, people who found something that they're frustrated about enough that they want to fix it themselves. That's how I got involved; I wanted to learn. So that's the sustainability of having people involved is always an ongoing challenge it is for every open source organization, I think. ARTY: Yeah. Do you have any ideas on how we can do those sorts of things better? As you said, it's a concern, in general with how do we do open source better with these kinds of constraints? And then two, I feel like there's been some cultural shifts, I guess, you could say over time of you think about when the open source movement first started. We had a lot more of this community ownership ideal where we really were going and building software together and now, there's a lot more of, well, there's all this free software out there that we use, that we build on top of to build our apps on, but that ownership piece isn't really there. It's an expectation that there should just be this free software out there that's maintained that we get and why is it falling apart? So I feel like, culturally, just over time, some of those things have shifted as far as expectations around open source and then you talked about some of the corporate sponsorship aspects with usage as being one way these things get funded. But I'm wondering if you have ideas on how some of these things could work better. JEN: People have done PhDs on this topic, I'm pretty sure. [chuckles] Like, theses. I read a white paper, a really involved white paper, a few weeks ago that was about, what was it? it was called something like the Burden of Maintaining Software, or something like that and it did this deep dive into how much goes in and just keeping the ship afloat. How much goes into just if there's a package that needs to be updated? That kind of ongoing, constant, mundane work that adds up really, really big. So for very large projects, I think it's a good thing to have some sort of an evolvement of a sponsor company, if you will and so, that sponsor company may not actually ever donate any money, but the time of their engineers that they say like, “Hey, we're willing to help support this project” is really important. I think another piece is that the leadership of projects should consider the people involved, that that group is going to be rotating. That people's involvement is ephemeral. Every time somebody changes jobs, maybe they're not going to be involved in that project anymore. If we can think about that ahead of time, plan for it, and make sure that we are sharing knowledge with each other such that the project can survive somebody moving onto something else, it can survive somebody going on vacation for a while. So I think that's another key component of success is how do you make it so that you're not just relying on the same set of people still being there so many years later? We've been very fortunate within the Ember community that a lot of the same people have stuck around, but I try really hard not to bank on that. The group of contributors that I help organize, I think, “Hey.” We have a chat every time somebody joins the learning core team and say, “Hey, we get that you're not going to be here forever. Please let us know what we can do to support you. Please let us know when you're thinking of taking a break, or taking a step back. Please involve other people on any project that you're working on so that they will also continue your work and also support you so you don't get burnt out. Another thing I try to do is always framing the work into how it values the contributor. Sometimes in open source you hear this discussion of like, “Oh, well, everyone should participate in open source because we all benefit from it.” There's a better attitude that we can have, I think, which is that for people who are interested in participating, what can they get out of it? What can I do as a leader to help them get something out of this? If you just approach it with this altruism of “This is a community and I want to help,” that'll get you like a little bit. But if you can say, “I want to help because I want to learn from other developers,” that's something I can deliver on. That's something that they can take. That's valuable for their future earning potential, income, confidence, maybe they'll make the connection that helps them find their next job. Even if someone isn't being paid to help out, is there something that they can take away from this? And lastly, just acknowledging that doing work for free is a privilege as well. We have to reframe how we think about open source sustainability, too. Not everybody can devote a few hours after work here and there and involving them and including them means that it's got to be part of their workday. So continuing to socialize from the company level that engineers should have a little bit of time here and there to try to help improve an open source project. Everybody doing that just a little bit helps with quite a few of the problems that these projects face. ARTY: I've been thinking about this myself and you work directly, you're significantly involved in a major open source project, and so, you see things that a lot of people don't have perspective on. So I appreciate your insights on this. I'm wondering what if major companies that were using open source software, if we made more efforts for companies to be a project sponsor and donate part of the company somebody who's on the company's time to help contribute to projects as like a thing. I feel like if that thing caught on, that the companies that were using this software for free [chuckles] had more of a sense of a social obligation to be one of the people that contribute some time to helping with that. Or get some companies that are big enough, too. It's probably easier and they have more interest in those sorts of things. But I feel like if we did make that more of a thing, that that would be useful because as you're saying, somehow realistically speaking, this has to be something that can be worked into the workday. JEN: Yes. ARTY: For us to be able to support and sustain these things. And people that can do that outside of their workday as an extra free time thing. It really is a privilege. JEN: Yeah. I think a couple of strategies that can help here are to frame it in the value to the company and frame it as a value to the users, frame it as a value to the engineering team. So rather than having it be like, “Oh, you use free software, you should do this thing.” Instead more like engineers, we always need to learn constantly in order to keep improving our own skills and to keep up with things that are changing. So having an open source hour, or something like that—it takes a little more than an hour usually to accomplish much. But having a period of time that engineers were allowed to contribute to open sources. Professional development that you don't have to pay for a subscription. You don't have to pay for a licensing fee. You don't have to pay for somebody's conference submission. If someone has the opportunity to reach outside of their sphere of knowledge, or comfort zone and it just so happens that if they succeed, it'll benefit your company maybe indirectly. Another piece is what's the value to the users? So there were a bunch of people who all contributed effort towards bringing some improved linting tools for the template system within Ember. When we think of linting tools, we usually think that's like, “Oh, here's this thing to remind me to use nice tidy syntax and don't make my variable names too long and space everything out in a certain way,” but they can also help us find real actual problems in our apps. So an example that this team worked on is they introduced some more linting rules for accessibility. If one person succeeds in introducing this new linting rule for accessibility, then it's there in their app for their team and they get to stop talking about, “Hey, make sure you do this one thing” over and over again because now it's enforced in the code base. Also, they've brought this benefit to all of the other apps that are out there. Again, sometimes you can tie it back in to that value for the product and for the users, and really trying to think creatively about that connection. Because there's so many different things we can all spend our time on, you've really got to sell it in a way that aligns with the goals, or values of that organization. ARTY: Yeah. I like that reframing. I can see just how important that is. Other things I'm thinking about if you had a dev team and one of your developers was really involved with the Ember core team, you'd have more knowledge about how things worked. So when something was broken, or something, you probably have more insight into what was going on and being able to help the team more effectively – JEN: Yeah. [overtalk] ARTY: To build stuff. And then if there's any suggestions, or things that could make things easier for your team, you'd have the ability to have influence with getting RFPs through to get changes made and things. I think you're right. It needs to be reframed as a value proposition. JEN: Yeah, and it also requires an attitude shift on the side of the projects as well. There's tons of people who've tried to do open source and hit running straight into a wall of they open up pull requests that are never merged, or even reviewed and that can be a really frustrating experience. And some projects just don't have the feedback structure, or the governance structure that really allows open participation either. So that's something that I think is an ongoing journey with lots of projects. It's like, how do we communicate? How do we involve other people? What types of decisions do we say like, “Hey, implementer, or community, you're in charge, you can make this” versus things that have to pass some sort of review. It's not just a one side of companies need to step up, but also, maintainers seem to have a long-term vision of how they're interacting with everybody else. DAMIEN: Yeah, I really love that frame of this is professional development and that you can get for free. That's like how would you like to educate your engineers and make them better engineers, especially on the tools you work on and not –? Yeah, that's really awesome. But then of course, on the other side, you need a welcoming environment. That's like, “Oh yeah, when you make a contribution, we're going to look at it. We're going to give you useful feedback on it.” JEN: Yeah. I tried to get an open source project going a few years ago and I struggled for a while and eventually ended up giving up. But some of the things I ran into, I'd have somebody that would volunteer to help out with things and I'd work with them long enough to just start to get a feel for things and be able to contribute and then they would disappear. [laughs] And I go through that process a few times. It's like, “Oh, yay. I'm excited, I get –” another person has volunteered and so, then I go and start working with them and trying to – and I put a lot of attention into trying to get things going and then they disappear. t was difficult to try and get traction in that way and eventually, I went, “Well, I'm back by myself again” [laughs] and that I just need to keep going. ARTY: Right. So what kind of things have you found help with getting that participation aspect going and what kind of things are barriers that get in the way that maybe we can be better at? JEN: Yeah. So my advice is always start with using the buddy system. Trying to pair program with people, who I'm hoping to stay involved, and the leveling up version of that is the people who are contributing pair with each other. It's so much more fun. There's so much more of a learning experience when it's two developers working on the project. Left to my own devices, the projects that I work on, I have to really dig into my willpower to keep them moving if I'm the only person working on it versus if we're pairing, what's the value that I'm getting? It's like, I get to hear how the other person approaches the problem. I get to experience how they work. They teach me things. I teach them things. We have this good rapport. So I pair once a week with my friend, Chris, and we work on everything from this kind of mundane stuff to the big vision, like what would we do if we could totally change how this thing works, or something like that, and that kind of energy and get ideas, they build up. So that's one piece. The other, this one's difficult, but having well-scoped, well-written issues is a huge time sink, but also, it can be one of the best ways get people engaged and keep them engaged. If I stop writing really specific issues, people peter off. Someone will ask, maybe only once, they'll ask, “Hey, I want to help out, or something. What should I pick up next?” They don't usually ask a second time, but I don't have something right away to hand off to them. So what is the momentum? Can I keep writing up issues and things that other people can follow through with? And then presenting them with increasing levels of challenge of like, “I have this unstructured problem. We've worked on this a lot together. You can do this. How would you approach this? What do you think we should do?” I don't necessarily say,” You can do this,” because it's more of a subtle cheerleading that's happening than that. But “I'd love to hear your proposal of what should happen next” just is a really powerful moment and sometimes, that can be the thing that catapults somebody into taking more ownership of a project and gathering together other people to help them out. And then people do come and go, but the commits are still there! So that's something, right? [chuckles] Like, things have taken some steps forward. DAMIEN: Yeah. People come and go, that's something you know you have to accept on an open source project, but it happens in other places, too. [chuckles] No team stays together for all of eternity. JEN: Right. DAMIEN: Is the project going to live on and how can you make it so that it does? So these are very good lessons, even for that. ARTY: It seems like just investing in thinking about, we were talking initially about planning for the success case, even when things happen. So if we think about the case of okay, people are going to leave the team. [chuckles] What's the success case look like? Imagining the way that things go really well when people are leaving the team, what does that look like? What are the things that we wish we had in place to be able to ramp people up quickly, to be able to find new people, to work on the project quickly? All of those things that we can think about and open source has this to a much larger degree and challenge so that you really have to think about it a lot. Where on a commercial project, it's one of those things that often happens when you wish it wouldn't and one of the things I see in corporate companies is you'll have a management change, or something will happen with a product that upsets a bunch of people and you'll have exodus phase on the project and then ending up often rewriting things because you lose your core knowledge on the project and nobody knows what's going on anymore and it actually becomes easier to rewrite the things than to [chuckles] figure out how it works. If we had imagined the ways that things could go well and prepared for those certain circumstances, maybe we wouldn't be in that situation. ARTY: Yeah. You mentioned something really important there, too, which is what can we do to help people spin up more quickly on something. That's another big piece of sustained engagement because you need a group of people spun up quickly. You need a group of people who can figure out the next steps on their own. And so, we've spent a lot of time, the projects that I work most actively on, making sure that everything is there in the Read Me, making sure that if you run npm start that things work if you're running it on a different environment. Those types of little things, reducing those barriers can also go a long way and just widening the pool of people who could potentially help is another big one. DAMIEN: How do you do that? Because you're a core contributor on the project. You have the curse of knowledge. JEN: Yes. DAMIEN: You have a development scene that is tightly home to work on this project. JEN: That's a great question. Ah, I do have the curse of knowledge. Being easy to reach so that if people do encounter problems that they can find you and tell you, which can be, it can be a small step. Just making sure that if you have a documentation page, it's got a link at the bottom that's like, “Find a problem, open an issue!” That sort of thing. Also, I'm pretty active on Twitter. Sometimes other contributors, experienced contributors, they'll spot something that somebody else has posted and they'll say, “Hey, Jen, take a look at this,” and they bring it to my attention. There's this team effort to uncover those gaps. Another aspect is just working in the open. So having open meetings, having open chat channels, places where people can interact with the people leading the projects, they can come to the meetings, things like that means that we're more likely to hear their feedback. So if we get feedback, “Hey, this thing was difficult,” making sure that we address it. DAMIEN: Wow. Well. JEN: I'm really big into user experience driven design. We've been talking about maintainability a lot, we've been talking about the code, and versions, and things, but coming back to what is the impact for our users. If you accept a user experience driven way of developing software, it means that you're always going to need to be upgrading, you're always going to have to be flexing, changing, and growing because the products of 2 years ago versus the product of today can be really different. Open source library that you needed to rely on 2 years ago versus today. Maybe the web app ecosystem has shifted. Maybe there's new ways of doing things. Maybe there's new syntaxes that are available. Sometimes, it can be a little frustrating because you feel like, “Oh, there's this endless pile of work. We made all these wrong choices back in the day and now this thing's hard to upgrade,” and all that. A different mindset is to think about what do we know today that is different than what we knew yesterday? What are the things we know today about our users that inform our next move? How do these upgrades, or improvements, or my choice of open source library help the end user have a better experience? And trying to come back to that big picture from time to time, because it can be pretty frustrating. When you get stuck, you think like, “Oh, I can't. I just tried to upgrade this major version and everything broke and everything's terrible. But what's the feature list look like, how am I going to use this to deliver something better to the users can really help?” DAMIEN: Wow. ARTY: So at this part of the show, we usually do reflections and finish off with any final thoughts we had, or takeaways from the episode. Damien, you want to start? DAMIEN: The big takeaway I got from this is kind of… it's perspective. Jen, you mentioned a user experience driven design. I was already really close to that language, but from a perspective of contributors to an open source project, sponsors—both in terms of engineering and then money—and then also, users. Like, these are also users. These are also people who are impacted by the work we do. So in order to do it successfully, it's very important to think of how can this go well for them and then move to that direction. So thank you, that was really great. M: For me, the big takeaway, I feel like I learned a whole lot just perspective wise of what it's like to work on a big open source project. I haven't really had a conversation like this with someone that's been that involved with a major resource project before. So I found that really insightful. One of the big questions I asked you about how do we make this sustainable? [laughs] Like all the challenges around things. I know they're big challenges that we face in figuring that out and you had some really key insights around how we can frame things differently as opposed to framing it as an obligation, like a social obligation, or you should do this altruistically because it's the right thing to do as the appeal that we make is when you're talking to a contributor, how do you frame things to be a value proposition for them as an individual. When we're talking to a company, how do we frame things in a way so there's a value proposition for the company to get involved with doing something? And change the way that we frame all these things to be able to get folks involved because they realize benefits as individuals, as company, as people being directly involved in things? I feel like if we can do some work to maybe change some of the framing around things. That maybe there's a pathway there to increase engagement and support of open source projects, which I think is one of those things that we really need to figure out. There's not really easy answers to that, but I feel like some of the insights you came to there are really key in finding a pathway to get there. So thank you, Jen. I appreciate the conversation. JEN: So for me, when I'm reflecting on the most is the story that you shared already of trying to get people involved and just having them leave. They show up for a little while and then they disappear and where does all that work go? I'm interested to explore a little bit more of that small project life cycle. I was pretty fortunate to just come in at a time where there was already a well-established community when I started getting involved in Ember and I'd love to hear more from other people about what are the success stories of those first few steps where someone began this little project and it really started to grow and take off. This might be a case where like some of the strategies I described, they work when you already have an established community. So it's kind of like a catch-22. I don't know, that could be a really cool future episode is the beginning. DAMIEN: Yeah. That's something I'd definitely like to hear about. ARTY: Well, thank you for joining us, Jen. It was really a pleasure talking with you. JEN: Thanks so much for having me! Special Guest: Jen Weber.

UNPLUGGED Live Concerts
“The B Sides” from Songs in A Minor Alicia Keys - 2021

UNPLUGGED Live Concerts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 17:52


All uploads on this channel are for promotional purposes only! The music has been converted before uploading to prevent ripping and to protect the artist(s) and label(s). If you don't want your content here (that goes for audio or images) please contact me immediately via email: unpluggedtube@outlook.it and I WILL REMOVE THE EPISODE OR ARTWORK IMMEDIATELY! ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From Alicia:  "Cooked up a little something to celebrate the release of my very first album, Songs in A Minor

Not For Prophets Stereo Podcast
092 "Josh Duggar Wants to be In A-♭Minor All the Time"

Not For Prophets Stereo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 50:13


Delivered straight to you, it's a brand new sensational episode of the only all Arkansas focused podcast and the best sounding podcast made in the Natural State. You can have a look around and keep reading, or you can pour these sound waves into your head and let me tell you all about what's crammed in this episode. - HONORABLE MENTIONS   * Taylor the Creator IG   * X3MEX- IG   * J-Styles - Not For Prophets Stereo Podcast Arkansas Crop Report - UPDATES   + killer Quake takes plea   + deviant Duggar denied   + the Humph HR files released   + Pine Bluff drag strip: 6 months ahead of schedule - warning: HOT BRIDGE NEWS - stone wrecker in Eureka Springs - SHS vs AG LR: war chest - suits against the AG stay - BIG BIG win for AG Leslie Rutledge - GET THIS HERO A STATUE - Dogpatch USA has buyer - News from 100 Years Ago ....of course there's plenty more than just that. But you'll have to find out the rest of it on your own. The BRIBES ARE OUT...and they're leaving fast! Come claim yours if you left an Apple Podcasts review (with words). You just won some TREMENDOUS Arkansas related art, canvas prints, shirts, prints...all kinds of great stuff. The reviews help get the the ONLY all Arkansas focused podcast to the top of the results when someone types in "Arkansas" into the podcast search field. (TONS of fantastic bribes are to be had.) Thanks for hopping on the ride with me and I hope you dig it. Tap the SUBSCRIBE button to make sure you never miss a new weekly episode, or any of the bonus episodes that come out by surprise. If you're liking what's happing here, tell someone. Better yet, just grab their phone and subscribe for them. Do them the favor, okay? Interested in sponsoring the podcast, or want to reach out? mail@notforprophets.net notforprophets.net Instagram Twitter YouTube Spotify

Behind The Numbers | A Football Card Podcast by Bench Clear Media
Kyler and Herbert MVP shot? Week 4 Review with a minor grading card rant !

Behind The Numbers | A Football Card Podcast by Bench Clear Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 19:49


Review all the games of week 4 and RC performances. Talk on grading cards and the PSA only approach. Lastly give you my 5 Takeaways from week 4. Follow me @numbers_behind

Locked On Reds - Daily Podcast On The Cincinnati Reds
Missing the Playoffs: a Minor Depression for Fans of the Cincinnati Reds and San Diego Padres

Locked On Reds - Daily Podcast On The Cincinnati Reds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 49:52


The Cincinnati Reds and San Diego Padres looked to be the two teams vying for the postseason...until neither made it. Jeff and Javi Reyes, from Locked On Padres, attempt to wade through the massive deluge of losses that both their teams endured to finish out 2021. They look at what the biggest factor in each team's collapse was and ultimately crown one team the superior collapse of 2021. *FOLLOW* the podcast on your favorite app and on Twitter and Instagram @lockedonreds Also follow @jefffcarr on Twitter and @carrjefff on Instagram Call or text (513) 549-0159 Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Revive Stronger Podcast
279: Brian Minor - Metabolic Building | How To Eat Into Shows Successfully

The Revive Stronger Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 57:13


This week we have Brian Minor back on the show. In this episode we dig into his 2017 prep where he was able to take his food from 2300kcal up to 3000kcal with less activity. The result of this was not fat gain but a more conditioned look, through what might be known as a metabolic building phase. Timestamps: (00:00) Intro (01:22) Can you be ready too early? And personal experience with it. (15:10) When do you know you're lean enough? (23:16) Adding refeeds super beneficial when being super lean (26:15) Scale weight behaviour when adding back in calories and carbohydrates impact on the body (39:52) When is it better to push and when to pull back? (46:03) Timelength of refeeds/increasing calories https://www.instagram.com/bdminor/ https://myojournal.com/ Thanks, please comment, like and subscribe! COACHING: https://revivestronger.com/online-coaching/ MEMBERSITE: https://revivestronger.com/team-revive-stronger/ WEBSITE: https://www.revivestronger.com MINI CUT MOVEMENT: https://revivestronger.com/mini-cut-movement/ FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/revivestronger INSTAGRAM: http://www.instagram.com/revivestronger NEWSLETTER: https://bit.ly/2rRONG5 YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eN0vyBD4MVE __________________________________________________________________ If you want to support us via a donation, that's highly appreciated! Patreon • https://www.patreon.com/revivestronger Don't like Patreon, go to Paypal! • https://bit.ly/2XZloJ4 __________________________________________________________________ Our Ebooks! Ultimate Guide To Contest Prep Ebook: • https://revivestronger.com/product/the-ultimate-guide-to-contest-prep/ Primer Phase Ebook: • https://revivestronger.com/product/the-primer-phase/ __________________________________________________________________ Stay up to date with the latest research and educate yourself! MASS (Research Review): • https://goo.gl/c7FSJD RP+ Membership: • https://ob262.isrefer.com/go/plus/Steve90/ JPS Mentorship • https://jpseducation.mykajabi.com/a/13324/esJ8AZwy __________________________________________________________________ Books we recommend! Muscle & Strength Pyramids • https://goo.gl/S8s6tG RP Books • http://bit.ly/2vREaH0 RP + Members site • https://ob262.isrefer.com/go/plus/Steve90/ For more • http://revivestronger.com/library/ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ When you're interested in online coaching, please go visit our website and follow the application form: https://www.revivestronger.com/online-coaching/

United States of Murder
Idaho: Kaylynn Blue & Cassie Jo Stoddart

United States of Murder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 50:00


This week we're in Idaho discussing a woman who was stabbed in her sleep. Then, we will tell you about a teenage girl who is house-sitting alone when unexpected visitors terrorize the home. So buckle up and join us on this dark and twisted ride through the Gem State. CW: Intellectual Disabilities, Murder of Pets, Murder of a Minor, Home Invasion, and Violence. Interested in your own digital "If I Go Missing" file? Get 20% off here: HelpYouFind.Me and be sure to use promo code USOFM You may now join us on Patreon or Buy us a Cocktail. Be sure to subscribe on Apple and leave a review, or, email us at unitedstatesofmurder@gmail.com Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter! Check out our website www.unitedstatesofmurder.com Sources: East Idaho News, Post Register, True Crime Society Blog, All That's Interesting, Idaho State Journal, Distractify, Ranker, Business Insider Music by Pixabay --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unitedstatesofmurder/support

Breaking Bread Podcast
Bitterness (Part 2 of 2)

Breaking Bread Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 11:24


Forgive, overlook and acknowledge - three verbs that give the embittered a path to freedom. None are easy. In in this episode of Breaking Bread, Craig Stickling brings them near and demonstrates the path out from his own life experience.   Show notes  Bitterness has a root: The root starts with hurt. Hurt that is not properly cared for. This hurt leads to anger. Anger left to seethe and build over time leads to stubbornness. Impenetrable walls are then built to protect. Behind these walls a rebellion settles in. Bitterness grows: Minor and major hurtful events stacked one on top of the other over time breeds a canker. The canker travels  its way into many areas of our lives. Bitterness has a fruit: The fruit tastes of isolation, division and hardness. Bitterness has a remedy: The embittered must engage with the hurt in three ways. Applying forgiveness where they have been sinned against. Overlooking misunderstandings and imperfections where they exist in their offender and acknowledging whatever truth that may exist in the hurt for their personal betterment.  

KeepItSports
Episode 42: Minor Setback For A Major Comeback

KeepItSports

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 67:18


This week our boy KeepItJuan is back. We talk a little basketball & of course talk NFL. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/keepitsports/message

ESPN Daily
A Major Problem in the Minor Leagues: Baseball's Big Myth

ESPN Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 30:41


Baseball is supposed to be romantic, right? America's pastime is predicated on tradition, hard work, and luck in getting to the show of MLB. But making it to the big leagues has become harder than ever. Minor leaguers today face pay that puts them below the poverty line, grueling schedules, and little support for the mental health and other problems that can arise from that. Joon Lee brings us a deep dive into the world of the minor leagues.

Cannabis Talk 101
NY College To Offer Cannabis Minor Degree, Supported By Berner's Cookies, Chris Webber's Fund

Cannabis Talk 101

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 44:17


In London, a suspected drug dealer was arrested dressed up as a food delivery driver. Why isn't the BCC cracking down on companies that cover up illegal cannabis transactions? Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

BYU-Idaho Radio
BYU-Idaho Adds New Minor in Peace & Conflict Transformation

BYU-Idaho Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 11:23


David Pulsipher, BYU-Idaho professor in the History, Geography, and Political Science Department, describes how new minor in peace and conflict transformation can be beneficial to students.

UNPLUGGED Live Concerts
Alicia Keys ft. Swae Lee - | 2021 VMAs | MTV | + Bustle Interview

UNPLUGGED Live Concerts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 13:17


Alicia Keys ft. Swae Lee perform "La La" and "Empire State of Mind" at the 2021 VMAs. #VMAs #MTV #AliciaKeys + Alicia Keys Reveals The Moments That Made Her | Bustle This girl has been on fire since 14. With a career spanning two decades, Alicia Keys has a lot to reflect on and sage advice to offer. Join us on the set of her cover issue with Bustle as she highlights the most significant moments of her life, including growing up in Hell's Kitchen, songwriting at age 14, working with Clive Davis, and rejecting unrealistic beauty standards. 00:14 1995 - Begins writing for ‘Songs in A Minor' 00:45 1998 - Starts recording with Columbia Records 01:08 2000 - Signs with J Records 01:16 2001 - ‘Songs in A Minor' released 01:36 2001 - “Fallin'” plays on MTV 02:25 2001 - First ‘Oprah Winfrey Show' appearance 02:58 2003 - First trip to Egypt 05:31 2013 - Obama inauguration performance 05:56 2016 - Liberation from beauty standards 06:50 2019 - Hosting the Grammys 07:50 2020 - ‘Alicia' album Team UNPLUGGED.

Yo Quiero Dinero: A Personal Finance Podcast For the Modern Latina
107. How To Work Smarter & Not Harder In Your Business | Asha Wilkerson, Esq., Business Coach & Attorney

Yo Quiero Dinero: A Personal Finance Podcast For the Modern Latina

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 49:00


Asha Wilkerson, Esq. is a Business Coach & Attorney who works with BIPOC entrepreneurs about business formation, contract creation, and liability reduction. She is committed to helping entrepreneurs of color not only start businesses, but also stay in business for years to come. She also enjoys training leaders in the areas diversity and leadership and she has a particular affinity for working with non-profit and faith-based organizations. In addition to practicing law, she is a full-time professor and Department Chair of the Legal Studies Program at American River College in Sacramento. Through her paralegal program, she has implemented a monthly record expungement clinic that assists participants in clearing past criminal records. So far, her clinic has served over 200 participants in just one year. California Lawyer Magazine has named Asha Wilkerson a Super Lawyer Rising Star for the past 6 years. In January 2020, she received a social justice award from the Sacramento Chapter of the National Lawyers Guild and received the Attorney of the Year award from the Wiley Manuel Bar Association in Sacramento in August 2019. She was also honored with a human rights award from Chans Altenativ/Alternative Chance, a non-profit organization dedicated to advocating on the behalf of Haitian criminal deportees, the Power 40 Award from Oakland's Allen Temple Baptist Church for being an influential young adult leader, and a Pro Bono award for her work with the AIDS Legal Referral Panel in San Francisco. Asha received a B.A. in English (with a Minor in Communications) from Santa Clara University, received her law degree from the University of California, Hastings, and earned a Masters in Business Administration at California State University, East Bay. When out of the office, Asha enjoys traveling, reading, Cuban salsa, and throwing parties. She is conversational in Spanish, Portuguese, and Haitian Creole with plans to tackle American Sign Language and French next. You can follow Asha on Instagram, Facebook, and LinkedIn. Loving this episode? Leave us a review (we read them all!) if you're listening on Apple podcasts & be sure to follow us on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube! Partners mentioned in this episode: BetterHelp – Professional Support When You Need It, At The Fraction Of The Cost Of In-Person Therapy. Get 10% off your first month! Fiverr – Connects businesses with freelancers offering digital services in 300+ categories, starting at just $5! Want to kickstart your financial journey? Download our free 14-page guide covering all the topics you need to start making your dinero moves, just visit yoquierodineropodcast.com/start. From money mindset, to budget basics, we've got you covered. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/yoquierodinero/support

ThePrint
ThePrintAM: What has the probe into Thane minor‘s gangrape found?

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 4:20


Freshly Signed
Protecting Minor Footballers: Ansi Fati Vs. Barcelona. Our lawyer's opinion.

Freshly Signed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 52:15


Clubs keen to sign the next big football talent are eager to spot them young. But how young is too young? Join us for a fascinating chat with Italian sports lawyer Lucio Mazzei as we dissect the fine line between exploitation and a footballer's dream career.If you have enjoyed this episode, please forward a show link to someone you care about? Thank you, it means a lot!This episode is brought to you by SportsLawAfrica  

GMB Show
Training Around Minor Injuries

GMB Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 35:05


The most requested topic from a recent round of surveys, how to train around minor injuries is a real and pertinent issue for all of us at some point or another. Whether you wake up one morning with a crick in your neck or you twist your ankle while running, learning to train with limitations is a skill that can be learned. In this episode, we dive into what constitutes a minor injury, why it's important to keep moving, and how to assess your situation and stay productive so you don't feel like you're wasting away while you heal.Key Points:How to Define ‘Minor' – the criteria to distinguish what's “minor”Why It's Important to Keep Moving – what the body needs to heal correctlyKnow Thyself – the ability to assess your needs and tendencies is invaluableHow to Continue Training – the smart way to adjust your focus to continue training in a productive wayReading Your Internal Barometer – learning to track and trust your subjective experience for longevity and autonomyThe Future: Help us decide which episodes to record nextResources:Body Maintenance Guide – Our head to toe solutions for aches and painsYour Guide To Moving Better With Less Pain – Our article and episode about active recoveryEasy Self-Assessments to End the Guesswork – Our article on using a scale for ease and quality to make measurable progressDealing With Injuries – Our episode on the not-so-secret key to recovery that everyone tries to ignoreOvercoming Chronic Pain with Exercise – Our article on the science of pain and how to break the pain cycleHow To Make Progress, Even With Limitations – Our article on strategies for working with pain and injuryIt's All in Your Head – our episode on owning your subjective experience of exerciseBronnie Lennox Thompson on Fibromyalgia and Living Well With Chronic Pain – a great episode on Todd Hargrove's The Better Movement PodcastBronnie Lennox Thompson's website – resource for on chronic pain self managementSupport the show (https://gmb.io/podcast/)

Peristyle Podcast - USC Trojan Football Discussion
BREAKING: USC freshman quarterback Jaxson Dart has minor meniscus surgery

Peristyle Podcast - USC Trojan Football Discussion

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 71:30


Peristyle Podcast hosts Ryan Abraham and Keely Eure discuss the breaking news that USC freshman quarterback and the star of the Washington State win Jaxson Dart suffered a meniscus injury in Pullman and had minor knee surgery to repair it this week. Keely and Ryan talk about the impact Dart's injury could have on the team going forward and discuss Kedon Slovis returning to practice from his neck injury, setting him up to start on Saturday against Oregon State. Speaking of the Beavers, Ryan and Keely talk about USC's next opponent and why OSU could give the Trojans some trouble Saturday night, they talk about some of the non-quarterback injuries, discuss what players and coaches had to say this week after practice. and as always they take the time to answer all of your email questions, text messages and voicemails. Please review, rate and subscribe to the Peristyle Podcast on Apple Podcasts! The best 5-star review each week will get a $50 Trader Joe's gift card! Thanks to Trader Joe's for sponsoring the Peristyle Podcast! Make sure you check out USCFootball.com for complete coverage of this USC Trojan football team.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Fr. Mike Schmitz Catholic Podcast
Turning Annoyances into Blessings

The Fr. Mike Schmitz Catholic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 7:02


Sometimes the smallest things annoy us the most. Minor inconveniences can easily make us forget to be thankful for all of the gifts God is constantly bestowing upon us. But what if we could find things to be thankful for inside of those small annoyances? Today, Fr. Mike teaches us the art of uncovering the “backwards blessings” all around us, and how to have “reverse gratitude”.

League Rundown - A League of Legends Esports Podcast
League Rundown - Episode 376 feat. RandomMinionCaster: Play-in Prospects - Minor Regions

League Rundown - A League of Legends Esports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 114:49


Welcome to the League Rundown! Please welcome special guest RandomMinionCaster to this weeks cast! Get 20% OFF @manscaped + Free Shipping with promo code TFORCE at MANSCAPED.com! #ad #manscapedpod RandomMinionCaster Twitter: https://twitter.com/RandomMCaster CLG Miko YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgLYUF-VQek6lxomsB0le1g JOIN THE COMMUNITY DISCORD: https://discord.gg/Hf6SjNHxYS Subscribe to us on Patreon: http://patreon.com/tforcenetwork Contact us: @leaguerundown on Twitter Email: lcs@trinityforcepodcast.com

Third Space with Jen Cort
Ideas for connecting equity work and mathematics ft. Nate Bridge, Kentaro Iwasaki & João (John) Gomes

Third Space with Jen Cort

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 55:44


Nate Bridge is Haverford School Math teacher and has taught in international schools. Principally interested in systemic changes to education and school culture that would result in more equitable outcomes such as Criterion-Based Grading for student assessment and Rank Choice Voting for electing student leaders. Twitter: @schoolmrbridge https://natebridge.wixsite.com/teachingKentaro Iwasaki- The son of Japanese immigrants, Kentaro Iwasaki knew from a young age that he aspired to become a teacher. He was a high school math teacher and department head for 16 years and led his department in dismantling the tracked honors math program, resulting in an increase of AP math enrollment by 400% and increased passing rates on AP math exams among students of color. Kentaro then served as the Associate Director of Learning and Teaching at non-profit ConnectEd for 7 years, where he trained over 1000 math teachers in creating collaborative classroom learning environments. Kentaro holds a doctorate in education leadership from Harvard and holds a BA from Stanford. He received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Math and Science Teaching in 2011 and is a National Board Certified Teacher. https://www.linkedin.com/in/kentaro-iwasaki-476a953b/ João (John) Gomes (he/him/his)Born in Lisbon, Portugal, John moved to New Jersey at a young age. With degrees from BS in Math and Computer Science with a Minor in English from Fairfield University and an MSEd in Education, Culture, & Society from Penn. Math teacher and Director of Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Belonging at The Agnes Irwin SchoolJohn wants everyone tied to the school community to see him learning and growing in real time. He wants everyone to know they belong. He makes mistakes. Twitter: @JoaoGomes84

Construct Your Life With Austin Linney
259 Artemis Scantalides: How To Overcome The Problem With Money

Construct Your Life With Austin Linney

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 42:51


Artemis Scantalides: How To Overcome The Problem With Money Meet Artemis,  born and raised in Newton, Massachusetts, Artemis Scantalides is a NASM Certified Personal Trainer, StrongFirst Team Leader, Elite Instructor, and “Iron Maiden”, Certified Kettlebell-Functional Movement Specialist (CK-FMS). She specializes in Hardstyle Style Kettlebell Training and women's strength training. She is also a Black Belt in Kung Fu, a certified SPIN® Instructor, DVRT Ultimate Sandbag Level I Instructor, Precision Nutrition Level I Coach (Pn1), as well as certified to train pregnant and postpartum clients. Artemis attended the George Washington University where she received a Bachelor's Degree in Psychology with a Minor in French. During her undergraduate years, Artemis studied abroad in various foreign language programs. As a result of her international studies, she is fluent in French and proficient in Arabic, Italian and Greek. Artemis has been working in the Fitness Industry for over 17 years. She made a drastic career change and left her job as an IT Consultant in order to pursue a career in fitness and never looked back. Working in an office did not suit her as she has been an athlete all of her life. Artemis was a ballet dancer for 23 years; she began training in Classical Ballet, Russian Technique, at the age of four, and continued on to study various types of dance with the Boston Ballet. After receiving her BA from the George Washington University in Washington, DC, Artemis relocated to New York City for two years. While living in New York City, Artemis worked and trained closely with celebrity trainer Ary Nunez, (Nike Sponsored Athlete, owner of Gotham Global Fitness LLC and personal trainer to celebrities such as Rihanna). At that time, Artemis decided to hang up her ballet shoes in order to study Kung Fu. Artemis started her martial arts journey studying Southern Shaolin style Kung Fu with a focus on the Five Animal System. Artemis returned to her University town of Washington, DC in 2005 where she began to study T'ien Shan Pai style Kung Fu and Contemporary Wu Shu. She competed in her first two Kung Fu competitions in June and September of 2007 where she won three gold medals and one silver medal. In 2009, while living in Washington, DC, Artemis obtained her Black Belt in T'ien Shan Pai style Kung Fu and Contemporary Wu Shu. Artemis will attest that next to training and testing for her RKC Instructor Certification, obtaining her Kung Fu Black Belt was one of the most challenging accomplishments that she has ever achieved. In 2011, Artemis' love for kettlebells and strength training drove her to open her own hardstyle kettlebell and training gym in Boston, Massachusetts, Iron Body Studios, with her husband, fellow StrongFirst Instructor and Certified Athletic Trainer, Eric Gahan. In addition, after she completed the Iron Maiden Challenge in 2014 (she was the ninth woman in the world to complete the Iron Maiden Challenge between StrongFirst and the RKC and the lightest and smallest woman to date as of July 25, 2014 to complete The Challenge), Artemis created her own women's strength workshop, I Am Not Afraid To Lift®, with the mission to educate women about the importance of strength training, about how to strength train properly, and to help them to feel empowered through strength training. Artemis believes that the self-efficacy and confidence that you build in the weight room carries over into all areas of life and over the past 6 years, she has taught dozens of her Lift® workshops to hundreds of women, both nationally and internationally. Artemis and her husband closed Iron Body Studios in 2016 and moved to Las Vegas, Nevada so that her husband could accept a Head Therapist position with Cirque du Soleil. Shortly after arriving in Vegas, Artemis also accepted a position with Cirque du Soleil to work as a Performance Conditioning Specialist in support of their Las Vegas resident show KÀ. Due to the demand of her online coaching and workshop business, Artemis stepped down from her position as the dedicated strength and conditioning coach for KÀ because she could no longer handle the demands of her business along with her responsibilities at Cirque du Soleil. In addition to her online coaching and workshop business, Artemis remains an On-Call strength coach for Cirque du Soleil and teaches courses and certifications as a StrongFirst Team Leader. Artemis seeks to empower women through strength as she continues to encourage and inspire women to not be afraid to lift weights and she swears by kettlebell training and strength training, as she states: “Kettlebell training and strength training not only strengthened and changed my body, but also my mindset.” What You Will Discover:  [3:10] Focusing On What I Could Do Versus What I Looked Like [5:18] They Instilled A Really Strong Work Ethic In Me [12:03] Challenges Of Business Of Owning A Facility [25:12] Overcome The Shame Of Bankruptcy [30:14] Getting Stuck In The Doing  [35:23] They're Rich Because They Learn How To Make Their Money Work For Them  Relevant Links:  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/IrnBdyByArtemis Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/IronBodyByArtemis Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/artemis_scantalides/?hl=en LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/artemis-scantalides-9ba4391/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/IrnBdyByArtemis Website: https://empoweru-online-coaching.mykajabi.com/ Website: https://ironbodybyartemis.com/   #podcast

Triad Of The Force
S2|E27 • Infinite Realities

Triad Of The Force

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 52:35


In Marvel's What If...? the multiverse takes a dark turn in the three middle episodes of the series... and it's fantastic! Minor changes in the stories result in radical spirals of destruction where some of our heroes become the villains. Is the road to hell paved with good intentions? Do these characters react within their natures? Join the Triad as we discuss! • • • Triad Of The Force is a podcast from three life-long Puerto Rican friends coming together to do deep dives into Star Wars and other nerd related media! Follow Triad Of The Force at: Twitter: https://twitter.com/TriadOfTheForce Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/triadoftheforce/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TriadoftheForce/ If you like us, get some merch and help the channel: TeePublic: https://www.teepublic.com/user/triad-of-the-force

Learn Jazz Standards Podcast
3 Ways to Spice Up Your Minor 2-5-1 Playing

Learn Jazz Standards Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 24:38


Welcome to episode 286 where today I talk about 3 different ways to spice up minor 2-5-1 chord progressions. Minor 2-5-1s can be found everywhere in jazz standards, so how do we make our comping, bass lines, and improv more interesting over them? I give several different ways we can utilize harmonic movement in our favor. Listen to episode 286 Minor 2-5-1 chord progressions are found all over the place in jazz standards, and so you'll be able to navigate them with relative ease. But how can we spice them up? How can we make them sound interesting when we improvise or walk bass lines or comp over top of these chord progressions? Well, that's exactly what we are going to talk about today in today's episode. We are going to talk about 3 different ways we can spice up minor 2-5-1 chord progressions. In this episode: 1. 1. i-bI7-tritone sub of ii-i 2. i-IV7-tritone sub of ii-i 3. i-IV7-II7-tritone sub ov V-i Important Links 1. LJS Inner Circle Membership

Daily Success Strategies - Jeff Heggie Entrepreneur & Coach
380: More Fit 4 The Kingdom | Skye Fagrell

Daily Success Strategies - Jeff Heggie Entrepreneur & Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 32:57


Jeff Heggie Daily Success Strategies 380: More Fit 4 The Kingdom | Skye Fagrell https://jeffheggie.com/ https://jeffheggie.com/ConfidentAthlete https://mindset.jeffheggie.com/ Skye Fagrell Book: More Fit 4 The Kingdom https://amzn.to/2WKOrnH Skye Fagrell is married to the former Ms. Jacquelyn Sargent. They met while studying at Brigham Young University. They love each other, their family, physical fitness, and vacations that involve the ocean! Together they have four amazing children; Alexa, Makenna, Gunner, and Jayda. Skye earned a Bachelor's degree in Visual Arts and a Minor in Coaching and Teaching Physical Education from Brigham Young University. He earned a Master's degree in Educational Leadership from Northern Arizona University. While he has advertised his willingness to exchange both degrees for a single Major League Baseball contract (preferably with the Oakland A's), he's yet to receive any takers. He still holds our hope. Skye has worked as a professional educator and administrator for nearly 20 years, teaching seminary and institute for the Church Educational System. He's also been an online professor for BYU-Idaho. He has held many coaching and leadership positions in his community and Church. He is the CEO of More Fit 4 Life, where he provides life and leadership consulting and training for individuals and organizations. The course of life we're all on is like a treadmill, possessing not only the ability to increase in speed, but in incline, as well. All signs indicate that both these variables will continue to intensify. Consequently, for years Church leaders have been urging us to increase our spiritual strength, both as individuals and families, so that we can remain both safely and securely on it. How can we stay on our feet during these "perilous battles" and not get thrown off course? How can we keep our guard up and avoid the pitfalls along the way? The answer is clear:Gain the spiritual strength the Savior emphasized by following the training program He utilized!That's the purpose of this book - to help individuals and families strategize by learning to identify, follow, and adapt His program in powerful and practical ways. By so doing, they will increase their spiritual strength and as the title of this book and the hymn More Holiness Give Me declares, become "More Fit for the Kingdom!"

Talking Real Money
The Last Q&A from VA

Talking Real Money

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 18:36


As Don just sold his house in Virginia, this is the last Q&A from there. In this episode, Don answers your questions on:Investing for a child?How aggressive is too aggressive?Tips for becoming a financial planner?Should a portfolio include dividend stocks or ETFs?Is a stock given as a gift subject to taxes when sold? 

Pride and Accomplishment
58: Satisfyingly Complex

Pride and Accomplishment

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 70:30


The New World open beta was last week, and Chris & Jason both played together. Listen to find out our opinions. Minor spoilers for Free Guy in the post-show. New World

Ahead of the Curve
Episode 35: Sarah Viñas

Ahead of the Curve

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 57:50


In this episode, we discuss using data and maps to engage residents and inform decisions, the critical importance of designing programs and services alongside residents, and building inclusion and equity into resident engagement strategies.About Sarah Viñas Sarah is the Director of Housing and Community for the Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina.Sarah joined the Town of Chapel Hill over a decade ago. She has served in a variety of roles within the Town Manager's Office, Public Works, and most recently Housing and Community, where she is Interim Director.Before joining the Town, Sarah worked in the nonprofit sector for several years doing community development and anti-poverty work. She served as a Congressional Hunger Fellow in Chicago and Washington, D.C., and subsequently Executive Director of two nonprofit organizations in Florida and North Carolina.Sarah holds a BA in Sociology and Religion with a Minor in Community Building and Social Change from Emory University. She also holds an MPA from UNC-Chapel Hill. Her work has been featured by the Harvard Kennedy School, the Alliance for Innovation, World Hunger Year, and NY Times, among other sources. Sarah has a passion for social justice, equitable community engagement, and affordable housing.

Project Ignite Podcast with Derek Gehl: Online Business | Internet Marketing | Make Money Online
135. How To Create Video Content For Your Marketing - With Alex Minor

Project Ignite Podcast with Derek Gehl: Online Business | Internet Marketing | Make Money Online

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 37:51


Effective video marketing can make a huge impact on your bottom line.    And in this episode, you'll receive practical advice about video content creation and marketing (that you can put into practice immediately after listening).    It's with Alex Minor. An expert in video content creation and marketing.    Tune in. Enjoy. And make sure you apply what you learn!