Podcasts about national endowment

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Best podcasts about national endowment

Show all podcasts related to national endowment

Latest podcast episodes about national endowment

The Long View
Tim Ranzetta: 'Financial Education Positively Impacts Almost All Financial Behaviors'

The Long View

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 49:06


Our guest on the podcast today is Tim Ranzetta. Tim is the co-founder of the nonprofit Next Gen Personal Finance, which provides free curricula, professional development, and advocacy tools to more than 40,000 teachers who reach 75% of high school students in the U.S. The goal of Next Gen Personal Finance and its community of teachers is for all high school students to take at least one stand-alone one-semester course focusing on personal finance by the end of 2030. Prior to founding NGPF, Tim co-founded several companies, including Equilar, a compensation and corporate governance research firm; and Student Lending Analytics, a student loan research firm. He began his career as a management consultant at Bain & Company. He graduated from the University of Virginia with a Bachelor of Science degree in commerce and received his MBA at the Stanford Graduate School of Business.BackgroundBioNext Gen Personal FinanceEastside College Preparatory SchoolWhat Works in Financial Education Interactive: The Financial Times' The Uber Game“Financial Education Affects Financial Knowledge and Downstream Behaviors,” by Tim Kaiser, Annamaria Lusardi, Lukas Menkhoff, and Carly J. Urban, National Bureau of Economic Research, April 2020.“Annamarie Lusardi: ‘Financial Education Works,' ” The Long View podcast, Morningstar.com, Feb. 19, 2020.Fidelity Youth AccountMillion Bazillion podcast “Bringing Personal Finance to the Classroom for Generation Z,” by Ann Carrns, nytimes.com, March 18, 2022.“The Truth About Day Trading,” by Ben Felix, YouTube.com, Oct. 24, 2020.The Stock Market GameSTAXfinviz.comThe State of Financial Education in the U.S.“NGPF's 2022 State of Financial Education Report,” ngpf.org, April 2022.Jump$tart Coalition for Personal Financial LiteracyCouncil for Economic Education“Financial Education Mandates 2022,” poll by National Endowment for Financial Education, nefe.org, March 17-21, 2022.“What I Learned Reading the State Auditor's Report About Financial Education in Utah,” by Tim Ranzetta, ngpf.org, Oct. 22, 2018.Mississippi Department of Education: National Board Certification—Master Teacher ProgramThe North Carolina Council on Economic EducationRhode Island Department of Education The Most Important Class You Never Had, NGPF documentary Other“Dan Otter and Scott Dauenhauer: Why Retirement Savings Options for Educators Are So Bad,” The Long View podcast, Morningstar.com, May 28, 2022.

The Kitchen Sisters Present
193 - Bowling With Taban: Afghan Women Refugees in America

The Kitchen Sisters Present

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 39:03


Every year around this time, The Kitchen Sisters host Bowling With Grace, our big annual community party at Mission Bowling Club in San Francisco where we honor life-long bowling savant, Amazing Grace Mulloy. Grace, who turns 99 this year, is in two senior bowling leagues and averages about 100 a game. Grace moves through the lanes sipping her signature Scotch and Soda with a green olive, sharing her bowling tips and wisdom with the crowd.   Recently a listener sent us an article from the DCist by writer and photographer Valerie Plesch about an astonishing group of young Afghan women journalists, musicians and activists who fled their country in fear for their lives when the Taliban took over their nation — a group now living in the DC area. Two paragraphs into the article, we knew had to record these women's stories, especially when we read that one of the journalists, 26-year-old Taban Ibraz, had a weekly national television show, Let's Bowl, where she interviewed politicians and people of note while bowling with them in an alley in Kabul. Bowling binds us as a community at Bowling with Grace. Bowling bound this journalist to her now shattered community in Kabul. Special thanks to Taban Ibraz, Anaitza Walizada, Maryam Yousifi, Helal Massomi, Elham Karimi, Marika Patridge, Lori Davis, Ed James and Ajmal Subat. Thanks also to The Daily Antidote Podcast and to writer/photographer Valerie Plesch for inspiring this story and sharing her photographs with The Kitchen Sisterhood. Valerie Plesch's photographs and more about this story, plus an interview with Tanya Henderson, Founder and President of Mina's List, a non-profit advancing women's political leadership and global peace, are on our website, kitchensisters.org Thanks to the National Endowment for the Arts, The Kaleta Doolin Foundation, The Texas Women's Foundation and listener contributions to The Kitchen Sisters Productions for the funding that makes these stories possible. The Kitchen Sisters Present... is part of Radiotopia, an independent, story driven, carefully crafted podcast network from PRX. 

The Chills at Will Podcast
Episode 131 with Alice Elliott Dark, Brilliant Chronicler of the Specific and Universal, Writer of ”In the Gloaming,” Best Short Stories of the Century, and the New Epic Novel, Fellowship Point

The Chills at Will Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 70:39


Episode 131 Notes and Links to Alice Elliott Dark's Work       On Episode 131 of The Chills at Will Podcast, Pete welcomes Alice Elliott Dark, and the two discuss, among other topics, Alice's upbringing and schooling that provided much room for intellectual growth and inquiry, her poetry writing days and gradual transfer to writing prose, her electrifying short story that made all-century lists, the story's presentation on the big screen, and the “saga” of her latest novel and its accompanying themes.     Alice Elliott Dark, author of the novels Fellowship Point and Think of England, and whose story "In the Gloaming” was chosen by John Updike for inclusion in The Best American Short Stories of The Century and made into films by HBO and Trinity Playhouse. Her non-fiction reviews and essays have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and many anthologies. She is a recipient of a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts and an Associate Professor at Rutgers-Newark in the English department and the MFA program.  Alice Elliott Dark's Website   Alice's Wikipedia Page   Buy Alice's Books   Publisher's Weekly Review of Fellowship Point   Kirkus Reviews Review of Fellowship Point At about 2:00, Alice details her childhood and adolescent relationship with language and reading   At about 4:40, Alice describes a formative experience where she realized that she, too, could become a professional writer   At about 5:20, Alice describes the books and writers who she loved as a kid, including A Stone for Danny Fisher and work by Irwin Shaw   At about 9:30, Alice responds to Pete's questions about what it was like growing up in Philadelphia and its cultures and ethos, including the Quaker influences    At about 13:35, Alice talks about her early days of writing poetry and how she read widely, particularly poetry   At about 14:30, Alice discusses how her college Asian Studies major happily upset her ideas of form   At about 17:00, Alice responds to Pete's question about any “ ‘Eureka' moments” that convinced her of her writing prowess, as well as how watching a lot of 1970s UK punk helped her shift to writing prose   At about 19:40, Alice gives background on the origins of her legendary short story “In the Gloaming”   At about 22:15, Alice explains the meanings of the iconic first line of the short story   At about 24:00, Alice defines “gloaming” and Pete and Alice discuss the story's beginning as Laird perks up around twilight   At about 25:20, Alice describes how she “step[s] aside” to let her characters develop and communication between mother and son   At about 28:40, Alice talks about her writing process and the importance of “picturing” the storyline, characters, etc.    At about 29:35, Pete and Alice discuss Martin, the father in the story, and his isolation, as well as intimacy between mother and son   At about 31:30, Pete and Alice talk about Laird's illness in terms of an AIDS diagnosis    At about 33:15, Alice and Pete compare ideas of anonymity/Everyman/Everywoman in Alice's writing and Chekhov's   At about 34:25, Laird's friend's letter is referenced as juxtaposition with Laird's deteriorating physical condition, and comparisons between Covid and AIDS are mentioned   At about 36:20, Pete reads and compliments the second-to-last sentence of the story   At about 37:40, Alice details the processes in which her story became a film and her experiences in watching the process unfold and witnessing the final product   At about 39:20, Alice discusses Christopher Reeve's role in making the movie   At about 40:35, Pete wonders about Alice's experience in having the story as part of    At about 41:50, Pete and Alice discuss the critical acclaim for Fellowship Point and the “saga” of the book's long life before being finished and published   At about 45:45, Alice details themes and aims for the book, and how some subtleties of herself came through, though the book is truly fiction   At about 46:40, Alice replies to Pete's questions about perspectives shifting as the book's saga played out   At about 48:35, Alice responds to Pete's question about if the characters are/were real to her   At about 50:45, Alice examines Covid's impact on her and others' writing   At about 52:25, Pete wonders how Alice saw and sees the finished product of Fellowship Point, and Alice highlights Mary Sue Rucci's great help in editing and revising    At about 54:45, Pete and Alice discuss the characteristics of the book's main characters    At about 58:10, The relationship between main character Agnes and an editor, Maud is discussed   At about 58:50, Ideas of land ownership and parallel themes are discussed in context of the book   At about 1:01:45, The theme of feminism is discussed, with regard to Agnes, and how the term is limiting for her    At about 1:03:50, Alice discusses what she has to say in the book about themes of aging (particularly with older women being ignored/underestimated) and    At about 1:05:50-friendship lasting and love as shown in different ways   At about 1:07:00-Alice gives her contact info, and highlights great work by Mary Sue Rucci Books, Scribner, and Cassandra Campbell for the reading of the audiobook   1:08:50-Alice provides her social media info    You can now subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, and leave me a five-star review. You can also ask for the podcast by name using Alexa, and find the pod on Stitcher, Spotify, and on Amazon Music. Follow me on IG, where I'm @chillsatwillpodcast, or on Twitter, where I'm @chillsatwillpo1. You can watch other episodes on YouTube-watch and subscribe to The Chills at Will Podcast Channel. Please subscribe to both my YouTube Channel and my podcast while you're checking out this episode.  This is a passion project of mine, a DIY operation, and I'd love for your help in promoting what I'm convinced is a unique and spirited look at an often-ignored art form. The intro song for The Chills at Will Podcast is “Wind Down” (Instrumental Version), and the other song played on this episode was “Hoops” (Instrumental)” by Matt Weidauer, and both songs are used through ArchesAudio.com.    Please tune in for Episode 132 with Morgan Talty, a citizen of the Penobscot Indian Nation where he grew up. Morgan teaches courses in both English and Native American Studies, and he is on the faculty at the Stonecoast MFA in creative writing. His highly-anticipated short story collection, Night of the Living Rez, is forthcoming from Tin House Books, on July 5. The episode will air on July 11.   

Power Station
Rising to the yell is not the answer

Power Station

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 35:05


We are reminded daily, in every scroll through social media, disputed election, tense family function and divisive school board meeting that America is a fractured nation. The polarization is so extreme that increasing numbers of our public leaders no longer identify democracy as a core value. In this episode of Power Station, we learn how the humanities (the arts, history, and philosophy) can be instrumental in creating a safe space for challenging conversations. Adam Davis, executive director of Oregon Humanities, describes what happens when people come together with a common purpose, leaving titles, biases, and egos behind. Oregon Humanities, one of 56 councils launched in 1971 by the National Endowment for the Humanities, uses poems, visuals, and stories to prompt non-combative dialogue. They train nonprofit leaders how to facilitate discussions that build bonds among people with disparate views and lived experience. Oregon Humanities is generating measurable impacts, most importantly a sense of agency among those who engage in these events. And the movement is growing, a hopeful sign for bridging gaps in a tenuous democracy.   

Gather by the Ghost Light
Ep 31: New Kid Next Door

Gather by the Ghost Light

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 23:18


NEW KID NEXT DOOR: Two siblings are stuck with the weird, creepy - and ultimately maybe not even human - kid from next door, on July Fourth, when there are firecrackers to be stolen and played with. Let freedom ring! Written by Arthur M. Jolly Directed by Jonathan Cook Performed by: Kelsie Johnson as KERRI Sophie Cook as SIMONE Luke Romagnoli as RAZIEL (the new kid next door) Intro/Outro music: JK/47 This program is supported in part by the Greater Augusta Arts Council through a grant from its partner agency - the National Endowment for the Arts. Gather by the Ghost Light merch available at Online Shop! If you would like to further support this podcast, please visit Buy Me a Coffee If you are associated with a theatre and would like to perform the stage version of this play, please contact playwright Arthur M. Jolly (http://www.arthurjolly.com) If you have any comments or feedback, please send an email to gatherbytheghostlight@gmail.com

Plein Air Easton Podcast
What Moves Your Spirit with Dan Weiss

Plein Air Easton Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 49:01


Dan Weiss, president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, served as the judge of the 2021 Plein Air Easton art competition.  As we worked with Dan during the festival, we found him to be a passionate, kind, and easy-going man that was able to say incredibly intelligent things in a way that felt connecting when other wise people may sound exclusionary.  He joined us virtually from quarantine to share the story of how he became such a uniquely qualified candidate for his role at the Met and express his love for Plein Air painting. A scholar of art history and a seasoned leader of complex institutions, Dan Weiss was previously President and Professor of Art History of Haverford College and, from 2005 to 2013 of Lafayette College. He holds an MBA from Yale and a PhD from Johns Hopkins University in western medieval and Byzantine art, where he joined the art history faculty and in six years rose to full professor and then chair of the department. Three years later, he became the James B. Knapp Dean of Johns Hopkins's Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. He holds a BA in Art History and Psychology from The George Washington University.  The author of six books and numerous articles, Weiss has published and lectured widely on a variety of topics, including the art of the Middle Ages and the Crusades, higher education, museums, and American culture. His most recent books include In That Time: Michael O'Donnell and the Tragic Era of Vietnam (2019), and Remaking College: Innovation and the Liberal Arts (2013). Earlier in his career, Weiss spent four years as a management consultant at Booz, Allen & Hamilton in New York. The recipient of fellowships from Harvard University, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, Weiss received the Business and Society Award from the Yale School of Management, the Van Courtlandt Elliott Award from the Medieval Academy of America for scholarship in medieval studies, the Distinguished Alumni Award from George Washington University, and he was inducted into the Society of Scholars at Johns Hopkins in 2018. Follow The MET: Official Site Facebook Instagram Twitter YouTube Follow Plein Air Easton: Official Site Facebook Instagram YouTube To inquire about being a guest or sponsoring the Plein Air Easton Podcast, send us an email at info@pleinaireaston.com. This episode is sponsored by JFM Enterprises, providing distinctive ready-made and custom frames & mouldings to the trade since 1974. Music in this episode was generously provided by Blue Dot Sessions & Scott Gratton.

The Graduate Center, CUNY
Post Roe, How to Advance Women's Rights, LGBTQ Rights

The Graduate Center, CUNY

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 46:42


Anne Valk, a specialist in women's history and public history, joins The Thought Project for a Pride Month conversation that touches on the curtailing of LGBTQ rights and of women's rights by the Supreme Court and state legislators. Valk is a professor of History and director of the American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning at the CUNY Graduate Center. As a public historian, Valk focuses on the ways history is preserved and presented to people through monuments, museums, libraries, and more. Also a noted oral historian, she has written about the history of second-wave feminism and of racial segregation in the U.S. Next month, the American Social History Project will host 30 middle and high school teachers for a National Endowment for the Humanities–funded institute on teaching LGBTQ history. Valk takes a long view of the Supreme Court's abortion ruling, noting that, “Roe has been eroded almost immediately since it was decided.” She adds, “The only way that positive change has happened is because of people pushing for it at all different levels and in lots of different forms.” Valk also talks about LGBTQ rights and the importance of teaching of LGBTQ history in schools, touching on research showing its benefits in boosting students' mental health and reducing bullying. Listen in for a timely conversation about women's rights, LGBTQ rights, and what the past reveals about both.

My Favorite Detective Stories
Edith Maxwell | My Favorite Detective Stories Episode 167

My Favorite Detective Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 48:01


Edith was first recognized for her fiction writing at the age of eleven. She won the Pasadena Star News contest for her short story, “Viking Girl” and walked away with the prize money of $2.00!In 2013 she left high-tech to write mystery fiction full-time and is now living her dream. Edith is a lifetime member of Sisters in Crime, and is a member of Mystery Writers of America. She is also a long-time member of the Society of Friends (Quaker) and a past Clerk of Amesbury Friends Meeting. Her art story was featured in the National Endowment for the Arts 50th anniversary celebration. Edith blogs with five other New England mystery authors at WickedAuthors.com who were featured in the Boston Globe.She also blogs at Mystery Lovers' Kitchen on the second and fourth Fridays of the month.https://edithmaxwell.com/Today's episode is brought to you by John's full series of crime thrillers available right now. You can get them through Amazon here: https://www.amazon.com/John-A.-Hoda/e/B00BGPXBMM%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share  You can also sign up for the newsletter at http://www.JohnHoda.com to get a free copy of John's new novella Liberty City Nights.Thank you for listening. If you have a moment to spare please leave a rating or comment on Apple Podcasts as that will help us expand the circle around our campfire. If you have any questions please feel to reach out to me via my website http://www.johnhoda.com

Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society
20/06/22: Samuel Scheffler on Partiality, Deference, and Engagement

Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 51:43


The partiality we display, insofar as we form and sustain personal attachments, is not normatively fundamental. It is a byproduct of the deference and responsiveness that are essential to our engagement with the world. We cannot form and sustain valuable personal relationships without seeing ourselves as answerable to the other participants in those relationships. And we cannot develop and sustain valuable projects without responding to the constraints imposed on our activities by the nature and requirements of those projects themselves. More generally, we cannot engage with the world without meeting it on its terms, and we cannot meet the world on its terms without responding differentially – or displaying partiality – with respect to the objects of our engagement. Partiality is thus a byproduct of engagement. We cannot engage with the world at all without exhibiting forms of partiality. Samuel Scheffler is University Professor in the Department of Philosophy at NYU. He works primarily in the areas of moral and political philosophy and the theory of value. His writings have addressed central questions in ethical theory, and he has also written on topics as diverse as equality, nationalism and cosmopolitanism, toleration, terrorism, immigration, tradition, death, and the future of humanity. Scheffler received his A.B. from Harvard and his Ph.D. from Princeton. From 1977-2008 he taught at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of six books: The Rejection of Consequentialism, Human Morality, Boundaries and Allegiances, Equality and Tradition, Death and the Afterlife (Niko Kolodny ed.), and Why Worry about Future Generations? He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the U.S. National Endowment for the Humanities, and he has been a Visiting Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. His first book was awarded the Matchette Prize of the American Philosophical Association. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a member of the Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters, and a foreign member of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. He is currently at work on a book (tentatively) titled The Lives We Lead: Personal Attachment and the Passage of Time. This podcast is an audio recording of Dr Scheffler's talk - "Partiality, Deference, and Engagement" - at the Aristotelian Society on 20th June 2022. This recording was produced by the Backdoor Broadcasting Company.

Cloak & Dagger On the Air
C&D Presents: "That's Just the Way It Was"

Cloak & Dagger On the Air

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 74:06


On Tuesday, May 31, 2022, The Ohio Valley Cloak & Dagger Company partnered with Oglebay Institute's Towngate Theatre and Elmhurst: The House of Friendship to present a special live audio drama, "That's Just the Way It Was," starring The Elmhurst Radio Players. Funded by the Creative Aging for Lifelong Learning Grant through Oglebay Institute, "That's Just the Way It Was" is based on stories from the lives of Elmhurst's residents and features a century's worth of experiences. During the course of the production, you'll hear tales of the Great Depression, the Flood of 1936, World War II, life in the 50s, and the origins behind such local milestones as the founding of Towngate Theatre and Wheeling Park High School. Featuring: Jessie Coleman, Charlene Goodwin, Jeanne Hicks, James Hossman, Shirley Milton, Penny Mourat, Bertha Sacco, Bettie Steele, Bea Stelmach, Kathryn Wallington, and Emily Wilson, with Pete Fernbaugh, Karissa Martin, and Tim Thompson. Sound Effects Artists: Karissa Martin and Judy McNabb. Accompanist: Rose Humway. The Creative Aging for Lifelong Learning Grant was made possible by: Aroha Philanthropies; National Assembly of State Arts Agencies; National Endowment for the Arts; and West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History's West Virginia Commission on the Arts. A Future Past Production. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cloak-dagger-on-the-air/message

The Watershed
17 | On the Lake (Alexandria, MN)

The Watershed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 14:01


The We Are Water MN exhibit is on the road for its 2022 tour. Throughout the year, We Are Water MN will be visiting five different communities in the state of Minnesota: Winona, Lake City, Alexandria, Otter Tail County, and Dakota County. On The Watershed podcast, we'll be sharing series of episodes that reflect on the water stories of people who live in each of these places. We Are Water has now arrived in Alexandria, where the Legacy of the Lakes Museum is hosting the exhibit June 23 - August 15. Learn more: https://legacyofthelakes.org/ Today, we celebrate Alexandria's active lake culture by hearing from community members who find enjoyment and meaning through spending time on the water. We are Water MN is led by the Minnesota Humanities Center in partnership with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency; the Minnesota Historical Society; the Minnesota Departments of Agriculture, Health, and Natural Resources; and University of Minnesota Extension, with support from the Clean Water, Land & Legacy Amendment and the National Endowment for the Humanities. To learn more about We Are Water MN, visit us at our website. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

American Craft Podcast
Object As...with Leandro Gómez Quintero

American Craft Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 44:01


The Willys Jeep, very common in Baracoa, Cuba, is something Quintero has represented many times in his work through his sociocultural project titled Transportarte a Baracoa (transport yourself to Baracoa). When Quintero started this project, he wanted to reflect the reality that surrounds those in Cuba. The Willys has been used to carry packages and help with moves. During World War II, it was employed by the military on the Guantánamo naval base, where the strong and brave vehicle proved its value more than once. American Craft Podcast thanks our guest, Leandro Gómez Quintero. View Quintero's object here. See more of his work here. Read about Leandro in the New York Times.    American Craft Podcast also thanks our host and producer Sarah Rachel Brown from perceivedvaluepodcast.com. Follow @sarahrachelbrown. Music is produced by Hamilton Boyce. Find him at hamiltonboyce.com and follow @hamiltonboyce. This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. To find out more about how National Endowment for the Arts grants impact individuals and communities, visit www.arts.gov. American Craft Podcast is property of the American Craft Council at craftcouncil.org. Your support through membership and contributions is appreciated. Subscribe, rate, and review the American Craft Podcast wherever you listen.

StitchCast Studio
Gun Violence Epidemic Part II

StitchCast Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 49:41


Youth leaders discuss current events around the gun violence epidemic in the wake of the school shooting in May when an 18-year-old fatally shot nineteen students and two teachers and wounded seventeen other people at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, and during high rates of accidental and unintentional shootings involving children in St. Louis where, as of June 14, at least 53 children 17 or under have been shot. Eight have died; 45 were injured. Recorded for StitchCast Studio LIVE! on June 10, 2022 at Central Stage in St. Louis, Missouri.   Pick the City UP Art Interlude Not Another One! Saint Louis Story Stitchers, 2016    Saint Louis Story Stitchers is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. On the web at arts dot gov. Story Stitchers is supported by The Lewis Prize for Music's 2021 Accelerator Award. The mission of The Lewis Prize is to partner with leaders who create positive change by investing in young people through music.  Additional support for StitchCast Studio and Story Stitchers youth programs was provided by the Spirit of St. Louis Women's Fund, City of St. Louis Youth at Risk Crime Prevention grant of 2021, Lush Corporation's The Charity Pot, and March For Our Lives Aid & Alliance.  

StitchCast Studio
Music Industry Standards

StitchCast Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 39:35


StitchCast Studio LIVE! Music Industry Standards In this week's StitchCast our panel sits down with Harvey Lockhardt, Executive Director ofHEAL Center for the Arts and Ntegrity, Story Stitchers Teaching Artist and Audio Producer. Recorded for StitchCast Studio LIVE! at Central Stage in St. Louis, Missouri on March 27, 2022. Pick the City UP Art Interlude What's Your Why KP Dennis and Ntegrity Saint Louis Story Stitchers, 2020 Saint Louis Story Stitchers is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. On the web at arts dot gov. Story Stitchers is supported by The Lewis Prize for Music's 2021 Accelerator Award. The mission of The Lewis Prize is to partner with leaders who create positive change by investing in young people through music.  Additional support for StitchCast Studio and Story Stitchers youth programs was provided by the Spirit of St. Louis Women's Fund, City of St. Louis Youth at Risk Crime Prevention grant of 2021, Lush Corporation's The Charity Pot, and March For Our Lives Aid & Alliance.

StitchCast Studio
Misunderstanding, Fear and Hate: Neurodivergent and ADHD Part II

StitchCast Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 29:49


Youth leaders share stories and build understanding about Neurodivergent and ADHD. Recorded in Zoom on March 22, 2022. Pick the City UP Art Interlude Alexis, Youth guitarist Saint Louis Story Stitchers is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. On the web at arts dot gov. Story Stitchers is supported by The Lewis Prize for Music's 2021 Accelerator Award. The mission of The Lewis Prize is to partner with leaders who create positive change by investing in young people through music.  Additional support for StitchCast Studio and Story Stitchers youth programs was provided by the Spirit of St. Louis Women's Fund, City of St. Louis Youth at Risk Crime Prevention grant of 2021, Lush Corporation's The Charity Pot, and March For Our Lives Aid & Alliance.

Indianz.Com
House Appropriations Subcommittee Approves Fiscal Year 2023 Interior-Environment Funding Bill

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 18:22


Appropriations Subcommittee Approves Fiscal Year 2023 Interior-Environment Funding Bill * The following contains portions of a June 21, 2022, press release from Rep. Betty McCollum (D-Minnesota). WASHINGTON, D.C. — The House Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies, of which Congresswoman Betty McCollum (MN-04) is Vice Chair, today approved by voice vote the subcommittee's Fiscal Year 2023 bill, which includes funding for programs within the Department of the Interior, the Environmental Protection Agency, and other agencies, including the Indian Health Service. The bill will next be considered by the full Appropriations Committee next week. In total, the bill includes $44.8 billion in regular appropriations, an increase of $6.8 billion – 18 percent – above the FY 2022 enacted level. There is also an additional $2.55 billion of funding provided under the fire suppression cap adjustment. The legislation also: Honors the federal government's responsibilities to Native American families by investing in tribal communities including through education and health care programs A summary of the fiscal year 2023 Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies bill is below. The text of the bill is here. Bill Summary: Department of the Interior (DOI) – The bill provides a total of $16.6 billion in discretionary appropriations for DOI, an increase of $2.1 billion above the FY 2022 enacted level. Of this amount, the bill includes: $171 million for the Historic Preservation Fund. Within this amount, the bill includes $82 million for State and Tribal Historic Preservation Offices, $38 million for Save America's Treasures competitive and project grants, $28 million for competitive grants to preserve the sites and stories of underrepresented community civil rights, and $10 million for grants to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. $4.4 billion for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Education, and Office of the Special Trustee, an increase of $778 million above the FY 2022 enacted level. Within this amount, the bill includes: $2.2 billion for Bureau of Indian Affairs Operation of Indian Programs, an increase of $330 million above the FY 2022 enacted level. $50 million for Indian Land Consolidation, an increase of $43 million above the FY 2022 enacted level. $181 million for Bureau of Indian Affairs Construction, an increase of $34 million above the FY 2022 enacted level. $14 million for the Indian Guaranteed Loan Program, an increase of $2 million above the FY 2022 enacted level. $1.2 billion for Bureau of Indian Education Operation of Indian Programs, an increase of $175 million above the FY 2022 enacted level. $375 million to Bureau of Indian Education Construction, an increase of $111 million above the FY 2022 enacted level. Fully funds Contract Support Costs and Payments for Tribal Leases. $111 million for the Office of the Special Trustee, an increase of $2 million above the FY 2022 enacted level. $457 million for Departmental Offices, $55 million above the FY 2022 enacted level. Within this amount, the bill includes: $129.7 million for the Office of Insular Affairs, an increase of $7.8 million above the FY 2022 enacted level and $4 million. $45 million for the Energy Community Revitalization Program, an increase of $40 million above the FY 2022 enacted level. The principal focus in fiscal year 2023 is on hard rock mining. Related Agencies $8.1 billion for the Indian Health Service, an increase of $1.5 billion above the FY 2022 enacted level. $5.7 billion for Health Services, an increase of $1 billion above the FY 2022 enacted level. $1.3 billion for Health Facilities, an increase of $367 million above the FY 2022 enacted level. Fully funds Contract Support Costs and Payments for Tribal Leases. $207 million each for the National Endowment for the Arts and the

New Books in Politics
Jonathan Crary, "Scorched Earth: Beyond the Digital Age to a Post-Capitalist World" (Verso, 2022)

New Books in Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 66:24


In this uncompromising essay, Jonathan Crary presents the obvious but unsayable reality: our ‘digital age' is synonymous with the disastrous terminal stage of global capitalism and its financialisation of social existence, mass impoverishment, ecocide, and military terror. Scorched Earth: Beyond the Digital Age to a Post-Capitalist World (Verso, 2022) surveys the wrecking of a living world by the internet complex and its devastation of communities and their capacities for mutual support. This polemic by the author of 24/7 dismantles the presumption that social media could be an instrument of radical change and contends that the networks and platforms of transnational corporations are intrinsically incompatible with a habitable earth or with the human interdependence needed to build egalitarian post-capitalist forms of life. Dr. Jonathan Crary is the Meyer Schapiro Professor of Modern Art and Theory at Columbia University in the Art history and Archeology Department. He is a prolific art and culture critic and is the co-founder (and co-editor) of Zone Books. Professor Crary has been the recipient of Guggenheim, Getty, Mellon, and National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships and has been a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. In 2005, his teaching and mentoring were recognized with a Distinguished Columbia Faculty Award. Dr. Crary is also the author of Techniques of the Observer: On Vision and Modernity in the Nineteenth Century, Suspensions of Perception: Attention, Spectacle and Modern Culture (winner of the 2001 Lionel Trilling Book Award), and 24/7 (a finalist for the 2016 Terzani International Literary Prize). Cody Skahan (cskahan@ksu.edu) is an anthropologist by training, starting an MA program in Anthropology at the University of Iceland in August 2022 as a Leifur Eriksson Fellow. His work focuses on the intersections of queerness, environmentalisms, and tourism in Iceland. Cody has a blog here  where he sometimes writes about Games User Research and will totally, 100% in the future post the podcast and other projects he is working on. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/politics-and-polemics

New Books in Communications
Jonathan Crary, "Scorched Earth: Beyond the Digital Age to a Post-Capitalist World" (Verso, 2022)

New Books in Communications

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 66:24


In this uncompromising essay, Jonathan Crary presents the obvious but unsayable reality: our ‘digital age' is synonymous with the disastrous terminal stage of global capitalism and its financialisation of social existence, mass impoverishment, ecocide, and military terror. Scorched Earth: Beyond the Digital Age to a Post-Capitalist World (Verso, 2022) surveys the wrecking of a living world by the internet complex and its devastation of communities and their capacities for mutual support. This polemic by the author of 24/7 dismantles the presumption that social media could be an instrument of radical change and contends that the networks and platforms of transnational corporations are intrinsically incompatible with a habitable earth or with the human interdependence needed to build egalitarian post-capitalist forms of life. Dr. Jonathan Crary is the Meyer Schapiro Professor of Modern Art and Theory at Columbia University in the Art history and Archeology Department. He is a prolific art and culture critic and is the co-founder (and co-editor) of Zone Books. Professor Crary has been the recipient of Guggenheim, Getty, Mellon, and National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships and has been a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. In 2005, his teaching and mentoring were recognized with a Distinguished Columbia Faculty Award. Dr. Crary is also the author of Techniques of the Observer: On Vision and Modernity in the Nineteenth Century, Suspensions of Perception: Attention, Spectacle and Modern Culture (winner of the 2001 Lionel Trilling Book Award), and 24/7 (a finalist for the 2016 Terzani International Literary Prize). Cody Skahan (cskahan@ksu.edu) is an anthropologist by training, starting an MA program in Anthropology at the University of Iceland in August 2022 as a Leifur Eriksson Fellow. His work focuses on the intersections of queerness, environmentalisms, and tourism in Iceland. Cody has a blog here  where he sometimes writes about Games User Research and will totally, 100% in the future post the podcast and other projects he is working on. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/communications

New Books in Technology
Jonathan Crary, "Scorched Earth: Beyond the Digital Age to a Post-Capitalist World" (Verso, 2022)

New Books in Technology

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 66:24


In this uncompromising essay, Jonathan Crary presents the obvious but unsayable reality: our ‘digital age' is synonymous with the disastrous terminal stage of global capitalism and its financialisation of social existence, mass impoverishment, ecocide, and military terror. Scorched Earth: Beyond the Digital Age to a Post-Capitalist World (Verso, 2022) surveys the wrecking of a living world by the internet complex and its devastation of communities and their capacities for mutual support. This polemic by the author of 24/7 dismantles the presumption that social media could be an instrument of radical change and contends that the networks and platforms of transnational corporations are intrinsically incompatible with a habitable earth or with the human interdependence needed to build egalitarian post-capitalist forms of life. Dr. Jonathan Crary is the Meyer Schapiro Professor of Modern Art and Theory at Columbia University in the Art history and Archeology Department. He is a prolific art and culture critic and is the co-founder (and co-editor) of Zone Books. Professor Crary has been the recipient of Guggenheim, Getty, Mellon, and National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships and has been a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. In 2005, his teaching and mentoring were recognized with a Distinguished Columbia Faculty Award. Dr. Crary is also the author of Techniques of the Observer: On Vision and Modernity in the Nineteenth Century, Suspensions of Perception: Attention, Spectacle and Modern Culture (winner of the 2001 Lionel Trilling Book Award), and 24/7 (a finalist for the 2016 Terzani International Literary Prize). Cody Skahan (cskahan@ksu.edu) is an anthropologist by training, starting an MA program in Anthropology at the University of Iceland in August 2022 as a Leifur Eriksson Fellow. His work focuses on the intersections of queerness, environmentalisms, and tourism in Iceland. Cody has a blog here  where he sometimes writes about Games User Research and will totally, 100% in the future post the podcast and other projects he is working on. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/technology

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society
Jonathan Crary, "Scorched Earth: Beyond the Digital Age to a Post-Capitalist World" (Verso, 2022)

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 66:24


In this uncompromising essay, Jonathan Crary presents the obvious but unsayable reality: our ‘digital age' is synonymous with the disastrous terminal stage of global capitalism and its financialisation of social existence, mass impoverishment, ecocide, and military terror. Scorched Earth: Beyond the Digital Age to a Post-Capitalist World (Verso, 2022) surveys the wrecking of a living world by the internet complex and its devastation of communities and their capacities for mutual support. This polemic by the author of 24/7 dismantles the presumption that social media could be an instrument of radical change and contends that the networks and platforms of transnational corporations are intrinsically incompatible with a habitable earth or with the human interdependence needed to build egalitarian post-capitalist forms of life. Dr. Jonathan Crary is the Meyer Schapiro Professor of Modern Art and Theory at Columbia University in the Art history and Archeology Department. He is a prolific art and culture critic and is the co-founder (and co-editor) of Zone Books. Professor Crary has been the recipient of Guggenheim, Getty, Mellon, and National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships and has been a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. In 2005, his teaching and mentoring were recognized with a Distinguished Columbia Faculty Award. Dr. Crary is also the author of Techniques of the Observer: On Vision and Modernity in the Nineteenth Century, Suspensions of Perception: Attention, Spectacle and Modern Culture (winner of the 2001 Lionel Trilling Book Award), and 24/7 (a finalist for the 2016 Terzani International Literary Prize). Cody Skahan (cskahan@ksu.edu) is an anthropologist by training, starting an MA program in Anthropology at the University of Iceland in August 2022 as a Leifur Eriksson Fellow. His work focuses on the intersections of queerness, environmentalisms, and tourism in Iceland. Cody has a blog here  where he sometimes writes about Games User Research and will totally, 100% in the future post the podcast and other projects he is working on. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

New Books in Critical Theory
Jonathan Crary, "Scorched Earth: Beyond the Digital Age to a Post-Capitalist World" (Verso, 2022)

New Books in Critical Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 66:24


In this uncompromising essay, Jonathan Crary presents the obvious but unsayable reality: our ‘digital age' is synonymous with the disastrous terminal stage of global capitalism and its financialisation of social existence, mass impoverishment, ecocide, and military terror. Scorched Earth: Beyond the Digital Age to a Post-Capitalist World (Verso, 2022) surveys the wrecking of a living world by the internet complex and its devastation of communities and their capacities for mutual support. This polemic by the author of 24/7 dismantles the presumption that social media could be an instrument of radical change and contends that the networks and platforms of transnational corporations are intrinsically incompatible with a habitable earth or with the human interdependence needed to build egalitarian post-capitalist forms of life. Dr. Jonathan Crary is the Meyer Schapiro Professor of Modern Art and Theory at Columbia University in the Art history and Archeology Department. He is a prolific art and culture critic and is the co-founder (and co-editor) of Zone Books. Professor Crary has been the recipient of Guggenheim, Getty, Mellon, and National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships and has been a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. In 2005, his teaching and mentoring were recognized with a Distinguished Columbia Faculty Award. Dr. Crary is also the author of Techniques of the Observer: On Vision and Modernity in the Nineteenth Century, Suspensions of Perception: Attention, Spectacle and Modern Culture (winner of the 2001 Lionel Trilling Book Award), and 24/7 (a finalist for the 2016 Terzani International Literary Prize). Cody Skahan (cskahan@ksu.edu) is an anthropologist by training, starting an MA program in Anthropology at the University of Iceland in August 2022 as a Leifur Eriksson Fellow. His work focuses on the intersections of queerness, environmentalisms, and tourism in Iceland. Cody has a blog here  where he sometimes writes about Games User Research and will totally, 100% in the future post the podcast and other projects he is working on. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

New Books in Sociology
Jonathan Crary, "Scorched Earth: Beyond the Digital Age to a Post-Capitalist World" (Verso, 2022)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 66:24


In this uncompromising essay, Jonathan Crary presents the obvious but unsayable reality: our ‘digital age' is synonymous with the disastrous terminal stage of global capitalism and its financialisation of social existence, mass impoverishment, ecocide, and military terror. Scorched Earth: Beyond the Digital Age to a Post-Capitalist World (Verso, 2022) surveys the wrecking of a living world by the internet complex and its devastation of communities and their capacities for mutual support. This polemic by the author of 24/7 dismantles the presumption that social media could be an instrument of radical change and contends that the networks and platforms of transnational corporations are intrinsically incompatible with a habitable earth or with the human interdependence needed to build egalitarian post-capitalist forms of life. Dr. Jonathan Crary is the Meyer Schapiro Professor of Modern Art and Theory at Columbia University in the Art history and Archeology Department. He is a prolific art and culture critic and is the co-founder (and co-editor) of Zone Books. Professor Crary has been the recipient of Guggenheim, Getty, Mellon, and National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships and has been a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. In 2005, his teaching and mentoring were recognized with a Distinguished Columbia Faculty Award. Dr. Crary is also the author of Techniques of the Observer: On Vision and Modernity in the Nineteenth Century, Suspensions of Perception: Attention, Spectacle and Modern Culture (winner of the 2001 Lionel Trilling Book Award), and 24/7 (a finalist for the 2016 Terzani International Literary Prize). Cody Skahan (cskahan@ksu.edu) is an anthropologist by training, starting an MA program in Anthropology at the University of Iceland in August 2022 as a Leifur Eriksson Fellow. His work focuses on the intersections of queerness, environmentalisms, and tourism in Iceland. Cody has a blog here  where he sometimes writes about Games User Research and will totally, 100% in the future post the podcast and other projects he is working on. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books in Anthropology
Jonathan Crary, "Scorched Earth: Beyond the Digital Age to a Post-Capitalist World" (Verso, 2022)

New Books in Anthropology

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 66:24


In this uncompromising essay, Jonathan Crary presents the obvious but unsayable reality: our ‘digital age' is synonymous with the disastrous terminal stage of global capitalism and its financialisation of social existence, mass impoverishment, ecocide, and military terror. Scorched Earth: Beyond the Digital Age to a Post-Capitalist World (Verso, 2022) surveys the wrecking of a living world by the internet complex and its devastation of communities and their capacities for mutual support. This polemic by the author of 24/7 dismantles the presumption that social media could be an instrument of radical change and contends that the networks and platforms of transnational corporations are intrinsically incompatible with a habitable earth or with the human interdependence needed to build egalitarian post-capitalist forms of life. Dr. Jonathan Crary is the Meyer Schapiro Professor of Modern Art and Theory at Columbia University in the Art history and Archeology Department. He is a prolific art and culture critic and is the co-founder (and co-editor) of Zone Books. Professor Crary has been the recipient of Guggenheim, Getty, Mellon, and National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships and has been a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. In 2005, his teaching and mentoring were recognized with a Distinguished Columbia Faculty Award. Dr. Crary is also the author of Techniques of the Observer: On Vision and Modernity in the Nineteenth Century, Suspensions of Perception: Attention, Spectacle and Modern Culture (winner of the 2001 Lionel Trilling Book Award), and 24/7 (a finalist for the 2016 Terzani International Literary Prize). Cody Skahan (cskahan@ksu.edu) is an anthropologist by training, starting an MA program in Anthropology at the University of Iceland in August 2022 as a Leifur Eriksson Fellow. His work focuses on the intersections of queerness, environmentalisms, and tourism in Iceland. Cody has a blog here  where he sometimes writes about Games User Research and will totally, 100% in the future post the podcast and other projects he is working on. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

New Books Network
Jonathan Crary, "Scorched Earth: Beyond the Digital Age to a Post-Capitalist World" (Verso, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 66:24


In this uncompromising essay, Jonathan Crary presents the obvious but unsayable reality: our ‘digital age' is synonymous with the disastrous terminal stage of global capitalism and its financialisation of social existence, mass impoverishment, ecocide, and military terror. Scorched Earth: Beyond the Digital Age to a Post-Capitalist World (Verso, 2022) surveys the wrecking of a living world by the internet complex and its devastation of communities and their capacities for mutual support. This polemic by the author of 24/7 dismantles the presumption that social media could be an instrument of radical change and contends that the networks and platforms of transnational corporations are intrinsically incompatible with a habitable earth or with the human interdependence needed to build egalitarian post-capitalist forms of life. Dr. Jonathan Crary is the Meyer Schapiro Professor of Modern Art and Theory at Columbia University in the Art history and Archeology Department. He is a prolific art and culture critic and is the co-founder (and co-editor) of Zone Books. Professor Crary has been the recipient of Guggenheim, Getty, Mellon, and National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships and has been a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. In 2005, his teaching and mentoring were recognized with a Distinguished Columbia Faculty Award. Dr. Crary is also the author of Techniques of the Observer: On Vision and Modernity in the Nineteenth Century, Suspensions of Perception: Attention, Spectacle and Modern Culture (winner of the 2001 Lionel Trilling Book Award), and 24/7 (a finalist for the 2016 Terzani International Literary Prize). Cody Skahan (cskahan@ksu.edu) is an anthropologist by training, starting an MA program in Anthropology at the University of Iceland in August 2022 as a Leifur Eriksson Fellow. His work focuses on the intersections of queerness, environmentalisms, and tourism in Iceland. Cody has a blog here  where he sometimes writes about Games User Research and will totally, 100% in the future post the podcast and other projects he is working on. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Quotomania
Quotomania 262: Jim Harrison

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 1:32


Jim Harrison was born in 1937, in Grayling, Michigan. His writing has appeared in The New Yorker, Esquire, Sports Illustrated, Playboy, and The New York Times.Harrison was also the author of over thirty books of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, including seven volumes of novellas, Legends of the Fall (1979), The Woman Lit by Fireflies (1990), Julip (1994), The Beast God Forgot to Invent (2000), The Summer He Didn't Die (2005), The Farmer's Daughter (2010), and The River Swimmer (2013); eleven novels, Wolf (1971), A Good Day to Die (1973), Farmer (1976), Warlock(1981), Sundog (1984), Dalva (1988), The Road Home (1998), True North (2004), Returning to Earth (2007), The English Major (2008), and The Great Leader (2011); thirteen collections of poetry, including most recently Songs of Unreason (2011), In Search of Small Gods(2009), and Saving Daylight (2006); and three works of nonfiction, the memoir Off to the Side (2001) and the collections Just Before Dark(1991) and The Raw and the Cooked: Adventures of a Roving Gourmand (2001).The winner of a National Endowment for the Arts grant, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and the Spirit of the West Award from the Mountains & Plains Booksellers Association, he was inducted into the American Academy of Arts & Letters (2007) and was named Officier des Arts et Lettres (2012) by the French Ministry of Culture for his “significant contribution to the enrichment of the French cultural inheritance.” He has had his work published in twenty-seven languages.Harrison lived in Montana and Arizona before his death in 2016 at the age of seventy-eight.From https://groveatlantic.com/author/jim-harrison/. For more information about Jim Harrison:Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:James McBride about Harrison, at 24:05: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-092-james-mcbrideSaving Daylight: https://www.coppercanyonpress.org/books/saving-daylight-by-jim-harrison/“Jim Harrison, The Art of Fiction No. 104”: https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/2511/the-art-of-fiction-no-104-jim-harrison“Jim Harrison”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/jim-harrison

THE TAPESTRY
The Wisdom and Artistry of VICKI MEEK

THE TAPESTRY

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 27:16


Vicki Meek, born and raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is a nationally recognized artist who has exhibited widely. Meek is in the permanent collections of the African American Museum in Dallas, The Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, Fort Wayne Museum of Art in Indiana, Paul Quinn College in Dallas, Serie Art Project in Austin and Norwalk Community College in Norwalk, Connecticut. She was awarded three public arts commissions with the Dallas Area Rapid Transit Art Program and was co-artist on the largest public art project in Dallas, the Dallas Convention Center Public Art Project. Vicki Meek has been awarded a number of grants and honors including National Endowment for the Arts NFRIG Grant, Dallas Observer MasterMind Award, Dallas Museum of Art Otis and Velma Davis Dozier Travel Grant, Texas Black Filmmakers Mission Award, Women of Visionary Influence Mentor Award, Dallas Women's Foundation Maura Award, nominated for the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Award, the African American Museum at Dallas A. Maceo Smith Award for Cultural Achievement and was selected as the 2021 Texas Artist of the Year by Art League of Houston. Meek was an adjunct faculty member for UMass Arts Extension Program in Amherst, Massachusetts where she taught a course in Cultural Equity in the Arts. With over 40+ years of arts administrative experience that includes working as a senior program administrator for a state arts agency, a local arts agency and running a non-profit visual arts center, after 20 years, Vicki Meek retired in March 2016 as the Manager of the South Dallas Cultural Center in Dallas. Vicki Meek currently spends time as Chief Operating Officer and Board Member of USEKRA: Center for Creative Investigation, a non-profit retreat for creatives in Costa Rica founded by internationally acclaimed performance artist Elia Arce. She is also Dallas Mayor Eric Johnson's at-large appointment to the Arts and Culture Commission and the Public Art Committee. Meek is represented by Talley Dunn Gallery in Dallas, Texas.

Best Show Ever
78. Craig Owsley

Best Show Ever

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 22:55


Thanks for tuning in to Best Show Ever, a podcast presented by The Englert Theatre. Welcome to the season 4 finale episode. We knew we'd have to make this one extra special so we asked one of our own, one of our very best, Craig Owsley, to join us this week. Craig is not only the box office lead for the Englert, he's also been doing security and admissions for venues across Iowa City for almost 30 years. Check out Craig's YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/c/PROJECT33VIDEO The episode features music by Dan Padley and Wave Cage. Ongoing support comes from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Iowa Arts Council. Best Show Ever is produced by the Englert in Iowa City, Iowa, and is supported by Friends of the Englert and Fellowship for the Future members. Visit www.englert.org/friends to support our programming. -------------------- Host: Elly Hofmaier Line Producer: Elly Hofmaier Audio Engineers: Elly Hofmaier Executive Producers: John Schickedanz & Andre Perry --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/englert/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/englert/support

The Creative Process Podcast
Mario Alberto Zambrano - Dancer, Writer, Assoc. Director of Dance, The Juilliard School

The Creative Process Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 46:10


Mario Alberto Zambrano is the Associate Director of Juilliard Dance. He was born in Houston, danced for Batsheva Dance Company, Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, Nederlands Dans Theater II, and Ballet Frankfurt between 1994 and 2005. He then returned to school and earned an MFA in English at the Iowa Writers' Workshop, where he received a John C. Schupes fellowship for excellence in fiction. His first novel, Lotería (Harper Collins), was a Barnes and Noble Discover Great New Writers pick in 2013 and a finalist for the 2014 John Gardner Fiction Book Award. Zambrano, who was awarded the Alice Hoffman Prize for Fiction for his short story “Some of You,” has been a YoungArts Presidential Scholar in the Arts and a Princess Grace Award winner. He has been awarded literary fellowships to MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, the National Endowment for the Arts, and Scotland's Hawthornden Castle. Before joining Juilliard, he was a lecturer in theater, dance, and media at Harvard. He serves as program director for Orsolina28's summer program and curates The LIT Series, a library of interdisciplinary thinking consisting of series of lectures, interviews, classes and discussions.“In both writing a first draft and in the improvisation of a dancing body, what is so key and relevant and exposed is voice. That internal voice of the artist of what they're writing on the page or what they're writing in space. If you go to fiction workshop, you talk about plot, structure, and you talk about character development, but there are very few classes within a dance curriculum where you break down an improvisation and you talk about voice, point of view, metaphor, or musical composition within a phrase. The lifespan of a phrase. And so this realisation is helping me understand that a one minute post of improvisation or even a ten-minute span of improvisation if it's recorded is very similar to a first draft of creative writing, where then the artist is in a position to evaluate those 10 minutes and identify what is the setting? What is the voice that has come out of my experience of writing this first draft of an improvisation? And how can I give it structure? How can I give it form?”www.marioalbertozambrano.comIG @juilliardschool IG @malberto777IG @thelitserieswww.thelitseries.comwww.juilliard.edu/dance/faculty/zambrano-mario-albertowww.creativeprocess.infowww.oneplanetpodcast.org

STUDIO STORIES: REMINISCING ON TWIN CITIES DANCE HISTORY
Studio Stories: Reminiscing on Twin Cities Dance with Georgia Stephens - Season 7, Episode 93

STUDIO STORIES: REMINISCING ON TWIN CITIES DANCE HISTORY

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 58:23


Georgia Stephens was active as a Dance Theater choreographer, director, writer andsound designer from 1975 through 2009. She moved to the Twin Cities in 1980 toparticipate in the newly formed Independent Choreographer's Alliance (MICA). Throughthis organization, she received numerous performance opportunities and financialsupport for her work from the McKnight, Jerome and Northwest Area Foundations, twoawards from the National Endowment for The Arts, Metropolitan Council for the Arts andthe Minnesota State Arts Board. Georgia was commissioned in 1993 to create anoriginal piece for the New Dance Ensemble and in 1986 for the Zenon Dance Company.She was one of five choreographers invited to create an original dance/video piece withvideographer James Byrne, in his project SOLO!.Although Georgia delighted in the process of interweaving original text and soundscores into her work, she also frequently collaborated with musician David Means.In 1986, Georgia was awarded a Bush Foundation Fellowship for Choreography. Withthese funds, she prepared an evening of new and old work titled Crosstalk, presented atDance Theater Workshop (NYC) in 1987. Performers included Laurie Van Wieren, TomCarlson, Alan Lindblad, Mary Beth Elchert and Mary Abrams. After a brief hiatus toassimilate her journey, she immerged with several evening-length Dance Theatercreations: World Without End Amen, produced by the MN Dance Alliance with JeromeFoundation funds in Extended Play; Omoomofamaliamenia, a collaborationcommissioned by The Southern Theater with the music group Zeitgeist; and severalself-produced theater events for a variety of venues.In 1990, Georgia incorporated as Georgia Stephens Contemporary Dance Theater. Thisgathering of dance performers included John Munger, Wendy Ansley, Diane Aldis,Ethan Emanual Balcos, Jill Haeberlin, and many other guest appearances (Mary Easter,Linda Shapiro, Lisa Carlson, Marilyn Habermas-Scher, Wendy Morris, Marty Winkler,Rebecca Katz). Around this same time, she joined with fellow dance artists Paula Mannand Shawn McConneloug to create SpaceSpace, an informal rehearsal andperformance studio. Georgia created work for this venue almost exclusively until its endin 1999. Georgia then began creating original work for David Means' Nobels eXperimental interMedia Group. They presented several full-length pieces between 1999 and 2005 at Metro State University's Nobels Performance Space, Intermedia Arts, The Walker choreographers' Evening, Patrick's Cabaret, Bryant Lake Bowl Theater and Edison Theater in St. Lous MO. Between 2005 and 2008, Georgia created a series of showings at Bryant Lake Bowl Theater. Georgia's final premiere, Alibi Simile, featuring Jon Spayde, was created for Red Eye Collaboration's 2008 New Work series.During her career she taught classes and workshops at Webster College andWashington University of St. Louis, Ozone Dance, Carlton and St. Olaf Colleges.Georgia still pops up now and again to participate in various ways, as a participant inDavid Means' performances, as a stage arts consultant, and as an advocate for up-and-coming performing artists who push boundaries and challenge perceptual norms. Herwork was always based on the adage, “I move when I speak. I speak when I move.”This realization came to life out of the physical frustration of growing up as a stutterer. Itproduced a fascinating lifetime of liberating words “stuck inside” via breath andkinesthetic release. This, and her background of figure skating, provided Georgia with afoundation for her technique and unique movement style.And finally… THANK YOUA quick read of this biography caused me to realize that a mere mention of who didwhat and when, seems profoundly inadequate. I could not have brought to life my

GOD: An Autobiography, As Told to a Philosopher - The Podcast, S1
79. The Problem Of Evil | Series: Two Philosophers Wrestle With God | Dialogue 6 [Part 2]

GOD: An Autobiography, As Told to a Philosopher - The Podcast, S1

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 42:24


Dr. Jerry L. Martin and Dr. Richard Oxenberg return for part 2 of The Problem of Evil, discussing the birth of the universe, God, and purpose. Explore God as a Person with an ongoing development. Borrowing wisdom from philosophy and ancient religions, this discussion investigates whether evil is an impulse or a version of unheimlichkeit and how to attain the Victory Level.Dr. Jerry L. Martin is a philosopher and author of the true story, God: An Autobiography, As Told To A Philosopher. He has served as the head of the National Endowment for the Humanities and the University of Colorado philosophy department and is the founding chairman of the Theology Without Walls group at the AAR. Dr. Richard Oxenberg is a professor at Endicott College, has studied philosophy and ethics of religion, and published numerous articles on these subjects, including his book: On the Meaning of Human Being: Heidegger and the Bible in Dialogue.We appreciate your support, comments, and reviews!  God: An Autobiography, As Told To A Philosopher | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube | Contact: questions@godanautobiography.com___Read God: An Autobiography, As Told To A Philosopher.Begin the dramatic adaptation of God: An Autobiography, As Told To A PhilosopherRelated Episodes: -[Two Philosophers Wrestle With God] Dialogue 6 The Problem of Evil  79; Dialogue 5 The Big Picture 75, 74; Dialogue 4 The Nature Of Divine Reality 71, 70; Dialogue 3 Purpose 66, 65Related Content: Youtube: God Centered Prayer

Town Hall Seattle Arts & Culture Series
200. Mimi Gardner Gates with Lynda V. Mapes and Catharina Manchanda: The Innovation of the Olympic Sculpture Park

Town Hall Seattle Arts & Culture Series

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 78:31


When the Seattle Art Museum opened the Olympic Sculpture Park on the urban waterfront in 2007, it changed the way people could interact with art and experience the city's environment. The fact that it's free and open to everyone makes the park one of the most inclusive places to see art in the Pacific Northwest. The sculpture park contains pieces like Alexander Calder's red sculpture The Eagle, Jaume Plensa's giant head Echo, and Neukom Vivarium, a 60-foot nurse log in a custom-designed greenhouse, among many others. Although many people believe that the greatest work of art at the park is the park itself and the way it connects with its surroundings. Because of the efforts of the Seattle Art Museum and the city, instead of being filled with private condo buildings, this former industrial site has become a welcoming part of the waterfront for the public to enjoy sculptures, activities, and the gorgeous Elliott Bay views. The new book Seattle's Olympic Sculpture Park: A Place for Art, Environment, and an Open Mind, pays homage to the interconnected spirit of the park. Mimi Gardner Gates — the director of the Seattle Art Museum (1994–2009) at the time of the Sculpture Park's conception and creation — edited this collection of writings and images about the park and how public-private partnerships can create innovative civic spaces. Other contributors include Barry Bergdoll, Lisa Graziose Corrin, Renée Devine, Mark Dion, Teresita Fernández, Leonard Garfield, Jerry Gorovoy for Louise Bourgeois, Michael A. Manfredi, Lynda V. Mapes, Roy McMakin, Peter Reed, Pedro Reyes, Maggie Walker, and Marion Weiss. Seattle Times journalist Lynda V. Mapes and SAM curator Catharina Manchanda joined Gates in discussion about the remarkable waterfront park and how it might inspire future innovation in civic spaces. Mimi Gardner Gates was director of the Seattle Art Museum for fifteen years and is now director emerita, overseeing the Gardner Center for Asian Art and Ideas. Previously, she spent nineteen years at Yale University Art Gallery, the last seven-and-a-half of those years as director. She is a fellow of the Yale Corporation; Chairman of the Dunhuang Foundation; Chairman of the Blakemore Foundation; a trustee of the San Francisco Asian Art Museum; a trustee of the H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment, and serves on the boards of the Yale University Art Gallery, the Northwest African American Museum, the Terra Foundation, and Copper Canyon Press. Dr. Gates formerly chaired the National Indemnity Program at the National Endowment for the Arts and served on the Getty Leadership Institute Advisory Committee. Lynda V. Mapes is a journalist, author, and close observer of the natural world, and covers natural history, environmental topics, and issues related to Pacific Northwest indigenous cultures for The Seattle Times. Over the course of her career she has won numerous awards, including the international 2019 and 2012 Kavli gold award for science journalism from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world's largest professional science association. She has written six books, including Orca Shared Waters Shared Home, winner of the 2021 National Outdoor Book Award, and Elwha, a River Reborn. Catharina Manchanda joined the Seattle Art Museum as the Jon & Mary Shirley Curator of Modern & Contemporary Art in 2011. Notable exhibitions for SAM include Pop Departures (2014-15), City Dwellers: Contemporary Art from India (2015), Figuring History: Robert Colescott, Kerry James Marshall, Mickalene Thomas (2017), and Frisson: The Richard E. Lang and Jane Lang Davis Collection (2021). Prior to joining SAM, she was the Senior Curator of Exhibitions at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio. She has also worked in curatorial positions at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, St. Louis; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. She is the recipient of numerous international awards including an Andy Warhol Foundation grant, Getty Library Research grant, and others. Buy the Book: Seattle's Olympic Sculpture Park: A Place For Art, Environment, And An Open Mind from University Book Store Presented by Town Hall Seattle. To become a member or make a donation click here. 

Democracy IRL
The Crisis of Democracy in West Africa, with Emmanuel Gyimah-Boadi

Democracy IRL

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 30:46


Professor Emmanuel Gyimah-Boadi, co-founder and board chair of Afrobarometer — the pan-African survey research network and global reference point for high-quality data on African democracy, governance, and quality of life — joins us to discuss the worsening crisis of democracy in West Africa, including that which is enveloping the region's largest country, Nigeria. He also points to some rays of hope as democracy advocates push back against this trend.E. Gyimah-Boadi is co-founder and board chair of Afrobarometer, the pan-African survey research network and global reference point for high-quality data on African democracy, governance, and quality of life. He is also co-founder and former executive director of the Ghana Center for Democratic Development, a leading independent democracy and good-governance think tank. In June 2022 he was appointed president of the board of directors of the Institute for Integrated Transitions.A former professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Ghana, he has also held faculty positions at several universities in the United States, including the American University's School of International Service, as well as fellowships at Queen Mary University; the Center for Democracy, Rule of Law and Development at Stanford University; the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; and the International Forum for Democratic Studies at the National Endowment for Democracy.A graduate of the University of California (Davis) and University of Ghana (Legon), Gyimah-Boadi is a fellow of the National Academy of Sciences (U.S.) and the Ghana Academy of Arts and Sciences. For his contributions to research and policy advocacy on democracy, accountable governance, and human rights, he has won a myriad of awards, including the Distinguished Africanist of the Year Award of the African Studies Association (2018); the Martin Luther King, Jr. Award for Peace and Social Justice (2017); and one of the Republic of Ghana's highest honors, the Order of Volta (2008). He was named one of New African Magazine's “100 Most Influential Africans of 2021.”

Millennial Debt Domination
Episode 41: The Importance of Financial Literacy Part 1

Millennial Debt Domination

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 19:57


On this episode, Katie discusses why financial literacy is so important. Financial literacy is the ability to use knowledge and skills to manage your financial resources effectively for a lifetime of financial well-being. In order to be financially literate you must know how to manage money and show you can actually do it.  Without financial literacy, the financial decisions you make, or don't make, can potentially threaten your financial security. Today, Katie is joined by Amy Marty Conrad and Raven Newberry from the National Endowment for Financial Education, or NEFE. Amy is the Managing Director, Insights and Raven is the Director, Policy and Advocacy. Amy, Raven, and Katie discuss financial well-being, the impact COVID has had on personal finance, how Americans ended financially in 2021, and much more. Amy and Raven will be joining Katie again next month for part two of the importance of financial literacy. Follow Navicore on Social Media: Twitter: @NavicorePR Instagram: @navicoresolutions Facebook: NavicoreSolutionsPR More questions for Katie? E-mail us: olm@navicoresolutions.org About Navicore Solutions: We are a national nonprofit provider of financial education and compassionate personal finance counseling. We can help you gain control of your finances. A debt free future is possible. Learn more about us here: http://navicoresolutions.org/ Follow Navicore on Social Media: Twitter: @NavicorePR Instagram: @navicoresolutions Facebook: NavicoreSolutionsPR More questions for Katie? E-mail us: olm@navicoresolutions.org About Navicore Solutions: We are a national nonprofit provider of financial education and compassionate personal finance counseling. We can help you gain control of your finances. A debt free future is possible. Learn more about us here: http://navicoresolutions.org/ NEFE'S Website

StitchCast Studio
Gun Violence Epidemic Part I

StitchCast Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 64:10


Gun Violence Epidemic Part I Disclaimer: The views, opinions and thoughts expressed here are those of the individuals and do not necessarily represent the views or mission of St. Louis Story Stitchers. In this week's StitchCast our panel sits down and talks about gun violence, gun ownership, and the traumas associated with it, with Retired St. Louis Police Captain Perry Johnson. Recorded live at Central Stage in St. Louis, Missouri on April 29, 2022.   Pick the City UP Art Interlude Not Another One! Saint Louis Story Stitchers, 2016   Not Another One! A Play For Peace book is now available on Amazon under Saint Louis Story Stitchers. Album will be released July 4, 2022. The book and album contain all of the tools needed to stage the play Not Another One! A Play For Peace.   Saint Louis Story Stitchers is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. On the web at arts dot gov. Story Stitchers is supported by The Lewis Prize for Music's 2021 Accelerator Award. The mission of The Lewis Prize is to partner with leaders who create positive change by investing in young people through music.  Additional support for StitchCast Studio and Story Stitchers youth programs was provided by the Spirit of St. Louis Women's Fund, City of St. Louis Youth at Risk Crime Prevention grant of 2021, Lush Corporation's The Charity Pot, and March For Our Lives Aid & Alliance.  

Queens Memory: Our Major Minor Voices
Episode 10: Things That Brought Us Together

Queens Memory: Our Major Minor Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 25:27


Listening back to all 8 episodes, I realize we’ve created a multilingual memory book that speaks to how far we’ve come as a borough and how far we still have to go.  This memory book would not be complete without hearing from the producers themselves whose deep connections to their communities allowed unique access and intimate encounters.  In the final episode, we bring them together to discuss the making of “Our Major Minor Voices.”  This episode was produced by Melody Cao in conjunction with Anna Williams and Natalie Milbrodt. It was hosted by J. Faye Yuan. Mixing and editing by Cory Choy with music composed by Elias Ravin.  This podcast has been made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities: Democracy demands wisdom. The views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this episode are those of its creators and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of National Endowment for the Humanities, Queens Public Library, the City University of New York, or their employees.

Best Show Ever
77. Blake Shaw

Best Show Ever

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 22:32


On this week's episode we talk to beloved Iowa City musician Blake Shaw. More specifically, chat with Blake about the art of practice… when to practice, how to practice, why to practice, etc. Hang around for some free advice from self-taught legend, Mr. Shaw. The episode features music by Dan Padley and Wave Cage. Ongoing support comes from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Iowa Arts Council. Best Show Ever is produced by the Englert in Iowa City, Iowa, and is supported by Friends of the Englert and Fellowship for the Future members. Visit www.englert.org/friends to support our programming. -------------------- Host: Elly Hofmaier Line Producer: Elly Hofmaier Audio Engineers: Elly Hofmaier Executive Producers: John Schickedanz & Andre Perry --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/englert/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/englert/support

American Craft Podcast
Object As... Bukola Koiki

American Craft Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 55:18


During the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, the in-between spaces of immigrant life were made more acute for Bukola Koiki than ever. Searching for the feeling of home during the seemingly endless isolation of that time, she found herself comforted in abstracted forms and shapes of houses. The Pull was made in response to her yearning for Nigeria and beloved family members. American Craft Podcast thanks our guest, Bukola Koiki, See more of her work at bukolakoiki.com and follow @bukolakoiki. See this Object at craftcouncil.org. American Craft Podcast also thanks our host and producer Sarah Rachel Brown from perceivedvaluepodcast.com. Follow @sarahrachelbrown. Music is produced by Hamilton Boyce. Find him at hamiltonboyce.com and follow @hamiltonboyce. This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. To find out more about how National Endowment for the Arts grants impact individuals and communities, visit www.arts.gov. American Craft Podcast is property of the American Craft Council at craftcouncil.org. Your support through membership and contributions is appreciated. Subscribe, rate, and review the American Craft Podcast wherever you listen.

GOD: An Autobiography, As Told to a Philosopher - The Podcast, S1
78. The Problem Of Evil | Series: Two Philosophers Wrestle With God | Dialogue 6 [Part 1]

GOD: An Autobiography, As Told to a Philosopher - The Podcast, S1

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 34:43


Dr. Jerry L. Martin and Dr. Richard Oxenberg invite Kierkegaard, pioneer existentialist and Danish philosopher, Stendhal, realist French novelist, and Heschel, Jewish philosopher and theologian of the 20th century, to the conversation with God, taking a deep look at evil and suffering. Dr. Jerry L. Martin is a philosopher and author of the true story, God: An Autobiography, As Told To A Philosopher. He has served as the head of the National Endowment for the Humanities and the University of Colorado philosophy department and is the founding chairman of the Theology Without Walls group at the AAR. Dr. Richard Oxenberg is a professor at Endicott College. He has studied philosophy and ethics of religion and has published numerous articles on these subjects, including his book: On the Meaning of Human Being: Heidegger and the Bible in Dialogue.Join host Scott Langdon as he connects Dr. Richard Oxenberg and Dr. Jerry L. Martin to discuss why God does not simply end all evil and suffering.We appreciate your support, comments, and reviews!  God: An Autobiography, As Told To A Philosopher | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube | Contact: questions@godanautobiography.com___Read God: An Autobiography, As Told To A Philosopher.Begin the dramatic adaptation of God: An Autobiography, As Told To A PhilosopherRelated Episodes-[Two Philosophers Wrestle With God] Dialogue 5 The Big Picture 75, 74; Dialogue 4 The Nature Of Divine Reality 71, 70; Dialogue 3 Purpose 66, 65; Dialogue 2 Revelation 62, 61Related Content: Youtube: How Do You Live With God?

Art Works Podcasts
Leading an arts center into the future

Art Works Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 34:00


Stella Abrera and Sonja Kostich share a background in dance, are Asian-American and now lead an important artistic center in the Hudson Valley Kaatsbaan Cultural Park. In this podcast, they talk about Kaatsbaan Cultural Park and its 30 year history, Kaatsbaan's singular role as both an artistic incubator and an arts presenter, its unique position during Covid in having the space to create and present work safely for both performers and audience, Stella's and Sonja's careers as dancers and their transition to arts administration, their commitment to diversity in programming, performers, staff and audience, Kaatbaan's upcoming festivals, and the organization's first grant from the Arts Endowment.  https://www.instagram.com/kaatsbaan/ https://twitter.com/kaatsbaandance   Keywords: Kaatsbaan Cultural Park, Stella Abrera, Sonja Kostich, Hudson Valley, National Endowment for the Arts

Storytelling School
How to Change the Direction of the Story Being Told

Storytelling School

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 31:09


It's knife training time in my martial arts class. I'm on the mat when Grandmaster says, “Master Kymberlee, I want you to be my partner for this demonstration.”  Oh boy. I know what this means. Usually, demonstrations with me as his partner don't turn out well… for me, that is. But I can't say no to Grandmaster, so up I go. I meet Grandmaster in front of the class, and he executes this flawless knife technique. During multiple demonstrations, no matter what I do, no matter how many counter-moves I try, it doesn't work against him! My turn. It's time to try the technique on someone else in class. Except I can't replicate what Grandmaster just did, either. Sensing my frustration, he comes over and tells me, “Make this your own Master Kymberlee. There's always a way.”  Aha! So I turn the knife over, reverse my direction, and come in with a completely different series of moves. And guess what - it works! There's always a way. And my special guest today has used that concept to change perspectives, outcomes, and even laws. As a writer and actor, Matthew-Lee Erlbach also advocates on behalf of the Arts and those who work in them. If you're curious to know: How do you help others view advocacy as on behalf of an industry instead of a cause so that it'll get economic and legislative priority? How did the sitcom Will & Grace influence the unfolding story of gay rights (while displaying an essential storytelling element)? Why are 1922 and 2022 synonymous, and how were Arts and Culture at the forefront of the aftermath of events 100 years ago? Then tune in as we discuss the power of influencing where the story goes and how doing so can make history! What you will learn in this episode: How personal stories of American workers have changed the country Why we as human beings crave stories so much What one thing you want to ensure you include in your story Who is Matthew-Lee? Matthew-Lee Erlbach is an actor, writer, and labor activist from Chicago and New York. He has written for Adam McKay's Kings of America, starring Amy Adams (Netflix); Masters of Sex (Showtime); Gypsy (Netflix); We Are the Champions (Netflix), for WWE, MTV, and Nickelodeon. As a playwright, his work has appeared Off-Bway, regionally, and at Steppenwolf, where he is currently under commission, and where his play The Doppelgänger (An International Farce) premiered.  He has received support from the National Endowment for the Arts, Laurents/Hatcher Foundation, Elizabeth F. Cheney Foundation, Puffin Foundation, and is a HUMANITAS New Voices recipient. Beyond his work with Habitat for Humanity and individuals who are houseless, he is a proponent of ethical AI and ethical transhumanism. A Co-Founder of Arts Workers United and their national Be An Arts Hero campaign, he has co-authored legislation, built national campaigns, and works with Congress to make Arts and Culture Workers an economic and legislative priority.  Links and Resources: Be An Arts Hero Matthew-Lee Erlbach @thismatthewlee on Instagram @thismatthewlee on Twitter @Matthew-LeeErlbach on Facebook Storytelling School Website @storytellingschool on Instagram @storytellingSchool on Facebook