Podcasts about Chadwick

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Latest podcast episodes about Chadwick

Leaving the Theater
Black Panther Wakanda Forever

Leaving the Theater

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 22:42


Ronald Young Jr. reviews Black Panther Wakanda Forever with Mass Potential aka Michael Jefferson... RYJ and MP discuss the movie and marvel's tendency to start several plot lines in one title that are the origins of another. Does this work? Do we need this? RYJ - 3.5 of 5 starsMP - 3 of 5 stars Follow me on IG, and Twitter and TikTok - @ohitsbigron Follow Michael Jefferson on IG and Twitter - @masspotential and on TikTok - @masspobeats Check out more of Michael's work here:https://www.masspobeats.com/ Available in Theaters and eventually on Disney Plus Starring Letitia Wright, Angela Bassett, Lupita Nyongo, Danai Guirra, Winston Duke, Dominique Thorne, Michaela Coel, and Tenoch HuertaDirected by Ryan CooglerWritten by Ryan Coogler and Joe Robert Cole https://www.imdb.com/title/tt9114286/ Support Leaving the Theater on Patreon using the link below: https://www.patreon.com/LeavingTheTheater

Law of Attraction with LOA Today, Your Daily Dose of Happy | Tips & Secrets
Catherine Chadwick - From Registered Nurse To Life Mastery Consultant

Law of Attraction with LOA Today, Your Daily Dose of Happy | Tips & Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 60:15


Catherine is the founder and creator of: You've Got Nurse®, The Sunshine Quotient®, and The Art Of Self Craftsmanship®. She's a former ICU registered nurse who studied the work of Dr. Wayne Dyer and Eckhart Tolle. She later became a practitioner of Applied Positive Psychology. She's offering an upcoming webinar and two class series. If you're interested in the classes, you can contact her via email at cc@sunshinequotient.org or by calling her at 646.416.4552. Also, here's a link to the YouTube video Louis mentioned, the Ted Talk by Dr. Alan Watkins:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q_fFattg8N0 Follow the LOA Today podcast: https://www.loatoday.net/follow

Acting Up
Return to Wakanda

Acting Up

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 28:38


On this week's episode of Acting Up, Cortney Wills takes us back to Wakanda and dives in to the highly anticipated film ‘Black Panther: Wakanda Forever'. She sits down with actress Lupita Nyong'o to find out how her character Nakia's journey through grief compared to her own experience mourning the late Chadwick Boseman. She also talks to the film's co-writer and director, Ryan Coogler to find out how he continued the story after losing his hero and managed to invite a whole new demographic to the MCU. He also explains how he navigating art imitating life and what parts of the script Chadwick Boseman was excited about before he passed. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Soundtracking with Edith Bowman
Episode 333: Ryan Coogler On The Music Of Wakanda Forever

Soundtracking with Edith Bowman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 33:15


Bonus episode time with Ryan Coogler, director of the new Black Panther film, Wakanda Forever. The film's release is obviously hugely bittersweet for all involved with the sad passing of Chadwick Boseman - but, boy, have Ryan and the exceptional cast done his memory proud. Here he discusses Chadwick's legacy and the tonal influence his death has had on narrative, as well as the excellent soundtrack and Ludwig Goransson's score.

Blockbusters
"Black Panther" 2 : Chadwick Boseman Forever !

Blockbusters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 3:52


durée : 00:03:52 - La chronique de Frederick Sigrist - Wakanda Forever vient de sortir sur nos écrans de cinéma, il a la lourde tache de gérer la disparition de l'interprète de Black Panther : Chadwick Boseman.

Fear the Wavecast
FTW Cast with FTW Student Athlete of the Month Chadwick Bailey

Fear the Wavecast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 10:25


FTW Football Student Athlete of the Month Chadwick Bailey joins Kelly Comarda to discuss his journey to Tulane and life as a walk-on in college football

The Growth Project
Episode 198: The U.S. Military & Legendary Mentors: The Road to Professional Baseball with Colorado Rockies' Dr. Douglas Chadwick

The Growth Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 37:33


The humanistic approach in psychology, which emphasizes genuine connection, the personal worth of the individual, and truly understanding one another on a human level, is the perspective put into practice by Dr. Douglas Chadwick, the Director of Mental Skills Development for the Colorado Rockies. Dr. Cory Shaffer and Chadwick talk about this approach, Chadwick's unique pathway into performance pyschology after serving in the U.S. Army for 20 years, and the positive influence of Chadwick's mentor and sport spychology legend, Ken Ravizza.

They Will Kill
The Insane Murder of QC Chadwick

They Will Kill

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 67:34


Peter and QC Chadwick had an idyllic life in affluent Newport Beach, CA until they both vanished one day in 2012.  For show notes go to www.theywillkill.com. This episode is brought to you by Wondery's The Vanished. Follow The Vanished on Amazon Music, Apple Podcasts or listen early and ad-free by joining Wondery Plus in Apple Podcasts or the Wondery app. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WPKN Community Radio
What a Story! hosted by Ina Chadwick | Saturday, September 24th, 2022

WPKN Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 59:59


What A Story! with Ina Chadwick is a mostly spoken word program, integrating previous live recordings of themed short true tales, writings, poetry and plays from the event arm of MouseMuse Productions. Original readings from new plays, original songs, offbeat show music etc., interspersed into this one-hour eclectic lifestyle magazine show. It's a new edition every month; which airs from 12-1 PM, on the last Saturday of the month. What a Story! is truly a Live Magazine. And the show has its own original song- “You've got to have a story/you have to entertain us after all.”

CFTN Podcasts
Revival Glory Pt. 2 - Whisper Of The Heart | Pastor George Chadwick

CFTN Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 46:01


Podcast 616
Black Panther (w/Rashawn Scott & Vinny Thomas)

Podcast 616

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 80:39


We never FREEZE True Believers! At last Podcast 616 is heading to Wakanda to discuss the first Black Panther movie ahead of the Wakanda Forever release. Join your host, Damon, and his guests Rashawn Scott & Vinny Thomas as they discuss King T'Challa's first week as King of Wakanda. Discussions included: - The various inter-workings of Wakanda tribes. - A discussion of Killmonger's master plan. Did he have to it alone? - And Okoye's wig… we gotta talk about it.    All that plus justice for our favorite character: Coffee Girl. You're gonna love this one folks! So grab your vibranium headphones and tune in!   Listen. Subscribe. Chadwick. Produced by: Michael Seijas

The Dietitian Success Podcast
111: Mastering Your Mindset to Live a 10/10 Life with Cory Chadwick

The Dietitian Success Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 26:09


In this episode of The Dietitian Success Podcast, I sit down with Cory Chadwick, founder of The Mental Gym - an organization committed to helping you think, make decisions, feel and perform as the best version of yourself so you can live your best life. In this episode, Cory and I chat about: Why mental fitness is just as important as physical fitness The 6 "essential" skills we need to exercise in order to live our best lives Making small, sustainable changes to see massive life results Daily practices for happiness and fulfillment Links: Check out Cory and The Mental Gym here: https://www.mentalgymlife.com/ Access our freebies - the Business Planning Workbook, Client Resource Kit & PES Statements Cheat Sheet here: https://www.dietitiansuccesscenter.com/freebie Learn more about DSC https://www.dietitiansuccesscenter.com/

Pain Matters
[Part 2] The FACE (Lab) of Innovation: Dr. Andrea Chadwick on Her Journey Starting a Pain Exploration Lab

Pain Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 22:25


In the second episode of our two-part conversation with Dr. Andrea Chadwick, MD, MSc, FASA, she discusses the obstacles she overcame on her path to developing a successful research lab in a field she is passionate about. Listen in as she shares her professional and personal struggles and outlines the blueprint other researchers can use to harness their potential and advocate for patients with invisible illnesses. Join host Dr. Shravani Durbhakula, MD, MPH, MBA, in this episode of the Pain Matters Podcast as she continues her conversation with Dr. Chadwick about launching FACE Lab, a pain exploration lab dedicated to advancing research on fibromyalgia. The two discuss how Dr. Chadwick secured funding for FACE Lab and what her successes can teach other physicians about jump-starting their careers in medical research.   Tune in to discover: Strategic approaches to applying for grant funding in your area of specializationHow medical research can give you independence as a medical professionalHow to translate personal struggles into professional successesWhy following your passion is one of the most effective ways to help patients

The Girl Next Door Podcast
Our Favorite Things in 2022

The Girl Next Door Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 32:08


Become a Friend of the Show! – join our Patreon communityThese are a few of our favorite things...in 2022! We're swapping favorite splurges, kid things, tiny joys, and great adulting finds (you know, the kind of stuff you only get really excited about as an adult). We hope you find some things you might like to try or to put on your wish list!Mentioned on the show:Eufy Robovac SlimAllbirds low sneakers and slippersWest Elm towel hooksAllen + Roth towel hooksCascade platinum dishwasher pods"If your dishwasher still sucks, try a different detergent." – New York TimesChadwick mid-century bed frameLand's End white seed stitch quiltKindle OasisRoborock wet/dry robot vacuum...see the more links to our recommendations in the show notes at girlnextdoorpodcast.com.Become a Friend of the Show! – join our Patreon communityConnect with us on Instagram: @higirlsnextdoorSee show notes on our website: girlnextdoorpodcast.comWe love to get your emails: higirlsnextdoor@gmail.comYour reviews on Apple Podcasts really help the show - thank you! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The PBSCCS Podcast
Episode 139: Interview with Ben Chadwick (Part 2)

The PBSCCS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 29:37


Ben Chadwick has served as a Strength and Conditioning Coach for the Boston Red Sox organization the past 8 years.  He just completed his 2nd season in AAA with the Worcester Red Sox after splitting the previous 6 years between AA Portland, High-A Salem, and Rookie GCL Red Sox. In 2015, he served as the strength and conditioning coach for Leones del Caracas of the Venezuelan Professional Baseball League. Prior to his work in the Red Sox organization, he interned under former Red Sox strength and conditioning consultant Mike Boyle as well as with the University of South Carolina Gamecocks football team during the 2014 season. He graduated from the University of Massachusetts in 2013 with a degree in Kinesiology.Topics covered in this episode:-Making sacrifices-Continuing education-Resume mistakes and advice for othersQuotes:-"There's more competent people trying to get jobs in the field than there are jobs" (1:22)-"It's very rare that you get that perfect job right where you grew up; it's just not that common" (8:10)-"Something that so many young coaches screw up is their resume" (9:02)If you would like to learn more from Ben, you can follow him on social media:Instagram:@bchadwic

The Hunt Lift Eat Podcast
Tuesday Tips Ep: 60 "I'm Definitely No Expert"- Archery Tips

The Hunt Lift Eat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 25:20


This week on Tuesday Tips Bobby, Chadwick, and Scotty share some knowledge on some archery tips that have worked well for them in the past. Topics covered include: buying used, finding a good mentor, the importance of a shot process, and advice on how to ick a bow when purchasing. Good luck to everyone this season! Please follow @thehuntlifteatpodcast and @huntlifteatofficial Chadwick- @chadwics Scotty- @the_skull_keeper Bobby- @bobby_litee Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Killer Destinations
THE MOST UNKINDEST CUT OF ALL: Quee Choo Chadwick - Newport Beach, CA 2012

Killer Destinations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 44:23


Quee Choo “Q.C.” Chadwick was smart, talented and above all else, devoted to her husband, Peter, and their three sons. When Q.C. and Peter did not pick up their sons after school, it was so unlike the couple that neighbors were quick to call the authorities. Q.C.'s body was found a week later in a dumpster more than 100 miles away from her home. The roadblocks to justice that popped up along the way would take the combined resources of the Newport Beach Police Dept., the US Marshals, Homeland Security, and Interpol, along with the creation of a true crime podcast, before the perpetrator would see the inside of a jail cell. 

The Charlie Kirk Show
How Brazil Got California'd

The Charlie Kirk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 33:52


Charlie reflects on the popular vote loss of Jair Bolsonaro's in Brazil to convicted criminal and communist Lula da Silva. But what actually led to Bolsonaro's loss when he won the vote in every single region except for one, and how has the structure of America's constitutional republic, for hundreds of years, helped save America from small but populous areas of the country controlling the rest? Next, columnist and commentator Chadwick Moore joins the show for the first time to talk about his journey to leaving the left as a civil libertarian gay man, and joining the center right. He also discusses his brand new book that many in the audience can most definitely relate to: "So You've Been Sent to Diversity Training: Smiling Through the DEI Apocalypse". Chadwick also chimes in on the Paul Pelosi saga from his unique vantage point. Support the show: http://www.charliekirk.com/supportSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

All Out of F***s Podcast
S3EP15: Nerding Out Session: Movie and Series Reviews, Bulls-Celtics, and more Ye

All Out of F***s Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 70:07


Greg and Robert catch up on reviewing Top Gun:Maverick, Spider Man: No Way Home, Preview Black Panther: Wakanda Forever, that Mr. Chocolate Atlanta Episode, and Cobra Kai. We also debriefing the Bulls-Celtics, what is wrong with the Lakers, and should we care about Ye full on cancelation. Plus…go vote! INTRODUCTION Welcome Back Thanks for subscribing and listening. Find us on Apple Podcasts on iTunes, Spotify, Soundcloud and Libsyn   BLOWING SMOKE   Greg Jet Setting   SESSION OF THE DAY: Movie and Series Catch Up, Bulls v. Celtics, and more Top Gun: Maverick Review   Better than the original?   Spider Man: No Way Home - Multiverse impact Black Panther: Wakanda Forever Preview - Black men not going because no Chadwick? - Dr. Doom? Atlanta - Mr. Chocolate Cobra Kai - Why is it so great? - Upcoming Season Prediction Bulls v. Celtics - Patrick Williams  - Offense Humming - New Bench Mob? Lakers Look Bad Ye Being Dropped by Adidas - Noone cared when he was saying anti-black shit - Is it ok to be critical of Jewish community? WHAT THE F*CK NEWS SEGMENT   VOTE!!!   THANK YOU Thanks for joining us this episode of All Out of Fucks Podcast! Make sure to check us out on Instagram @alloutoffuckspodcast, Twitter @AllOutofFuxPod, and our website at alloutoffuckspodcast.com, where you can subscribe to the show in iTunes, Stitcher or via RSS so you'll never miss a show. While you're at it, if you liked what you heard, then we'd appreciate you heading over to iTunes and giving us a 5 star rating or just tell a friend about the show

Locked On Syracuse - Daily Podcast On Syracuse Orange Football & Basketball
Can Syracuse Keep This Dream Season Alive with a Win Over Notre Dame?

Locked On Syracuse - Daily Podcast On Syracuse Orange Football & Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 30:43


Matt Bonaparte and Owen Valentine preview this weekend's matchup between Syracuse and Notre Dame, giving you questions, observations, a Chat with Chadwick, and of course predictions. Get it all on your Friday episode. You can find episodes of the Locked On Syracuse podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Audacy or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a like and rating as we would leave to hear your feedback. Be sure to tell your friends if you enjoy the pod! For bonus coverage, check us out on Twitter @LO_Syracuse to interact with us throughout games and feel free to suggest topics in the future. Underdog Fantasy Sign up on underdogfantasy.com with the promo code LOCKED ON and get your first deposit doubled up to $100! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

CFTN Podcasts
Revival Glory | Pastor George Chadwick

CFTN Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 44:48


How To Survive The Narcissist Apocalypse
Top 5 Signs of Isolation & How Isolation is Used to Abuse You - Q&A With Brandon Chadwick

How To Survive The Narcissist Apocalypse

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 44:54


Brandon discusses the top 5 signs of isolation, how isolation is used to abuse you, common phrases used to isolate you, creating dependency, manipulation tactics, isolation as a form of punishment, identity erosion, and the difficulty in leaving. If you want to be a guest on our survivor story podcast, please click here or send us an email at narcissistapocalypse@gmail.com Thank you to our sponsor BETTERHELP. If you need online counseling from anywhere in the world, please do go to https://www.betterhelp.com/nap Get started today and enjoy 10% off your first month. If you or someone you know are experiencing abuse, you are not alone. DomesticShelters.org offers an extensive library of articles and resources that can help you make sense of what you're experiencing, connect you with local resources and find ways to heal and move forward. Visit www.domesticshelters.org to access this free resource.  Join our new Community Social Network at https://community.narcissistapocalypse.com/ Join our Instagram Channel at https://www.instagram.com/narcissistapocalypse Join our Youtube Channel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpTIgjTqVJa4caNWMIAJllA Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Pain Matters
[Part 1] The FACE (Lab) of Innovation: Dr. Andrea Chadwick on Her Journey Starting a Pain Exploration Lab

Pain Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 32:39


Research is the backbone of medical innovation. However, it can be challenging to find the resources and support needed to launch your own research lab and lay the foundation for its success. Dr. Andrea Chadwick is no stranger to the adversities researchers face–tune in as she shares her struggles and outlines the steps others can take to follow their passions into research and secure funding for their projects. In this two-part episode of the Pain Matters Podcast, host Shravani Durbhakula, MD, MPH, MBA, invites Associate Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology, Pain and Perioperative Medicine at the University of Kansas Medical Center, Andrea Chadwick, MD, MSc, FASA, to revisit the journey she took to create FACE Lab, a pain exploration lab dedicated to advancing research on fibromyalgia. Tune in to discover: How pursuing a career in medical research can help you discover your passionsThe importance of mentorships and cultivating professional networksWhy rejection is an essential step on the path to success and how to cope with itHow to garner support for your medical research and apply for funding

The PBSCCS Podcast
Episode 138: Interview with Ben Chadwick (Part 1)

The PBSCCS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 33:37


Ben Chadwick has served as a Strength and Conditioning Coach for the Boston Red Sox organization the past 8 years.  He just completed his 2nd season in AAA with the Worcester Red Sox after splitting the previous 6 years between AA Portland, High-A Salem, and Rookie GCL Red Sox. In 2015, he served as the strength and conditioning coach for Leones del Caracas of the Venezuelan Professional Baseball League. Prior to his work in the Red Sox organization, he interned under former Red Sox strength and conditioning consultant Mike Boyle as well as with the University of South Carolina Gamecocks football team during the 2014 season. He graduated from the University of Massachusetts in 2013 with a degree in Kinesiology.Topics covered in this episode:-Best Professional Baseball story-Personality Typing & Connecting with players-Finding success & the extra layers of being a Strength and Conditioning Coach in professional baseballQuotes:-"I think the more you can learn people on a deeper level the better off you are" (7:05)-"I think the more guys you can learn how to connect with the better you're gonna be as a coach" (14:07)-"There's a lot of different personalities that end up being great strength coaches" (23:15)If you would like to learn more from Ben, you can follow him on social media:Instagram:@bchadwic

Timcast IRL
Timcast IRL #638 Kanye BUYS Parler, Parler Then DOXXES Entire PR List w/Chadwick Moore & Blaire White

Timcast IRL

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 128:13 Very Popular


Tim, Luke, & Serge join Chadwick Moore & Blaire White to discuss Kanye's purchase of Parler, A lab in Boston that has created a new Covid strain with an 80% kill rate, mainstream media claiming that calls for peace in the Ukraine war is dangerous, polls showing Republicans will win the 2022 midterms, Roger Stone's weird video that could be a deep-fake, and the outrage surrounding Ulta's new video featuring two men talking about women's issues. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Desert Island Discs
Sue Barker, presenter and tennis player

Desert Island Discs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 36:16 Very Popular


Sue Barker is a television presenter and former professional tennis player. She presented the BBC's Wimbledon coverage for nearly three decades, before stepping down this year, when she received a standing ovation. Sue was born in Devon in 1956, and was educated at the Marist Convent School where she had a reputation for being naughty – until her PE teacher, Mrs Chadwick, diverted her energy into tennis. Aged 11 she was selected for training by the local tennis coach Arthur Roberts, who had already guided players to Grand Slam titles. Sue started playing – and winning – junior tournaments. She turned professional at 17, and moved to the US, joining a new women's tour set up by Billie Jean King. During her career, she reached the ranking of World No. 3, playing and defeating her contemporaries, including Chris Evert, Martina Navratilova, Evonne Goolagong and Virginia Wade. Her biggest win came at the French Open in 1976 where, aged 20, she took her first – and only – Grand Slam title. Her biggest disappointment came at Wimbledon the following year, when she lost in the semi-final, despite being the clear favourite. Plagued by injuries, she retired from tennis in 1985. She began commentating on Australia's Channel 7, before moving to BskyB in the UK, and then joining the BBC in 1993. She has hosted Wimbledon, Grandstand, the Summer and Winter Olympics, the Commonwealth Games, BBC Sports Personality of the Year, and A Question of Sport. When she announced her retirement from TV, her idol Billie Jean King called her the GOAT, the ‘greatest of all time'. DISC ONE: Run Boy Run by Woodkid DISC TWO: Piano Concerto in A minor, composed by Edvard Grieg and performed by Sir Clifford Curzon (piano) and London Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Øivin Fjeldstad DISC THREE: Harry Hippie by Bobby Womack DISC FOUR: California Girls by The Beach Boys DISC FIVE: The Greatest Love of All by George Benson DISC SIX: Simply Beautiful by Al Green DISC SEVEN: Grandstand by Keith Mansfield DISC EIGHT: Philadelphia Freedom by Elton John BOOK CHOICE: All In by Billie Jean King LUXURY ITEM: New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc wine CASTAWAY'S FAVOURITE: Harry Hippie by Bobby Womack Presenter Lauren Laverne Producer Katy Hickman

Get In The Car, Loser!
Chadwick Cheaster Wordington

Get In The Car, Loser!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 39:51


Today we talk about lab-grown brain cells that learn to play Pong, we check out BONELAB which is an experimental physics action game, and then we discuss Coll of Duty's latest efforts to combat cheating.

Disorderly Dogs!
232. Cooperative Care, Replay

Disorderly Dogs!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 Very Popular


In this episode, Krystin Maloney, CPBT-KA (certified professional bird trainer) joins me and shares her experience of being a zoo keeper at the Denver Zoo and training her red tail hawk Chadwick. Connect with Krysin on InstagramCheck complete show notes hereEpisode 232: Cooperative Care, ReplayReactive Redefined FREE Mini Course  Adventure Dog Academy FREE Mini CourseTrustworthy RecallsFollow us on Instagram @agoodfeeling_inco www.agoodfeelingdogtraining.comVetCs discount code DISORDERLYDOGS 10% off your purchase Leaving a 5-star review really helps this podcast reach other dog guardians in search of help for their dogs and I literally read every single one! Song credit: Podington Bear

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 66 – Unstoppable Blind Therapist with Delmar MacLean

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 66:17


Yes, our guest on this episode, Delmar MacLean, happens to be blind. Does it really matter if Delmar is blind or not? No not at all. Some may ask then why I even mention blindness? It is because Delmar typifies the fact that happening to be blind does not in any way define him. Delmar's philosophy is that while he has a disability, he is not disabled.   Delmar completed a Bachelor of Arts degree with a double major in psychology and Religious Studies in 1998 and an honors thesis in psychology in 2001. He went on to complete a Master of Social Work degree at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo Ontario in 2003.   Since securing his Master's degree he has held several jobs he will discuss during our conversation. Today he works as a tele-counsellor for an international company helping employees dealing with issues about well-being.   What strikes me most about Delmar is that he has one of the most positive attitudes I have encountered not only about being blind, but about life in general. I believe you will find his thoughts and observations inspiring and thought-provoking. Please let me know what you think after listening to our episode.   About the Guest: Delmar MacLean, MSW, RSW.   Delmar MacLean was born and raised in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada.  Although Delmar has had vision loss since birth, he has never let his vision loss hold him back.  Delmar's philosophy is that while he has a disability, he is not disabled.  Delmar believes in the social model of disability and that disability is just something that you work around.  Delmar completed a Bachelor of Arts degree with a double major in psychology and Religious Studies in 1998 and an honours thesis in psychology in 2001, both at the University of Prince Edward Island.  Delmar went on to complete a Master of Social Work degree at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo Ontario in 2003, specializing in clinical social work.  Since completing his master's degree in 2003, Delmar has worked in a variety of social service settings.  Delmar has lived and worked in a several different Canadian communities, including Halifax, Nova Scotia, Calgary, Alberta, Kitchener, Ontario, Waterloo, Ontario, and Barrie Ontario.  Delmar worked as a Service Coordinator for Vision Loss Rehabilitation Canada from 2008 to 2019.  Since 2019, Delmar has worked as a tele-Counsellor for LifeWorks, a multinational wellbeing platform that improves employee's individual, social, financial, and metal wellbeing.  Delmar currently lives in Barrie Ontario, Canada.             About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:21 Well, hi, wherever you may be, this is Mike Hingson. And welcome back to unstoppable mindset where you're glad you're here. And we have a guest Delmar MacLean today Delmar has a master's in social welfare work. And he is also a person who happens to be blind. So we have some things in common there and Delmar has had his share of life experiences and adventures and we'll get to talk about some of those. And you'll get to meet him and kind of learn about him and maybe he'll inspire you a little bit so Delmar, welcome to unstoppable mindset. Glad you're with us.   Delmar MacLean  01:56 Oh, thank you very much. It's great to be here. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  02:00 Well, tell me a little bit about your life growing up and were you born without sight Were you born blind.   Delmar MacLean  02:07 I actually I was I was born. I was born blind. I had what I was told anyways, and I had congenital cataracts and other issues. Now, the congenital cataracts they weren't dealt with in the same way when I was young as they are now of course, I was born in 1973. And I had, I had basically up until about 1977, or 78, I had five operations, you know, in five I operations within that period. And that allowed me to obtain partial vision in one eye. So So technically, I'm not totally blind. Now, obviously, I have enough vision right now that I can, you know, I can get around. I, you know, I can take public transit, I can walk I you know, read large print, I have larger fonts on my computer. But to give you a context there, I had my first i operation, I think it was in January of 1974. So, yeah, so between 74 and 77 or 78, that's when I had my series of five eye operations. And I had one last eye surgery in 2011 wherein I, there was a an inter ocular lens implanted in my better seeing IRA because, when I had my surgeries back in the early 70s the process at least as I understand it for children was not to take out you know, the the lens that was that had the cataract and right and replace it with anything, right? They would just remove the lenses and then often you would, they would use, you know, glasses right with with strong magnification to you know, if there was any vision to that could be maximized.   Michael Hingson  04:08 So how, yeah, so how is cataract surgery changed over the years?   Delmar MacLean  04:13 Well, I think nowadays, you know, you can have the the inter ocular lenses putting your eyes in often you know, a person can have fairly normal vision, you know, like, it's a result of the surgeries but because of the type of surgeries they did when I was younger, you know, there was I think I'm not not a medical expert so cracked it I mean, I don't I have to be careful what I say here, but I think that it was more of a risk of you know, scar tissue being left behind. And that's what happened in my other eye, which I sent for the see blur, right? I prayed. I pretty much consider myself as being blind in that eye because it's really there's nothing there to use, you know? to do anything, and that's what happened there, there was, there was some scar tissue that was left behind that the surgeon couldn't get in. And, you know you in in 2011, the surgeon that was that I was working with, he said, yeah, there is no in no real sense, you know, trying to do anything once and I, he said I could we could try to implant a lamp lens in there. But he said, I don't think it would really make a difference, it wouldn't really give give you anything. So,   Michael Hingson  05:31 of course surgery, and I'm not a medical expert, either by any standard, but I would think that surgery has changed now to where there is a lot more specific pinpoint surgery they can do and a lot that they can do with lasers that they weren't able to do 4050 years ago.   Delmar MacLean  05:49 Yeah, but just in my case. So they're saying at this point, it's not, it wouldn't give me anything more than what I have. As it was, in 2011, when I had the lens put in my, in my seeing eye, so to speak, the dot one of the physician's assistants, when I went for my post surgical checkup, he said, Oh, I'm sorry, the surgery failed, you know, and your vision. So poor. Meanwhile, I thought it was great, because I had been wearing really thick glasses, you know, for most of my life. And now, of course, I feel like I have a little bit more vision than what I had with the thick glasses. So so to me, it's an improvement. They're telling me basically now, getting any type of eyeglasses won't really help me. But I think it's kind of great not to have to wear to wear glasses. And it's weird, because now sometimes people don't even know that I have you know that I have low vision. And so I'm kind of excited that I can walk around without glasses, and I don't I don't, you know, consider it a failure. So I guess it's all perspective.   Michael Hingson  07:02 It is one of the constant things that we tend to see. And you you summarized it very well with what that woman told you, which is, I'm sorry that we failed, and you can't have more vision. And the problem in the medical the optical industry is it's a failure if they can't restore your eyesight rather than recognizing that eyesight is not the only game in town. Yeah, it makes it it makes it so unfortunate that we see that so much. And that contributes to the myth that if you're blind, you can't do anything. And that'd be my question to you. What if you tomorrow lost the rest of your eyesight?   Delmar MacLean  07:44 Yeah, I mean, I think I mean, I can't say that I wouldn't be, you know, have some measure of disappointment for sure. I'd be but but I feel in, in my, my view, and this, of course, probably, I have worked for cniv, the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, their vision loss rehabilitation area. So I worked for them for a number of years. And so I'm, you know, I'm well aware of how one can compensate for partial vision, no vision, you know, there's ways to work around it. So of course, I, I think I would have some measure of disappointment, because I don't, I don't actually remember having no vision because I was so young. But I know that I could work around like I don't think, to me, it doesn't have to be, oh, my goodness, I'm blind, I might, you know, I'm life's not worth living. And trust me, I have worked with people who were at that point, you know, where they thought, you know, the idea of going blind, it would be the worst thing ever, or even, you know, having partial vision that will walk can you do when you're blind, you know, it's over? Right? Where so I certainly don't think that way, my view of disability is, you know, it's something that you you can work around, right, that you have to look at strategies that help you just to go around, you know, kind of like you might have to go around, you know, a fork in the road, right or an obstacle in the road, you know, in in in people. I think we all function differently. To a degree anyway. Right? So, like you said, it's it does, having no vision or less vision, it doesn't have to be thought of as a deficit. You know, it's,   Michael Hingson  09:34 well, the problem is that society treats it as a deficit. And so let me let me suggest this and we've talked about this on unstoppable mindset before my proposal and my submission is everyone has a disability. And the fact is that people with eyesight all have a disability and to use your terminology, they've worked around it that is their light dependent, and they don't know how to function without light, Thomas Edison and the people who invented the electric light bulb, worked around their disability, but make no mistake, it's still there. And as soon as you as soon as you lose power, as soon as you learn light and lose lights, people run for candles, flashlights and other things, so that they can see what to do, which they may or may not be able to find technology to temporarily offset that disability. It's there. But we don't we we don't make the leap to say okay, but there are people who are that way all the time. Why should we treat them different?   Delmar MacLean  10:38 Yeah, yeah. Yeah, no, um, and I as human as we're, as we're talking with that, I can think of instances where I've, let's say, I've come home to my condo with a friend who's totally sighted, right, and we go into the, in the doorway, you know, when it's dark in there, I noticed they're having a fit, because, oh, you put the lights on, right. And I'm kind of just, you know, walking, walking around my condo in the dark, you know, until I until I eventually get to where the, you know, light sources and turn the switch on, right. But I noticed they're, they're panicking, you know, there's no light, there's no plate, right? And I'm kind of chuckling to myself, you know, these guys really need light. It's not that hard to get around, you know, like dark gray, you can feel your way. And of course, you know, pretty familiar with with my own house, right? So I know where things are. Yeah. But I know what you're saying society has this idea that you especially with, with vision, right, that you can't do anything without vision Corps, I think those of us who have vision loss, or really any type, any type of disability know that we can, we can work around if we're creative. And that's, I had a colleague at CNN, IB years ago, who would say that, you know, we have to be creative if we have a loss, you know, to work around, and he was totally blind. And he actually said it was honorable that I remember he said, it was honorable to have vision loss. That is to say,   Michael Hingson  12:11 Well, the problem is, I suppose I'll put it that way, we do have to be creative, because society has as yet not chosen to be inclusive. And the fact is that society should recognize that we all need different tools to function in life. And the fact that I may need some slightly different tools than a totally sighted person might need doesn't change the fact. And we can't seem to get away from that. So we're forced to oftentimes be a lot more creative than we otherwise might need to be. And we have to go do things differently, like on the internet, it is it is a challenge to go to a lot of websites that aren't very accessible. And one of the reasons I joined accessibility in 2021 was to help promote a concept that as it increased and improved and was enhanced, would make more websites accessible in a very scalable way. But the fact is that websites can be made accessible, whether it be through artificial intelligence, and remediation, or just manual coding. And even so less than 2% of all websites are accessible today, because it reflects the attitudes of the society.   Delmar MacLean  13:28 Right? I find we, and I'm not before I say this, I'm not saying this is easy, but I think we, as people with vision loss have to be continually advocating for ourselves and others, I think we have to be willing to speak up and say, you know, this, this, the way we're doing things right now isn't working. But here are some solutions that we can use. And I know that that sometimes people get offended by that, or they you know, they they they get a little bit a little bit defensive, right, when we're when we're trying to say that something isn't working, and here's a better way. But I think that's the only way to help things to move forward as if we continually, you know, continually being vocal, and advocating and trying to educate people in terms of what can be done in the fact that vision loss doesn't have to be a total obstacle in that you can work around it. And we all do. I mean, we   Michael Hingson  14:31 all and we all have to Yeah, advocacy is is something that more and more we all have to do to to get things done. In this country. There are lots of political debates raging. And you've got a lot of evidence that most of society may view things one way, and Congress views it another way. And even advocacy to tends to have major challenges because you've got 500 up to 537 people that just have decided no, this is the way it's going to be no matter what 80 or 90% of the population believes. And at the same time, we can't give up advocating for ourselves and advocating for what we need to have, because it's the only way that we're going to make any progress and get to be part of the dialogue by society.   Delmar MacLean  15:29 It sounds like Canada, right where I am. I mean, not not, you know, a little bit different political structure. Right. But a similar issues, you know, I think,   Michael Hingson  15:37 yeah, it is. It is the same sort of thing. And yeah, the political structure is different to a degree, but the, the political leaders, sometimes in quotes, don't listen to people, and they think they know more. And you know, that is true down the line, as you said, Some people can get offended when you advocate and say, well, this system isn't working for a person who happens to be blind, here's a better way. And they get offended by that, because they don't think that we really know or can know, what we need for ourselves, because obviously, we're blind. We don't know anything.   Delmar MacLean  16:20 And the other thing, though, I think the other factor is that they have a different lived experience, because they they often they don't have a disability they've not maybe not associated with people with disabilities. So they don't really know what's possible. I actually had a professor, when I was in University suggests to me that there is no discrimination toward people with disabilities, because we have government legislation to prevent that. And I had to really try not to just sort of laugh in his face, I was really trying to bite my tongue and think, What the heck is this guy talking? I'm sure I know, he meant well, but really, you can see, do you really think that just because government enacts legislation that that things go away? Like so for example, if government enacts legislation, does discrimination, you know, toward persons of color go away, you know, does our, you know, issues of poverty immediately solve because the government enacts legislation? To me that's such a crazy, naive idea. But that, to me, that was because he didn't have lived experience of, you know, living with a disability, right, and trying to navigate various aspects of society. Various.   Michael Hingson  17:38 One of the things that we, one of the things that we tried to do with this podcast is to stir people's curiosity to maybe look at some of the things that we talked about, like what you're you're talking about, and your professor is an interesting example. And it's all too often the case, oh, there's no real discrimination, because there are laws tell that to women who aren't hired for positions or tell it to the women Professional Soccer League, in this country that works as hard as men, and just now has pushed to get a contract that says that they're going to get equal pay anything visibility? That is discriminatory as he gets, and that that there wasn't a contract for all these years. And the reality is that it it does go back to societal attitudes. And you're right, a lot of people tend not to have the life experiences that some of us do. But their life experiences also teach them, they have the answers, and that's what needs to change. True.   Delmar MacLean  18:51 I agree. I agree. And your idea, you know, as he said earlier, that people with vision loss or with disabilities in general, don't know what they need, right? Because we're, we're somehow, you know, we have this deficit, right. And we need to be taken care of, I mean, I think that that needs to be changed. I know that. I don't know what your experience has been. But But I know, sometimes when you know, people find out that I that I have a graduate degree and that I own my own place and that I you know, I live on my own you know, people are, say things like, Oh, that's wonderful. You have a you know, you have a job and you live on your own and you own your home, in but they always have to attach on the end of that, given your challenges every year. I'm thinking like, what the heck does that mean? I had a doctor who, while I was doing my, actually when I was doing my last eye surgery in 2011. And he told me that once I had the lens implant, my life I'd have a normal life. And I thought to myself, What the heck is this guy talking about? You know, because even at that time, obviously I was, you know, I had my master's I was working full time. Let me know, I remind you, I didn't know in my own home at that time, but you know, things come along, right. I mean, but otherwise, you know, my life was, I thought fairly normal. So I again, I had to bite my tongue and, and try not to laugh at this guy, what the heck? Are you talking about normal life? You know? And sometimes I feel like saying to them, Wow, that's wonderful. You went to medical school? You know, how did you do that? You know?   Michael Hingson  20:24 Yeah. No, it is amazing. So what was it like growing up on Prince Edward Island where you're from? It was   Delmar MacLean  20:32 it was interesting. Pei. It's, it's very community oriented. And I guess, both in good and maybe bad ways. The good, of course, is that you always have, I think, support your friends and family. And it's, it's fairly apparent fairly tight knit type of community. Now, the challenges there, of course, are that you, you have to be careful that you, you if you do something that Peeves someone off, right, or like, especially for example, in your, in the business world, it's going to really come back to, to hurt you because of because of the smallness of the community, we're, of course, talking to a province of, I think it's 150,000 Now, I believe is what the population is. So if you do something, that, that, you know, you have a bad experience in an employment setting, and you're, you know, you're looking for other jobs, that's probably going to make it hard for you to, to move ahead in terms of your career, right, because so many people know one another. So that's a little bit a little bit of a drawback there. But overall, I, you know, I, I found growing up there to be to be, I guess, successful for me, I mean, I didn't really have any major drawbacks. Now, I think when I was growing up, I really didn't think that Pei was any different from any other place. I didn't understand the fact that, you know, there wasn't much anonymity there, you know, given the small size of the population. For example, when I left the island, a was hard at first to get used to living in, in larger centers where, you know, people don't really get as much involved in your life, you know, they're not looking at what the neighbors do. Because I noticed, like, if I go back east to visit back home to visit, because of the smallness people are more interested in, you know, and what their neighbors are doing, or if their neighbors are having trouble, you know, and, and sometimes, there might be a little more of a tendency to, you know, to talk about your neighbors, right, whereas, I don't know, that happens as much in bigger centers. And I don't say that I don't mean to poopoo PII in any in any way. It's a it's a great place in many ways. But I also recognize that there are some limitations given its size.   Michael Hingson  23:11 It's small, and the size is what it is, it is an island. Yes, it is. Yes, yes. There walk too far in one direction, or you'd be in trouble. Well, I   Delmar MacLean  23:20 mean, yeah, I mean, you have to hit Santos still does take several hours, you know, to drive across it. So. Yeah, so but I mean, you're you're talking about, so the main urban area, there, of course, is Charlottetown. And I think it's about 60,000 people now. And that's what that's where most of the population lives. So other than that, it's, there's another small city, I think that's around 15,000. That's Summerside. But other than that, there are a lot of, you know, rural towns. And so it is very much a rural, rural province. None, you know, nothing wrong with that, right. It just just, I think it's just accepting what it is right? When, right, wherever you are, right, accepting what it is. Now, one other challenge that I've had that I did find growing up there, of course, was in relation to having a disability, right, there aren't as many accessible features that you would find in larger centers. We do have a transportation system now in Charlottetown. But once you get outside of that, you know, when you're having to use a car, so if you can't drive or you, you know, don't have a partner who drives you're going to want to, you're going to pretty much be staying in Charlotte him. So like, I think, you know, I just, you know, I still love the place because I mean, obviously, I grew up there and I still have that attachment to it, but I also recognize the limitations that it presents for me in terms of what I want to do in my life. Do you still have family there? I have some cousins. Is there but mostly like, my parents are gone, you know, sisters and their sisters and brothers. There are some of the some sisters and brothers of my father's family that are still around, but, but my parents had me when they were older. So like they were in their early 40s When they had me.   Michael Hingson  25:22 So, did you have any siblings? No, no. So you were an only child? Yes. Yeah. Which also had its experiences and in your in challenges and, and blessings, I suppose, in a way?   Delmar MacLean  25:34 Well, I used to joke that. And I mean, don't don't take this really seriously. But I'd say, in a funny way, the well, being an only child, I tended to get, I tended to get what I wanted, right, because I didn't have any siblings to compete against. I remember. My, my friend and his brother, you know, they sometimes will they fought over things. I would think, man, I'm glad I'm an only child. And I don't mean when I say that I got what I wanted. I don't mean that I was spoiled, spoiled and demanded a lot. Right. But it's just that I, you know, I didn't have to, I figured I didn't have to worry about a brother or sister and then you know, fighting with them.   Michael Hingson  26:15 Well, you went to college, and did all those things.   Delmar MacLean  26:19 Yes, yes. Yes, I did my my undergraduate degree in actually psychology and world religions. For a while I was having trouble deciding whether I wanted to exclusively do psychology or world world religions, which I was also interested in. So I decided to do a double major. I did that at the course at the University of Prince Edward Island. And then, after I finished my honours in psychology, I went off to do my master's in social work from Wilfrid Laurier University, which is in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.   Michael Hingson  26:56 What What made you go into social work and get a, an advanced degree in MSW?   Delmar MacLean  27:01 Well, when I was going on social work, yes, well, when I was growing up, when I was in the ball, I was of course, a client of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, and they hooked me up. This is how I remember and anyway, it was, it was pretty young, probably 10 or 11. Maybe they hooked me up with a gentleman who was totally blind through a summer program. And of course, we became, we became good friends. He, as an adult, retrained to become a social worker. And well, I was his friend. And, you know, he was mentoring me, he, he went back to school, he finished his, his is psychology degree, I believe it was he was studying and also then he did his master's in social work. And, you know, during that time, obviously, I was thinking about, Okay, what could I be when I when I grew up, you know, and I knew that I, you know, I couldn't do something where I'd have to drive a car, right? I couldn't be a boss driver, I wouldn't be an airline pilot or something like that. But I think my through my friendship with him, I saw him you know, doing his doing his university degrees and you know, in working and I thought, Well, gee, you know, here's a guy that has, they can't see anything, right. And he's doing all these things. So obviously, if he can do it, I can do it. And I don't know I think just through his mentoring and learning about what he did, I figured that's that's what I wanted to do. So   Michael Hingson  28:31 of course now with societal attitudes slowly changing. Maybe you could at least if you were living down here you could go off and be a bus driver or whatever you're given the way most people drive down here I don't see the problem.   Delmar MacLean  28:43 Yeah, well I sometimes think that here where I am to and in Barry you know, sometimes I'm crossing the street you know, and I of course have the green light and I see someone barrel through the intersection. I'm thinking gee, do you not know that when someone the pedestrians in the crosswalk you you're supposed to stop? Or you better go back and take your driving past again? Especially when the light is in your favor? Yeah, yeah, yeah. So you but you still obviously you know, have to be careful about because I guess not everybody obeys the traffic laws even if they happen to have a driving license My   Michael Hingson  29:17 point exactly. And it seems to be happening more and more people are impatient. People want to do what they want to do when they want to do it and everything else be damned as it were. An unfortunate in your Well, you're not maybe not old enough to have may have lived in a time to hear the terms of things like defensive driving where people really looked out for each other but that is that is a concept that it seems to have dropped by the wayside over the   Delmar MacLean  29:48 No I do remember that con concept because I was thinking that the other day here when I was walking I said wow, these drivers are really offensive now you know, they're, they're, they're they You want to get to where they want to go? And then that's, you know, that's That's it. Yeah. And I think they might drive. You know, I shouldn't say this, but part of me was thinking, you know, perhaps they would just run if you were in the way their way, they would just run into you and keep going, Oh, well, I've got to get here. So, no, I mean, that's maybe a little bit. I shouldn't say that's a little bit extreme.   Michael Hingson  30:22 I'm not sure that's always true. Yeah. Things things can happen. But you got your master's in social work. Yes. And what did you then do? Ah,   Delmar MacLean  30:34 well, I, you know, of course, I spent a little bit of time looking for work. It was a little bit challenging initially. I, I nomadically, if you will, moved around the country a little bit. I started of course, in Kitchener Waterloo where I got my masters. No, I'm sorry. I actually went I actually briefly went back to Pei tried to get work there. It just wasn't happening. So that I, I decided I'd go back to Kitchener Waterloo and I did that. I worked for a really small agency for a few months, which base basically as a human, sorry, what am I I'm trying to remember what the title of my my job was sort of like an information resource type of worker where I help people with disabilities to access resources. And you know, and I helped him with issues around advocacy. I did that was a very, very, very small agency. So I worked there. And when was that? Oh, it was way back in 2004. Okay. So I did that for a little bit. And then I got a job with a community counseling agency. They're a contract position, and I was there for about a year. And then after that, I, I decided I try Calgary, Alberta. So I moved there. I worked for a bit, or an employment counseling agency. That was interesting. And then I actually I ended up back, I ended up back in Kitchener for a while. And then I ended up in Halifax where Halifax is in Nova Scotia is where I, I started with the Canadian National Institute for the Blind. So I was there for a while, which led me actually to Barry, where I continued to work for cniv for about 11 years, until unfortunately, I should mention that when I was up seeing IB, I was doing mostly service coordination and counseling work, you know, dealing with clients who were new to vision loss, right. So, so helping them adjusted to vision loss, and access appropriate rehabilitation services. So I did that up until 2019. And unfortunately, I was I was part of a union. And there was a cot made to a certain position in you know, when someone else was allowed to take my position it was, you know, I guess they call it pumping. So, so then I, yeah, so then I had to, to look for something else. And I started working with the company I'm with now, which is LifeWorks. And they're a they're an international EAP company apply Employment Assistance Program. And I do, I'm a counselor with them. So did telephone counseling. So I've been there now. Well, actually, it'll be next month, it'll be three years.   Michael Hingson  33:43 So the union didn't tend to protect you much.   Delmar MacLean  33:45 No, no. And I think, yeah, and, of course, where I am now doesn't have a union. And, you know, it's funny, because before I got a unionized job, I thought, oh, you know, unions, great unions. Great. Right. And you often hear that, that, you know, the union is the be all and end all but yeah, but it just goes to show that you can your job is still not guaranteed. Absolutely. 100% If you're in the union, of course, you have union dues, and all of that, too. I'm not saying you know that unions are totally bad either, right? I'm just saying, there's no guarantee 100% You know, just because you have a union that your your job is your job is what's the word I'm looking for, you know that you can never Yeah, 100% secure that you can never lose it.   Michael Hingson  34:35 And it probably shouldn't be that way because if somebody was, I'm not saying is true for you, but if somebody isn't doing a good job, we hear a lot of times that they they tend to get protected a lot. And you know, we look at look at the George Floyd case and the police cases and a lot of the things that have happened down here, where clearly someone did something they weren't supposed to do How can unions defend it no matter what. Right? Where do you where do you draw the line on that too?   Delmar MacLean  35:07 Right. And the other thing I find, too, sometimes with the unions is, some employees will just say, Well, you know, that's my job. And that's it. I'm not doing anything else that's, you know, leaving a little bit outside of the scope of my job, you know, I'm just doing what I have to do. This is what the union says I have to do. And sometimes, I think that in the old days, you know, we we really, maybe we really needed the protection of unions, but sometimes, sometimes, you know, unions can, can we, you know, they can ask for maybe more than what's what's really needed. You know, there can be some, some, a little bit of greed there, too, not saying I'm not saying that all unions are bad. I don't want to I don't want to generalize, but certainly challenges, right?   Michael Hingson  35:59 No, absolutely not. You don't want to do that. Because unions can be very, and are very helpful in a lot of ways. There's a lot out there, does. We, you have lived in a lot of places in Canada, what's your favorite place to live?   Delmar MacLean  36:14 I knew you're gonna ask me that. And everybody asked me that. And what I would say that it's really hard to pick one place and say, That's my favorite place. I think every place I've lived, as had things that I really liked, and then things that maybe I didn't like as much. And I think that what I learned from that is that no matter where you are, there are going to be positives and negatives. You know, there's never there's never a perfect, you know, you can have your cake and eat it and every everything's, everything's roses, right? I mean, I think wherever you are, it's what it's what you you make it, you know, if you look at making your life positive, and having a positive attitude, you'll succeed. But if you if you say, Oh, this isn't like where I was before, why did he do these things this way, and not the way it was done in my hometown, and this is wrong. And, you know, and he, you're and you're not going to endear yourself to the people there. Right, and you're going to you're going to have trouble acclimating and into the society. So I think it's just what I've learned is every, like I say, every place has positives, and every place, you know, things that you really like, right? And then there's going to be drawbacks, things that you that maybe you're not as fond of in every place and just, yeah, just have a good attitude and be happy where you are and try to align yourself with some things, but the things that you like and, and just try to have an open mind and you'll, you know, you'll you'll have a good good experience there. I like living in different places and seeing different things.   Michael Hingson  37:55 I hear exactly what you're saying. I grew up in a little town about 55 miles from where I live now. I grew up in a town called Palmdale, California, okay, right in the Mojave Desert, Southern California. And it was a small town, we only had about 26 2700 people in the town. Oh, and as we drove around Southern California occasionally we went through this little town called Victorville, which was hardly even a blip on a radar scope compared to Palmdale is 2700 people when I grew up and went to the University of California at Irvine have lived in a number of places. And, and they have good memories of Palmdale, but also never wanted really to move back there. Because I found other places that I enjoyed well, and ultimately, in 2014, we were living in the San Francisco area in a town called Novato, which is in actually Marin County, just north of San Francisco. And because of an illness my wife had and so on, we decided to move closer to family. And we ended up finding property and building a home in Victorville California, which used to be a blip on the radar scope. But when we came to Victorville in 2014, there were 115,000 people living here. Okay, well, as I said, is 55 miles from where I grew up. And you know, there are there things that are good about Victorville, and things that that we don't tend to like. But there are things that we do like, and most important of all, we have a nice home here. We built a home because it's easier to when you have property to do it build a home, when you need to make it wheelchair accessible, which we needed to do for Karen. Because if you buy a home and modify it, it's so expensive. So every place you go is what you make of it. And I hear people talking all the time about how horrible New York is, and they wouldn't want to live there. And they say the New York cabbies are dangerous and so on. My wife actually pointed out once when we were in New York and We were in our car with a friend. And Karen said to our friend, look at the New York cabs, you never see any of them with dented fenders and all dinged up. The reality is they're good drivers. Now they honk their horns and they get impatient. And that's part of the New York Mystique, I suppose. But they don't. They don't tend to crash their cabs and have all sorts of dinged up cabs, they're taking care of, and they drive. They really drive pretty well. Now, that was a while ago, and I don't know about today. But the best thing to do in New York is to take public transportation anyway.   Delmar MacLean  40:39 I've never been to New York, my mother was and she, my mother didn't really like big cities. So I asked her about New York, no big city, you know. I don't know. I mean, I think that's someplace I would like to go someday, I'd like to see, I'd really like to see Madison Square Garden, because my, one of my my favorite rock band Led Zeppelin played there. And in 19, seven, while he played there a lot in the 70s. Right, but I'd love to see the cmst. And I don't know, I think I think it'd be neat just to, you know, walk amongst the tall buildings there. And the excitement, there's a lot going on. So I think eventually, eventually, at some point in my life, I'll probably, you know, go there for a visit,   Michael Hingson  41:23 there is a lot going on there. It's a wonderful place to be. And Karen said, If we ever had to move back to the New York area, although we lived in Westfield, New Jersey for six years, so we're about 40 miles from New York and took the trains in. Although when she went in, she drove, said if I wanted to, had to live back there, I'd want to live in New York City, and maybe expensive, but rent an apartment because you don't need a car to get around. And even she in a wheelchair doesn't need a car, because public transportation is accessible, but there is so much there. And so close, there's a lot of culture in New York City, and I lived.   Delmar MacLean  42:02 I just gonna say, like, then see, that's, I think that's, I think, not to keep dwelling on, you know, disability related issues. But I feel like, as a person with a disability, I value being in a large center, where there's really good trends and like you say, where you don't need a car where you can, you know, hop on a bus or subway or whatnot, and, you know, in go ease, move easily between destinations. And that's, for example, PII, right, you don't have that because it's small. And I think what happens is, when you try to point that out to people who live there who say don't have a disability, they don't really get it, and they think they may be taken, as you know, like you're putting their place down while being one, because you're pointing out that it doesn't have a lot of transportation, because they can hop in a car, right, and they can drive long distances between venues. So for them, maybe they think all the big city, it's, you know, too noisy, there's too many people and there's too many big buildings, and everything's congested together, right. Whereas, you know, I guess, to us, right, we see the value of, Wow, you can, you know, you can, you can get to so many places so quickly and with so much ease, and you don't need to own a vehicle or worry about driving. I just wanted to add that in there. I didn't mean to interrupt you.   Michael Hingson  43:20 And those big buildings. If you walk around a lot in a city like New York, then you start to wonder what's going on in there, I want to go see. And it's a lot of fun. But you know, not every large city has the same level of access and public transportation. And sometimes there's strong resistance. I remember when I moved to Westfield, we moved just before they started modifying the train station in Westfield to make it wheelchair accessible. So when we first moved there, you would if you were at the train station waiting for the train, the only way to get on the train is they have built in stairs on the train, they're very steep, you go up three steps that take you probably up over four, well, not up over four feet, but close to it. Three feet or so no more than that. And you get on the train. So wheelchair access didn't exist there. And when the New Jersey Transit organization said, We're gonna make this accessible, there was a lot of opposition to a Why don't you just hire people to be at each station in case somebody in a wheelchair comes in, you lift them on the train, forget the liability and the dangers of doing that, especially in the rain. And, and other things. There was a lot of opposition to it, even though it was the right thing to do. And one of the arguments was, well, if you put in these ramps and so on that we have to run up the ramp and run across the sidewalk and get on a train. And if we're there at the last second, we might miss the train. I mean, there were all sorts of excuses, right? Right, that people would give rather than saying, why don't we want to be inclusive. And the reality is that it didn't make a difference to people's access to the train. From a standpoint of the average walking person getting on the train, they still got on the train, they made it. But it also, once it was done, made it possible for people in chairs, to get on the train, and be just as accommodated as everyone else was.   Delmar MacLean  45:30 Yeah, well, it's like, if that's the same thing as if you look at the slope curbs, you know, the street corners, I like, it doesn't just benefit someone in a wheelchair, it's easier for a walker. So you're not stepping down like a steep curb really abruptly, you know, or or, you know, a parent with a child in a stroller, you know, he can roll up and down those easily, like, so really? It really benefits everybody, right?   Michael Hingson  45:53 Sure it does. And the reality is, that is so often the case, and a lot of the technologies that blind people use could certainly benefit other segments of society. But we tend not to think about that. Why are we using VoiceOver and the voice technology and iPhones a lot more in vehicles than we do to make us not need to look at touchscreens and so on. There are so many examples that that are out there well, and on one of the episodes of unstoppable mindset, we interviewed a woman. She's known as the blind history lady, Peggy Chung, and she told the story of how the typewriter was originally invented for a blind Countess, to be able to communicate privately write an interesting story. And there are a lot of examples of that kind of thing.   Delmar MacLean  46:44 For sure. And I was, I was also thinking of just how, you know, most transit authorities now, you know, you have the automated announcing on the bus, you know, announcing the stops, right. And of course, originally, of course, we're thinking that people with vision loss, but that also, I think convenor can benefit people, maybe who's, you know, maybe, you know, English isn't their first language, and maybe they struggle a little bit with reading English, right, but they're better at hearing it, you know, and people that are just more auditory in terms of perception, right? It can be, you can be beneficial for them, you know, maybe even people who, you know, can't read, right, but they can, but they can hear the stop Oh, here, you know, a, you know, I get off now. Right. So, right. So yeah, it's beneficial to more, you know, to all kinds of segments and in society. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  47:39 So, what is the for you from a standpoint of having a master's in social work, and so on? What's the most challenging part of being a therapist?   Delmar MacLean  47:48 I think, the most challenging part, I think is, um, you know, when learning to do to do this, what am I trying to say here? I'm better in terms of doing this. And I wasn't actually but I think the most challenging part is not to think that you have to give the person all the answers. It's really, you know, you, you, you listen to what they say, You, you, you know, you're reflecting back to them, what you hear them, saying their concerns are, you know, you're making suggestions about things that could be helpful. But in the end, it's for them to do the work, you know, and if they don't do the work, you have to be careful not to take the blame for that. Because sometimes people will try to project that blame back on you, you know, if they, if they don't do the work they need to do you know, they might say, you know, they might come back to you and say, Oh, I'm still, you know, I'm feeling I'm still feeling stressed. My you know, I'm not, I'm not finding any answers here, you know, what kind of a therapist, are you? Right? I mean, they might not, you know, directly come out and say that so much, maybe that's an extreme example, but sometimes people will try to put the blame on you if they haven't moved forward. And it's because they they haven't, they haven't done the work, you know, for example, if you talk about self care, sometimes, you know, person will be really stressed out, right, and they won't have a very good balance between work and personal life. And you'll suggest to them, you know, the importance of taking time to take care of themselves, you know, do things they find that are relaxing and enjoyable. So they're, so they get some diversion from the stress of work, but then they don't do it right. And then they come back with you with the same, the same challenges, you know, but they they get, sometimes people can get it because they get frustrated with you, but they haven't really tried to put the strategies in place that you've, you've suggested, so you have to be just careful. Not to take that on. So I think as a therapist who I really have to know how to take care of myself, right how to make sure that I'm that I'm getting some diversion from my work, right when I'm not working so that I so that I don't burn out. Does that? Does that make sense? What I'm saying?   Michael Hingson  50:20 It does? It does. And you do have to really take care of yourself to in all that. Yeah. Yeah, you need to step back yourself sometimes and look at how is this affecting me? And how do I deal with   Delmar MacLean  50:34 it? Right. And I think the only thing I've noticed as, again, as a person with with vision loss is I've had to find a creative way to, you know, to work within the electronic structures that they have, you know, for important note taking and effective ways to do my notes. And, for example, you know, as talented, as challenging as it can be, I make notes while I'm talking to people, you know, and I halfway done have my, you know, my notes when I'm done sessions, so then I just have to edit things, because it tends to take me longer to do paperwork. So I can't necessarily leave all my paperwork till after my sessions, because then you know, I'd be working all the time, right? Have you looked at?   Michael Hingson  51:15 Have you looked at doing things like recording sessions, or maybe having a microphone and laying a computer? transcribe the conversations?   Delmar MacLean  51:23 I thought about that. I mean, it's, yeah, I'm still some of that's, I guess, still a work in progress. But yeah, those are things I have thought about. So far, what I'm doing seems to be working for me. But like, I'm not my mind isn't isn't close to, to alternative suggestions like that.   Michael Hingson  51:46 You've said, and some of the information we've learned about you, and so on, and looking at your bow that you subscribe to the social model of disabilities. Can you tell me more about that? Sure. So, basically, so historically, right, I   Delmar MacLean  52:02 think we've we we sit, we subscribe to the, the medical individual model of disability, right? Where, where a person is seen as having deficits, right? And then the deficits are kind of their problem, right to deal with, right? That per, you know, for example, well, you know, that, that, that that person, you know, is in a wheelchair, that's, you know, that's too bad, right? But that's, you know, that's their, that's the deficit they have, right, or that person's blind or so on, right. Whereas the, the social model of disability, I first learned about that, you know, in in graduate school, I was reading works by all all Alden Alden. Chadwick in the UK, and he was talking about the social model of disability where disability, if seen more as a reflection of the, you know, the limitations in society, right to barriers in society. So, someone you know, wheelchairs is considered disabled, if there isn't a ramp to allow them to get into the building, right? Or, or someone who is blind, right? Well, there, we, they would be considered more disabled within the context. So, you know, if there's not voice to tech software, I just thought that maybe they're the, you know, the company that they're working, that they want to work for they they won't offer them jobs, right Job asked access with speech, you know, so they can, you know, use the computer just like someone who has total vision. So in other words, so the disability is more of a more of a reflection of the limitations in society than it is the, the, the physical limitations, right. Right. So that's why I like that model.   Michael Hingson  53:57 Well, you know, and as we advance in technology, we're, we're finding more and more ways to address some of that if people will choose to do it. So for example, for blind people, probably one of the more significant overall technologies in the last seven or eight years is Ira, I don't know whether you're familiar with Ira. I've heard of it, but I'm not as familiar with it. So I resent what's called a visual interpreter. And the the way Ira works is that you run an app on your phone, which activates a connection with a trained agent. And the operative part about that is trained. The agent can see whatever the phone camera sees, there are other technologies that you can add to it like if you're sitting at your your, your desktop or laptop, you can activate something called TeamViewer. The Ira agent can actually work on your computer and fill out forms. But the idea of IRA is that what you're able to do Who is when something is visual and you can't use, you can't do it yourself. There is a way to activate a technology that allows someone with eyesight who is trained to come essentially in and help you, which means you still get to do things on your own terms, or going through airports and traveling around can be very helpful. There are other technologies like Be My Eyes that   Delmar MacLean  55:24 mentioned that one. Yeah, that's the one I was, as you were talking about that, that was the one I was thinking of.   Michael Hingson  55:29 Except the problem with Be My Eyes is that the agents are our volunteers. And there's not the level of training. Whereas with Ira, not only are agents trained and hired because they demonstrate an incredible aptitude to be able to describe read maps and other things, but they sign nondisclosure and confidentiality agreements so that blind people using IRA can do tax work, they can use IRA, in doing work on their jobs, there are lawyers who use IRA to look at documents for discovery. An IRA is okay for that because of the level of confidentiality and absolute restrictions that agents are under. So what happens that IRA stays on Ira if you will, right, but But it means that I have access that I never used to have, which is really kind of cool. And then you've got access, and you've got technologies like accessibility, which uses in large part in artificial intelligence, which that can help make a website a lot more usable than it otherwise would. It's not the total solution for complicated websites, but the technologies are making things better, which is really cool. Yeah, and what we need to do is to get society to accept more of it,   Delmar MacLean  56:46 I just gotta say that to you know, to, to educate people more about these things and get them to accept it. So. So you don't hear things like well, you know, a blind or partially sighted person couldn't do this job, right? Because, you know, then they just, sometimes you hear things like that, oh, no, you know, that person couldn't do this job, right? Because they don't, they don't know. But all these technologies that are available, and that it's actually not a really costly Big Deal thing, you know, to to make the the work environment more accessible.   Michael Hingson  57:18 I have used IRA to interact with touchscreens, right? So the agent can direct me as to exactly where to push to activate something that's on a touchscreen, which is cool. Able to get hot chocolate out of a fancy coffee, hot chocolate tea machine, you know, for example, right? So you have hobbies, I assume, like anyone else, what type of last question for you is, what's your hobby?   Delmar MacLean  57:42 Oh, well, one of my hobbies is, I like to fool around on the guitar.   Michael Hingson  57:47 Of course, you like Frank Zappa? What else could you do?   Delmar MacLean  57:52 Well, I make noise and mostly right. I mean, I, I can't say that I'm a really proficient musician, but I just, I just like to play to play around with it just to relax. I'm also also, not currently, but I have in the past, and I tend to return to this as I've been a member of Toastmasters International. So enjoy, I enjoy public speaking. And so So Toastmasters International, it's a program where you learn leadership skills, you know, like public speaking, meeting presentations, you know, organizing different projects. But what I really like about that is the mentoring aspect of it, helping others in improve their public speaking skills and leadership skills, guiding others. So that's another hobby that I that I've had and I plan to return to that I kind of drifted away a little bit during the pandemic, because they, you know, they were doing a lot of remote meetings, and I don't know, I prefer I prefer in person. I found that after sitting on a computer all day for work, I didn't feel like doing. But I didn't know. Yeah. I also, let's see, what else am I into now? I, I like to do volunteer work. I'm on the accessibility Advisory Committee for one of my local school boards. And, of course, what we do is work with the school board to help to improve accessibility for students and staff who have disabilities, you know, within within the schools, the school board. So that does, that's interesting. We have several meetings each year and we also do during non pandemic times, right? We do audits in the school board within the schools, right. So we tour schools and we, we help to point out areas where you Um, things could be made more accessible. You know, like, for example, color contrast the gun steps, making washrooms more physically accessible for students and staff and you know, using wheelchairs or, you know, canes or walkers, things like that. You know, so it's, that that also keeps me busy too, in my spare time I enjoy that   Michael Hingson  1:00:25 keeps you out of trouble.   Delmar MacLean  1:00:28 know for sure. Some of the simpler things I enjoy. I love to walk, right. So I love to be I always it's funny, my friends always want to offer me rides here and there, right. But so I just, I just liked the simple thing of being Oh, walking to the grocery store, walking on air and just going for walks I like to, I like to you talked earlier about, you know, looking at buildings and wondering what people are doing in there. I do that when sometimes when I just, there's some apartment buildings in my in my neighborhood here. And I I walk by these high rises and then think, oh, who lives in there? And what are they doing? You know, the same thing with the houses. They're just, you know, you hear the birds, right? And you you see people driving by in their cars. And I don't know, I like just I just like to notice those things. It's relaxing.   Michael Hingson  1:01:20 They're driving and they don't take time to smell the roses as it were.   Delmar MacLean  1:01:23 Well, you know, and that's funny, because I think that, you know, when I think about the fact that I did, I can't drive I think some ways I think I'm lucky, right? Because I noticed my driving grams. That's all they do, right? They drive everywhere. And then it's like, oh, I have to go to the gym. But I figure I do so much walking. That's my that's my exercise. I feel like I'm I'm healthier. There you go. Sorry. You see it as positive?   Michael Hingson  1:01:46 Well, it is. And there's there's a lot to be said for walking and slowing down sometimes to when not rushing everywhere. I wish we all would do sometimes a little bit more than that. Well, this has been fun. If people want to reach out to you and maybe engage in more of a chat or learn more about what you do. How can they do that?   Delmar MacLean  1:02:08 Sure. Well, you could reach out to me, my my email addresses, Delmar D E L M A R ,M A C L E A N  so Delmar mclean@gmail.com. Or you can find me on Facebook, if you like I'm on there. I can't say I'm not on Twitter or any of these other social media platforms. I always joke I'm I'm almost 50 So I'm a little bit old school. So mostly it's the email or the Facebook, you know, you can certainly reach out to me, if you like,   Michael Hingson  1:02:39 yeah. Hey, whatever works? For sure. For sure. Well, Delmar, thank you very much for joining us today and giving us lots of insights. I hope that people have found this interesting and that people will reach out. And my   Delmar MacLean  1:02:53 pleasure, Michael, thank you for having me. It's been it's been fun.   1:02:57 I think we've all gotten a lot to think about from it. You know, you and me and everyone listening and I hope lots of people are. As always, I would appreciate it if after this episode, you give us a five star rating. And if you'd like to reach out to me, whoever you are, feel free to do so by writing me at Michaelhi@accessibe.com. That's M I C H A E L H I  at Accessibe A C C E S S I B E.com. Go and listen or go look at our podcast page. Michael hingson.com/podcast. And Michael Hingson is M I C H A E L H I N G S O N .com/podcast. But again, wherever you listen to this, please give us a five star rating. We appreciate it. Because of all of your comments. We were the February 2022. Podcast magazine's Editor's Choice and I want to again, thank everyone for that. And Delmar especially, I really appreciate the opportunity to have met you and to have you on the podcast and really appreciate you being here.   Delmar MacLean  1:04:00 Yes. And it was an honor for me. I thank you for or asking me to, you know, to come on i I've really I've really enjoyed it. And then in the end it was a pleasure.   Michael Hingson  1:04:10 My pleasure as well. And let's stay in touch.   Delmar MacLean  1:04:13 We will. All right. Thank you.   Michael Hingson  1:04:19 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

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Chadwick Bosch is a former navy vet, trainer and CEO of Orlando Calisthenics. You can check out your work below.https://znap.link/Super.Chadhttps://www.instagram.com/super_chad_fitCheck out our sponsors Magic Mind!https://magicmind.co/cteUse code CTE20 for 20% off!If you enjoyed the podcast please rate, subscribe and share with your friends!Follow Scott on Instagram for more here. www.instagram.com/causingtheeffectpodcastYou can email Scott @ causingtheeffectpodcast@gmail.comJust click below to subscribe to the YouTube channel!https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDspmpM11TLZlqXv_bmV5jQ?sub_confirmation=1

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This week Tony and Brynne welcome singer songwriter Chadwick Johnson to the show. They chat with Chadwick about his fourth studio album called "Unbreakable" his most personal album to date. Chadwick talks about his inspiration for this album, songwriting as storytelling, how he got started in the music business and his passion for horse training. Tony and Brynne also talk about Red Dress party San Diego and what they thought of Hocus Pocus 2.

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https://brizcliz.com/​ contact@brizcliz.com *** FOLLOW US *** https://brizcliz.podbean.com/​ https://www.instagram.com/brizcliz/​ https://www.facebook.com/Brizcliz/​ https://www.tiktok.com/@brizcliz​ https://twitter.com/brizzclizz​

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Old Blood

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 57:04


1806 Virginia sees a murder forgotten, a murder ignored, and a murderer set free.This is also the episode where you learn about Thomas Jefferson's secret murdered love child. Maybe.This is Part II of Monstrous Strange. For Part I, please listen to episode 29.Sources:Bailey, John. Jefferson's Second Father:  (Pan, 2013).Berexa, Daniel. “The Murder of Founding Father George Wythe.” Tennessee Bar Association. https://www.tba.org/?pg=LawBlog&blAction=showEntry&blogEntry=9542 . 2010.Boyd, Julian. "The Murder of George Wythe," in The Murder of George Wythe: Two Essays (The Institute of Early American History & Culture, 1955)Callender, James. “The President, Again” by James Thomson Callender (September 1, 1802). (2020, December 07). In Encyclopedia Virginia. https://encyclopediavirginia.org/entries/the-president-again-by-james-thomson-callender-september-1-1802.Chadwick, Bruce. I Am Murdered: George Wythe, Thomas Jefferson, and the Killing That Shocked a New Nation. (Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2009).Crawford, Alan Pell. “A House Called Bizarre.” The Washington Post.https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/travel/2000/11/26/a-house-called-bizarre/4ea73982-5c3c-4599-9086-ea209464a666/ 26 November 2000.“George Wythe.” Colonial Williamsburg. https://www.colonialwilliamsburg.org/explore/nation-builders/george-wythe/"Our Lives, Our Stories: Legacy of the Randolph Site - Virtual Tour." Colonial Williamsburg. https://virtualtours.colonialwilliamsburg.org/randolph/ and https://www.colonialwilliamsburg.org/learn/behind-the-scenes/newest-virtual-tour-randolph-site/Hemphill, Edwin. "Examinations of George Wythe Swinney for Forgery and Murder: A Documentary Essay," The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 12, no. 4 (October 1955): 551–562.Longsworth, Polly. "Jefferson's "alleged child." Colonial Williamsburg Journal. Vol. 21, No. 02 (April/May 1999). “Lydia Broadnax.” Slavery and Remembrance: Colonial Williamsburg. https://slaveryandremembrance.org/people/person/?id=PP040"Monticello Affirms Thomas Jefferson Fathered Children with Sally HemingsA Statement by the Thomas Jefferson Foundation." Thomas Jefferson's Monticello. https://www.monticello.org/thomas-jefferson/jefferson-slavery/thomas-jefferson-and-sally-hemings-a-brief-account/monticello-affirms-thomas-jefferson-fathered-children-with-sally-hemings/Mumford, George Wythe. The Two Parsons (Richmond: J.D.K. Sleight, 1884)."Sally Hemings." Thomas Jefferson's Monticello. https://www.monticello.org/sallyhemings/"Slavery FAQs." Thomas Jefferson's Monticello. https://www.monticello.org/slavery/slavery-faqs/“Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: A Brief Account.”  and “Sally Hemings.” Thomas Jefferson's Monticello. https://www.monticello.org/thomas-jefferson/jefferson-slavery/thomas-jefferson-and-sally-hemings-a-brief-account/ and https://www.monticello.org/sallyhemings/ “Q&A with Bruce Chadwick.” C-SPAN Transcript Viewer. https://www.c-span.org/video/transcript/?id=8188. July 6, 2009.Wolfe, Brendan. “Wythe, The Death of George (1806).” Encyclopedia Virginia.https://encyclopediavirginia.org/entries/wythe-the-death-of-george-1806/“Wythepedia: The George Wythe Encyclopedia.” The Wolf Law Library. https://lawlibrary.wm.edu/wythepedia/index.php/Main_PageMusic: Dellasera by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.comFor more information, visit www.oldbloodpodcast.com

You Talking To Me?!
Chadwick Boseman

You Talking To Me?!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 4:52


The journey of Chadwick Boseman... Mark breaks down how Chadwick Boseman worked his way through small and stereotypical roles until eventually portraying Black Panther, the first black Avenger and the first superhero of African American descent in mainstream American comics and media.

Building Abundant Success!!© with Sabrina-Marie
Episode 2307: Niles, Elite Lyricist & GRAMMY® Winner Nabate' Isles Talk About Their GRAMMY® Nom Tribute SuperHero "Ode to Chadwick Boseman

Building Abundant Success!!© with Sabrina-Marie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 26:55


 GRAMMY® Award Winning Trumpeter- Elite Poet & Lyrist " & Grammy Nom TributeThe  Much Awaited  Film, "Wakanda Forever" will Debut in Theatre's November 2022!! Actor Chadwick Boseman was an icon who impacted the world in an incredible way. He was very adamant on playing roles that told the stories of innovative African-American heroes. His performances portraying Jackie Robinson ('42'), James Brown (‘Get On Up'), Thurgood Marshall (‘Marshall') as well as King T'Challa in ‘Black Panther', exhibited his impeccable depth as a thespian He held his own acting along side acting Veterans Forrest Whittaker & Angela Bassett plus many new veterans of Stage, TV & Film.When he passed away in August 2020, it inspired Niles to create a tribute verse about him that he released online, resulting in resounding praise. Grammy-winning trumpeter and producer, ​Nabaté Isles​ contacted his friend, Niles and suggested that they make a full record about Chadwick and the rest was history. When “Niles & Nabaté” linked, they needed a powerful singer and they knew just who to contact, an amazing Detroit vocalist named Beth Griffith-Manley. Beth has toured for years with Anita Baker and Kem, recorded on projects with Yolanda Adams and was featured on NBC's “The Voice”. Beth was delighted to be featured because, like Niles & Nabaté, she has a tremendous respect for Chadwick Boseman and his legacy.The record is a great song with a sound that is reminiscent of the classic Hip-Hop with a soulful-pop undertone fusing African percussion, giving it a tribal and organic essence. This sonic cornucopia makes it a timeless piece of musical art. As the song reflects on Chadwick Boseman's resonating impact on the world, it is sure to make a contribution to keeping Chadwick Boseman's legacy alive forever.“Super Hero: Ode To Chadwick Boseman” is out now on Bandcamp, Amazon, Spotify, Youtube Music, and many more digital music platforms. A portion of the proceeds will go to the Chadwick Boseman Charitable Fund For The Arts.© 2022 Building Abundant Success!!2022 All Rights ReservedJoin Me on ~ iHeart Media @ https://tinyurl.com/iHeartBASSpot Me on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/yxuy23baAmazon Music ~ https://tinyurl.com/AmzBASAudacy:  https://tinyurl.com/BASAud

Pipe It Up!
#117 - Why Bonham Felt Blindsided by the Chadwick Trade

Pipe It Up!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 64:50


The Metro Magic were swept for the 3rd consecutive time, so Trevor Bonham joins the show to share his frustration. His emotions are well justified, given the 2-13 finish for the Magic and given the fact that Bonham's teammate and friend, Jason Chadwick, requested to be traded away. Now, Bonham is trying to forget this season and focus on what's ahead for his squad. Follow us on Instagram for more behind the scenes of MLW Wiffle Ball! https://www.instagram.com/pipeitupmlw/?hl=en And SUBSCRIBE to MLW! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0oe5dxrhIFOiFPd0OAWAew --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Spoken Label
Heidi Hinda Chadwick (Spoken Label, October 2022)

Spoken Label

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 45:29


Latest Spoken Label (Spoken Word / Artist / Author Podcast) features the fantastic Heidi Hinda Chadwick. Heidi in her own words is a "Dreamer, dancer, word-play musings, fairy-tale lover, poet, performer, yogini n soul-filled seeker, musical mischief maker, n creatrix medicine chica. I am a creative life coach, writer, performer and mentor. I have a wealth of experience: teaching, producing events, and facilitating creative approaches to projects, crowdfunding, creating content and courses for organisations, resources for health and wellbeing, and supporting value and human heart-centred businesses. My passion is storytelling. Words. Engaging. meaningful and creative. I am a content writer, and course creator, and love working on projects that resonate with my values: respect, clarity, integrity, and power." More about Heidi can be found at: https://www.facebook.com/HHTheCreativeGenius/ https://uk.linkedin.com/in/heidihindachadwick

The Listening Brain
A Conversation with Christy Chadwick, Relational Therapist & Educator of the Deaf

The Listening Brain

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 32:57


Christy is a relational therapist and deaf educator, bringing mindful and yogic principles, energy healing modalities, plus evidence based therapeutic models to her practice with families and practitioners in the field of deaf education.   In 2016, Christy completed her masters in Deaf Education from Washington University and later completed her degree in Marriage and Family Therapy in 2021.   She brings these together in her work of Deafness Relations, where she helps hearing parents of DHH children gain clarity and help them navigate their emotions.   Christy is also an advocate for deaf education services in Hawaii and founded Hawaii Hears in 2017 to bring more services to the islands for families and their children who are deaf or hard of hearing. You can follow Christy on Instagram, Facebook, or send her an email Hello@christychadwick.com http://www.facebook.com/hawaiihears www.christychadwick.com www.hawaiihears.com IG: @Christy.Chadwick.Healing IG: @hawaiihears IG: @deafnessrelations   You can listen to this podcast at: www.3cdigitalmedianetwork.com/the-listening-brain-podcast    

When the Moment Chooses You!
Your Sunshine Quotient is Your Calling Card with Catherine Chadwick

When the Moment Chooses You!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 38:32


ABOUT WHEN THE MOMENT CHOOSES YOU PODCAST Coach Charlene's purpose is to bring transformation by creating and inspiring destiny moments because every heartbeat matters... When the Moment chooses you will engage in compassionate courageous conversations with some of the most daring trailblazers and change agents in organizations, corporations and the world who dared to respond to those destiny moments. Listen to new episodes bi-weekly on Sundays anywhere you get your podcasts. You will move from thinking and talking about your dreams….to manifesting the desires of your heart….Be inspired to become the highest expression of yourself. What will you do when the moment chooses you? follow me on social media: whenthemomentchoosesyou Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/whenthemomentchoosesyou Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/whenthemomentchoosesyou/ Website: https://coachcharlene.carrd.co/# --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/charlene-johnson68/message

Black Rain
Behind The Bunker: Seasons 1 Production Update

Black Rain

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 16:50


Chadwick, Scott, and Scott talk about the up-and-coming episodes of Black Rain. Support the show

The Emergency Mind Podcast
EP 70: Diane Chadwick-Jones on Safety and Human Performance

The Emergency Mind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 41:09


Diane Chadwick-Jones, former director of human performance at bp joins to talk about changing organizations, developing a safety-II mindset, and much more.

Pint Glass Football Podcast
S4E26: NFL Quarterbacks, MVP Pick, and College Football with Guest Max Chadwick

Pint Glass Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 43:52


PRESENTED By BettorEdge, On this episode host Brad Fowler discusses NFL news such as the NFL Pro Bowl going to flag football, Sterling Shepard's injury and OBJ's comments, 2 young NFL QBs are crushing it beyond my expectations, a pillar NFL franchise has a serious QB problem, I'll tell you who the NFL MVP is so far, who the worst 2-1 team is, and talk college football with guest Max Chadwick (@Chad_Maxwick) from Pro Football Focus (PFF.com) and much more! Create an account at BettorEdge.com and use code "PGF" for $10 FREE on your first order! pintglassfootball.com

The Open Highway
74- Charles Chadwick: Higher Education, Loans and Debt

The Open Highway

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 62:39


GUEST-  Charles Chadwick is the author of Chadwick's College Checklist and Chadwick's Cultivated Circumstances. Both books also available from Audible! Charles prides himself in helping people find their way when it comes to college, university, trade school and the work force. WHAT SERVICE ARE YOU LOOKING FOR? TRY FIVERR TODAY! Check out our partners Koa Coffee Plantation and Black Helmet Apparel!  

3-21 NoKiddin' Gambling Recovery Podcast
Money Talks- Student Debt, Loans, and Everything Else! (ft. Charles Chadwick)

3-21 NoKiddin' Gambling Recovery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 60:36


602Almost everyone's problem... student loans, rents, debts. What do you do with these? How do you catch up with them? You might learn something with this episode about money talks!In today's episode of The Recovering Entrepreneur Show, we are joined by Charles Chadwick Jr.. He has two degrees, but he also learned a trade before college. Learning a trade can add more value in today's very competitive job market. His trade experience/employment even helped him pay off his student loans! Also, during the pandemic, he was able to work, being deemed an essential worker working in the construction/security industry.Charles discussed how he was able to write 2 books in 2 years, his passion for writing and most importantly, discussed money! He also discussed how he finish paying off his student loans, rents, and other debts. Visit Charles on this social media platforms:Website: https://www.chadwicksexperiences.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ReducecollegedebtInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/reducecollegedebtPlease support Charles' book:Charles' College Checklist (live on Amazon now!)Happy Friday!------------------------------------------------Did you enjoy the show? Please leave us a rate and review!This helps us reach other gamblers who may need to hear recovery messages.------------------------------------------------Get in touch with me!Email address : bobbie@321NoKiddin.comFacebook          : www.facebook.com/321NoKiddinInstagram         : www.instagram.com/bobbietheawesomestPinterest           : www.pinterest.ph/bobbiemalatestaLinkedIn            : www.linkedin.com/in/bobbiemalatestaYouTube           : www.youtube.com/channel/UCkUV58i4z2Se3jXuDldcXaAWebsite            : www.321nokiddin.com**A super special thanks to Justin Furstenfeld for granting us permission to use his music on the show!Please support and follow the Blue October band on:Facebook  : www.facebook.com/blueoctoberInstagram : www.instagram.com/blueoctoberbandTwitter       : www.twitter.com/blueoctoberYoutube    : www.youtube.com/user/blueoctoberofficialSupport the show

DJ Blaze Radio Show Podcast
He Caught That Chadwick

DJ Blaze Radio Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 65:13


On this episode Amy (@amys22cents) Kee (@bosslady819) and B-Eazy (@preacher_bp) discuss the Emmys, the SAFE-T Act, Chaka Zulu charged, Black Girl Magic, and the new Viola Davis movie The Woman King. Email: djblazeshow@gmail.com

William Ramsey Investigates
What! Adnan Syed to be released for a new trial? WR on the True Crime Report with Roberta Glass, Robb Chadwick and Lisa O'Brien.

William Ramsey Investigates

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 48:43


What! Adnan Syed to be released for a new trial? WR on the True Crime Report with Roberta Glass, Robb Chadwick and Lisa O'Brien.  Roberta Glass True Crime Report: https://www.youtube.com/user/robertaglass Lisa O'Brien Twitter: @obrienlann Robb Chadwick: @robbchadwick Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Todd Starnes Podcast
FAA Presents "The Game Ball" w/Chadwick Moore

The Todd Starnes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 17:48


This week's Game Ball goes to Chadwick Moore. The contributing editor at The Spectator came in to gloat about his controversial victory over Jimmy on Tucker Carlson's show. They also discussed the Left's fury over Florida Gov. Ron Desantis sending 50 migrants to Martha's Vineyard Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Pipe It Up!
#114 - A Blockbuster Trade and a Breakout Performance

Pipe It Up!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 48:28


Another week of CHAOS in the MLW Wiffle Ball world. The Metro Magic finalized a deal sending Jason Chadwick to the Great Lakes Gators for a pair of draft picks. In this episode, hear opinions from Coughlin, Aigner, Chadwick, and Jorgensen on the deal. Later, Sawyer Behen joins the show to discuss his breakout performance that led the Cobras to a sweep against their division rivals. Behen also chimed in on all the trash talk that went on during the series. Follow us on Instagram for more behind the scenes of MLW Wiffle Ball! https://www.instagram.com/pipeitupmlw/?hl=en And SUBSCRIBE to MLW! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0oe5dxrhIFOiFPd0OAWAew --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app