Podcasts about DRS

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Best podcasts about DRS

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Latest podcast episodes about DRS

The ASES Podcast
ASES Podcast - Episode 56 - In Honor of Dr. Rockwood: Part 2

The ASES Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 42:05


In this episode of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Podcast, hosts Dr. Rachel Frank and Dr. Peter Chalmers interview Drs. Burkhead, Matsen, and Bigliani about their memories of Dr. Charles Rockwood.

The ASES Podcast
ASES Podcast - Episode 55 - In Honor of Dr. Rockwood: Part 1

The ASES Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 28:20


In this episode of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Podcast, host Dr. Rachel Frank interviews Drs. Williams and Cofield about their memories of Dr. Charles Rockwood. 

PVRoundup Podcast
Early Treatment in MEfRVO

PVRoundup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 19:50


Drs. Singer and Hariprasad take a deep dive into the complexities of diagnosing and treating retinal vein occlusions. They explore typical presentations in older and younger patients as well as advances in imaging and the art of treating retinal vein occlusion.

RFD Today
RFD Today May 20

RFD Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 53:01


Friday's show includes a conversation with Drs. Herman Dick and Ibrahim Mustafa with Carle BroMenn Medical Center. The two highlight National Stroke Awareness Month. We also preview next month's Illinois FFA Convention with Illinois FFA Executive Director Mindy Bunselmeyer. Rita Frazer chats with New Mexico farmer Don Hart. We wrap up the show with an update from Jenny Webb, who serves as Illinois Farm Bureau Member Engagement Manager.

Orientering
Orientering: Satire eller troværdighedsproblem i DR? - 20. maj 2022

Orientering

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 109:37


Danmarks Radio får hård kritik fra flere forskere, der har deltaget i ungdomsprogrammer uden at vide, at journalistens spørgsmål kom fra en usynlig udspørger, blandt andet en " flat-earther" altså en, der mener, at jorden er flad. Er det satire og en god måde at ramme et ungt publikum? Eller et voldsomt problem for DRs troværdighed? På usædvanlig vis bliver der for tiden fundet indtil flere tilfælde af virussygdommen abekopper rundt i Europa. En sygdom, der er i familie med almindelige kopper, og som findes i både mennesker og dyr. Virusset er blandt andet registreret i Storbritannien, Spanien, Portugal og vores nabolande Sverige og Tyskland. Men er vi overhovedet mere parate til at håndtere end ny mulig pandemi end vi var for to år siden? Vi har allesammen bemærket det: inflationen ruller derudaf, så det bliver dyrere at være familie. og vi bliver mere og mere skeptiske overfor den økonomiske fremtid. Forbrugertilliden er på 22,4 pct. i maj måned. Og det selvom det forlyder, at dansk økonomi er i god form og beskæftigelsen højere end længe. Hvordan hænger det sammen? Brita Kvist og Søren Carlsen er værter, Tine Møller Sørensen er dagens redaktør. www.dr.dk/orientering

Protecting Your NEST with Dr. Tony Hampton
Jahfari Jones: Episode 99

Protecting Your NEST with Dr. Tony Hampton

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 65:27


Welcome to Protecting Your Nest with Dr. Tony Hampton. Jahfari Jones is a 20 year old who discovered the power of the carnivore diet. In this episode, he shares his story of recovery and healing. In this discussion, Drs. Tony and Jahfari talk about: (00:04:36) How the carnivore diet has changed Jahfari's life (00:12:06) Growing up in the country of Belize (00:16:52) Having the courage to go against conventional wisdom (00:23:03) Critically evaluating research and evidence (00:31:36) Navigating social and family life as a carnivore (00:38:57) How using communications and video production skills can help spread the message of low-carb/keto (00:41:19) The importance of prioritizing sleep (00:45:44) How to approach sharing the valuable health information you've learned with the people around you who are stuck in bad health with bad information (00:49:39) The progress of Jahfari's journey with the carnivore diet and general health (00:56:00) Jahfari's goals for the future Thank you for listening to Protecting Your Nest. For additional resources and information, please see the links below.    Links:   Jahfari Jones: Twitter Instagram   Dr. Tony Hampton: Linktree Instagram Account LinkedIn Account Ritmos Negros Podcast

Not Another Baptist Podcast
Episode 292: Episode 239: SWBTS at #SBC22 with Greenway, Upton, and Schroeder

Not Another Baptist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 23:55


Kyle was unavailable, so Matt invited Drs. Adam Greenway and Ed Upton, along with George Schroeder, to discuss the upcoming ways to connect with Southwestern Seminary at #sbc22. While you may know Dr. Greenway, President of SWBTS, Upton serves as VP for Institutional Advancement and Schroeder serves as AVP for Institutional Relations, and all three are on the show to keep you in the know!Alumni Association: https://swbts.edu/alumni/SWBTS @ SBC: https://swbts.edu/swbts-at-sbc22/Tickets are on sale now for Southwestern Seminary's SBC Alumni & Friends Luncheon, which will take place on June 15 at 12:00pm. Make plans to reconnect with fellow Southwesterners, catch up with SWBTS faculty, and hear from President Adam W. Greenway.You can purchase your tickets at swbts.edu/sbc22.

PVRoundup Podcast
Practice Management Pearls for the Busy Retinal Specialist

PVRoundup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 15:18


Drs. Goldberg and Marcus discuss the operational aspects of managing a busy retinal practice. Topics include electronic medical records (EMRs) and the need, value and importance of medical scribes as well as staffing issues particularly in the face of the pandemic. They share techniques to incorporate using images to promote and enhance patient education.

AAHKS Amplified
The YAG Augment: Legends of Arthroplasty with Drs. Allan Gross and Clive Duncan (Season 2, Episode 8)

AAHKS Amplified

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 52:43


In this episode, show hosts and Young Arthroplasty Group (YAG) Leaders Drs. Cohen-Rosenblum, Buller, Mildren and Wolfstadt host “Legends” Allan E. Gross, MD, FRCSC, O.Ont. and Clive P. Duncan, MD, MSc, FRCS(C) in our latest “Legends of Arthroplasty” edition. Discussion includes development of the Vancouver classification of periprosthetic hip fractures, working with Sir John Charnley, […] The post The YAG Augment: Legends of Arthroplasty with Drs. Allan Gross and Clive Duncan (Season 2, Episode 8) first appeared on AAHKS.

Podiatry Today Podcasts
Key Concepts in Bone Grafting

Podiatry Today Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 35:38


Drs. McAlister and Dujela share their experiences with various types of bone grafting, including handling of complications, choosing the best approach and evidence from the literature.

Back to the Reformation
Interview with Drs. Mike Abendroth and John Fonville on Sanctification

Back to the Reformation

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 98:36


We Interview with Drs. Mike Abendroth and John Fonville on Sanctification

Medic Mindset
Pediatric Pain

Medic Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 57:11


This is a special cross-post with the brand new pediatric podcast from NAEMSP: The Pediatric EMS Podcast created by Drs. Joelle Donofrio-Odmann and Dr. Joseph Finney. Dr. Donofrio-Odmann has been a guest on the show previously in . Other guests in this episode are Drs. , and They've created these . While you are there subscribe to their podcast which is sure to be a hit.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: An ode to buffets

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 164:17


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by discussing the latest slew of midterm primaries. Art Caplan discusses the baby formula shortage, and a new study that could predict traumatic brain injury outcomes. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Juliette Kayyem talks about the Buffalo shooting, and why the “lone wolf” framing does not capture the state of white supremacy in the U.S. Kayyem is former assistant secretary for homeland security under President Barack Obama, and the faculty chair of the homeland-security program at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. Stacy Thompson makes the case for better bike infrastructure, and talks with listeners about the debate between bike lanes and parking. Thompson is executive director of Livable Streets. Michigan State Senator Mallory McMorrow discusses her viral speech defending herself against Republican “groomer” attacks, and why her identity as a “straight white Christian married suburban mom” inspired her to take political action. McMorrow is a State Senator representing Michigan's 13th District. Neal Thompson tells stories from the Kennedy family, tracing the political family's lineage from Ireland to the U.S. Thompson's new book is “The First Kennedys: The Humble Roots of an American Dynasty.” We end the show by discussing the return of restaurant buffets.

Barbell Medicine Podcast
Episode #177: Blood Pressure Part I

Barbell Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 81:31


Drs. Baraki and Feigenbaum discuss blood pressure and exercise. Survey Link: https://forms.gle/FMfM1m4fFziSbe1o6 App Link: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/barbell-medicine/id1536216161 Resources From This episode: Lifestyle Gym Paper https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/15598276221089898?journalCode=ajla&#.YoI35luCifI.twitter USPSTF Screening Guidelines https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/recommendation/hypertension-in-adults-screening Blood Pressure Cuffs ValidateBP.org History of Hypertension Treatment https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4763852/ Exercise vs. Medication for Treating Hypertension https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30563873/ Meta-analysis on Resistance Training for Hypertension https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28769100/ Hypertensive Response to Exercise https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4962449/ Measuring BP During Exercise https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25273859/ https://www.barbellmedicine.com/blog/a-basic-guide-to-blood-pressure-part-i/ https://www.barbellmedicine.com/blog/a-basic-guide-to-blood-pressure-part-ii/ https://www.barbellmedicine.com/blog/the-effect-of-resistance-training-on-high-blood-pressure/ https://hypertension.cochrane.org For more of our stuff: Podcasts: goo.gl/X4H4z8 Website: www.barbellmedicine.com Instagram: @austin_barbellmedicine @jordan_barbellmedicine @leah_barbellmedicine @vanessa_barbellmedicine @untamedstrength @derek_barbellmedicine @hassan_barbellmedicine @charlie_barbellmedicine @alex_barbellmedicine @tomcampitelli @joe_barbellmedicine @rheece_barbellmedicine @cam_barbellmedicine @claire_barbellmedicine @ben_barbellmedicine @cassi.niemann @caleb_barbellmedicine Email: info@barbellmedicine.com Supplements/Templates/Seminars: www.barbellmedicine.com/shop/ Forum: forum.barbellmedicine.com/

Owning Your Health
Raising a Healthy in Sick World : Part 1 of 4

Owning Your Health

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 25:51


In this episode you will hear from Drs. Holly and Kyle Loveless on how to raise a healthy family. Dr. Kyle and Holly have three children (5 yrs, 2yrs and a newborn). They have been teaching their patients for years how to avoid most of the child health issues we see in America today. In this series they will walk you through the steps they have taken to raise their 3 healthy children. The future podcast will also be on our YouTube channel. (LovelessHealthSolutions)Dr. Kyle mentioned the new "Understanding Inflammation" E-book available on their website for free. Simply go to www.queencityhealthcenter.com and scrolled down to the free ebook. Click and enjoy. Thank you so much for listening.YOUTUBE:Loveless Health SolutionsINSTAGRAM:www.instagram.com/queencityhealthcenterwww.instagram.com/drhollylovelesswww.instagram.com/dr.kylelovelessFACEBOOK:www.facebook.com/queencityhealthcenterhttps://www.facebook.com/groups/36316...PODCAST:https://www.buzzsprout.com/994888For more information, please visit queencityhealthcenter.comFor personal questions, email us at queencityhealthcenter@gmail.com Charlotte, NC (980) 422-2000Matthews, NC (704) 844-6368

Neurology Exam Prep Podcast
Episode 45 - "Parkinson-Plus" Syndromes

Neurology Exam Prep Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 58:17


An overview of the major "Parkinson-plus" syndromes with Drs. Aaron Bower, Sara Schaefer and Katherine Fu.Note: This podcast is intended solely as an educational tool for learners, especially neurology residents. The contents should not be interpreted as medical advice.

Hope for the Caregiver
They Raised Two Children With Huntington's Disease

Hope for the Caregiver

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 39:44


May Is HD Awareness month, and our guests for this episode were Drs. Elton and Laquita Higgs. The couple adopted a little girl many years ago - who developed Huntington's Disease (HD). One of the most horrific diseases on the planet, HD eventually cost their daughter her life - but not before she had a daughter who also developed the genetic (and terminal) illness. Listen to their inspiring and insightful story - from their book, SHATTERED DREAMS - BUT HOPE: Encouragement for Caregivers of Huntington's Disease and Other Progressive Illnesses   For more information on HD, please visit HDSA.org (The Huntington's Disease Society of America)

Student Affairs NOW
Graduate Student Well-Being: Mental Health, Well-Being, and Support

Student Affairs NOW

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 56:25


Dr. Keith Edwards discusses graduate student mental health, well-being, and support with Drs. Christina W. Yao, Lisa S. Kaler, Dave Nguyen, and Michael J. Stebleton. Each guest brings perspectives as a graduate student, supporting graduate and professional students, and their writing and research about graduate students. The conversation explores the challenges facing graduate and professional students and ways to support students holistically from the individual to institutional levels.

Health Ignited
Episode 68:4 Ways You Can Master Self Love

Health Ignited

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 34:59


What does self-love look like to you? In this weeks episode Drs.Nick and Sonya talk about the everyday impact that we have on ourselves based on the choices we make and the boundaries that we set. Knowing our intentions and goals can help guide us into what we want out of life and what we need to do in order to get there. Tune in to find out the 4 aspects to consider when working on self-care and how honest communication can help you step into freedom.   Get your magnesium below at 10% off with code DRNICK https://bioptimizers.com/shop/products/magnesium-breakthrough   Bring brain tap into your home! Link below https://braintap.com/#a_aid=2007NIJE     Join the community and subscribe to our channel for more inspiring discussions on holistic health and wellness!   https://www.youtube.com/c/DrsNickandS...   Join our online communities: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/divineelemen... Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/divineeleme... Website - https://divineelements.ca   Level up your health with a community of like-minded individuals: https://drsjensen.com/   Order Dr. Sonya Jensen ND's new book, Woman Unleashed: https://www.amazon.ca/dp/1953153534/r…

Breathe Easy
Critical Perspective: PEEP and Lung Recruitment Selection Strategies with Mortality in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

Breathe Easy

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 33:33


In this “Breathe Easy Critical Perspective” podcast, Dr. Dominique Pepper interviews Drs. Jose Dianti and Ewan Goligher. They discuss their recent 2022 publication in the Blue Journal about the association of PEEP and Lung Recruitment Selection Strategies with Mortality in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis.

The Addiction Connection
Episode 104 - Varenicline (Chantix) for the Treatment of Cocaine Dependence

The Addiction Connection

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 26:02


Drs. Bell and DeVine explore the use of varenicline (Chantix) for the treatment of cocaine dependence. There are no current FDA approved medications for the treatment of cocaine dependence and several smaller studies have reviewed varenicline as a possible treatment. What does this most recent article, published April 2022, show? To learn more about the doctors as well as keep up with current happenings follow us on twitter: @echocsct or email us with questions or feedback: theaddictionconnectionpodcast@gmail.com

Prime Talk - eCommerce Podcast
PT115 - Travis Zigler - Amazon Seller & CEO of Profitable Pineapple Ads

Prime Talk - eCommerce Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 43:51


In this Prime Talk Podcast Sponsored by GETIDA – Travis Zigler - Amazon Seller & CEO of Profitable Pineapple Ads talk about How an Eye Doctor Found Great Purpose and Success on Amazon, also more information about his life's journey. #traviszigler #amazon seller About Travis Zigler of Profitable Pineapple Ads - https://www.profitablepineapple.com Drs. Travis and Jenna Zigler are on a mission to help one million dry eye sufferers. "When you have that big of a mission, you can't let the struggles get in the way," explained Travis. "When something big hits, you'll want to shut down if you're only about the money." Find out more about GETIDA: https://getida.com/ Please subscribe to our channel and share your thoughts and comments below. Stay safe and healthy in the meantime!

New Books in Medicine
Martin Abrahamson and Sanjiv Chopra, "Conquer Your Diabetes: Prevention, Control, Remission" (2022)

New Books in Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 50:34


The global epidemic of diabetes and prediabetes afflicts more than 1 billion people. And sadly, more than 50% of people with the disease do not achieve their desired glucose control. In Conquer Your Diabetes: Prevention, Control, Remission, Drs. Martin Abrahamson and Sanjiv Chopra, two Harvard Medical School professors and master clinicians, provide a roadmap for people with diabetes to manage their condition and live rewarding and fulfilling lives. Sine Yaganoglu trained as a neuroscientist and bioengineer (PhD, ETH Zurich). She currently works in innovation management and diagnostics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/medicine

New Books Network
Martin Abrahamson and Sanjiv Chopra, "Conquer Your Diabetes: Prevention, Control, Remission" (2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 50:34


The global epidemic of diabetes and prediabetes afflicts more than 1 billion people. And sadly, more than 50% of people with the disease do not achieve their desired glucose control. In Conquer Your Diabetes: Prevention, Control, Remission, Drs. Martin Abrahamson and Sanjiv Chopra, two Harvard Medical School professors and master clinicians, provide a roadmap for people with diabetes to manage their condition and live rewarding and fulfilling lives. Sine Yaganoglu trained as a neuroscientist and bioengineer (PhD, ETH Zurich). She currently works in innovation management and diagnostics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Stanford Medcast
Episode 41: Hot Topics Mini-series - Clinical decision-making in Prostate Cancer

Stanford Medcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 29:47


This episode is part of the Stanford Medicine Prostate Cancer CME Series: Treatment Across the Prostate Cancer Continuum. In this episode, Drs. Benjamin Chung, Ali Khaki, Sumit Shaw and Yushen Qian will discuss the complex treatment options for prostate cancer, as well as advances in diagnostic decision making. This episode will also include cased based discussions regarding diagnosis and clinical decision making. Read Transcript CME Information: https://stanford.cloud-cme.com/medcastepisode41 Claim CE: https://stanford.cloud-cme.com/Form.aspx?FormID=1178

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Oncology, Etc. – Rediscovering the Joy in Medicine with Dr. Deborah Schrag (Part 2)

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 30:03


In the second of this two-part conversation Drs. Patrick Loehrer and David Johnson sit down with Dr. Deborah Schrag, the current Chair of the Department of Medicine at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center to continue the discussion of her roles as a leader, researcher, oncologist, public health expert, and more. If you liked this episode, please subscribe. Learn more at https://education.asco.org, or email us at education@asco.org.     TRANSCRIPT Dr. Dave Johnson: Hi everyone, welcome back to Oncology, Etc. an ASCO educational podcast. My name is Dave Johnson. I'm at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. And I'm here with my good friend Dr. Pat Loehrer who serves as a director of Global Oncology and Health Equities at Indiana University. In the second half of our conversation with Dr. Deborah Schrag, the current chair of Medicine at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. In part one, we heard about Dr. Schrag's early life and background, as well as the importance of affordable cancer care and much more. Let's jump back into the conversation and hear about her current goals and initiatives at Memorial Sloan Kettering. I have a question for you. Jumping ahead a little bit. But I mean, you're such a role model for all of us. But you're now in a very powerful position as head of medicine at the preeminent cancer center in the world. So, I'd be interested in knowing what are your top initiatives? What did you come to this role wanting to do short-term and long-term? I'd be curious to hear from you about that. Dr. Deborah Schrag: Yeah. So, I have lots of specific initiatives, all the things that are probably very similar across medical cancer centers. We have to figure out the role of immuno-oncology. We have to figure out the role of CAR T-cell Therapy. There are lots of specific things, but let me tell you about three sort of overarching principles and things that I think we need to think about. So, one of the reasons why I decided to leave my job where I really focused on training researchers and building a research program to lead a department of medicine that has a mix of clinicians, educators, and investigators is that there's really a profound sense of exhaustion and disconnection. I'll use the word even burnout or people get the sense of losing the joy in the practice of medicine. And as corny as it sounds, and I know I'm going a little corny here, Dave. But I really want to help bring back and connect people to the joy in the practice of medicine. It's the joy that we experience when we crack a tough case, when we help a patient, when our patients make us laugh, when our patients and their families make us cry, when they drive us bananas, when they cook us food that is inedible, just reconnecting us to the joy, to the stories. I really wanted to try to be a different kind of leader because I felt that I could make a contribution to the field of academic medicine in general and oncology in particular, by working with faculty to set them up to tap into that joy, because I know they all started with it. I know they all went into medicine because they care about those human stories, because they do want to make a difference. This past week, a fellow intern of mine who you may know, passed away. His name was Paul Farmer. He was the head of Partners in Health and he was an infectious disease physician. There's a book about him by Tracy Kidder that's really moving. There's also a documentary about him called, Bending the Arc, which I would highly recommend. Paul was an incredible inspiration, just incredible, but he brought so much joy to the practice of medicine. I remember when Paul was going to some of the poorest places on the planet, specifically Cange, Haiti. He got an idea that he needed to bring chemotherapy because there were large cancers that were untreated. And he wanted to get leftover chemotherapy from the Dana-Farber. So, in the 1990s, when I was a fellow, he would ask me whether I could get him any leftover Taxol. I was like, ‘Paul, I can't do that. It's not safe. You can't take leftover Taxol to Cange'. And he said, ‘Deb, just wait, the drugs will be oral soon, and then I'll get it'. But guess what? Paul came back to me in 1999, and capecitabine had been approved. The oral equivalent of 5-FU. He held my feet to the fire. He said, ‘Every time you have a dead patient, if there's any leftover capecitabine, I want you to get it for me'. Inspirational leadership, connecting people to the joy in the practice of medicine. I would say that's number one. There's no one simple formula or way to do that. It's hard work. It requires a team I think a lot more teamwork into the practice of medicine. I think we're coming out of a hard two years where we've been confined to Zoom boxes. But it's a lot easier when we can sit together in a room and have a pizza and a beer on a Friday afternoon. But we have to figure this out, and we will, step by step. The other big thematic area, I think, has to do with the patient experience. Dave, I mean, when I started out as a fellow, patients with advanced lung cancer were living for 10 months, 10-12 months, that was a pretty good run with advanced metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. Well, these days, it's 2-3 years, and there's even quite a tale of patients who were living 4-5 years. And that is a long journey. It's no longer the 800-meter sprint, it's a half marathon, turning into a marathon and even an ultra-marathon. So, the way we deliver care needs to change. So, we're really rethinking here, how we deliver care. So, as an example of some, if you go back to the 80s and 90s, cancer chemotherapy was something that happened in the hospital. And in the last quarter century, we've transitioned that to an outpatient practice. I think in the next quarter century, we won't transition all of it, but we will transition a lot of it to home. As an example, I'm struck by when patients undergo IVF, they get handed some Lupron and are taught how to self-administer Lupron every day, so they can undergo a fertility cycle. But when those same women get breast cancer, they have to come into the clinic and sit and wait and take half a day off of work to get the same Lupron. The same is true for men with prostate cancer. Why is that? It's because of policies, and it's not safety, it's not patient-centered. So, I think we have an opportunity to change the patient experience. I think we'll be able to give immunotherapy at home, and HER-2 agents at home. We have to do the trials and make sure that it's safe, but we have to make cancer care more patient-centric and improve the experience. And that's just essential when it's a marathon that we're asking our patients to run, not these 12-month sprints. Families need this also. So, those are a few of the challenges that I want to take on. Joy in medicine, patient experience, and of course, the physician-scientist pathway needs to be strengthened. Dr. Pat Loehrer: I love it. You can imagine between Dave and me, I think that resonates so much about having joy in medicine. I've not heard other people talk about that, but I really think that's an important vocation. But I'm going to ask you something else too because, in the efforts of being joyful and being a role model for that, there's the other side of it, where you can't actually let your hair down, and really be depressed, if you will, or down because you can't let the other side see that. And so, who do you lean on if you will, your confessor that you can talk to when you're feeling down when you're trying to fight the anti-joy part of your job? Dr. Deborah Schrag: I have lots of friends outside of medicine. And I've always found that that's really helpful to make time for friends outside of medicine. They help connect me to humor and other things. I'm coming up on a big high school reunion. My high school classmates and I still meet for picnics in Central Park. And there are about 120 in our graduating class. And I think we'll have about 110 of us getting together. We still have picnics with 40-50 people attending. So, there's nothing like old friends from childhood who now do all kinds of different things. So, that's really helpful. But I've also found that my mentors and colleagues who trained me and who know me really well, are a great source of advice. So, leaders in academic medicine, and I've always found that I've been able to get advice from people who were senior and leaders, people such as Dr. Mayer, Dr. Benz, Dr. Jim Griffin, and also junior colleagues. I now increasingly as I get old, I rely more and more on my trainees and my mentees. So, some of the folks I know best are people who I trained. So, I'll just give you one example. Many of you may know Ethan Basch. We worked together when we were both just coming up. I was an assistant professor. He was a couple of years behind me. I mentored him. Well, he's now chief of the Division of Oncology at UNC. He and I have written lots of grants together. We're really partners now. But it's been a lifelong professional friendship. Sometimes when I just need to let my hair down, I get on the phone with Ethan, and yeah, there's a little bit of commiserating. But I'll give you an example that runs through Dave. Some really valuable experiences had to do with being asked to serve on committees. I think it's great. I just want to give a shout-out to ASCO. Some of my earliest professional relationships were with superstars that I met through ASCO. So, people like Joe Simone, reading his Simone's Maxims everyone needs to read Simone's Maxims if you haven't. There was a guy by the name of Christopher Desh, who sadly passed on. But he was an ASCO member who practiced at the Virginia Commonwealth University back in the late 1990s. Boy, did that guy understand the joy in medicine, some of the early folks who started QOPI. Being introduced to those individuals who practiced in different parts of the country and who had different kinds of challenges - having that sort of rich network has been incredible. At some point, I think through such a connection, maybe it was through Dr. Mayer, I was referred to Dr. Johnson, who was then running the American Board of Internal Medicine committee that wrote the oncology exam. I participated in that for a few years that was led by Dr. Johnson. And I met incredible people on that committee, including Dr. Johnson, just Dr. Johnson's stories could inspire anyone and get them back on track just in terms of the humor and the joy and the love, and really the pride in the profession. But I met Jamie Von Roenn that way, who's now leading educational efforts at ASCO, she was on that committee. Lynn Schuchter became a good friend of mine as a result of that. So, I would just say, sometimes you need to get out of your own space. And sometimes I need to get out of Dodge, as they say, I need to get out of New York, get out of Boston, and being connected to colleagues across the country has been so rewarding. I have a network of friends at other institutions who I rely on. Serving on external advisory boards is a great place to meet people. Study section, if anyone has the opportunity to be on study section. That's a fabulous opportunity. So, I think participating in peer review, showing up at meetings, serving on ASCO committees, or ASH or AACR. These are really important experiences. And I will say in my leadership role, I'm really trying to make it clear to faculty that I encourage them to take time to participate in these activities and attend these events and even travel because the traveling is important, too. I could not have gotten the same dose of Dave Johnson, if I had not actually gone to the meeting, spent all day writing board review questions, and then having a nice meal afterward. That was part of the experience. I don't know what you would say, Dave, but that was my view. Dr. Dave Johnson: So, one of the things that Osler talked about was the fellowship of the profession, and how important it is to have those relationships. Even if one can't physically be with that individual, developing that spiritual relationship is really critically important. I'm so glad you brought this up and expanded on it in the way you did because I think it's absolutely critical to retain the joy of medicine. It's our colleagues, as well as our patients that make it such a marvelous, majestic profession, in my view. Dr. Pat Loehrer: I was going to just add something if I could. So, Deb, replace me on the ABIM, just to let you know, because we had certain slots on there. One of the not sure if it was the rules or guidelines that were mandated is that everyone needed to take the oncology boards, even though we wrote the questions, we had to take the test. And you knew that and you had such unbridled enthusiasm for this. I still remember this deeply, and that not only did you recertify for the oncology board, but you also studied to take the medicine boards too. Your love of medicine is so contagious. And I'm sure everyone at Memorial benefits from this. Dr. Deborah Schrag: Thank you. That's very nice to say. I do, I love the stories. I've been rounding with the house staff on the inpatient service. I think both of you know, inpatient oncology, as we're able to do more and more in the outpatient setting, our inpatients are very, very sick. And we often get a front-row seat to what I would call the social determinants of health challenges. In other words, if you've got relatives and resources, you may be able to be at home. But if you have severe pain or symptoms, and you lack the relatives, or you live on a fifth floor, walk-up, or just don't have the resources to get the home care that you need, you're more likely to be in our hospital. But as I round with the house staff, I find myself asking them to tell me more about the patient stories. Because when I round and they tell me that it's a 74-year-old with peritoneal carcinomatosis, jaundice, and abdominal pain. I'm so old that I've seen so many hundreds of those patients and the management hasn't changed very much. But what's really the privilege is to understand the journeys that got people where they are, and to learn a little bit about who these people are. I try to do that when I round with house staff and I find that it makes the experience better for them. I have to say that I do worry about how we train young physicians in oncology because what they see on the inpatient side is really the hardest of the hard, that's obviously less true in a leukemia service, where they're delivering lots of curative therapy or a stem cell transplant service. But in solid tumor oncology, it's really hard. I think it's something we have to have to tackle. We have to rethink education and medical oncology. I'm hoping that we're going to do that. That's also on the bucket list, by the way. I think we have to do that as a profession. And I know both of you are passionate champions and advocates for education, as is ASCO. But I think it's really imperative that we do that if we are to keep attracting talent. And then I just want to make one more point, which is that New York City is one of the most diverse places in the United States. I don't know about the planet, because I don't know the whole planet. But in the United States, we are incredibly diverse. But the oncology workforce does not yet look like that. So, we have a lot of work to do to train a much more diverse workforce. We're doing well with respect to gender, very well. We're literally about 50/50, we may even have a little bit higher proportion of women on the faculty here at MSK. And I think that's true nationally as well. But with respect to Blacks and Hispanics, and other underrepresented communities, Native Americans, we've got a long way to go. And we have a pipeline problem. And that's going to be hard. But it's hard work that we have to do, and I know you guys are working on that in your own centers as well. Dr. Dave Johnson: Let me follow up on that. What attributes are you looking for in trainees and newly hired faculty? Whether they be junior or senior faculty? What are the characteristics or attributes you seek that you think predict, or certainly you want your individuals to possess? Dr. Deborah Schrag: We all want people who have everything, but I would say creativity, the willingness to take risks, and the ability to ask a question. I say this to the trainees, frankly, I say it to my own children as well. ‘It's okay, take a harder course. Yes, you may get a B minus by trying something new and different, that doesn't play to your strengths. But try something new. Take risks. Yes, the trial may fail. Yes, you may not get that grant.' But I think a willingness to take risks, a willingness to put yourself out there, a willingness to stretch. I'm also looking for people who can work in teams because there is no aspect of medical care that happens in MSK, I suspect that it's also true that maybe medicine in Antarctica, but even medicine in Antarctica is probably a team sport. Medicine has become a very complicated team sport. It's a very complicated dance with pharmacists, nurses, and APPs. It takes a village to give a course of immunotherapy. It is very complicated. And so, when people like to control things and like to do everything themselves, they're going to have a hard time. And that's true I find for teaching, laboratory investigation, wet lab, dry lab, most good, impactful, important science in oncology these days, clinical trials, wet, dry, all of it gets done in teams. Teams that have people with different levels of training, different skill sets, early stage, late stage, people who are quantitative, people who can write, people who can program, people who can do lab experiments, and people who know what an organoid is. People who know how to program an in R. All different kinds of skill sets but they have to be able to work in teams. People who can't do that are going to struggle to achieve maximum impact. I'm not saying that there isn't room at the end for the occasional genius person who likes to work solo. But that's not really what we need to move the needle. So, I need team players. I think there is a big emphasis on collegiality. Of course, we want smart and we want brilliance. But sometimes a drop less brilliance and a drop more collegiality and being able to work together in a team, it goes a long way and it's the difference between doing something impactful and not. That's what I look for. I also think that it takes all different kinds of people. And no one has to excel at everything, but it's great for people to be able to excel at something. So, passion, drive, and ability to ask questions, and not being afraid to occasionally fail and having some tolerance for that and trying to make sure that leaders are able to tolerate that, too. We have to be able to. Dr. Dave Johnson: Yeah, I think those are great suggestions. We're getting near the end of our time today, and we have a lot more questions to ask. But what's your biggest fear, as the head of the Department of Medicine, looking to the future, what causes you to lose sleep at night? Dr. Deborah Schrag: I think the business of medicine. If medicine turns into something that feels just like [inaudible] work, and losing physicians, if we don't respect physicians' need to take care of themselves, to take care of their families, and yeah, to find that joy, then we will not attract the top talents. I think we need great minds and great hearts and people from all walks of life to enter the profession, because that's the talent that we need, to quote my friend, Paul Farmer, ‘Bend the arc'. And you know, we need to bend Kaplan-Meier curves in the right direction. And we need the talent to come into the profession, and if they see that we are not happy and not thriving, the next generation is going to go elsewhere. I don't want to begrudge my wonderful endocrinology colleagues. We need people to tackle diabetes, and we need great surgeons and great anesthesiologists, too. So, it's not just oncology. In medicine, I'm responsible for all kinds of discipline. And boy, we need a lot of cardio-oncologists because we've created all kinds of new challenges. So, it's all of the sub-disciplines of medicine, but I think physician well-being and attracting talent to the field is really essential and making sure that the business side of medicine doesn't take over and destroy the core promise and premise of academic medicine. It is a spectacular profession and calling, and it has led to so many advances that have really changed the world. And we have to, I think, preserve the good in that. My fear is that that gets further eroded. Dr. Pat Loehrer: Just one last question from me. Thank you for all your wonderful comments. But I think I have to ask this because it's such an unusual thing as they brought up at the beginning that you're the first female Head of Medicine at Memorial and Lisa DeAngelis is the first Physician in Chief. And so, although there is gender equity in medicine, there is not gender equity and leadership around the academic world. And this is a very unique situation there. Can you reflect a little bit about the significance of this and perhaps, lessons learned, particularly if you're speaking to a younger version of yourself or a young woman who's thinking about a career? What are the lessons between you and Dr. DeAngelis mean? Dr. Deborah Schrag: I'm not sure I've been at it long enough to have lessons. I'm just so grateful. So, I'm not in the generation that was a trailblazer. I'm a beneficiary. So, I've had the privilege of being trained by Dr. Jane Weeks, by Dr. Judy Garber. I, myself, had so many great mentors who were women. I would say to women, that you can have it all. You just may not be able to have it all at once. Women and men have to make choices. Can you have a lab and be a laboratory investigator? Yes. Can you do that and have a family? Yes. I think running a high-power lab and having a gigantic clinical practice and running clinical trials, I think the three-legged stool and the so-called triple threat is really, really hard. But I think it's hard for women and men. What I would also say to women is you don't have to be the boys - be yourself. I think the best advice I can give to leaders is to be authentic. Because everyone, men, women, people smell a phony and no one likes to phony. So, I think if you know how to partner, you understand that it's a team sport. I think women do that really well. So, I think being authentic, and I think women need to hear that, you don't have to emulate male role models. You have to be yourself. I would love to emulate the two of you. I have to thank both of you because the Indiana Miracle and Dave from his Vanderbilt days, Vandy, as Dave likes to call it, from his Vanderbilt days to his Texas days, like, the two of you are such incredible thought leaders and inspirational leaders in oncology, but I can't be you. The best we can be is sort of the best version of ourselves but we can be inspired by the great qualities that we see in other leaders and carry a little bit of that with us. So, I think that goes for women and for men. Dr. Pat Loehrer: Thank you! Well said, and I appreciate the thoughts. We've kind of gone through this and we're going to have to wrap it up. One of the questions that we often times ask our visitors is if there's a book that they're reading, a documentary that they're watching, a movie they're seeing, or anything you'd recommend? Dr. Deborah Schrag: That's a good question. So, yes, actually. One of the ways that I learn about leadership that I find, actually a fun way that's both relaxing and educational, is to read a biography. I love reading biographies. I'm going to name two. And these are popular books - for scholars these may not be. First really fun book is ‘The Splendid and the Vile', by Erik Larson. It's a book about Winston Churchill in 1940, and how he has to try to persuade the United States to enter World War Two, but it's really about a particular year in history and Winston Churchill. Dr. Dave Johnson: It's a great book. Dr. Deborah Schrag: It's called, The Splendid and the Vile. I just learned so much about leadership from that book and the decisions that Winston Churchill makes in his bathtub. So, just read that book and think about what Winston Churchill does in his bathtub. I can't lead from my bathtub, I live in a New York City apartment, but that's one. Then more recently, I guess there's a little German theme happening here, is, The Chancellor. It's about the life of Angela Merkel. It's long, I haven't finished it yet. But it's incredible. What a story, East Germany, her leadership style, how she studies chemistry, how she rises. It's a fantastic book. It's called, The Chancellor. So, I will recommend that one. Then the last one, my beloved nephew who's like a son to me. He's about 36 years old, and he has ALS. And he's completely paralyzed. He is on a vent and he has two little kids. But he released a documentary that actually won at the Tribeca Film Festival called, Not Going Quietly, which is about a cross-country trip that he made. He's a pretty inspirational character, despite the fact that my nephew was completely locked in, he communicates only with his eyes. He is living a remarkable life. I think that documentay, I know this is a shameless plug for my nephew, but he's a pretty inspirational character. I don't necessarily agree with 100% of his policy prescriptions and recommendations. But there are lots of ways to make meaning in the world. So, that's another documentary. Dr. Pat Loehrer: That's incredible. Thank you so much for sharing that. I'm going to look it up. People think cancer is the worst thing you can get but there are worse diseases to have. Dr. Deborah Schrag: Yeah, I think this one might change your idea. And then I would also say Paul Farmer's Bending the Arc. I think for young physicians who haven't seen that movie, I would recommend Bending the Arc. Dr. Pat Loehrer: Thank you. Dr. Deborah Schrag: Thank you! It's been great to chat with you. Dr. Pat Loehrer: It's great. So, that's all the time we have for today. And I really want to thank you, Deb, for joining us and for all your insight. It's been wonderful. I also want to thank all our listeners for tuning in to Oncology, Etc. This is an ASCO Education podcast where we'll talk about just about anything and everything, if you've heard. If you have an idea for a topic or guest you'd like to see on the show or a host that you would like not to see on the show, just email us at education@asco.org. Thanks again. And Dave, I just have a riddle for you here. How do you make an octopus laugh? Dr. Dave Johnson: Show him your picture. Dr. Pat Loehrer: Ten-tickles. That's all we have for today. You guys have a good evening. Take care.   Thank you for listening to the ASCO Education podcast. To stay up to date with the latest episodes, please click subscribe. Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the comprehensive education center at education.asco.org.   The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.

AAEP Practice Life
Accounts receivable

AAEP Practice Life

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 33:00


Join AAEP Practice Life Podcast host Dr. Mike Pownall as he discusses accounts receivable strategies with three colleagues, Drs. Patrick First of First Equine Veterinary Services (Alabama), Wendy Krebs of Bend Equine Medical Center (Oregon), and Liz Steele of Steele Equine Veterinary Services & Performance Horse Center (Florida). AAEP Practice Life is sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim. Visit them at theartofhorse.com.  

Beaumont HouseCall Podcast
the COVID-19 Update: Summer 2022 episode

Beaumont HouseCall Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 27:32


Summer is here and unfortunately so is a rise of COVID cases and community transmission throughout Michigan, the U.S. and the world. What does this mean for your summer plans and how do we continue to move forward in the safest way possible? Drs. Gilpin and Skrzynski break it all down in our latest COVID-19 Update.

Diabetes Core Update
Diabetes Core Update Diabetic Neuropathy Part 3 May 2022

Diabetes Core Update

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 30:24


In this special three-part series we will be doing a deep dive into diabetic peripheral neuropathy.    In this third episode Drs. J. Robinson Singleton and Robin Marcus join our host, Dr. Neil Skolnik to discuss non-pharmacologic treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.  In part 1 we covered the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, screening and diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and in part 2 of the series we covered pharmacologic management.   This series is supported by an unrestricted educational grant to the American Diabetes Association from Nevro, Inc. Presented by: Neil Skolnik, M.D., Professor of Family and Community Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University; Associate Director, Family Medicine Residency Program, Abington Jefferson Health Dr. J. Robinson Singleton and Dr. Robin Marcus. Dr. Singleton is Professor and Vice Chair for VA affairs, Neurology, Director, CTSI Clinical Trials Services Foundation at the University of Utah and Chief of Service, Neurology in the Salt Lake City Veterans Administration Health System. For more information about diabetic peripheral neuropathy, please see the full compendium at: professional.diabetes.org/monographs Dr. Robin Marcus is a Specialist in Orthopedic Physical Therapy in the Department of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training and Professor and Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs in the College of Health at the University of Utah.

Live Foreverish
Uncovering the Clues of Greying Hair

Live Foreverish

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 13:50


The Science of Aging and Gray Hair Gray hair….do you embrace it or color it? Gray hair is a visible reminder that we are getting older. Is there something you can do about it? Emerging research on gray hair sheds light on the aging process and provides evident that it can be halted or temporarily reversed. On the latest episode of Live FOREVERISH, Drs. Mike and Crystal will discuss what causes gray hair and how to stop it.

Central Line by American Society of Anesthesiologists
Spokespeople Speak Up at ASA's Legislative Conference

Central Line by American Society of Anesthesiologists

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 14:02


In this special episode, we interviewed attendees of ASA's Legislative Conference who joined a leadership spokesperson training session to find out what drives them and what they'll take away from the conference and spokesperson training. Listen in as Drs. Sharon Ashley, Kevin Beitz, Arianna Cook, Elisa Lund, Lydiesther Martinez, Zelle Ndika, Andrew Nicoli, and Felipe Perez take us behind the scenes and share their best tips. Recorded May 2022.

Docs Who Lift
The Gym Clinic - Your Doctor's Office as a Gym

Docs Who Lift

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 22:30


Drs. Karl and Spencer discuss incorporating a gym into a doctor's office to utilize exercise as medicine. You'll learn: How this idea came about How it would work Why it is important How Dr. Spencer got fired - LOL only half kidding. Click here to read the published article

Straight From The Cutter's Mouth: A Retina Podcast
Episode 343: Journal Club including discussion of fibrates for DR, natural history of ERM, COVID-19 and vascular occlusions, Google searches and Teprotumumab

Straight From The Cutter's Mouth: A Retina Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022


Drs. Nicholas Farber, M. Ali Khan, and Safa Rahmani join for a journal club discussion of four recent publications in major ophthalmology journals:Fibrates and Diabetic Retinopathy (https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/article-abstract/2790668)Natural History of Epiretinal Membranes (https://www.ophthalmologyretina.org/article/S2468-6530(22)00087-2/fulltext#%20)COVID-19 and Vascular Occlusions (https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/fullarticle/2790988)Google Searches for Thyroid Eye Disease and Teprotumumab (https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/article-abstract/2791596)Financial Disclosures: Dr. Sridhar is a consultant for Alcon, Allergan, Dorc, Genentech, and Regeneron. Dr. Khan, Dr. Farber, and Dr. Rahmani have no relevant disclosures.You can claim CME credits for many podcast episodes via the AAO website. Visit https://www.aao.org/browse-multimedia?filter=Audi

Bede's Podcast with Michael A.G. Haykin
1689 Baptist Confession of Faith (Part 3): Article 1—On the Holy Scriptures

Bede's Podcast with Michael A.G. Haykin

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 43:10


In this episode Drs. Haykin and Pohlman continue their exploration of the 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith as they take up Article I: On the Holy Scriptures. What makes the BCF unique when compared to Roman Catholicism? And what are some of the important implications of the BCF's doctrine of Scripture for ministry today?    Resource Recommendation:  1689: The Baptist Confession of Faith 

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Dr Arthur Caplan and Dave Rothkopf Episode 604

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 63:58


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more David Rothkopf is the CEO of The Rothkopf Group, host of the Deep State Radio podcast, and the author, most recently of “Traitor: A History of Betraying America from Benedict Arnold to Donald Trump.” The Rothkopf Group produces podcasts including Deep State Radio, National Security Magazine, custom programming for clients and it organizes live interactive web-based and live forums. Rothkopf is a contributing columnist to The Daily Beast and a member of the Board of Contributors of USA Today.  He is the author of hundreds articles on international, national security and political themes for publications that include the New York Times, Washington Post, USA Today, the Financial Times, the Daily Beast, Foreign Policy and Foreign Affairs. He is also a regular commentator on broadcast media worldwide. His previous books include Great Questions of Tomorrow, National Insecurity: American Leadership in an Age of Fear, Power, Inc.: The Epic Rivalry Between Big Business and Government—and the Reckoning That Lies Ahead , Superclass: The Global Power Elite and the World They Are Making, and Running the World: The Inside Story of the National Security Council and the Architects of American Power. His most recent book is The Great Questions of Tomorrow. Rothkopf has taught international affairs at Columbia University, Georgetown University and Johns Hopkins University. He has served as a member of a number of boards and advisory boards including those associated with the U.S. Institute of Peace, IREX, the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University, the Progressive Policy Institute, and the Center for the Study of the Presidency. Previously, Rothkopf served as CEO and Editor of the FP Group, publishers of Foreign Policy Magazine, CEO of Garten Rothkopf and was the founder and CEO of Intellibridge Corporation, an open source intelligence provider to government and private sector organizations. Prior to that he served as managing director of Kissinger Associates. Rothkopf served as deputy undersecretary of commerce for international trade policy in the Clinton administration and played a central role in developing the administration's groundbreaking Big Emerging Markets Initiative. Before government, Rothkopf was founder and CEO of International Media Partners and editor and publisher of the CEO Magazine and Emerging Markets newspaper. He also served as chairman of the CEO Institute. He is a graduate of Columbia College of Columbia University and attended the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism. Dr Arthur Caplan who is currently the Drs. William F and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Prior to coming to NYU School of Medicine, Dr. Caplan was the Sidney D. Caplan Professor of Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine in Philadelphia, where he created the Center for Bioethics and the Department of Medical Ethics. Caplan has also taught at the University of Minnesota, where he founded the Center for Biomedical Ethics, the University of Pittsburgh, and Columbia University.  He received his PhD from Columbia University Follow Dr Caplan on Twitter and let him know you heard him here! Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe   Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page

Skin The Surface
BONUS EPISODE: SKIN OF COLOR WITH DERMASPHERE PODCAST

Skin The Surface

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 18:16


Dr Rina is excited to be joined by Dermasphere podcaster hosted by dermatologist Drs. Luke Johnson and Michelle Tarbox to dive into skin of color.

PVRoundup Podcast
Early Diagnosis and Treatment in DME

PVRoundup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 14:39


Drs. MacCumber and Singer explore the complex nature of caring for patients with diabetic macular edema including factors that impact arriving at the initial diagnosis, getting patients to the appropriate eye healthcare professional, and initiating appropriate therapy. They also describe the clinical factors that impact their treatment decision choices.

PVRoundup Podcast
The Patient Experience in Retinal Diseases

PVRoundup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 14:51


Retinal specialists, Drs. Mathew MacCumber and Seenu Hariprasad share their insights into potential barriers to care, reimbursement, treating, and managing different chronic retinal diseases. Potential opportunities for prevention and limiting progression are discussed.

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series
Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: ASCO Guideline Endorsement of ASTRO Guideline

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 13:51


An interview with Dr. David Schiff from the University of Virginia Medical Center in Charlottesville, VA, Dr. Michael Vogelbaum from Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, FL, and Dr. Vinai Gondi from Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center Warrenville and Proton Center in Warrenville, IL, authors on "Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: American Society of Clinical Oncology Guideline Endorsement of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Guideline." An ASCO endorsement panel endorsed the "Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: an ASTRO Clinical Practice Guideline," and the authors review the endorsement process and key points in this episode. Read the full guideline endorsement at www.asco.org/neurooncology-guidelines.   TRANSCRIPT Brittany Harvey: Hello and welcome to the ASCO Guidelines podcast series, brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, a collection of nine programs covering a range of educational and scientific content and offering enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all the shows including this one at asco.org/podcasts. My name is Brittany Harvey, and today I'm interviewing Dr. David Schiff, from the University of Virginia Medical Center in Charlottesville, Virginia, Dr. Michael Vogelbaum from Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida, and Dr. Vinai Gondi from Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center Warrenville and Proton Center in Warrenville, Illinois, authors on 'Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: American Society of Clinical Oncology Guideline Endorsement of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Guideline'. Thank you for being here, Dr. Schiff, Dr. Vogelbaum, and Dr. Gondi. Drs. Schiff, Vogelbaum, and Gondi: Our pleasure. Brittany Harvey: First, I'd like to note that ASCO takes great care in the development of its guideline products and ensures that the ASCO conflict of interest policy is followed for each guideline product. The full conflict of interest information for this guideline endorsement panel is available online with the publication in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Schiff, do you have any relevant disclosures that are directly related to this topic? Dr. David Schiff: No relevant disclosures, Brittany. Brittany Harvey: Thank you. And Dr. Vogelbaum, do you have any relevant disclosures that are related to this topic? Dr. Michael Vogelbaum: I have no relevant disclosures. Brittany Harvey: Thank you. And Dr. Gondi, do you have any relevant disclosures that are related to this topic? Dr. Vinai Gondi: Brittany, my only relevant disclosure is that I served as vice-chair of the guidelines that we're discussing today, but otherwise, no relevant disclosures. Brittany Harvey: Excellent! Thank you all. So, then starting us off, Dr. Schiff, what is the scope of this guideline endorsement? And how does it intersect with the recently published 'Treatment for Brain Metastases: ASCO-SNO-ASTRO Guideline'? Dr. David Schiff: Sure. A little bit of background, from the start of the joint ASCO and SNO guideline effort, we had the participation of radiation oncologists, in addition to neurosurgeons, medical oncologists, and neuro-oncologists. As we were getting underway, ASTRO reached out asking to participate formally as well. They had been planning to update their brain metastasis guidelines but were a year or two away from getting started. And they recognized it would be redundant for them to create comprehensive guidelines that covered chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and surgery as our guidelines were poised to do. By participating with ASCO and SNO, they were able to have their task force focus specifically on key questions related to radiation oncology practices. In particular, the ASTRO project went into considerable depth on issues of radiation and radiosurgery dose, fractionation schemes, and the risk of radiation complications. These were areas that our guidelines didn't address. Several members of the ASTRO task force including their chair, Paul Brown, and co-chair Dr. Gondi were members of our committee, and we added Dr. Brown as a co-chair to our committee when ASTRO came on board. The overlap between our two groups helped ensure that our recommendations were in harmony. Brittany Harvey: So, then, Dr. Vogelbaum, can you provide us with an overview of how the ASCO guideline endorsement process works? Dr. Michael Vogelbaum: Sure, Brittany. So, as Dr. Schiff mentioned, ASCO had convened a guidelines panel to develop the new 'Treatment for Brain Metastasis: ASCO-SNO-ASTRO Guideline'. And this was a multidisciplinary panel that he and I co-chaired and was anchored by a guideline specialist from ASCO, Hans Messersmith, and the process was that we had evaluated recent literature pertaining to the treatment of the brain metastases, and so, we had a very good understanding of what was supported by high-quality evidence and what was not there yet, as a group. So, when ASTRO came to ASCO and asked whether or not we would be interested in endorsing their guidelines, we were already prepared with all the evidence. And so, the same panel got together again, to evaluate the ASTRO guidelines. And we did this, again, in a very structured manner. We reviewed the guideline questions and recommendations, compared them to the evidence, and went through the same type of review and polling process that we had when we had developed our own original guidelines. In the end, we had a conversation with the ASTRO guidelines leadership about some of the points that we raised questions about, and we were able to reach an accommodation that allowed us to fully endorse the ASTRO guidelines. Brittany Harvey: Thank you, Dr. Vogelbaum for that overview of the endorsement process. So, then, Dr. Gondi, what are the key recommendations of the ASTRO guideline? Dr. Vinai Gondi: Thank you, Brittany. As Dr. Schiff and Dr. Vogelbaum outlined, ASTRO commissioned a list of key questions that they sought to address specifically to inform the radiotherapeutic management of brain metastases. And to address these questions, ASTRO not only convened a panel of expert radiation oncologists across the country but also engaged with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to create a comparative effectiveness evidence review, in addition to our own high-level evidence review to address these questions. The four key questions that were addressed in the ASTRO guidelines are: Number one: What are the indications for stereotactic radiosurgery alone for patients with intact brain metastases? Number two: What are the indications for observation, preoperative radiosurgery or post-operative radiosurgery, or whole-brain radiotherapy in patients with resected brain metastases? Number three: What are the indications for whole-brain radiotherapy for patients with intact brain metastases? Number four: What are the risks of symptomatic radionecrosis with whole-brain radiotherapy and/or stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with brain metastases? The recommendations that were made are based on a high-level review of a considerable amount of literature over the past several years that addressed these specific questions. I would encourage the listeners to this podcast to read through the guidelines to understand the specific nuances of each of those recommendations. Brittany Harvey: Excellent! Thank you for that overview. Then, in addition to what Dr. Gondi just said, Dr. Vogelbaum, were there any additional points of discussion raised by the ASCO endorsement panel? Dr. Michael Vogelbaum: Brittany, yes, there was an area of discussion where we needed to interact with the ASTRO guidelines leadership, as I mentioned earlier, and it really related to that key question one that Dr. Gondi described, which is what are the indications for SRS alone for patients with intact brain metastasis. The approach that had been strongly endorsed by ASCO was that there would be a multidisciplinary approach to decision making. And really the benefit of that, the value of that radiosurgery really comes in the form of the interaction between the radiation oncologist and the neurosurgeon. The way that the original proposal had been formulated, there was a size cut-off that was higher than we thought was appropriate for really endorsing that kind of conversation between the radiation oncologist and the neurosurgeon. And so really, we proposed that we bring that cut-off down further, there actually was another subpart to the guideline that had looked at a lower cut-off, but did not specifically call out that interaction between the neurosurgeon and the radiation oncologist. And we felt it would be more appropriate to insert that at that cut-off rather than the larger lesion cut-off. And after a conversation, there was agreement, that was really the only guideline or subpart of the guidelines where there was any real debate or discussion. For the rest of it, the comments that came up from the panel were easily addressed and it really just came down to this one modification. And fortunately, ASTRO agreed, and we were able to go ahead and complete the endorsement. Brittany Harvey: Great! It's great that this was able to be a complete endorsement of that guideline. So, then, Dr. Gondi, in your view, what is the importance of this guideline endorsement? And how will it affect ASCO members? Dr. Vinai Gondi: Thank you, Brittany. A number of responses to that. Number one is, as Dr. Vogelbaum, outlined the purpose of these guidelines was meant to be patient-centric and patient-focused, that we had patient champions who had navigated, who are part of the guideline development team, but also to be multidisciplinary. And so, the type of input and feedback we received from the ASCO team was super valued and valuable, as we were formulating these guidelines and Dr. Vogelbaum outlined a good example. Number two, it had been almost a decade since the last guidelines had come out from ASTRO related to brain metastases management. And much has happened in our field over the past several years that has been practice-changing. We have several novel and innovative radiotherapy technologies and techniques, such as the emergence of radiosurgery, the use of novel radioprotectants, such as hippocampal avoidance, and memantine, but also the emergence of innovative and novel neurosurgical interventions and CNS active systemic therapies. So, the modern management of brain metastases has really undergone quite a revolution over just the past few years, and it is important that these guidelines be updated to reflect those changes, but also to inform radiation oncologists on the contemporary management of brain metastases and in evidence-based care. So, we believe that these guidelines will significantly impact ASCO members. Certainly, those who are radiation oncologists, as brain metastases are some of the most common patients that radiation oncologists manage in the community and in academic centers, but also for other members of ASCO medical oncologists, surgeons to understand sort of the nuances of radiotherapy management that is evidence-based, so they can have a patient-centered, patient-focused, multidisciplinary discussion with their radiation oncologist as well. Brittany Harvey: Those are excellent points for clinicians on the management for brain metastases. So, then finally, Dr. Schiff, Dr. Gondi just mentioned how these guidelines are patient-centric. So, how will these guideline recommendations impact patients with brain metastases? Dr. David Schiff: Yeah, well, I think what I'm about to say is really going to echo what Dr. Gondi just said. You know, 20 years ago, patients diagnosed with brain metastases were typically immediately referred to a radiation oncologist, they almost always got whole-brain radiation therapy, the median survival was about four months, and many, if not most patients, died from their brain metastases. The situation has really changed recently. With the rapid advances in management from new therapies, and well-designed clinical trials in recent years, outcomes have markedly improved, it's probably less than a quarter of patients now who succumb to their intracranial disease. But at the same time, decision-making for patients has become much more complicated. Nowadays, medical oncologists may reach out initially to neurosurgeons for consideration of radiosurgery or surgical resection, or in some circumstances utilize systemic therapy as a first step. Conversely, a patient might see a neurosurgeon first, who may or may not be aware that there's appropriate immunotherapy or targeted agent that might make sense prior to going on to radiosurgery. It's obviously a challenge for sub-specialists to keep up with all the emerging clinical trial data and new drugs. Our two sets of guidelines provide a roadmap for physicians of different expertise to help determine what types of therapies or referral should be considered when brain metastases are found. The end result of all this is improved control of intracranial disease and improved quality of life for the patients. Brittany Harvey: Absolutely. Those are key points. It's excellent to see these guidelines, and the overarching 'Treatment for Brain Metastases: ASCO-ASTRO-SNO Guideline' be published. So, I want to thank you all for your time today, Dr. Schiff, Dr. Vogelbaum, and Dr. Gondi. Thank you for all of your work on these guidelines. Dr. Michael Vogelbaum: My pleasure. Dr. Vinai Gondi: Thank you for having us. Dr. David Schiff: Thank you, Brittany. It was great to participate in this important project. Brittany Harvey: And thank you to all of our listeners for tuning in to the ASCO Guidelines podcast series. To read the full guideline endorsement go to www.asco.org/neurooncology-guidelines. You can also find many of our guidelines and interactive resources in the free ASCO Guidelines app available in iTunes or the Google Play Store. If you have enjoyed what you've heard today, please rate and review the podcast and be sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode.   The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.

The Clinical Consult
Drs. Wendy Nilsen and Lisa Ulmer on Individualized Client Care Through Precision Medicine

The Clinical Consult

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 41:20


Drs. Wendy Nilsen and Lisa Ulmer discuss precision medicine and the work they are doing at the National Science Foundation... View More The post Drs. Wendy Nilsen and Lisa Ulmer on Individualized Client Care Through Precision Medicine appeared first on National Register.

Protecting Your NEST with Dr. Tony Hampton
Dr. Peter Ballerstedt: Meat Sustainability, Ruminate Agriculture, & More: Episode 98

Protecting Your NEST with Dr. Tony Hampton

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 79:07


Welcome to Protecting Your Nest with Dr. Tony Hampton. Dr. Peter Ballerstedt (aka The Sodfather) received his Bachelor of Science in Agriculture in 1981 and Master of Science in 1983, both from the University of Georgia. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Kentucky in 1986, specializing in forage management and utilization, minoring in ruminant nutrition. He was the forage extension specialist at Oregon State University from 1986 to 1992. He is an advocate for ruminant animal agriculture and its products, speaking to audiences in several countries about the role of ruminants in humanity's past, present and future. In this discussion, Drs. Tony and Peter talk about: (00:03:34) How Dr. Ballerstedt discovered the low-carb way of eating. (00:08:08) The meaning of the terms, ‘forages' and ‘ruminants.' (00:10:50) How ruminant animals' digestive systems utilize fiber versus how human beings' digestive systems utilize it. (00:14:34) The scientific field of Agronomy (00:15:35) The importance of bridging gaps between those in the agricultural industry/field, consumers, and medical/nutritional professionals. (00:19:26) The relational and cultural value of eating real food and being in touch with local producers. (00:24:09) The misconception that plant-based eating/agriculture is better for the environment and for society than animal-based eating/agriculture. (00:40:26) The qualitative differences between plant portent and animal protein. (00:52:32) The differences between grass-fed, grass-finished, and normal super market meat. (00:59:53) Animal agriculture, animal welfare, and animal rights. (01:06:08) What it will take, and wether it would be possible, to transition to sustainable and regenerative agricultural practices. Thank you for listening to Protecting Your Nest. For additional resources and information, please see the links below.    Links:   Dr. Peter Ballerstedt: Twitter Instagram Facebook Email: peter.ballerstedt@gmail.com Grass Based Health Blog   Dr. Tony Hampton: Linktree Instagram Account LinkedIn Account Ritmos Negros Podcast

Wade Center
The Dangers of Individualism and Cliques: C.S. Lewis's essays, "Inner Ring" and "Membership"

Wade Center

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 52:24


"As long as you are governed by that desire you will never get what you want. ... Until you conquer the fear of being an outsider, an outsider you will remain." In C.S. Lewis's essays—"The Inner Ring" and "Membership"—he unpacks two dangerous social forces that threaten both the church and the morality of Christians: individualism and cliques. This week Drs. Crystal and David C. Downing continue their examination of Lewis's powerful essays and sermons published as The Weight of Glory and Other Addresses in 1948. How does our desire to belong, to be considered meaningful to others, warp and distort not only our heart but our actions. How do they so easily turn good people into "scoundrels?" And what can we do to overcome these temptations?

Admit It, An AACRAO Podcast
Life Changes, Career Changes, Global Changes -- and AdmitIt

Admit It, An AACRAO Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 21:52


Season 3 kicks off with a mini episode welcoming back our host -- James Miller -- and introducing Drs. Angela Brokelsby and Stephanie Krusemark.

Formula Latina
Respondemos tus preguntas post Miami GP

Formula Latina

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 19:44


Seguimos con el análisis que nos dejo el GP de Miami y respondiendo sus preguntas. Comentamos sobre el uso del DRS en la vuelta 1. Explicamos cómo es desmontable el circuito del GP de Miami También comentamos las diferencias en el asfalto en cada circuito y las cuestiones que debe mejorar el GP Miami para ofrecer un mejor espectáculo. Déjanos tu comentario y no olvides suscribirte! ✅ Suscribe: https://www.youtube.com/formulalatina  ✅ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FormulaLatinaPodcast/  ✅ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Formula_Latina  ✅ Instagram: https://instagram.com/formulalatinapodcast  Únete a nuestra liga en GRIDRIVAL en este enlace: https://bit.ly/3HNQ19T

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: No Mow May

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 164:37


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners how they're handling COVID amid the latest surge. Brian McGrory shares insights from the latest Globe reporting, including the Federal Transit Administration's investigation into the MBTA, the state settlement over the deaths at the Holyoke Soldiers' Home and the state of national politics. McGrory is the Editor of the Boston Globe. Andrea Cabral talks about the Senate's failed vote on a bill that would codify Roe v. Wade, and the Mario Batali and Johnny Depp court cases involving harassment. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and secretary of public safety, and former CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Then, we open up the lines to hear from listeners what they want Jim and Margery to talk more about. Eric Deggans previews his latest TV commentary, including his review of “Bosch: Legacy” and who he wants to see succeed James Corden. Eric Deggans is NPR's TV critic and author of the book “Race-Baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation.” Art Caplan talks about the divide between red and blue states over abortion, and renewed advocacy around the right to die. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. We end the show by asking listeners their thoughts on “no mow may,” where some homeowners are opting to let their yards grow wild to benefit pollinators.

Moral Matters
Becoming Advocates, Part 1 | Episode 37: Dr. Cadey Harrel MD and Dr. Brad Dreifuss MD

Moral Matters

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 27:40


Drs. Cadey Harrel and Brad Dreifuss are physicians, educators, and advocates. In Part 1 of our conversation, they share what drew them to advocacy work and where they're making change. To support the podcast: https://www.fixmoralinjury.org/get-started Twitter - @fixmoralinjury Instagram - @moralinjury Facebook - @MoralInjuryofHC LinkedIn - Moral Injury of Healthcare Click the link to reflect and unlock credits & more: https://earnc.me/0CtQi8

The Behavioral Observations Podcast with Matt Cicoria
How to Write a Behavior Contract: Session 188 with Jill Dardig and Bill Heward

The Behavioral Observations Podcast with Matt Cicoria

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 96:53


This was a fun one for sure. In Session 188, I chatted with Drs. Jill Dardig and Bill Heward about a whole host of topics, including their new book, Let's Make a Contract: A positive way to change your child's behavior.  In this conversation, we covered: How Jill and Bill discovered Behavior Analysis, especially at a time when it wasn't as ubiquitous as it is now. How they of course met each other (yes, there is a love story here). Why they wrote an earlier iteration of this book titled, Sign Here: A contracting book for children and their parents. The success Jill and Bill had in getting their works translated in various languages, and distributed to countries across the globe. The power of storytelling. The basics of behavioral contracting.  Special circumstances that make contracting challenging, and what to do about them. What to make of the "open economy" of today's screen-based reinforcers. Directions for future research in this area. Advice for the newly minted. Their hopes for the future of ABA.  This bullet list of course could go on and on. There are so many storylines in this conversation, from the history of ABA, to dissemination across cultures and languages, to the power of storytelling, to parenting, and so much more. I think there is something in this episode for everyone (note: we get to the actual mechanics of behavioral contracting about 1/2 to 2/3 the way into the conversation). Bill and Jill more generally offer some great parenting strategies in their description of the contracting process. We discussed some of the following resources in this episode: Their book of course, Let's Make a Contract. Michael (1993). Concepts and Principles of Behavior Analysis. Highlights for Children magazine. Risley (2005). Montrose Wolf memoriam in JABA. Today's ABA with Greg Hanley (Session 160; shameless plug: CEU for this podcast here). Gover et al (2021). On the generality of preference for contingent reinforcement.  Their soon-to-be developed companion website for the book.  Strain and Joseph (2004). A not so good job with "good job," A response to Cohn (2001). Session 188 is brought to you with support from: HRIC Recruiting. Barb Voss has been placing BCBAs in permanent positions throughout the US for just about a decade, and has been in the business more generally for 30 years. When you work with HRIC, you work directly with Barb, thereby accessing highly personalized service. So if you're about to graduate, you're looking for a change of pace, or you just want to know if the grass really is greener on the other side, head over to HRIColorado.com to schedule a confidential chat right away. Behavior University. Their mission is to provide university quality professional development for the busy Behavior Analyst. Learn about their CEU offerings, including their brand new 8-hour Supervision Course, as well as their RBT offerings over at behavioruniversity.com/observations. The University of Cincinnati Online. UC Online designed a Master of Education in Behavior Analysis program that is 100% online and asynchronous, meaning you log on when it works for you. Want to learn more? Go to online.uc.edu and click the “request info” button. Also: Check out the BOP Patreon Tiers if you want an ad-free feed that includes occasional bonus content! Need CEUs on the go? Check out the podcasts that are available for BACB Continuing Education.

Docs Who Lift
Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

Docs Who Lift

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 30:27


Drs. Karl and Spencer Nadolsky discuss screening for and treating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Learn: - What NAFLD is - Why you should be aware of it - The difference between nonalcoholic fatty liver and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis - What to do if you get it - What diets are best to treat or prevent it

The Rounds Table
Episode 38 – IV Iron and SGLT2 Inhibitors in Heart Failure

The Rounds Table

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 18:38


Welcome back Rounds Table Listeners! We are back today with our Classic Rapid Fire Podcast! This week, Drs. Mike and John Fralick do a Rapid Fire session to discuss two recent papers exploring heart failure – specifically, if intravenous iron or the initiation of SGLT2 inhibitors in hospital for patients with heart failure improves clinical ... The post Episode 38 – IV Iron and SGLT2 Inhibitors in Heart Failure appeared first on Healthy Debate.

Barbell Medicine Podcast
Episode #176: Determining Calorie Intake Part II

Barbell Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 54:24


Drs. Baraki and Feigenbaum discuss how-to determine Calorie intake, energy balance, and more. Use code 'BBMPOD' for 15% all apparel May 11th only! https://www.barbellmedicine.com/shop/apparel/ Survey Link: https://forms.gle/FMfM1m4fFziSbe1o6 App Link: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/barbell-medicine/id1536216161 Part I: https://soundcloud.com/user-344313169/episode-175-determining-calorie-intake-part-i Resources From This episode: Calorie Confusion https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2238749/ History of the Calorie https://www.jstor.org/stable/6661?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents Role of Energy Excretion in Human Body Weight Regulation https://www.cell.com/trends/endocrinology-metabolism/fulltext/S1043-2760(20)30134-X?_returnURL=https%3A%2F%2Flinkinghub.elsevier.com%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS104327602030134X%3Fshowall%3Dtrue Thermic Effect of Food https://joe.bioscientifica.com/view/journals/joe/238/3/JOE-18-0240.xml Energy balance and its components https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/95/4/989/4576902?login=true NIH BW Planner https://www.niddk.nih.gov/bwp Overfeeding Identical Twins 5-year follow up https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8769366/ For more of our stuff: Podcasts: goo.gl/X4H4z8 Website: www.barbellmedicine.com Instagram: @austin_barbellmedicine @jordan_barbellmedicine @leah_barbellmedicine @vanessa_barbellmedicine @untamedstrength @derek_barbellmedicine @hassan_barbellmedicine @charlie_barbellmedicine @alex_barbellmedicine @tomcampitelli @joe_barbellmedicine @rheece_barbellmedicine @cam_barbellmedicine @claire_barbellmedicine @ben_barbellmedicine @cassi.niemann @caleb_barbellmedicine Email: info@barbellmedicine.com Supplements/Templates/Seminars: www.barbellmedicine.com/shop/ Forum: forum.barbellmedicine.com/