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Private research university in New York City

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  • Nov 29, 2021LATEST

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Latest podcast episodes about nyu

Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik
256: Turn Anxiety into Your Superpower with Dr. Wendy Suzuki

Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 20:00


How do you turn your anxiety into a superpower? If you're like most people, when you hear the word anxiety, you probably don't think of it as a gift. But what if, instead of learning to simply cope with increased anxiety or prolonged stress, you could transform them into a superpower? I'm excited to have Dr. Wendy Suzuki with us today. She's a Professor of Neural Science and Psychology at NYU and author of the brand-new book Good Anxiety: Harnessing the Power of the Most Misunderstood Emotion. Constant stress can shrink your brain, which is why learning to manage it is vital for prolonged brain health. Listen in as Wendy reveals simple tools to transform your anxiety so you can feel better, think clearer, and unlock your limitless potential. *** Need a boost of confidence to get things done? Check out our brand NEW 7-day Kwik Confidence online course. We use an accelerated learning model to guide you through simple confidence upgrade techniques each day. All you need is 15 minutes a day to get the results. Go to KwikConfidence.com to learn more. *** Or text me 310-299-9362 to get your burning questions answered and an insider sneak peek of exciting updates. I do my best to answer as many as I can each day, so shoot me a message today. 

The Josh Bolton Show
Are We Changing Too Fast? | Terry Thiele

The Josh Bolton Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 132:01


Terry Thiele has been a cold warrior and a corporate lawyer. He now consults and teaches strategic planning. This book is the culmination of 40 years of helping government officials, corporate officers, and graduate students think about the future. Terry graduated magna cum laude and received his B.A. in History from Princeton and his J.D. from NYU; he is a graduate of the National War College. He and partner Carol live near Wilmington, N.C.Links / websites tvthiele@fourth-age.com https://www.fourth-age.com Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/The_Josh_Bolton_Show)

How To Business In Show Business

What does connection with the voice as a whole look, sound, and feel like? Chris Dilley; singer, producer, teacher, lover of all things voice. Takes us through his curated syllabus he uses as a guide for his students. Be it when he's teaching the students of NYU, for his own career when he sings a part of the Broadway Inspirational Voices, or his own clients through his voice studio. Breaking down the instrument and how each breath, each muscle, even the tone of the day and how it plays a vital part of our voice's journey. 'Understand how you want to connect with your voice as an athlete'- Chris Dilley HTBISB MEDIA: https://www.businessinshowbusiness.com/ https://www.tiktok.com/@htbisb https://www.instagram.com/htbisb/ https://twitter.com/htbisb APPLE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/how-to-business-in-show-business/id1547219280 SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/3p1ytQ64BYKRXM3VJQnFsw

Tree Speech
The Liberty Tree with Mark Linehan, Maddie Webster, and Catherine Hanna Schrock

Tree Speech

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 52:49


In our next episode we examine the history of Boston's Liberty Tree, including its origin story and how that story evolved over time depending on who was telling it. We have wonderfully spirited conversations with distinguished actor, singer, dancer, and educator, Mark Linehan and historian Maddie Webster, a Boston University PhD student in the American & New England Studies Program. Then, we seek to uncover what liberty and liberation means in the present day with activist and Applied theatre practitioner Catherine Hanna Schrock, the Co-founder and Director of Imagine Brave Spaces, a San Diego-based theater company who shares a spoken word piece she wrote about her company which also serves as a call to action in making liberation a reality for all. Mark Linehan is a Boston-based actor with extensive stage and dance experience. A native of Massachusetts, he has performed in theaters across New England as a professional singer, dancer and actor. Mark's specialty is musical theater, and he has also worked in children's theater, drama and film. Maddie Webster is a PhD candidate in the American & New England Studies Program, where she studies urban history and historic preservation with a focus on Boston. Her dissertation explores Black Bostonians' historic preservation efforts from the late nineteenth century onward, a story that comes into clearer focus by reframing what activities constitute preservation work. As a public historian, Maddie wants to collaborate with and bolster Boston's citizen historians. Her partnership with the Initiative on Cities stems from this same impulse to engage with the modern city—and its challenges and opportunities—with the lessons of history close at hand. Catherine Hanna Schrock is an Applied Theater Practitioner, which unites her roles as an educator, theatre artist, and community organizer. She designs creative programming that equips diverse communities to engage in complex dialogues toward social and community development. Special thank you to Mark, Maddie and Catherine for their time and inspiration. For more info: Boston Historical Tours: https://www.bostonhistoricaltours.org/#/ Imagine Brave Spaces: https://imaginebravespaces.com Tree Speech's host, Dori Robinson, is a director, playwright, dramaturg, and educator who seeks and develops projects that explore social consciousness, personal heritage, and the difference one individual can have on their own community. Some of her great loves include teaching, the Oxford comma, intersectional feminism, and traveling. With a Masters degree from NYU's Educational Theatre program, she continues to share her love of Shakespeare, new play development, political theatre, and gender in performance. Dori's original plays have been produced in New York, Chicago, and Boston. More information at https://www.dorirobinson.com This week's episode was recorded in Massachusetts on the native lands of the Wabanaki Confederacy, Pennacook, Massachusett, and Pawtucket people. Logo design by Mill Riot. Special thanks to the Western Avenue Lofts and Studios for all their support. Tree Speech is produced and co-written by Jonathan Zautner with Alight Theater Guild. The mission of the guild is to advance compelling theatrical endeavors that showcase the diversity of our ever-changing world in order to build strong artists whose work creates empathy, challenges the status quo and unites communities. For more information about our work and programs, please visit www.alighttheater.org. Learn more about the podcast at: www.treespeechpodcast.com, and IG: treespeechpodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/treespeech/message

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Call Me Back: Lessons for the 2020s – With Historian Niall Ferguson (#40)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021


The first of our two-part conversation with Naill Ferguson is on applied history's lessons of the 1920s and the 1970s…for the 2020s. Niall is a historian and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, and he previously taught at Harvard, NYU and Oxford. He's the managing director of Greenmantle, a macroeconomic and geopolitical […]

Post Corona
Lessons for the 2020s - With Historian Niall Ferguson

Post Corona

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 41:23


The first of our two-part conversation with Naill Ferguson is on applied history's lessons of the 1920s and the 1970s...for the 2020s. Niall is a historian and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, and he previously taught at Harvard, NYU and Oxford. He's the managing director of Greenmantle, a macroeconomic and geopolitical advisory firm. Niall is also the author of 17 books including “The Square and the Tower: Networks and Power, from the Freemasons to Facebook” and “Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe”.

The Story Collider
Becoming a Scientist: Stories about what it means to be a scientist

The Story Collider

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 28:33


This week, we present two stories about the path to becoming a scientist and what makes a scientist a scientist. Part 1: Andrea Jones-Rooy quits her job as a scientist in order to become a scientist. Part 2: While studying flying foxes in Indonesia, Susan Tsang gets caught in a rainstorm that changes her relationship to field work. Andrea Jones-Rooy is a scientist, comedian, and circus performer. She's a professor of data science at NYU, where she also directs their undergraduate program in data science. When she's not doing that, she's regaling audiences around NYC, the world, and the Internet with her Opinions in the form of standup comedy. When she's not doing either of those things, she's hanging from some kind of aerial apparatus (usually, but not exclusively, a trapeze) and/or holding something that is on fire. When she's not doing ANY of those things, she's either hosting her podcast Majoring in Everything, losing to her mother on Words with Friends, or eating Dr. Cow's raw vegan nut cheese. Dr. Susan Tsang works as a private consultant through her company Biodiversitas Global LLC, and continues to conduct research through her Research Associate affiliations with the American Museum of Natural History and the National Museum of the Philippines. She provides subject matter expertise on and creates programs and activities to address illegal wildlife trade, disease ecology, and other global sustainable development challenges. As a researcher, her primary interest is in the evolution and biogeography of Southeast Asian flying foxes, the world's largest bats, which has led her to working with some of the most threatened yet poorly known bat species in the world. Along with her Southeast Asian colleagues, she has carried out conservation work both at the community and transnational levels, with some of her ongoing projects in Indonesia focused on local empowerment for reducing bat hunting. She also serves on the steering committee of the Southeast Asian Bat Conservation Research Unit and the Global Union of Bat Diversity Networks to address larger capacity building and assessment/policy needs and has been appointed as a member of the IUCN Bat Specialist Group and the Global Bat Taxonomy Working Group. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Heilman & Haver
Heilman & Haver - Episode 53 (Guest Stewart Lyons - Part 2)

Heilman & Haver

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 26:28


Welcome to Heilman & Haver - Episode 53.  We hope you enjoy the show! Please join the conversation - email us with thoughts and ideas and connect with the show on Facebook and Twitter and Instagram.   ANNOUNCEMENTS “A Classic Christmas" with Jeremy Arnold Saturday, December 18th, Jeremy Arnold will join us at the Roxy for a one-of-a-kind roundtable discussion before a “It's a Wonderful Life” hits the Roxy big screen.  Plan to come early for a matinee showing of “White Christmas” and stay for the holiday bites and wine before we hit the stage with Jeremy.  We'll also enjoy a special Christmas message from "Zuzu" herself, Karolyn Grimes.  Get more info and tickets at roxybremerton.org.  And tune in next week and keep an eye on our social media pages for your chance to WIN A PAIR OF TICKETS! Virtual "Coppelia" by Bainbridge Ballet to Stream Over Thanksgiving Keep an eye on the Bainbridge Ballet Facebook page next week for a special virtual production of comic ballet, "Coppelia", thanks to the skills of our friend, local filmmaker, Scott Breitbarth.   "A Match Made At Christmas" Special Event Mark your calendars for Thursday, December 9th, when BISA Vocal Studio, in partnership with Abundant House Films and Faraway Entertainment, will present the Bainbridge Island Premiere of a film made right here in the Pacific Northwest.  “A Match Made at Christmas” will play at 7pm at the Historic Lynwood Theatre at 7pm, followed by a Q&A with cast members Bainbridge Island resident Shannon Dowling, and Seattle actor Jared Hernandez.   IN THE SPOTLIGHT:  Stewart Lyons Stewart Lyons is a Co-Executive Producer, Line Producer, and Production Executive with extensive experience with most major studio, network, cable, and streaming television companies including Netflix, Sony Pictures Television, Warner Brothers, Amazon, HBO, Weinstein Productions, NBC, and CBS. He has worked on 33 television series, 27 pilots (20 ordered to series), and dozens of feature films and television movies.  He was recently Director, Original Series Production, for Netflix and prior to that assignment was Co-Executive Producer for the premiere season of “Better Call Saul”. He won 2 Emmys as Line Producer for “Breaking Bad”, the most critically acclaimed series in the history of television. He also received two Directors Guild Awards, two Producers Guild Awards, a Golden Globe, and two Peabody Awards for this series. He was also the only person, cast or crew, who was on set for every day of the production of "Breaking Bad".  In addition to his regular production positions, his work as a production consultant includes scheduling and/or budgeting over 160 pilots and television series for streaming, cable, and broadcast companies for projects throughout the United States, Canada, Australia, and Europe. In 2015, he was the first television line producer to be the subject of "An Evening With..." hosted by Senator Christopher Dodd at the MPAA in Washington, DC.  Stewart has lectured at the Directors Guild, the Producers Guild, Chapman University, USC's Peter Stark Program, UCLA, the University of Maryland, and in both England and Germany about set operations, scheduling, budgeting, and the development of "auteur" television. He received his BFA from NYU's Tisch School of the Arts and his MBA from NYU's Stern School of Business. He is a graduate of the DGA/Producers Training Program and currently works as adjunct Professor at DePaul University instructing in creative producing at their Los Angeles location for masters degree students.   He joined us from his home in Oxnard, CA.   COMING UP NEXT WEEK  Join us next week, Friday, December 26th, when we'll be joined by author Richard Barrios to talk about the history of the musical, the technology the films spawned, and some of his favorite must-see musicals throughout the years.

Two Old Bucks
S2 Ep 46: The One Year Anniversary Cast, Weber redux, Bodies of water, Gunther III, Pivot

Two Old Bucks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 30:04


The TOBs celebrate their one-year anniversary and spare their listeners any sappy retrospectives,  mainly because they can't remember much of what they talked about. But their loyal, hardworking staff reminded them that they've dropped 56 episodes for listeners in 24 countries. Meanwhile, the makers of Ambien are suing TOB LLC for a 42% drop in business since we launched our podcast. Del provides a followup on his Weber grill disaster and what he learned. Pay attention here-no joke. Del spells phytotelma--correctly, much to Dave's amazement. But he won't tell Dave what it means, challenging our listeners to send in the answer to: Buckstwoold@gmail.com  Can Del be a closet genius? Dave thinks so. He might even be an augury.  A what?Then there's GuntherVI, a German shepherd dog who owns a $32 million mansion in- where else- Florida.  Dave wonders if this is more fake news from Florida while Del has visions of an inter-species romance.  Try not to visualize it. Dave plugs another podcast-Pivot, hosted by Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway. Swisher is a seasoned tech journalist who can reportedly make Mark Zuckerburg sweat in his hoodie, which is good enough for Dave. Galloway is a prof at NYU, where he teaches graduate level marketing. Unlike the Bucks, they're really smart, giving their raw, unfiltered takes on tech, politics , and business. WARNING: DO NOT listen to them at bedtime. they will not put you to sleep.The Bucks close the anniversary issue with a LFA from Normalville. 

Fierce Lab
Career: Risk, Rejection, and Reward with Sade Balogun.

Fierce Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 50:23


In this podcast episode, she and Tara dive into the 3 Rs of career: risk, rejection and reward. Sade started with an early opportunity at Kohl's as a Business Analyst. After business school at NYU, a stint at Groupon, a Senior Brand Manager role at Starbucks, Sade is now a Global Product Marketer at Peloton. With each career move, Sade has honed her skills and evolved as a leader. Sade also shares her techniques for handling rejection and the rewards that come from going where you're valued, (hint: it involves promotion.) Respecting her mental health has also been a large component in Sade's career path. She shares about her "last straw" and when she realized it was time for her to take a break and set some boundaries during her time at Starbucks. If you're climbing the corporate ladder, or looking to make moves in Q1 of 2022 - Sade's encore release is for you!

Squawk Pod
Business Icons' Hope for Mental Health

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 18:10


Billionaire investor Ken Langone and Larry Bossidy, former Honeywell CEO, speak about the RADical Hope Foundation, their effort to reach young people struggling with mental health. The two united after Bossidy's grandson Chris Martin, a Gonzaga University student, died by suicide aged 20. Bossidy first discussed the tragedy in a moving 2018 Squawk Box appearance, that caught guest William Shatner by surprise. RADical Hope's new program -- RADical Health, being pioneered at NYU -- encourages students, parents and college communities to talk openly about mental health and teaches freshmen the skills to “stay well and resilient.”  Plus, only on Squawk Pod, Joe Kernen reflects on what talking about mental health means for a proud college dad. To find out more, visit https://radicalhopefoundation.org/If you or someone you know needs immediate help, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800.273.TALK (8255) or contact the Crisis Text Line by texting HOME to 741741.In this episode:Ken LangoneLarry Bossidy, @RADICALHOPE_FdnJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkBecky Quick, @BeckyQuickAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkinKatie Kramer, @Kramer_Katie

Scaling Up Services
Deirdre Breakenridge, Author, PR & Marketing Strategist, CEO, Pure Performance Communications

Scaling Up Services

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 33:43


Deirdre Breakenridge, Author, PR & Marketing Strategist, CEO, Pure Performance Communications Deirdre K. Breakenridge is CEO at Pure Performance Communications. She's a career-long storyteller and media expert, strategizing with brands and professionals to ignite engagement, lead pressing conversations and grow influence in the market. Deirdre has worked with senior leaders and organizations, including the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, JVC, Kraft, Nasdaq, NBA Events & Attractions and the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA). Deirdre is the author of seven business books sharing stories and advice to navigate changing consumer behavior and an evolving media landscape. Her most recent book, Answers for Ethical Marketers, will be released by Routledge in April 2021. Her book, Answers for Modern Communicators, was recognized among the Top 100 Storytelling Books of all-time by Book Authority in 2020. For 15 years, Deirdre has taught PR and social media courses, online and in the classroom for NYU, UMASS, Rutgers, and Fairleigh Dickinson University. She took her passion for teaching to LinkedIn Learning, and as one of their instructors, she has developed eight video courses on PR and marketing. Deirdre has been blogging at PR Strategies for over 10 years and she's also the host of the podcast, Women Worldwide, which is nearing two million downloads. Website: https://www.deirdrebreakenridge.com/​​​​ FEEL Academy: https://www.deirdrebreakenridge.com/d...​ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeirdreBreak​​​​... Twitter: https://twitter.com/dbreakenridge​​​​ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/deirdrebr...​ Email: deirdre@pureperformancecomm.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Planet Reimagined with Adam Met
2.11 Misinformation, Academia, and Divestment - Naomi Oreskes

Planet Reimagined with Adam Met

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 34:13


On our final episode of Season Two, we're talking to Naomi Oreskes, professor, climate activist, and author of the book Merchants of Doubt. Naomi began her academic career in Geology and Earth Sciences, working at Stanford and Dartmouth, but later began teaching the History of Science at NYU and UC San Diego. Now, as a Harvard History of Science professor, Naomi is educating her students—and the world—on human-caused, or anthropogenic, climate change. Her most well-known book, Merchants of Doubt—co-authored by Erik M. Conway and later made into a documentary of the same name—parallels the misinformation campaigns led against climate change with those led against the negative effects of tobacco. We talk about the companies that led those campaigns, the universities that have divested from fossil fuels, and the scientists who have raised public awareness. Her most recent book, Science on a Mission, is available here. Reminder that we plant a tree for every subscriber, so go ahead and hit that button! Executive Produced by Sustainable Partners, Inc. Edited/Produced by Shelby Kaufman Associate Produced and Engineered by Sophie Ewh Music by Ryan and Jack Met of AJR All Rights Reserved, Sustainable Partners, Inc.

With Intention
Michael Port on the Craft of Public Speaking

With Intention

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 81:54


NY Times & WSJ Best-selling author and one of the world's top speaking coaches, Michael Port, joins me in this conversation.  Michael is the co-founder of Heroic Public Speaking along with his wife, Amy.  They train some of the best keynote speakers on the planet.  Michael has his MFA from NYU and his written eight books, including his most recent, The Referable Speaker (along with his friend, Andrew Davis).  You can learn more about Michael at michaelport.com & heroicpublicspeaking.com

An Interview with Melissa Llarena
101: Leveraging Your Emotional Landscape to Figure Out Who You Really Are

An Interview with Melissa Llarena

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 46:34


I've come to realize that while the central themes of this podcast have been creativity, courage, and curiosity, the deepest core of this is our identity. Today, I'll be covering how some of my guests have uncovered their truest identities, whether you can truly change your identity, and what this whole identity crisis and searching is really all about.  You'll be hearing 10 excerpts from my last 100 episodes that I carefully curated because they've meant something to me, and I surmise, they can change the way you think about getting to know yourself. When it comes to our personal evolutions of who we are, I have noticed three types of moments that truly make an impact on our identities.  The first type is how traumatic experiences can put our identities in question. Such as Cepee Tabibian, Co-Founder of She Hit Refresh, who lost her two parents back-to-back and decided to leave a good Texan life for a great Spanish existence (Episode 45), and Marshall Dun, who after losing his brother to suicide, he learned how to trust himself and detach his identity from the allure of external desires and riches to become a spiritual leader. (Episode 60). The second type is those expansive moments that stretch our identities. For instance, Raphael Rowe leveraged the world of media and journalists to help him clear his name so he could eventually become a journalist himself for the BBC and on the Netflix series Inside the World's Toughest Prisons (Episode 89). The James Beard Award Recipient, Gabriele Corcos, also stretched his identity when he started out as a percussionist, then decided to become an entrepreneur, then farmer, and eventually, a politician (Episode 47). The third type is those rising moments such as when World Rugby Hall of Famer Phaidra Knight felt this push to greatness from her family, she decided to rise up to the challenge – including the challenge of expectations (Episode 17). Also, when I interviewed James Altucher back in Episodes 5 & 6, I knew I had to rise up to the occasion if I wanted to become a podcaster and interview my first multimillionaire. So I had to step up to the plate and figure it out.  You can be told to be someone by everyone and you can perform for everyone else's claps. However, ultimately, it is not until you decide to learn about what you want, and who you want to be that you will begin to truly live your life. It's that journey, which many of us avoid taking, that we can ever become who we were meant to be. You cannot watch someone else on their journey and expect to get to know yourself and change. You just have to be willing to take meaningful steps in your own evolution and feel every emotion that comes your way. My plan is to delve into these emotions next. So what emotions would you like me to feature in my next 100-podcasts? Any ones that have been a struggle? I want to hear from you! And, if you want to learn more about my Courage Makerspace online mastermind program and how it can help you boost your courage, I'm only a DM or email (Melissa[@]melissallarena.com) away.  Highlights Jonathan Arons, Episode 4 Music: You will surely get to know yourself when you are pissed off. Jonathan Arons uncovered that music was his muse and he was able to leverage his sensitivities as a child in order to find the courage to be who he has become today. Art or music is all about feeling. It's the most universal way to connect with anybody from any walk of life.  David Roberts, Episode 18 Joy: You get to know yourself when you are elated or when you have access to an experience or an emotion that makes you feel like joy is personified. New York Times bestselling illustrator David Roberts talks about imagination in this interview.  Michelle Ghilotti, Episode 7 Grief: Former Starbucks and Nike advertising executive turned entrepreneur Michelle Ghilotti decided to create an expanse during a period of her life when she had the option to recoil after losing loved ones in her life. She decided to grieve in the community while also acknowledging how other people experienced grief in their own ways. Sree Sreenivasan, Episode 11 Ask: You will get to know yourself when you have to be vulnerable and ask for help. Sree Sreenivasan, former Chief Digital Officer of New York City, used the power of social media to leverage his network and ultimately realized that people want to help.  Jeff Bollow, Episode 78 Love: You will get to know yourself when you let love in. Award-winning filmmaker Jeff Bollow shared his perspective and sense of humor on being an older dad. He offers up a metaphor for how having a son and this new identity as a dad has changed his perspective, quite a lot.   Beth Comstock, Episode 65 Mama's Love: You will get to know yourself when you let love in as a mom. Former CMO of GE, Beth Comstock talks about how being a mom helped her as a people leader. She talks about learning how to ask for help because you can't do everything. Ask your partner, your kids, and your colleagues for help. Diane Bell, Episode 21 Opportunity: You will definitely get to know yourself when doors get slammed in your face, especially if you're exploring or making your way into a new identity. Award-winning screenwriter and director Diane Bell talks about how she was going to do a movie with Mickey Rourke and then all of a sudden, she got an email that could have shattered heard, but didn't. Victor Hanning, Episode 68 Senses: You get to know yourself when you let yourself become absorbed by your senses. Witness how rockstar Victor Hanning came up with his sad songs, and how he leveraged his emotions, even sad and dark emotions to create something of beauty. And it has helped him evolve as a human as well. Muyambi, Episode 51 Passion: You get to know yourself when you can finally start to think beyond yourself. Muyambi, founder of a nonprofit called Cycle Connect talks about how we can all be passionate about issues beyond our borders. He provides practical steps in getting started with your cause-based journey. Suzy Batiz, Episode 67 Trust: You will definitely get to know yourself when you find someone who can actually see you for who you are. Self-made female millionaire, Suzy Batiz talks about how you don't have to have other people trust to look at what you've done. What can you do now without the trauma attached to it?  Courage: Get to know yourself by letting yourself see yourself for who you have become. And that takes courage. Allowing yourself to be courageous is how you let your emotions enter your life, and ultimately, guide you.  Change: Keep what you love about yourself and accept or change what you may not like very much. Make that change without shame and resentment.  Links to continue to learn from: Episode 5: https://www.melissallarena.com/james-altucher-2/ Episode 6: https://www.melissallarena.com/james-altucher/ Episode 45: https://www.melissallarena.com/cepee-tabibian-founder-of-she-hit-refresh-talks-about-traveling-aboard-building-a-global-community-for-women-and-creating-a-new-identity-episode-45/ Episode 60: https://www.melissallarena.com/how-to-find-your-higher-purpose-marshall-dunn-episode-60/ Episode 89: https://www.melissallarena.com/from-prisoner-to-presenter-raphael-rowe-gives-a-behind-the-scenes-look-into-the-netflix-show-inside-the-worlds-toughest-prisons/ Episode 47: https://www.melissallarena.com/gabriele-corcos-talks-about-continuing-to-dream-technology-and-agriculture-and-why-its-never-too-late-to-change-episode-47/ Episode 17: https://www.melissallarena.com/phaidra-knight-on-the-importance-of-equality-and-feeling-limitless-episode-17/  The 10 Episodes: Episode 2: https://www.melissallarena.com/jonathan-arons-2/ Episode 18: https://www.melissallarena.com/david-roberts-talks-about-imagination-following-our-childrens-lead-and-feedback/ Episode 7: https://www.melissallarena.com/michelle-ghilotti/ Episode 11: https://www.melissallarena.com/sree-sreenivasan/ Episode 78: https://www.melissallarena.com/award-winning-filmmaker-jeff-bollow-on-expanding-your-imagination-exponentially-episode-78/ Episode 65: https://www.melissallarena.com/granting-yourself-permission-to-explore-beth-comstock-episode-65/ Episode 21: https://www.melissallarena.com/diane-bell-screenwriter-and-director-talks-on-overcoming-obstacles-embracing-creativity-and-how-to-stand-out/ Episode 68: https://www.melissallarena.com/the-life-and-times-of-a-rockstar-with-the-former-frontman-of-the-jangletones-victor-hanning-episode-68/ Episode 51: https://www.melissallarena.com/muyambi-cycle-connect-social-entrepreneurship-episode-51/ Episode 67: https://www.melissallarena.com/suzybatiz-shares-the-wisdom-the-cherishes-for-giving-her-the-freedom-and-ability-to-trust-herself-and-accept-whatever-comes-her-wa-episode-67/  About Melissa Llarena Melissa brings a makerspace mindset that is laser-focused on creatively making space for courage for those with a big message to share with the world. A makerspace is a collaborative workspace with very different tools meant for making things fueled by active imaginations. In a makerspace, the goal is to inspire new creations. In Melissa's program called Courage Makerspace ™ we are making space for courage in your daily life so that you can become an incredible thought leader who has the courage to connect, communicate, and create something incredible that will have an impact on the world.  What makes Courage Makerspace™ different is that it uniquely brings an interdisciplinary and creative approach to high-performance coaching. This online program is based on psychological principles, the art of storytelling, and incorporates proprietary experiential tools that harness the power of our imagination. Melissa has infused proven strategies and insights that have empowered clients around the world.  Her background includes a psychology degree from NYU, an MBA from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth, and she holds a Transformational Coaching Academy certificate based on Tony Robbins principles and Landmark Education insights. She is a native New Yorker who has lived/worked in Paris as well as London, and courageously relocated to Sydney, Australia with her family. Want to be a COURAGEOUS human who is fulfilling their life purpose? If you intend to become a thought leader and have the courage to accomplish your life purpose faster than you've imagined possible, book an appointment with me in the next 24 hours. We're going to assess where you are on this confidence journey, then we're going to put our heads together and come up with a step-by-step game plan to define how you can rebuild your courage when you need it. Book this free session by going to http://www.melissallarena.com/sessions. Love An Interview With Melissa Llarena podcast? You can now support my time in producing the show with Patreon If you find that the podcast inspires you and you'd like to help support this labor of love, please consider supporting me on Patreon for a couple of dollars per month. You'll get early access to my video-recorded episodes featuring unreleased guest insights; your name and/or business will be mentioned during an episode.  You'll also see how I have connected with powerful world leaders so that you can network more effectively in any field or help you pitch hard-to-reach guests on your own platform. Then if you are feeling extra generous for only $10/a month, you'll get everything previously mentioned plus be invited to my monthly LIVE 30-Minute “Ball Juggling” Group Calls where I'll field your business or work-life questions, podcast/guest questions, and share with you courage hacks and imaginative tips so you can feel sane, level-headed, and stay on track pertaining to your upcoming goals. Want to continue the conversation? Find me on Instagram! You can read my daily mini-blogs centered on the same three topics that my podcast features: creativity, courage, and curiosity. I believe that without all three it would be impossible to solve the challenges we were each uniquely made to solve. Wouldn't you agree? I'm easy to find on Instagram @melissallarena Rather keep it professional? Let's connect on LinkedIn. I encourage every single podcast listener to connect with me.

Conversations: Hosted by NYU President Andy Hamilton

Rosanne Cash has spent her career as a musician and author telling stories—from the Mississippi Delta, from her family's roots in the 19th century, and from her own American experience. Now she brings that spirit to NYU students to "explore and spread the word about the roots music that informs so much of what I do and who I am.” A four-time Grammy winner and immensely successful crossover artist in country, pop, and Americana, she moved from Nashville to New York City in 1991 and considers it home. She continues to compose, record, and perform extensively, as well as to write memoir, fiction, and essays. Cash joined the NYU Steinhardt School as the 2021-22 Americana Artist-in-Residence—the first artist's residency developed in partnership with the Americana Music Association Foundation. She will present, curate, and moderate a variety of lectures, discussions, workshops, performances, and classroom visits throughout the 2021-22 academic year, including a three-day Lyric Workshop, in which a handful of NYU Steinhardt songwriting students will develop and workshop original material under her guidance. 

The Todd Herman Show
Hour 2: Jacob Blake was Neither Killed or Unarmed

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 36:59


 Dow Constantine pretends to care about violence and guns from his very safe sanctuary, BLM is just a way to being about the communist revolution, They say this is the only way to bring back the cure, Jacob Blake was neither killed nor was he unarmed, Father of Anthony Huber (the man who hit Rittenhouse with a skateboard) says Kyle should be serving 40 years, Justin Brady a black man was acquitted after proving self-defense in court after stabbing a student during a fight,  //  Austria reimposes full Covid lockdown and compulsory vaccinations, NYU professor shows you how to disarm propaganda, // JUST A FEW MORE THINGS See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Black Wine Guy Experience
Dan In Real Life. Dan Petroski's Massican Mission to Create Meaningful Impact in the World

The Black Wine Guy Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 91:54


MJ's guest is a winemaker and the founder of Massican Wines, Dan Petroski. Born and raised in Brooklyn, NY where he went on to play football at Columbia. He went on to work for Time Inc. while also studying for his MBA at NYU, both ingredients for a promising future in magazine publishing. Dan began his wine education literally winning and dining clients around Manhattan's best restaurants. He set off for Sicily, where he interned at Valle dell'Acate for a year. Dan originally intended to return to NYC to sell wine, but later received a harvest invitation in 2006 in Napa Valley. Not long after that, Petroski was hired as cellar master, ultimately claiming the Larkmead winemaker title in 2012. In 2009, Dan launched his own wine business called Massican, which specializes in Italian inspired white wines. Massican is a one-man operation where Dan manages all winemaking, sales and marketing. In July of 2020 Dan went back to his digital media roots launching Massican Magazine online. Petroski's approach and ability to craft wines as diverse as Cabernet Sauvignon and Tocai Friulano has earned him the recognition as San Francisco Chronicle's Winemaker of the Year in 2017On this episode, MJ and Dan enjoy a beautiful bottle of Fiorano Boncampagni Ludovisi, while discussing Dan's unlikely start to a decorated and fulfilling career in wine, his once in a lifetime winemaking education in Sicily, his time at Larkmead, starting his own business at Massican, and fighting climate change on the front lines! Period. Cheers! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Annoying Question Boy
Rittenhouse is Yet Another Murderer in the Nation of Murderers: A History and a Solution to US White Supremacy

Annoying Question Boy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 82:32


In this episode we briefly discuss the case of Kyle Rittenhouse and explain as to why he is not someone we need to focus on individually, unless someone plans on logging him out of the matrix. He is someone we will probably watch become a cop or a US Representative, but if that is the case will he truly be any different than many of the others? We also discuss the history of the US as a Settler-Colonial State and how Colonialism was directly connected to and a part of the Capitalist development in history. We also discuss the importance of organizing and why getting organized is the most important thing we can be doing today! I hope you enjoy! Hitler's American Model for NYU.pdf The Apocalypse of Settler Colonialism: The Roots of Slavery, White Supremacy, and Capitalism in 17th Century North America and the Caribbean - PDFDrive.com (wsimg.com)

Heilman & Haver
Heilman & Haver - Episode 52 (Guest Stewart Lyons - Part 1)

Heilman & Haver

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 29:11


Welcome to Heilman & Haver - Episode 52.  We hope you enjoy the show! Please join the conversation - email us with thoughts and ideas and connect with the show on Facebook and Twitter and Instagram.   ANNOUNCEMENTS “A Classic Christmas" with Jeremy Arnold Saturday, December 18th, Jeremy Arnold will join us at the Roxy for a one-of-a-kind roundtable discussion before a “It's a Wonderful Life” hits the Roxy big screen.  Plan to come early for a matinee showing of “White Christmas” and stay for the holiday bites and wine before we hit the stage with Jeremy.  We'll also enjoy a special Christmas message from "Zuzu" herself, Karolyn Grimes.  Get more info and tickets at roxybremerton.org. Movies of the Decade - "La La Land" Playing tomorrow, Saturday, 11/20, for the 20-teens decade, it's “La La Land” starring Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone and written and directed by Damian Chazelle.  We'll get things started as usual at 6:30 and this month we'll enjoy a special video introduction by one of Jeremy Arnold's fellow TCM authors, Richard Barrios, author of A “Song in the Dark: The Birth of the Musical Film” and “Must See Musicals”.  Richard will also be our guest for Episode 54 on Friday, December 3rd, so make sure to tune in. WWCA Holiday Variety Show Opens 11/26/21 Opening November 26th at Western Washington Center for the Arts in Port Orchard, it's the “WWCA Holiday Variety Show” directed by our friend Rebecca Ewen.  Come and celebrate the season with some of your favorite WWCA performers.  The show will feature choral arrangements written by beloved Music Director, the late Bruce Ewen, dance numbers performed by Just for Kicks School of Dance, and much more.  Get your tickets now at wwca.us. Virtual "Coppelia" by Bainbridge Ballet to Stream Over Thanksgiving Keep an eye on the Bainbridge Ballet Facebook page next week for a special virtual production of comic ballet, "Coppelia", thanks to the skills of our friend, local filmmaker, Scott Breitbarth.     IN THE SPOTLIGHT:  Stewart Lyons Stewart Lyons is a Co-Executive Producer, Line Producer, and Production Executive with extensive experience with most major studio, network, cable, and streaming television companies including Netflix, Sony Pictures Television, Warner Brothers, Amazon, HBO, Weinstein Productions, NBC, and CBS. He has worked on 33 television series, 27 pilots (20 ordered to series), and dozens of feature films and television movies.  He was recently Director, Original Series Production, for Netflix and prior to that assignment was Co-Executive Producer for the premiere season of “Better Call Saul”. He won 2 Emmys as Line Producer for “Breaking Bad”, the most critically acclaimed series in the history of television. He also received two Directors Guild Awards, two Producers Guild Awards, a Golden Globe, and two Peabody Awards for this series. He was also the only person, cast or crew, who was on set for every day of the production of "Breaking Bad".  In addition to his regular production positions, his work as a production consultant includes scheduling and/or budgeting over 160 pilots and television series for streaming, cable, and broadcast companies for projects throughout the United States, Canada, Australia, and Europe. In 2015, he was the first television line producer to be the subject of "An Evening With..." hosted by Senator Christopher Dodd at the MPAA in Washington, DC.  Stewart has lectured at the Directors Guild, the Producers Guild, Chapman University, USC's Peter Stark Program, UCLA, the University of Maryland, and in both England and Germany about set operations, scheduling, budgeting, and the development of "auteur" television. He received his BFA from NYU's Tisch School of the Arts and his MBA from NYU's Stern School of Business. He is a graduate of the DGA/Producers Training Program and currently works as adjunct Professor at DePaul University instructing in creative producing at their Los Angeles location for masters degree students.   He joined us from his home in Oxnard, CA. COMING UP NEXT WEEK  Join us next week, Friday, November 26th, for the second half of our interview with Stewart and more about "Breaking Bad" and the craft of television production. 

Keep Leading!™
KL128: Leveraging the Power of Visual Leadership

Keep Leading!™

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 35:16


KL128 Todd Cherches TEDx Speaker and Author of VisuaLeadership Leveraging the Power of Visual Leadership Episode Summary As a leader, how can you get others to "see" what you are saying? On Episode 128 of the Keep Leading!® podcast Todd Cherches says the secret to being a more effective communicator, innovator, manager, or leader is to master Visual Leadership! Bio Todd Cherches is the CEO & Co-founder of BigBlueGumball, an innovative New York City-based management consulting firm specializing in leadership development, public speaking, and executive coaching. He is also a three-time award-winning Adjunct Professor of leadership at NYU and a Lecturer on leadership at Columbia University. Todd is a member of the Marshall Goldsmith "MG 100 Coaches"; a founding partner of the Global Institute For Thought Leadership; a TEDx speaker; and the author of "VisuaLeadership: Leveraging the Power of Visual Thinking in Leadership and in Life" (Post Hill Press/Simon & Schuster, 2020). Website https://www.toddcherches.com/ Other Website http://www.bigbluegumball.com/ LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/toddcherches/ Twitter https://twitter.com/toddcherches   Facebook https://www.facebook.com/todd.cherches/   Leadership Quote "The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new lands, but in seeing with new eyes." ~ Marcel Proust (French novelist) Get Your Copy of Todd's Book! https://www.toddcherches.com/book Subscribe, share and review on Apple Podcasts! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/keep-leading/id1461490512 Full Episode Transcripts and Detailed Guest Information www.KeepLeadingPodcast.com   Keep Leading LIVE (Live Recordings of the Keep Leading!® Podcast) www.KeepLeadingLive.com The Keep Leading!® podcast is for people passionate about leadership. It is dedicated to leadership development and insights. Join your host Eddie Turner, The Leadership Excelerator® as he speaks with accomplished leaders and people of influence across the globe as they share their journey to leadership excellence. Listen as they share leadership strategies, techniques, and insights. For more information visit https://eddieturnerllc.com or follow Eddie Turner on Twitter and Instagram at @eddieturnerjr. Like Eddie Turner LLC on Facebook. Connect with Eddie Turner on LinkedIn. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Your Resource For Success Podcast
Communication Is The Key

Your Resource For Success Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 41:48


Adam Kol is The Couples Financial Coach. He helps couples who love each other make sure the money conversation doesn't get in the way. He also hosts the Couples Financial Coach Podcast.Adam is a Certified Mediator with experience as a Tax Attorney and Financial Advisor. He has a Duke Law degree and a Master's in Tax Law from NYU.Adam is a musician, vegan, and social justice advocate. Through his Pathways to Prosperity Program, numerous couples have achieved financial clarity, teamwork, and peace of mind.Your Resource For Success

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Energy Policy and Efforts to Combat Climate Change

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


Jason Bordoff, cofounding dean, Columbia Climate School, founding director of the Center on Global Energy Policy, and professor of professional practice in international and public affairs at Columbia University, leads a conversation on energy policy and efforts to combat climate change.   FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I am Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record. And the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/academic. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted to have with us today Jason Bordoff to talk about energy policy and efforts to combat climate change. Jason Bordoff is cofounding dean of the Columbia Climate School, founding director of the Center on Global Energy Policy, and professor of professional practice in international and public affairs at Columbia University. He previously served as special assistant to President Obama and senior director for energy and climate change on the National Security Council, and he has held senior policy positions on the White House's National Economic Council and Council on Environmental Quality. He is a columnist for Foreign Policy magazine and is often on TV and radio. So, we're really happy to have him with us today. So, Jason, thank you very much. We are just coming off the COP26 conference that took place in Glasgow that started on October 31, I believe, and concluded last Friday, November 12. Could you talk about what came out of the conference at a high level, if you think that the agreements that were reached went far enough or didn't go far enough, and what your policy recommendations are to really advance and fight the countdown that we have to the Earth warming? BORDOFF: Yeah. Thanks. Well, first, thanks to you, Irina, and thanks to CFR for the invitation to be with you all today. Really delighted to have the chance to talk about these important issues. I was there for much of the two-week period in Glasgow representing the Energy Center and the Climate School here at Columbia. I think it's kind of a glass half-full/glass half-empty outlook coming out of Glasgow. So I think the Glasgow conference was notable in several respects. We'll look back on it, I think, and some of the things we will remember are—some of the things we'll remember—(dog barking)—sorry—are the role of the private sector and private finance, I think, was much more prominent in Glasgow this year. I think there were commitments around some important things like methane, a very potent greenhouse gas, was much higher on the priority list in this U.N. climate meeting than in prior ones. You had pledges on deforestation and other things that are important. And then the final agreement did have some important elements to it, particularly around Article 6, how you design carbon markets around the world. But the glass half-empty outlook is still we are nowhere close to being on track for the kind of targets that countries and companies are committing to: net zero by 2050 or 1.5 degrees of warming. I think there were—there should be hope and optimism coming out of COP. The role of the youth—at Columbia, we were honored to organize a private roundtable for President Obama with youth climate activists. It's hard to spend time with young people in COP or on campus here at Columbia or anywhere else and not be inspired by how passionately they take these issues. So the activism you saw in the streets, the sense of urgency among everyone—activists, civil society, governments, the private sector—felt different, I think, at this COP than other COPs that I have attended or probably the ones I haven't attended. But there was also for some I saw kind of we're coming out of this and we're on track for below two degrees. Or, you know, Fatih Birol, the head of the International Energy Agency, tweeted that when you add up all the pledges we're on track for 1.8 degrees Celsius warming. He's talking about all of the pledges meaning every country who's promised to be net zero by 2050, 2060, 2070, and at least from my standpoint there's a good reason to take those with a grain of salt. They're not often backed up by concrete plans or ideas about how you would get anywhere close to achieving those goals. So it's good that we have elevated ambition, which is kind of one of the core outcomes of the COP in Glasgow. But it is also the case that when you elevate ambition and the reality doesn't change as fast or maybe faster than the ambition is changing, what you have is a growing gap between ambition and reality. And I think that's where we are today. Oil use is rising each and every year. Gas use is rising. Coal use is going up this year. I don't know if it's going to keep going up, but at a minimum it's going to plateau. It's not falling off a cliff. So the reality of the energy world today—which is 75 percent of emissions are energy—is not anything close to net zero by 2050. It is the case that progress is possible. So if you go back to before the Paris agreement, we were on track for something like maybe 3.7 degrees Celsius of warming. If you look at a current outlook, it's maybe 2.7, 2.8 (degrees), so just below three degrees. So progress is possible. That's good. If you look at the nationally determined contribution pledges—so the commitments countries made that are more near term, more accountability for them; the commitments they made to reduce emissions by 2030, their NDCs—we would be on track for about 2.4 degrees Celsius warming, assuming all those pledges are fulfilled. But history would suggest a reason to be a little skeptical about that. The U.S. has a pledge to get to a 50 to 52 percent reduction in emissions by 2030, and look at how things are working or not working in Washington and make your own judgment about how likely it is that we'll put in place the set of policies that would be required to get to that ambitious level of decarbonization by 2030. And I think the same healthy dose of skepticism is warranted when you look elsewhere in the world. But even if we achieve all of those, we're still falling short of below two degrees, nevertheless 1.5 (degrees). And so, again, I think the outcome from COP for me was optimism that progress is possible—we have made a lot of progress in the last ten years—but acute concern that we're nowhere close to being on track to take targets like 1.5 degrees Celsius or net zero by 2050 seriously. And we just need to be honest as a climate and energy community—and I live in both of those worlds; there's a lot of overlap between them, obviously—about how hard it is to achieve the goals we are talking about. Renewables have grown incredibly quickly. Optimistic headlines every day about what is happening in solar and wind. Costs have come down more than 90 percent. Battery costs have come down more than 90 percent in the last decade. But solar and wind create electricity, and electricity is 20 percent of global final energy consumption. The outlook for electric vehicles is much more promising today. Lots of companies like Ford and others are committing to be all-electric by a certain date ten or twenty years from now. Cars are 20 percent of global oil demand. About half of the emission reductions—cumulative emission reductions between now and 2050 will need to come from technologies that are not yet available at commercial scale and sectors of the economy that are really hard to decarbonize like steel and cement and ships and airplanes. We're not—we don't have all the tools we need to do those yet. And then, in Glasgow, the focus of a lot of what we did at Columbia was on—we did a lot of different things, but one of the key areas of focus was the challenge of thinking about decarbonization in emerging and developing economies. I don't think we talk about that enough. The issue of historical responsibility of loss and damage was more on the agenda this year, and I think you'll hear even more about it in the year ahead. The next COP is in Africa. There was growing tension between rich and poor countries at this COP. I think a starting point was what we see in the pandemic alone and how inequitable around the world the impacts of the pandemic are. Many people couldn't even travel to Glasgow from the Global South because they couldn't get vaccinated. We need, between now and 2050, estimates are—a ballpark—$100 trillion of additional investment in clean energy if we're going to get on track for 1.5 (degrees)/net zero by 2050. So the question that should obsess all of us who work in this space: Where will that money come from? Most of it's going to be private sector, not public. Most of it is going to be in developing and emerging economies. That is where the growth in energy is going to come from. Eight hundred million people have no access to energy at all. Nevertheless, if you model what energy access means, it's often defined as, you have enough to turn on lights or charge your cellphone. But when you talk about even a fraction of the standard of living we take for granted—driving a car, having a refrigerator, having an air conditioner—the numbers are massive. They're just huge, and the population of Africa's going to double to 2.2 billion by the year 2050. So these are really big numbers and we need to recognize how hard this is. But we should also recognize that it is possible. We have a lot of the tools we need. We need innovation in technology and we need stronger policy, whether that's a carbon price or standards for different sectors. And then, of course, we need private-sector actors to step up as well, and all of us. And we have these great commitments to achieve these goals with a lot of capital being put to work, and now we need to hold people accountable to make sure that they do that. So, again, I look back on the last two weeks or before, two weeks of COP, the gap between ambition and reality got bigger. Not necessarily a bad thing—ambition is a good thing—but now it's time to turn the ambition into action. We need governments to follow through on their pledges. Good news is we have a wide menu of options for reducing emissions. The bad news is there's not a lot of time at our current rate of emissions. And emissions are still going up each and every year. They're not even falling yet. Remember, what matters is the cumulative total, not the annual flow. At our current rate of emissions, the budget—carbon budget for staying below 1.5 (degrees) is used up in, around a decade or so, so there's not much time to get to work. But I'm really excited about what we're building with the first climate school in the country here at Columbia. When it comes to pushing—turning ambition into action, that requires research, it requires education, and it requires engaging with partners in civil society and the public sector and the private sector to help turn that research into action. And the people we're working with here every day on campus are the ones who are going to be the leaders that are going to hopefully do a better job—(laughs)—than we've done over the last few decades. So whatever you're doing at your educational institution—be it teaching or research or learning—we all have a role to play in the implementation of responsible, forward-thinking energy policy. I'm really excited to have the chance to talk with you all today. Look forward to your questions and to the conversation. Thank you again. FASKIANOS: Jason, that's fantastic. Thank you very much for that informative and sobering view. So let's turn to all of you now for your questions. So I'm going to go first to—I have one raised hand from Stephen Kass. Q: OK. Thank you. Jason, thank you for the very useful and concise summary. What specific kinds of energy programs do you think developing countries should now be pursuing? Should they be giving up coal entirely? Should they be importing natural gas? Should they be investing in renewables or nuclear? What recipe would you advise developing countries to pursue for their own energy needs? BORDOFF: It's going to need to be a lot of different things, so there's no single answer to that, of course. And by the way, I'll just say it would be super helpful if people don't mind just introducing yourself when you ask a question. That would be helpful to me, at least. I appreciate it. I think they need to do a lot of different things. I think I would start with low-hanging fruit, and renewable electricity is not the entire answer. The sun and wind are intermittent. Electricity can't do certain things yet, like power ships and airplanes. But the low cost of solar and wind, I think, does mean it's a good place to start, and then we need to think about those other sectors as well. I think a key thing there comes back to finance, and that's why we're spending so much time on it with our research agenda here. Access to financing and cost of capital are really important. Clean energy tends to be more capital-intensive and then, like solar and wind, more CAPEX, less OPEX over time. But attaining financing in poor countries is really difficult and expensive. Lack of experience with renewable energy, local banks are often reluctant to lend to those kinds of projects. And then foreign investors, where most of that capital is going to come from, view projects often in emerging markets and developing economies particularly as more risky. Local utilities may not be creditworthy. There's currency inflation risk in many developing countries, people worry about recouping their upfront investment if bills are paid in local currency. There's political risk, maybe corruption, inconsistently enforced regulations. And it can be harder to build clean energy infrastructure if you don't have other kinds of infrastructure, like ports, and roads, and bridges and a good electrical grid. So I would start there. And I think there's a role for those countries to scale up their clean energy sectors, but also for policymakers and multilateral development banks and governments elsewhere—there was a lot of focus in Glasgow on whether the developed countries would make good on their promise made in Copenhagen to send $100 billion a year in climate finance to developing countries. And they fell short of that. But even that is kind of a rounding error, compared to the one to two trillion (dollars) a year that the International Energy Agency estimates is needed. So there are many other things besides just writing a check that government, like in the U.S. or elsewhere, can do. The Development Finance Corporation, for example, can lend to banks in local and affordable rates, finance projects in local currency, expand the availability of loan guarantees. I've written before about how I think even what often gets called industrial policy, let's think about some sectors—in the same way China did with solar or batteries fifteen years ago. Are there sectors where governments might help to grow domestic industries and, by doing that, scale—bring down the cost of technologies that are expensive now, the premium for low-carbon or zero-carbon cement or steel. It's just—it's not reasonable to ask a developing country to build new cities, and new highways, and all the new construction they're going to do with zero-carbon steel and cement because it's just way too expensive. So how do you bring those costs down? If we think about investments, we can make through U.S. infrastructure or other spending to do that, that not only may help to grow some domestic industries and jobs here, that can be its own form of global leadership if we're driving those costs of those technologies down to make it cheaper for others to pick up. So I think that's one of the places I'd start. But there are a lot of other things we need to do too. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question—and let me just go back. Stephen Kass is an adjunct professor at NYU. So the next question is a written question from Wei Liang, who is an assistant professor of international policy studies at Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. And the question is: I wonder if you could briefly address the Green Climate Fund and individual countries' pledge on that. BORDOFF: Yeah, I mean, it touches a little bit on what I said a moment ago about the need for developed countries to provide climate finance to developing countries. And so I think that's—it's important that we take those obligations seriously, and that we, in advanced economies, step up and make those funds available. And but, again, we're talking—the amount we're still talking about is so small compared to the amounts that are needed to deal both with the impacts of climate change, and then also to curb climate change, to mitigate climate change. Because we know that developing countries are in the parts of the world that will often be most adversely impacted by climate impacts—droughts, and heat waves, and storms, and food security issues—from a standpoint of equity are the parts of the world that have done the least to cause this problem, responsible for very few emissions. If you look cumulatively at emissions since the start of the industrial age, about half—nearly half have come from the U.S. and EU combined. Two percent from the entire continent of Africa. So they are using very little energy today, haven't therefore contributed to the problems, and have the fewest resources, of course, to cope with the impacts, and also to develop in a cleaner way. Sometimes it's cheaper to develop in a cleaner way. Renewables are often today competitive with coal, even without subsidy. But there are many areas where that's not the case, and there is a cost. And we need to help make sure that, you know, we're thinking about what a just transition looks like. And that means many different things for different communities, whether you're a coal worker or an agricultural worker in California that may, you know, be working outside in worse and worse heat. But it also means thinking about the parts of the world that need assistance to make this transition. So I think we need to be taking that much more seriously. FASKIANOS: Next question is a raised hand from Tara Weil, who is an undergraduate student at Pomona College. Q: Hi. So, given that developed nations are the largest contributors to carbon emissions, as you've said, how can larger powers be convinced as to the importance of addressing global inequality with regards to climate change? And thank you so much, also, for giving this talk. BORDOFF: Yeah. Thank you for being here. I don't have a great answer to your question. I mean, the politics of foreign aid in general are not great, as we often hear in events at CFR. So I do think one—we need to continue to encourage, through political advocacy, civil society, and other ways, governments in advanced economies to think about all the tools they have at their disposal. I think the ones that are going to be—I'm reluctant to try to speak as a political commenter rather than a climate and energy commenter on what's going to work politically. But part of that is demonstrating what—it's not just generosity. It is also in one's self-interest to do these things. And just look at the pandemic, right? What would it look like for the U.S. to show greater leadership, or any country to show even greater leadership and help cope with the pandemic all around the world in parts of the world that are struggling to vaccinate their people? That is not only an act of generosity, but it is clearly one of self-interest too, because it's a pretty globalized economy and you're not going to be able to get a pandemic under control at home if it's not under control abroad. Of course, the same is true of the impacts of climate change. It doesn't matter where a ton of CO2 comes from. And we can decarbonize our own economy, but the U.S. is only 15 percent of annual emissions globally. So it's not going to make a huge difference unless everyone else does that as well. There is also the potential, I think, to—and we see this increasingly when you look at the discussion of the Biden infrastructure bill, how they talk about the U.S.-China relationship, which of course are the two most important countries from the standpoint of climate change. It is one of cooperation. That was one of the success stories in Glasgow, was a commitment to cooperate more. We'll see if we can actually do it, because it's a pretty difficult and tense U.S.-China relationship right now. So the question is, can you separate climate from all those other problems on human rights, and intellectual property, and everything else and then cooperate on climate? It's been hard, but there's a renewed commitment to try to do that. But also, a recognition that action in the clean energy space is not only about cooperation but it's also about economic competition. And you have seen more and more focus on both the Republican and Democratic sides of the aisle on thinking about the security of supply chains, and critical minerals, and the inputs in lithium and rare earth elements that go into many aspects of clean energy. To my point before about aspects of industrial policy that might help grow your own domestic economy, I think there are ways in which countries can take measures that help—that help their own economies and help workers and help create jobs, and that in the process are helping to drive forward more quickly the clean energy technologies we need, and bring down the cost of those technologies to make them more accessible and available in some of the less-developed countries. So I think trying to frame it less as do we keep funds at home, do we write a check abroad? But there are actually many steps you could do to create economic opportunities and are win-win. Without being pollyannish about it, I think there is some truth to some of those. And I think we can focus on those politically as well. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take an international question from Luciana Alexandra Ghica, who is an associate professor for international cooperation at the University of Bucharest. What type of topics do you think we should address immediately in university programs that provide training in climate, development, global policies, or international public affairs, so that a new generation of leaders really pushes forward the agenda on climate change? BORDOFF: Yeah. Well, I'll say a quick word about what we're doing at Columbia, and maybe it's relevant to that question, because Columbia has made this historic commitment to build a climate school. There are many initiatives, and centers, and institutes. There was not only a handful of schools—law school, business school, medical school, engineering school. And it is the largest commitment a university can make to any particular topic, is something on the scale of a school with degree-granting authority and tenure-granting authority, and all the things that come with a school. And it's just the scale at a place like Columbia, and many other places, is just enormous. That's what we're doing on climate. We have created a climate school. And I'm honored President Bollinger asked me to help lead it. And we're going to build a faculty. We have our first inaugural class of masters' students, about ninety students that are going through the program right now, and we have a building in Manhattan for the climate school, and on and on. The idea—but the question is, what is climate, right? Because academia has been historically organized into traditional academic disciplines. So you have people who you hire through a tenured search, and they go to the engineering faculty and build their lab there. And there's law professors, and their business school professors, and on and on and on, social work. But for climate, you need all of those, right? They all kind of need to come together. And, like, interdisciplinary doesn't even sort of do justice to what it means to think about approaching this systemic—it's a systemic challenge. The system has to change. And so whatever solution you're talking about—if you want to get hydrogen to scale in the world, let's—you know, for certain sectors of the economy that may be hard to do with renewable energy, or in terms of renewable energy and, say, green hydrogen. You need engineering breakthroughs to bring down the cost of electrolyzers, or you need new business models, or you need financial institution frameworks that figure out how you're going to put the capital into these things. You need the policy incentives. How are you going to—you need permitting and regulation. How do we permit hydrogen infrastructure? It's barely been done before. There are concerns in the environmental justice community about some aspects of technologies like that or carbon capture that need to be taken seriously and addressed. There are geopolitical implications, potentially, to starting to build a global trade in ammonia or hydrogen, and what security concerns—energy security concerns might accompany those, the way we thought about oil or gas from Russia into Europe. I have an article coming out in the next issue of Foreign Affairs about the geopolitics of the energy transition. So we need disciplines that come together and look at a problem like that in all of those multifaceted dimensions, so we can figure out how to get from a lab to scale out in the world. And so when we think about the areas of concentration here, climate finance, climate justice, climate in society, climate in international security—I mean, a range of things that I think are really important to help people understand. And that's going to be a major focus of what we do at the climate school here. FASKIANOS: Fantastic. Let's go next to Sean Grossnickle, who has raised his hand. A graduate student at Fordham University. Q: Speak now? Hi, this is not Sean but Henry Schwalbenberg, also at Fordham, where I teach in our international political economy and development program. I went to a conference about a month ago in Rome. And there was a physicist from CERN. And he was a big advocate of something I'd never heard of, and this is this thorium for nuclear reactors. And he was going through all the pros, but I wanted a more balanced perspective on it. And I'm hoping that you might give me a little pros and cons of this thorium nuclear reactor technique. BORDOFF: Yeah. I will be honest and say that nuclear is not my area of focus. We have a pretty strong team here that works in nuclear, and I think is optimistic about the breakthroughs we're going to see in several potential areas of nuclear—advanced nuclear technology, that being one of them, or small modular reactors, and others. At a high level, I will say I do think if you're serious about the math of decarbonization and getting to net zero by 2050, it's hard to do without zero-carbon nuclear power. It's firm, baseload power. It runs all the time. Obviously, there are challenges with intermittency of solar and wind, although they can be addressed to some extent with energy story. Most of the analyses that are done show not necessarily in the U.S. but in other parts of the world significant growth in nuclear power. The International Energy Agency just modeled what it looks like to get to net zero by 2050, and this pathway that got a lot of attention for saying things like we would not be investing in new oil and gas supply. The world has to change a lot pretty quickly. And they have about a hundred new nuclear plants being built by 2030, so that's a pretty big number. So we're going to need all tools—(laughs)—that we have at our disposal. And unfortunately, I worry we may still fall short. So I think at a high level we need to think really hard about how to improve nuclear technology. The people who know that really well I think are optimistic about our ability to do that. And I will follow up on thorium in particular with my colleagues at Columbia, and happy to follow up with you offline about it. FASKIANOS: Great. I'm going to take a written question from Stephen Bird, who's an associate professor of political science at Clarkson University. He thanks you, and he wanted you to talk a little bit more about political will. The overall dollar amounts are clear. Much cheaper to address climate change than to ignore it. That said, countries are, clearly, lagging. Is it a case of countries just don't want to take action now because of issues of fairness or because of lack of domestic political support, i.e., citizens aren't convinced that they should pay costs now with payoffs that come later, and what might we do to improve that issue in terms of persuading or arguing for more political will? BORDOFF: Yeah. It's a question for, you know, a political scientist as much as an energy or climate expert, and I wish I had a better answer to it. I think it is—climate is one of the trickiest problems for so many reasons but one of those is there is no acute event now that you sort of respond to, hopefully, and pull everyone together. It's a set of things that, you know, of course, there would have been storms and droughts before but we know they're intensified and made worse. It's hard to rally public support. We often respond to a crisis kind of proverbial, you know, frog in the boiling water kind of thing. So that makes it hard. There are huge issues—we talked about a just transition a few minutes ago—there are huge issues with intergenerational equity when we talk about climate. There are, clearly, climate impacts and damages today but some of the worst will be in the future, including for people who may not be born yet, and we don't do a great job in our political environment about thinking about those and valuing them today and how you do that, and from an economic standpoint, of course, there are questions about discount rates you apply and everything else. I think, politically, one of the things that has mobilized stronger climate—support for climate action, so it is encouraging that if you look at polling on climate change, the level of urgency that the public in many countries, including the U.S., broadly, ascribe to acting on climate has gone up a lot. It's higher today than it was, you know, a decade or so ago. That's a result of people seeing the impacts and also advocacy campaigns and political campaigns. It is often tied to—it's like a win-win. Like, President Biden says when he thinks of climate he thinks of jobs, and so we're going to deal with climate and we're going to grow the economy faster and we're going to create jobs, and there is truth to that. It is also the case that there are costs. The cost of inaction are higher, but there are costs associated with the transition itself. So if you survey the American public, I think, climate, according to the latest YouGov/Economist poll I saw, you know, it was number two on the list of things they cared the most about. That's much higher than in the past. And then if you ask the American public are they willing to pay $0.25 a gallon more at the pump to act on climate, 75 percent say no. And you look at the challenges the Biden administration is having right now sort of thinking about a really strong set of measures to put in place to move the ball forward on climate, but acute concern today about where oil prices are and inflation and natural gas prices as we head into the winter. If the weather is cold then it's going to be really expensive for people to heat their homes in parts—some parts of the country like New England, maybe. So that's a reality, and I think we need to—it was interesting, in the roundtable we did with President Obama with climate activists, that was a message he had for them. You know, be impatient, be angry, keep the pressure on, but also be pragmatic. And by that he means, like, you know, try to see the world through the eyes of others and people who are worried about the cost of filling up at the pump, the cost of paying their heating bills. They're not—some of them may not be where you are yet. They may not have the same sense of urgency with acting on climate that many of us on this Zoom do and need to take those concerns seriously. So I think that's a real challenge, and it can be addressed with good policy, to some extent, right, if you think about the revenue raised from a carbon tax and how it could be redistributed in a way that reduce the regressive impacts. I've written about how, at a high level—I'll say one last point—if we get on track for an energy transition, which we're not on yet, right. (Laughs.) Oil and gas use are going up each and every year. But imagine we started to get on track where those were falling year after year. It's still going to take decades, and that process of transition is going to be really messy. It's going to be really volatile. We're going to have fits and starts in policy from Obama to Trump to Biden. We're going to make estimate—we're going to make bets on technologies and maybe get those technologies wrong or misunderstand the cost curves, the potential to shut down investment in certain forms of energy before the rest are ready to pick up the slack. If it's messy and volatile and bumpy, that's not only harmful economically and geopolitically, it will undermine public support for stronger climate action. So you see, like, in Washington they're selling off the Strategic Petroleum Reserve because we're moving to a world beyond oil and also we have all this domestic oil now with shale. We need more, not fewer, tools to mitigate volatility for the next several decades if we're serious about making this transition, and I think the same is true for thinking about sort of buffers you could build into geopolitics, foreign policy, and national security, because there will be—in a post-oil and gas world, you know, you may say, well, we're not going to worry as much about the Middle East or about, you know, Russia's leverage in Europe. But there will be new risks created and we can talk about what some of those might be, and we need new tools of foreign policy to mitigate those potential foreign policy risks. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question. Raised hand from Chloe Demrovsky, adjunct instructor at NYU. Q: Hey, can you hear me? BORDOFF: Yes. Thank you. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Hi. Chloe Demrovsky, adjunct at NYU and president and CEO of Disaster Recovery Institute International. Thanks for being with us, Jason. So my question is about the feasibility and your thoughts on artificially altered clouds or solar geoengineering. What are the ethical and geopolitical implications of, perhaps, using this to buy a little time for our energy transition? Thanks. BORDOFF: Yeah. A super interesting question, and I will say, again, I'm sort of—think of myself as an energy expert. So that is where I spend more time than thinking about tools like solar geoengineering. I guess, it seems there's, obviously, huge risks associated with something like that and we need to understand them. We need to do research. We need to figure out what those risks may be. There are global governance concerns. It's actually pretty cheap to do solar geoengineering. So what happens when some country or some billionaire decides they want to start spraying stuff into the atmosphere to cool the planet? And for those who don't know that, you know, solar—I mean, you think of after a volcano the planet cools a little bit because of all the particulates up in the atmosphere. When you model in an energy system model how much phasing out coal will reduce warming, you, obviously, have much less carbon dioxide emissions but that's offset slightly—not completely, of course—it's offset a little bit by the fact that you have less local air pollution, which is a good thing from air pollution. But air pollution has a slightly cooling effect, because you have these little particles floating around that reflect sunlight. So the idea is can we create that artificially and cool the planet, and you can imagine lots of reasons why that could go wrong when you're trying to figure out what—how much to put in there, what unintended consequences could be. You still have other impacts of carbon dioxide like ocean acidification. Maybe you go too far in one direction, that's like you're setting the thermostat. That's why one of the companies doing carbon removal is called Global Thermostat. You're kind of figuring out what temperature it should be. But I will say so it's an area that needs research and I think, given how far we are away from achieving goals like 1.5 and net-zero 2050, I guess what I would say is in the same way that when I worked in the Obama administration it was—I wouldn't say controversial, but there were some people who didn't want to talk about adaptation because it was kind of a more—there was a moral hazard problem there. It was, you know, less pressure to mitigate and reduce emissions if we thought adaptation was a solution. People worry about that from the standpoint of solar geoengineering. But the likelihood—I hope I'm wrong, but the likelihood that we roll the clock forward, you know, later this decade and we realize we've made progress but we're still pretty far short, and the impacts of climate change in the same way the IPCC 1.5 report said, you know what, 1.5 is going to be pretty bad, too, and that's even worse than we thought, the more we learn about climate the more reason there is to be concerned, not less concerned. It seems very plausible to me that we will kind of come to a growing consensus that we have to think about whether this technology can, as you said, buy us time. This is not something you do permanently. You need to get to net zero to stop global warming. But if you want to reduce the impacts of warming on the rate of Arctic sea ice melt and all the rest, can you buy time, extend the runway, by doing this for some number of decades. And I think—I don't have a strong view on the right answer to that. But I think it's something we, certainly, need to be thinking about researching and understanding what the consequences would be because we're going to have to figure out how to take more abrupt actions to close that gap between ambition and reality unless the reality starts to change much more quickly than is the case right now. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I saw a raised hand from Maya but she lowered it. So if you want to raise your hand again, please do so. And in the meantime, I'm going to take a written question from Jennifer Sklarew, who's an assistant professor of energy and sustainability at George Mason University. Was CCS/CCUS, which carbon capture and storage/carbon capture utilization and storage, to write out those acronyms, promoted as a climate change solution in Glasgow and was there a pushback against this technology option as both a climate change solution and a support mechanism for continued fossil fuel use? BORDOFF: There was some pushback but, I think, actually, more in the other direction. So I think there has been a growing recognition from many in the climate world that carbon capture technology, carbon removal technology, need to be part of the solution. I think there's almost no climate model at this point that shows how you would get to 1.5 degrees or net zero—1.5 degrees without huge amounts of negative emissions—carbon removal. Some of that can be nature based, but a lot of it will be—some of it will be technology based as well and focusing on what we care about, which is the emissions, is the most important thing. So and this is not, I don't think, the primary thing you're going to do. You want to do the things that are easiest and cheapest and present the fewest risks. So putting a lot of renewables into the grid, getting electrification into the vehicle fleet—there's a lot of things that you would do before that. But if you think about some of the sectors in the economy we talked about before that are hard to decarbonize like steel and cement, it may well be the case that carbon capture is part of the technology there. There was a big announcement yesterday from the NET Power Allam Cycle gas plant in Texas that they had finally come online with delivering net-zero power to the grid. It was sort of a milestone in that technology. So we need to advance this technology and figure out how we're going to—how we're going to get where we need to be. We need to hold that kind of technology accountable to make sure that it's actually meeting the standards we're talking about so that it actually is very low, if not zero, carbon. But if you look at, you know, most of the scenarios I'm aware of, whether it's—Princeton did the study “Net-Zero America,” how we get to net zero by 2050 in the U.S. The International Energy Agency, as I said, did it for net zero globally. There is a meaningful role for carbon capture, to some extent, in the power sector in these heavy industry sectors like steel and cement, and then making, say, hydrogen some of that will be blue hydrogen. Most of it, eventually, will be green, but there may be some role for blue hydrogen, which is—which is gas with carbon capture. So I think, if anything, there's been a growing understanding that we need all tools on deck right away and, again, I fear even with all the tools we may still fall short. FASKIANOS: Great. There's a written question from Laila Bichara, who's at SUNY Farmingdale, international business. There was a New York Times article, “Business Schools Respond to a Flood of Interest in ESG,” talking about the issue of the scarcity of skills in recent graduates to help with social impact, sustainable investments, climate finance, and social entrepreneurship. And she wanted to know if there are resources that you could point the group to in terms of foundation courses or certification that would provide all students with a basic foundation. BORDOFF: Yeah. That's a really good question and it's a growing area of focus and I think universities should be doing more in. The Tamer Center of Columbia Business School does a lot of work in ESG. We hosted a really interesting roundtable at the Center on Global Energy Policy yesterday on ESG and actually been doing a lot of work thinking about that in the context of state-owned enterprises and national oil companies, which we don't talk about enough. But they're a really, really big part of the problem we're talking about. We tend to focus more on these very well-known private sector companies or financial institutions in places like New York. So there—Bloomberg Philanthropies has done a huge amount in this space. I think there's some really good educational programs with some universities and business schools that have done a lot in the ESG space. But I think it's a need, to be frank. I mean, the fact that you're asking the question and I'm pointing to a few examples, but not a huge number, and it is something that universities need to educate themselves about but then is an opportunity for us to educate others. Maybe a revenue one, too, with executive education or something. But there's a lot of companies and financial institutions that want to understand this better. I worry that while there's a huge growing focus on climate, which is a good thing, in the financial community, the phrase ESG kind of means so many different things right now. It's this alphabet soup of regulations and standards and disclosure requirements, and some may make a difference and some may not and it's hard to figure out which ones matter, and for people who want to do the responsible thing what does that really mean. That's an area where research is needed. I mean, that's a role for what we do every day to think about if the SEC is going to regulate what makes a difference and what doesn't, if you're going to create green bonds. If you're going to call everything green in the finance community, what's real and what's not? What moves the needle? What doesn't? What are the returns for greener portfolios? How is that affecting the cost of capital for clean energy versus dirty energy? You know, on and on. I think those are important research questions for us to take on and then it's our job to help educate others as well. FASKIANOS: Great. So the next question I'm going to take from—oh, OK. Good. Maya Copeland (sp) has written her question. She's a political science major at Delaware State University. Do you believe developed nations like the U.S. have done a lot in reference to climate change or mostly talk? If you believe nations like the U.S. have dropped the ball in this aspect, what do you think it would take to get those powerhouses serious about environmental change? BORDOFF: I think advanced economies have done—many have done a lot. I mean, the European Union has taken climate seriously and has reduced emissions and has pretty strong measures in place with a carbon market, for example, with a pretty high carbon price right now. The politics of this issue are not quite as favorable in the U.S., but the U.S. has seen emissions decline more than most over the last decade and a half, in part because of policy measures that have, you know, advanced renewable energy and brought the cost of that down as well as cheaper natural gas displacing coal for a while. But at a broader level, you know, have we done enough? The answer is no one's done enough—(laughs)—which is why emissions are still going up every single year. So that—so the answer is no, we haven't done enough. Almost no country has done enough at home to be on a trajectory for net zero 2050. You saw the announcements from countries like India saying, we'll get to net zero by 2070, and, you know, people said, oh, well, that's terrible. They're not saying 2050. And implicit in that is sort of saying, well, if you want to get global to net zero by 2050 we're not all going to move at the same speed, right. Some countries have advanced with the benefit of hydrocarbons since the Industrial Age and some haven't. So, presumably, the pathways are going to look different, right. And, you know, that's not always how countries in the advanced—in the developing—in the developed world talk about it. The commitment from the Biden administration is net zero by 2050. So I would say there's been—there are some models to point to of countries that have taken this issue seriously but we're not doing enough and partly because the political will is not there and partly—I come back to what I said before—this problem is harder than people realize. So you say which countries are doing enough, like, point to some models, right, and somebody might point to Norway, which, you know, the share of new vehicles sold that are electric in Norway went from zero to, I think, it's 70 percent now. I mean, that's amazing. Seventy percent of new car sales are electric. And if you go back to the start of that trajectory, about a decade or decade and a half, oil demand is unchanged in Norway. So we can talk about why that is and it's because a lot—as I said earlier, a lot of oil is used for things other than cars, and it's increased for trucks and planes and petrochemicals. It takes time for the vehicle fleet to turn over. So when you start selling a bunch of electric cars, you know, average car is on the road for fifteen years so it takes a while before that—the vehicle stock turns over. So I saw that kind of mapped out on a chart recently, just two lines—one is electric vehicle sales going straight up and then the other is oil demand in a flat line. It's a reminder of how unforgiving the math of decarbonization is. The math of climate is really unforgiving, like, you know, the kind of harmful impacts we're going to see with even 1.5 degrees warming. But the math of energy and decarbonization is really unforgiving, too. It's—and we just need to be honest with ourselves about what it takes to get where we need to go. Because I think it's good to have optimism and ambition, but I worry there should be optimism but not happy talk. We should recognize that there's a lot of work to do and let's get to work doing it. FASKIANOS: Great. So there are several questions in the chat about China. I'm going to start off with Andrew Campbell, who's a student at George Mason University. Is LNG—liquefied natural gas—a bridge toward renewable energy still being considered? If not, how are India and China's expected growth and increase in coal use going to be addressed? And then there are a couple of other comments or questions about China. You know, what's your take on China as the biggest emitter and return somewhat to coal? Can we actually even make stated and adequate new goals? And, you know, given the relationship between U.S. and China, which is contentious, you know, what is the cooperation going to be between U.S. and China on climate? So there's a lot packed in there, but I know you can address it all. (Laughs.) BORDOFF: Yeah. I think the China question is really hard, as I said earlier, this kind of, like, competition and cooperation and we're going to try to do both, and I think there was a hope early on—Secretary Kerry said it—that climate could be segmented from the broader challenges in the U.S.-China relationship, and I think that has proven harder to do than people had hoped, in part, because, you know, you need both parties to want to do that. I think China has signaled it's not necessarily willing to segment cooperation on climate from lots of other issues. And then these things bleed together where, you know, there's measures being taken in Washington to restrict imports of solar panels from China, that there were concerns that were made with—in ways that have human rights abuses associated with them with forced labor or maybe have unfair trade practices in terms of subsidies. China is—you know, the leadership in China takes climate seriously. This is a country that recognizes, I think, climate change is real and that needs to be addressed. They have a set of national interests that matter a lot, obviously, to them in terms of economic growth, and the pathway to get there is challenging. So it's a country that's growing clean energy incredibly quickly, as we're seeing right now, in part because there's a(n) energy crunch throughout Europe and Asia. They are ramping up the use of coal quite a bit again, but also taking some pretty strong measures to advance clean energy and, over time, hopefully, move in a lower carbon direction for reasons both about concerns over climate but also local air pollution, which is much, much worse in many parts of China than it is here and that's a huge source of concern for the public there. So when it comes to things like coal they need to figure out how to address those air pollution problems. And then for reasons of economic competition, like I mentioned a minute ago. I mean, China dominates the global market for refining and processing of critical minerals for solar panels, and there are economic and national competitiveness and strategic reasons to do that. So all of those things motivate them to move in the direction of clean energy, but they need to be moving faster to phase down hydrocarbon energy for sure. And then you ask a really hard question about—not hard, but one of the most contentious questions is about the role of natural gas in the transition, and we can have a whole separate session about that. I think there is a view of many in the climate community and many in developing countries—in developed countries that there's not space left in the carbon budget for natural gas, and you saw the Biden administration recently declare through the Treasury Department that, except in very rare cases of the poorest of the poor like Sierra Leone or something, they would not finance natural gas projects through the multilateral development banks. The vice president of Nigeria, I think, responded—speaking of CFR—in Foreign Affairs by writing that this was not fair and you need to think about a viable pathway for a country like Nigeria to develop and it just—it doesn't work to get there that fast. There has to be a bridge. The role of gas looks very different in different parts of the world. It looks different in the U.S. than it does in an emerging or a developing economy. It looks different in the power sector, where there are a lot more alternatives like renewables than it does in heavy industry or how we heat our homes. It looks different for, say, in the Global South, where you're talking about people who are still using coal and charcoal and dung for cooking to think about solutions like liquefied petroleum gas. So all of those things are true, but we need to think about gas also with the carbon budget in mind. I mean, the math is just the math. (Laughs.) If you're going to build any gas infrastructure and not have it blow through the carbon budget, it's going to have to be retired before the end of its normal economic life and you need to think about how that might look in different parts of the world. So you need to be fair to people, to allow them to grow, but also recognize that the math of carbon, you know, is what it is. FASKIANOS: Great. I just want to credit those last—the China questions came from Lada Kochtcheeva at North Carolina State University and Joan Kaufman, who's director of Schwarzman Scholars based in China. We are really at the end of our time—we started a couple minutes late—and I just wanted to go back to—there are students on the call who are following with a professor on the webinar who wanted you just to comment on blue hydrogen, whether or not it is contributing or helping to reduce greenhouse gases. BORDOFF: I think the answer is it can. You just need to make sure that it actually does. So the question of—and by blue hydrogen we mean, you know, using gas with carbon capture to create hydrogen. It needs to have very low methane leakage rates. It needs to have very high capture rates, and we know that is technically possible. It doesn't mean it will be done that way. So if people are going to pursue blue hydrogen as part of the solution in the—particularly in the near term, you need to make sure that it's meeting those standards. I think in the long run my guess and, I think, most guesses would be that green hydrogen is going to make more sense. It's going to be cheaper. The cost is going to come down. And so if we have a significant part of the energy sector that is hydrogen and ammonia in, say, 2050, more of that's going to be green than blue. But there can be a role for blue if you make sure it's done the right way. You just have to actually make sure it's done the right way. FASKIANOS: Great. And, Jason, we are out of time, but I wanted to give you one last, you know, one-minute or thirty seconds, whatever you want, just to say some parting words on your work at the center or, you know, to leave the group with what they can do, again. So— BORDOFF: Well, I would just say thanks for the chance to be with you all and for the work that you're doing every day. You know, I think Glasgow was a moment when the world came together to elevate ambition and roll up our sleeves and say this is—this is the decisive decade. Like, we'll know ten years from now—(laughs)—if we got anywhere close to making it or not. And so it's time for everyone to kind of roll up their sleeves and say, what can we do? We're doing that, I think, at Columbia with the creation of this new climate school. We do that every day at the Center on Global Energy Policy. And so just in all of your institutions, you know, what does that mean for you? What does it mean for the institution? What does that mean for your own research and time and how you allocate it? How do we step up and say, what can we do in the biggest and boldest way we can? Because we need—we're creating a climate school because I think the view is—you know, a hundred years ago there were no schools of public health and now it's how would you deal with a pandemic without a school of public health? So I think our view is decades from now we'll look back and wonder how we ever thought it was possible to handle a problem as complex and urgent as climate change without universities devoting their greatest kind of resource to them. And the measure of success for universities has to be research and new knowledge creation. It has to be education. It has to be serving our own communities. For us, it's, you know, the community here in New York, Harlem. But also are we focusing the extraordinary resources and capacity and expertise of these great institutions to solve humanity's greatest problems? That has to be a motivating force, too, for much of—maybe not all of but a lot of what universities do. So I'd just ask all of us to go back and think about how we can do that in our own work every day. and we have to do it through partnerships. I think universities don't work together as well as they need to. But this is only going to work if we work together. FASKIANOS: Great way to end. Thank you very much, Jason Bordoff. We really appreciate it. We'll have to look for your article in Foreign Affairs magazine, which is published by CFR. So, we are excited that you continue to contribute to the magazine. You can follow Jason Bordoff on Twitter at @JasonBordoff. Very easy to remember. Our final academic webinar of the semester will be on Wednesday, December 1, at 1:00 p.m. (ET). Michelle Gavin, who is CFR's Ralph Bunche senior fellow for Africa policy studies, will talk about African politics and security issues. So in the meantime, follow us at @CFR_Academic. Come to CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for research and analysis on global issues, and we look forward to continuing the conversation with you. Take care. BORDOFF: Thank you. (END)

All Of It
Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration with Nicole Fleetwood

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 22:21


[REBROADCAST FROM September 25, 2020] In September 2020, MoMA PS1 featured author and professor of Media, Culture, and Communication at NYU Nicole Fleetwood's exhibit, "Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration." Showcasing art made by people in prisons and work by non-incarcerated artists concerned with state repression, erasure, and imprisonment, this major exhibition explored the centrality of incarceration to contemporary art and culture. Fleetwood, who was awarded a 2021 MacArthur Genius Fellowship, spoke with us about the project.

I AM GPH
EP105 New York City's COVID-19 Journey with Dr. Ted Long

I AM GPH

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 29:14


In this episode, we chat with Dr. Ted Long, Senior Vice President of Ambulatory Care and Population Health at New York City Health + Hospitals, the largest public healthcare system in the U.S. He has served at the city, state and federal levels in the US as the Medical Director at the Rhode Island State Department of Health in addition to creating the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for programs such as MACRA. Dr. Long is currently a faculty member in the Yale School of Medicine and the Harvard Medical School Center for Primary Care, where he teaches about health policy and administration. He is also teaching at NYU this semester. Dr. Long, with his current 5 million + patients, wants to give all New Yorkers an integrated system of universal access to care. In this episode, we talk about how NYC combatted COVID-19, the importance of community in healthcare and what people can do to discover their path in the field of Public Health. To learn more about the NYU School of Global Public Health, and how our innovative programs are training the next generation of public health leaders, visit publichealth.nyu.edu.

Peak Performance Humans
Human Design | Erin Claire Jones

Peak Performance Humans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 51:47


Brought to you by Athletic Greens (https://athleticgreens.com/naeem) Swannies  (https://naeemmahmood.com/swannies/)Free Gift -  Simple Steps to Meditation:https://naeemmahmood.com/meditation/Erin Claire Jones uses Human Design to help thousands of individuals and companies step into their work and their lives as their truest selves and to their highest potential. Connect with Erin:https://erinclairejones.com/ https://www.instagram.com/erinclairejones/ **************** I would really appreciate it if you left a short review!  It takes only a minute and I love reading the reviews!

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S27E29 - Throwback Tuesday - Bringing Mindfulness and Stress Management Practices to Individuals, Teams, and Organizations, with Neelu Kaur

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 29:03


In this "Throwback Tuesday" HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonathanhwestover/) talks with Neelu Kaur about bringing mindfulness and stress management practices to individuals, teams, and organizations (Originally Aired May 17, 2021). See the video here: https://youtu.be/tTDEdb0qQGI. Neelu Kaur (https://www.linkedin.com/in/neelukaur/) is a Corporate Facilitator, Leadership & NLP (Neurolinguistic Programming) Coach, and Stress Management Specialist. She holds a BS from NYU's Stern School of Business, an MA in Social & Organizational Psychology from Columbia University, and is a certified NLP Master Practitioner and Coach from the NLP Center of New York. Neelu has 15 years of experience specializing in Adult Learning & Leadership Development in large organizations ranging from Financial Services, Consulting, to the Tech Industry. She is a certified Yoga Instructor and an Ericksonian trained Hypnotherapist focused on bringing mindfulness and stress management practices to individuals, teams, and organizations. Check out Dr. Westover's new book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/bluerthanindigo. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/leadershipalchemy. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/hci-magazine. Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/performance_management_podcasts/ Ranked #6 Workplace Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/workplace_podcasts/ Ranked #7 HR Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/hr_podcasts/ Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/talent_management_podcasts/ Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/personal_development_podcasts/ Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/leadership_podcasts/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hcipodcast/support

New Books in Biography
Karla Huebner, "Magnetic Woman: Toyen and the Surrealist Erotic" (U Pittsburgh Press, 2020)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 71:19


Karla Huebner's Magnetic Woman: Toyen and the Surrealist Erotic (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2020) follows the life and career Czech artist Toyen (Marie Čermínová, 1902-1980). Toyen's career spans the twentieth century, from the cultural flux of interwar Prague to postwar France. Huebner traces the growth, divergence, and fluidity of Czech as well as international avant-gardes. Eroticism, Huebner argues, centered Toyen's life, settings, and art. Toyen's ambiguous gender equally found its own place in the predominantly male Czech Devětsil group, lesbian milieus of interwar Paris, and André Breton's postwar Surrealist network. So too did Toyen's work in erotic drawings, book commissions, collage, and oil paintings, all generously represented in this monograph. Magnetic Woman hence unites art history with cultural and intellectual history. Huebner analyzes Toyen's artistic collaborations and friendships with figures as diverse as Jindřich Štyrský, Karel Teige, and Philippe Soupault. She traces Toyen's wide reading of European classics, contemporary writing, and psychological and sexual literature of the day. Huebner anchors Toyen's artwork in these contexts throughout the monograph while showcasing its inherent originality and formal innovations. Magnetic Woman: Toyen and the Surrealist Erotic furnishes readers with both a fascinating biography of the artist and a map of the entangled histories of the Czech and French avant-gardes. Huebner's work will interest scholars of interwar European history, of European sexuality and gender, art history, and international history alike, and the heavily illustrated monograph will intrigue scholars, general readers, and artists in equal measure. John Raimo is a PhD. Candidate in History at NYU finishing up my dissertation (on postwar publishing houses) this summer in European history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books Network
Karla Huebner, "Magnetic Woman: Toyen and the Surrealist Erotic" (U Pittsburgh Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 71:19


Karla Huebner's Magnetic Woman: Toyen and the Surrealist Erotic (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2020) follows the life and career Czech artist Toyen (Marie Čermínová, 1902-1980). Toyen's career spans the twentieth century, from the cultural flux of interwar Prague to postwar France. Huebner traces the growth, divergence, and fluidity of Czech as well as international avant-gardes. Eroticism, Huebner argues, centered Toyen's life, settings, and art. Toyen's ambiguous gender equally found its own place in the predominantly male Czech Devětsil group, lesbian milieus of interwar Paris, and André Breton's postwar Surrealist network. So too did Toyen's work in erotic drawings, book commissions, collage, and oil paintings, all generously represented in this monograph. Magnetic Woman hence unites art history with cultural and intellectual history. Huebner analyzes Toyen's artistic collaborations and friendships with figures as diverse as Jindřich Štyrský, Karel Teige, and Philippe Soupault. She traces Toyen's wide reading of European classics, contemporary writing, and psychological and sexual literature of the day. Huebner anchors Toyen's artwork in these contexts throughout the monograph while showcasing its inherent originality and formal innovations. Magnetic Woman: Toyen and the Surrealist Erotic furnishes readers with both a fascinating biography of the artist and a map of the entangled histories of the Czech and French avant-gardes. Huebner's work will interest scholars of interwar European history, of European sexuality and gender, art history, and international history alike, and the heavily illustrated monograph will intrigue scholars, general readers, and artists in equal measure. John Raimo is a PhD. Candidate in History at NYU finishing up my dissertation (on postwar publishing houses) this summer in European history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Karla Huebner, "Magnetic Woman: Toyen and the Surrealist Erotic" (U Pittsburgh Press, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 71:19


Karla Huebner's Magnetic Woman: Toyen and the Surrealist Erotic (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2020) follows the life and career Czech artist Toyen (Marie Čermínová, 1902-1980). Toyen's career spans the twentieth century, from the cultural flux of interwar Prague to postwar France. Huebner traces the growth, divergence, and fluidity of Czech as well as international avant-gardes. Eroticism, Huebner argues, centered Toyen's life, settings, and art. Toyen's ambiguous gender equally found its own place in the predominantly male Czech Devětsil group, lesbian milieus of interwar Paris, and André Breton's postwar Surrealist network. So too did Toyen's work in erotic drawings, book commissions, collage, and oil paintings, all generously represented in this monograph. Magnetic Woman hence unites art history with cultural and intellectual history. Huebner analyzes Toyen's artistic collaborations and friendships with figures as diverse as Jindřich Štyrský, Karel Teige, and Philippe Soupault. She traces Toyen's wide reading of European classics, contemporary writing, and psychological and sexual literature of the day. Huebner anchors Toyen's artwork in these contexts throughout the monograph while showcasing its inherent originality and formal innovations. Magnetic Woman: Toyen and the Surrealist Erotic furnishes readers with both a fascinating biography of the artist and a map of the entangled histories of the Czech and French avant-gardes. Huebner's work will interest scholars of interwar European history, of European sexuality and gender, art history, and international history alike, and the heavily illustrated monograph will intrigue scholars, general readers, and artists in equal measure. John Raimo is a PhD. Candidate in History at NYU finishing up my dissertation (on postwar publishing houses) this summer in European history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Intellectual History
Karla Huebner, "Magnetic Woman: Toyen and the Surrealist Erotic" (U Pittsburgh Press, 2020)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 71:19


Karla Huebner's Magnetic Woman: Toyen and the Surrealist Erotic (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2020) follows the life and career Czech artist Toyen (Marie Čermínová, 1902-1980). Toyen's career spans the twentieth century, from the cultural flux of interwar Prague to postwar France. Huebner traces the growth, divergence, and fluidity of Czech as well as international avant-gardes. Eroticism, Huebner argues, centered Toyen's life, settings, and art. Toyen's ambiguous gender equally found its own place in the predominantly male Czech Devětsil group, lesbian milieus of interwar Paris, and André Breton's postwar Surrealist network. So too did Toyen's work in erotic drawings, book commissions, collage, and oil paintings, all generously represented in this monograph. Magnetic Woman hence unites art history with cultural and intellectual history. Huebner analyzes Toyen's artistic collaborations and friendships with figures as diverse as Jindřich Štyrský, Karel Teige, and Philippe Soupault. She traces Toyen's wide reading of European classics, contemporary writing, and psychological and sexual literature of the day. Huebner anchors Toyen's artwork in these contexts throughout the monograph while showcasing its inherent originality and formal innovations. Magnetic Woman: Toyen and the Surrealist Erotic furnishes readers with both a fascinating biography of the artist and a map of the entangled histories of the Czech and French avant-gardes. Huebner's work will interest scholars of interwar European history, of European sexuality and gender, art history, and international history alike, and the heavily illustrated monograph will intrigue scholars, general readers, and artists in equal measure. John Raimo is a PhD. Candidate in History at NYU finishing up my dissertation (on postwar publishing houses) this summer in European history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

The Talent Economy Podcast
Recharging as a Team

The Talent Economy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 25:14


For those of us who continue to work remotely as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, we've come to enjoy the flexibility that comes from it. But for many of us, there's also a flip side: seemingly endless Zoom calls, lack of socializing, and an all-around feeling of burnout. In this episode, we speak with Scott Domann, Chief People Officer of Calm, the software company behind one of the leading mindfulness and meditation apps, about how the company is working hard to make sure its own employees benefit from Calm's wellness philosophy. Domann joined Calm as the first CPO in July 2020, overseeing people, learning, development, recruitment, and operations. Domann, who holds a master's degree in psychology and industrial organization from NYU, previously led HR teams at Honey, Netflix, Spotify, and Facebook. In his work, Domann strives to create corporate cultures founded in inclusion, creativity, and positive action, and to raise the bar for building world-class teams.In this episode, he discusses the mindfulness practices that he has picked up since he began working at Calm, why having a high emotional quotient is so important, and the tools that Calm offers to help people develop a mindful leadership style. He also shares steps that HR leaders can take to promote a culture of wellness in their companies, and how admitting, “I don't know,” can be a powerful management tool. Some Questions Asked:What was it like to become CPO so early in the pandemic and lead people through a time of transition while you yourself were onboarding?Was this your first time working remotely?Can you tell me how Calm for Business works?In This Episode, You Will Learn:The mindfulness practices that Calm incorporates into its companywide daily routine.How Calm implemented mental health days, so everyone on the team could recharge at once. How HR leaders at companies that are new to talking about mental and emotional well-being can start the conversation.Links:Scott Domann - LinkedInCalm See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Roads Taken
Growing a Backbone: Adam Wollowick on figuring out for yourself what you should do

Roads Taken

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 25:42


Guest Adam Wollowick figured he would go to medical school but also brought a love of art history with him from high school. He took on an art history major along with his pre-med classes and bounced from fraternity basement to library, living the “work hard, play hard” ethos. With a father in orthopedics, he followed in that practice when he realized he liked working with his hands and selected spine surgery because it was the hardest thing he could try. At every turn, though, he wondered if medicine was really for him. Colleagues kept telling him just had to get through med school or residency or internship and it would be fine. But it never did feel fine. Despite being good at his job, he was miserable.When he noticed that his hospital system was acquiring other orthopedic practices and no one was running it as a business, he thought he could do it. He asked his hospital to pay for an MBA. And a few weeks in he realized this is what he really wanted to do. The hospital started getting cold feet and didn't want him to leave surgery. So he took a risk and quit without a new job. Ultimately, he landed with a company doing mergers and acquisitions in the spine space and felt he'd found more meaning and fulfillment.In this episode, find out from Adam how listening to your own “should” can have healthier outcomes than someone else's…on ROADS TAKEN...with Leslie Jennings Rowley. About This Episode's GuestAdam Wollowick is Senior Director of Business Development at Stryker Spine, working in mergers and acquisitions in the spine and orthopedic space. He is also a mentor at NYU's Endless Frontier Labs, an accelerator for early-stage science and technology-based startups. Previously, he worked as a spine surgeon at the Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, NY and held the title of Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine also in the Bronx.  Executive Producer/Host: Leslie Jennings RowleyMusic: Brian Burrows Find more episodes at https://roadstakenshow.comEmail the show at RoadsTakenShow@gmail.com

Ladies Who Law School
LWLS X Legally Judgy: Law School PTSD, Big Law to In-House + More

Ladies Who Law School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 70:16


On this week's episode, the ladies chat with Nicole and Alexa from the Legally Judgy Podcast! Alexa is a double Bruin and graduated from UCLA law in 2014! But before law school, she interned at a law firm in downtown LA where she experienced litigation and transactional work. She quickly knew transactional law was where she wanted to be. Nicole graduated from NYU undergrad and started her career as a teacher. After realizing teaching was not for her she decided to go to law school. Nicole graduated from Penn law and after a successful OCI, she went into big law. But their stories are soooo much more than that! Listen and hear how their law school experiences were at TOP law schools!  After law school, both women worked the law firm life and share all the tea about what it is like working at 'the firm'. The big takeaway: do more on the self-care front, from the beginning!! After 3 years working at law firms the women ended up in house! Alexa at Amazon Studios and Nicole at CBS. After Nicole moved across the country to California she started at Amazon Studios. Alexa actually sold her on the job! Que them becoming best friends! The ladies then share what it is like working for a studio and the different roles it takes to get jobs done! If you want a GREAT breakdown of entertainment law, this episode if for you!! ALSO, check out our newest favorite website-- goinhouse.com -- a great place to look for jobs! Be sure to add their podcast, Legally Judgy to your podcast rotation! Follow them on Instagram HERE and check out their Pateron HEREFACEBOOK GROUP

Tree Speech
Speak For The Trees with David Meshoulam

Tree Speech

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 37:04


Our next episode features a conversation with David Meshoulam, PhD, Co-Founder and Executive Director of the Boston nonprofit, SPEAK FOR THE TREES, an organization whose mission is to improve the size and health of the urban tree canopy in Boston, with a focus on under-resourced and under-canopied neighborhoods. David (pronounced Dah-veed) co-founded Speak for the Trees in 2018. Trained as a science educator, his work has focused on ways to increase understanding of the connections between science, culture, and history and to empower people to be change agents. He holds a PhD in Curriculum & Instruction from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is a Senior Fellow at the Environmental Leadership Program, and is co-chair of the Urban Ecology Collaborative. When he's not tending to trees, his 2 children, or his 1 mini Australian Shepherd, you can reach him at david@treeboston.org. Special thank you to David for his time and inspiration. For more info: SPEAK FOR THE TREES website: https://treeboston.org SPEAK FOR THE TREES instagram: trees_boston Boston Tree Equity Maps: https://treeboston.org/tree-equity/ American Forests Tree Equity Score tracker: https://www.treeequityscore.org Tree Speech's host, Dori Robinson, is a director, playwright, dramaturg, and educator who seeks and develops projects that explore social consciousness, personal heritage, and the difference one individual can have on their own community. Some of her great loves include teaching, the Oxford comma, intersectional feminism, and traveling. With a Masters degree from NYU's Educational Theatre program, she continues to share her love of Shakespeare, new play development, political theatre, and gender in performance. Dori's original plays have been produced in New York, Chicago, and Boston. More information at https://www.dorirobinson.com This week's episode was recorded in Massachusetts on the native lands of the Wabanaki Confederacy, Pennacook, Massa-adchu-es-et (Massachusett), and Pawtucket people. Logo design by Mill Riot. Special thanks to the Western Avenue Lofts and Studios for all their support. Tree Speech is produced and co-written by Jonathan Zautner with Alight Theater Guild. The mission of the guild is to advance compelling theatrical endeavors that showcase the diversity of our ever-changing world in order to build strong artists whose work creates empathy, challenges the status quo and unites communities. For more information about our work and programs, please visit www.alighttheater.org. Learn more about the podcast at: www.treespeechpodcast.com, and IG: treespeechpodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/treespeech/message

American Prestige
E19 - Cuba's American History w/ Ada Ferrer

American Prestige

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 79:35


Danny and Derek talk about the Nicaraguan elections, MBS and his pro-Republican oil policy, and last weekend's attack on the Iraqi prime minister. They then speak with Ada Ferrer (21:00), professor of history and Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU, about the history of Cuba from the precolonial period until the Spanish-American War/War of 1898. Grab Ada's book here: https://bit.ly/3CevBUK Become a patron today! www.patreon.com/americanprestige

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed

While in film school at NYU, Dee Rees directed a short film called Pariah that was essentially the first act of a feature script she was developing. Spike Lee, her professor and mentor, helped her get the feature version financed and in 2011, she released it to much acclaim. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our 10 Year Anniversary series with Rees' feature version of her short film Pariah. There's a lot to discuss about Pariah, from the performances to the filmmaking style. We love all of the performances in this film, but Adepero Oduye as Alike, our protagonist, is the heart of this film. Her journey of coming out as a lesbian is a powerful one, and we're right along the ride with her from the start of the film. But all the performances in Pariah are great. Pernell Walker as Alike's best friend Laura. Aasha Davis as her first love Bina. Charles Parnell and Kim Wayans as her parents. Everyone gets story time and they sell this journey. Pariah is a strong story because Rees doesn't make the parents typical antagonists who aren't happy with her as a lesbian. We get a sense of their world and can understand their perspective, even if we don't agree with them. We also get a strong sense of the family world and connections to church, not to mention Dad's affair. All of this helps us feel like we understand the family dynamics. Rees and her cinematographer Bradford Young crafted a personal, intimate film. The film is beautiful to look at with many gorgeous closeups. It also has raw energy in the scenes that require it. All told, it's clear right out of the gate that Rees is a filmmaker pushing honesty and truth with her first film in a visually exciting way. Pariah is a powerful film that delivers and rightfully holds up as one of the great LGBTQ films. We have a great time talking about it, so check it out then tune in! The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership. Watch this on Apple or Amazon, or find other places at JustWatch Script Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd Pariah NYU Short • 2007 Pariah on Criterion

Positive Impact Philanthropy Podcast
Episode 34: An Interview with Jennifer Flood Founder & Executive Director of Flood Sisters Kidney Foundation

Positive Impact Philanthropy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 23:48


Join Lori and her guest, Jennifer Flood, as they talk about just going for it when you have a vision that you want to execute. Jennifer is the founder and executive director of Flood Sisters Kidney Foundation. She shares the incredible story of how a seemingly uncommon and out-of-the-box idea would be the beginning of changing other people's lives. Stay tuned!   Here are the things to expect in this episode: Using Craigslist to look for donors for her father. How did it work? Being amazed by the responses of the people who wanted to help. Starting a nonprofit that helps match donors to patients. And many more!   About Jennifer Flood:   Jennifer is executive director and founder of Flood Sisters Kidney Foundation, which she started with her sisters while experiencing their father being diagnosed with kidney disease. Jennifer is a graduate of New York University where she received a bachelors of psychology degree. She was also on the Dean's list at NYU and received the Bart Lawson Award for Service in Humanitarianism for her service to New York City. Jennifer started her career in nursing and has worked for an array of well- known hospitals including NYPH – Weil Cornell in Westchester. She specialized in psychiatric nursing working in the field for 6 years. Aside from her past career in nursing, she has also worked as a paralegal for many affluent investment banks and firms. Her passion and time is devoted to helping others receive kidney transplants.   Connect with Jennifer! Website: https://floodsisterskidneyfnd.org/   Foundations mentioned: Harboring Hearts: https://harboringhearts.org/   Connect with Lori Kranczer! Website: https://www.everydayplannedgiving.com/  Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/positiveimpactphilanthropy  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lorikranczer/

Best Served
BSP356: Meet The Team w/ Camille Shoemaker - Tell Your Best Story Ep#15

Best Served

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 20:04


In this episode of Tell Your Best Story, Jensen speaks to Camille Shoemaker, a 86 86 86 Challenge Editor, about seeing all sides of the industry, getting her Masters in Food Studies at NYU, and how you don't need to be an amazing writers to tell your story.

The Wildescast
A Conversation with Leah Gottfried

The Wildescast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 41:19


In this episode Rabbi Wildes speaks with Leah Gottfried. Leah graduated with a Film Studies degree from Yeshiva University where she studied screenwriting and TV writing as well as cinematography at NYU. Leah also studied at The Actors Circle in Los Angeles and has numerous commercials and TV credits including Time Warner Cable and Yamaha ATV under her belt. She is a sought after speaker and writer, with recent speaking engagements including Yeshiva University and Limmud NY and an op-ed piece published on Mayim Bialik's Groknation website.

Boundless Body Radio
Kettlebell Concepts with Vincent Metzo! 188

Boundless Body Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 61:30


Vincent Metzo is the Director of Education for Kettlebell Concepts in New York City, and the Director of Fitness Education for NYSC! His passion for kettlebells and training grew out of his early training as a dancer and acrobat. Vincent has a master's degree in Exercise Physiology and Fitness Management from NYU. Vincent is the creator of the FCES (Flexibility and Corrective Exercise Specialist), and the Focus on Flexibility and Periodization of Sports Massage Workshops. As the Director of Education for Kettlebell Concepts, he has authored the content of several advanced kettlebell courses. His teaching is centered around the ideas of improved conditioning and helping people learn body management to move better. He lives in Westchester, New York with his wife and twin sons, and I was fortunate enough to meet Vincent and learn from him as my kettlebell instructor over a decade ago!Find Vincent at-https://kettlebellconcepts.com/FB- Vincent Metzohttps://www.newyorksportsclubs.com/THE KETTLEBELL SWING!!!! I love this exercise. 

StarShipSofa
StarShipSofa No 673 Mikel J. Wisler

StarShipSofa

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 65:03


Main Fiction: "Falling Sunward" by Mikel J. Wisler.This story is original to StarShipSofa.Mikel J. Wisler is a commercial and documentary filmmaker by day and science fiction author by night. He's a sincere believer that good science fiction can help us save the world. Through his writing and podcast (Exploring Tomorrow: Meaningful Science Fiction and Life's Big Questions), Wisler explores how we as people encounter and wrestle with meaning-of-life questions in the stories we love. He's the author of two novels, Unidentified, and Sleepwalker, with a third on its way. He's also written and directed several award-winning science fiction short films. Wisler was born in Brazil, South America, where he spent most of his childhood. He now lives on the south shore of Boston, Massachusetts, with my wife and daughter. To learn more about his work, please visit mikelwisler.com.Narrated by Tatiana Grey.Tatiana is a critically acclaimed actress of stage, screen, and the audio booth. She has been nominated for dozens of fancy awards but hasn't won a single damned thing. She went to NYU and lives in Brooklyn, New York. You can find her at tatianagrey.com.Fact: Looking Back At Genre History by Amy H SturgisSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/starshipsofa. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Thresholds
Gregory Pardlo

Thresholds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 38:00


Jordan is joined by Pulitzer-winning poet and memoirist Gregory Pardlo — currently teaching at NYU in Abu Dhabi — to talk about sobriety, understanding the stories of one's life, and answering the self-imposed question “What god are you serving, Pardlo, when you write X?” Gregory Pardlo was born in Philadelphia in 1968. He is the author of Air Traffic (Knopf, 2018), a memoir in essays, and the poetry collections Digest (Four Way Books, 2014), which received the 2015 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry and was shortlisted for the 2015 NAACP Image Award, and Totem (American Poetry Review), which was selected by Brenda Hillman for the American Poetry Review/Honickman Prize in 2007. He is the recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York Foundation for the Arts, among others. He is the poetry editor of Virginia Quarterly Review and is currently teaching at NYU in Abu Dhabi. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

PT Profit Podcast
Million Dollar Low Ticket Memberships with Allison Hollinger

PT Profit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021


You're going to love this episode, coaches. Allison Hollinger sits down to talk to me today about beginning with zero followers and building to a community of 35,000 strong. She shares tips of how to keep up with the game, which is constantly changing in this online space and dives into how she stays relevant on social media platforms that introduce new functions left and right. In addition to discussing how she built her community, we also talked about how she was able to manage that growth, and she also shared her tips on how she was able to find the right team to help run her business. You'll hear Allison talk with me about:- Adapting and staying relevant in the ever-changing social media landscape.- How to set pricing on your service.- The importance of having a support team to spark creativity. Don't forget to leave us a review on Apple Podcasts. About Today's Guest Allison Hollinger is a healthy recipe creator and founder of Plan to Nourish, her signature meal prepping program, where she teaches busy moms how to make meal prepping and feeding their families easy, healthy and affordable. She’s a proud mom of 3 and devoted military spouse and has been a teacher her entire life. After receiving her Masters in Special Education from NYU, she was a Special Educator in both New York City and Los Angeles. Once Allison had children, she retired from teaching to be a stay-at-home entrepreneur and launched her successful live cooking show on Facebook. You can catch her live each week sharing her favorite recipes and meal prepping tips on her business page. Allison HollingerAllison on FacebookAllison on Instagram Join the Facebook community! Are you a new fitness entrepreneur looking to attract clients? Maybe you're looking to dial in your messaging? Or perhaps you're experienced and looking to scale your business? Head on over to Facebook, and request access to my Online Marketing for Fitness Professionals group. Post an introduction about yourself, ask some questions, or let us celebrate your wins with you.

Gen X Guide To The Universe
MTV & Fall of the Berlin Wall

Gen X Guide To The Universe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 43:52


In 1989, MTV broadcast the fall of the Berlin Wall. In 2021, Heather and Jameson talked about, and some other stuff. Tune in this week to hear about the Berlin wall (Check out this article: “MTV's revolutionary hour on the Berlin Wall” https://tinyurl.com/78bt56va), how annoying Bono is (very), Jameson's lack of appreciation for Hedwig and the Angry Inch, confirmed for Jameson it's Taye Diggs and not Taint Diggs, Heather's “summering” in Berlin (check out the Checkpoint Charlie museum: https://tinyurl.com/y3bpjw6s), and Jameson confuses Lindsay Graham with Ashley Graham. The duo also breaks down Berlin's “Take My Breath Away” (https://tinyurl.com/xrvdf6ew). And of course, get your tickets here to Afterwork Theater's production of Newsies starring the incomparable broadway baby, Julie Mirwis: https://tinyurl.com/ymzu4d5d

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
565: Dr. Jessica Schwartz: Concussion Myths and Concussion Corner Academy

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 34:23


In this episode, Founder of the Concussion Corner Academy®, Jessica Schwartz, talks about the nature of concussion treatment. Today, Jessica talks about her concussion experience and how it has shaped her work leading up to the Concussion Corner Academy®, the reality of long-term concussion symptoms, and some of the top concussion myths. Is it ever too late to have your concussion symptoms treated? Hear about treatment barriers, some of the surprising statistics in concussion and TBI research, and the importance of education, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “When you're young, make sure you have extended disability on yourself.” “There's no evidence-based, agreed upon international definition of concussion or traumatic brain injury.” “There's been zero phase 3 trials on TBI and concussion in over 30 years.” “Up to 30% of folks now have persistent symptoms of concussion.” “If we can teach one, we can serve many.” “2012 was the first year the International Consensus Statement discussed the cervical spine in terms of examination treatment.” “2015 was the first academic year in which there was a formal training for both TBI and concussion if you were a neurology resident.” “2017 was the first year on the International Consensus Statement that we identified concussion as a rehabilitative injury.” “The injury of concussion is an injury of loss. It's a loss of your ‘I am.'” “Join Twitter.”   More about Jessica Schwartz Jessica Schwartz PT, DPT, CSCS is an award-winning Physical Therapist, a national spokeswoman for the American Physical Therapy Association, host of the Concussion Corner Podcast, founder of the Concussion Corner Academy®, and a post-concussion syndrome survivor, advocate, and concussion educator. After spending a full year in rehabilitation, experiencing the profound dichotomy of being both doctor and patient, Dr. Schwartz identified the gaps in concussion treatment and management in the global healthcare community. Her role has been to identify the cognitive blind spots and facilitate collective competence for healthcare providers, physicians to athletic trainers, focusing on comprehensive targeted physical examinations, rehabilitative teams, and concussion care management.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Concussion, Research, Statistics, Physiotherapy, Neurology, Concussion Corner, Myths, Healthcare, Rehabilitation, Injury, Loss,   To learn more, follow Jessica at: Website to Join the Program:          The Concussion Corner Academy® Facebook:       Concussion Corner Twitter:            @ConcussionCornr Instagram:       @ConcussionCorner LinkedIn:         Jessica Schwartz YouTube:        Concussion Corner LinkTree:         https://linktr.ee/ConcussionCorner   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the full transcript here:  00:02 Hey Jess, welcome to the podcast. Finally, I'm so excited to have you on.   00:07 Thank you so much for having me. I can't believe we haven't done this yet.   00:10 I know it's like absolutely insane. And just so people know Jessica and I both live in New York City, and we actually see each other quite a bit. And this is the first time I've had you on the podcast. But I'm really excited to have you on today because we're going to be talking about concussion, persistent post concussion symptoms, and you'll talk a little bit more about that name changed in the bulk of the interview. But before we get into some common myths around concussions, I would love for you to let the listeners know a little bit more about why you decided to really specialize in this niche within medicine and rehabilitation.   00:52 Awesome. Well, I thank you for the softball pitch care know. For those that don't know, Karen used to play softball on Central Park quite a bit. But yeah, no, I mean, I thank you so much for having me on. First. I've been listening to healthy, wealthy smart forever. So just thank you again. And yeah, I mean, gosh, I think back to I was a we were one of the first six residents actually, we were the first six residents in orthopedics at NYU in 2010. When I finished up grad school and all that jazz, and we I had it, I got the dream job, right, got the dream job. I had to leave New York City for it, which sounds crazy. But I think a lot of folks can connect to that, you know, working in, you know, the old adage, Jay, we used to call mills and things like that are seeing three or four patients plus per hour. And I was like, this isn't why I went into physical therapy. This is not why I wanted to do this. And I found this great clinic out in New Jersey during residency and we saw one to two patients per hour. And we had a support staff and they were emotionally intelligent. They were physical therapy owned, and they let us grow. And keep that like use of excitement, right? I don't know about you. But I'm hopped up on caffeine and too little sleep as we launched a new business this week. But it was great. And it really it fed my soul. It was wonderful colleagues and we ended up I ended up starting kind of in the opposite end of things, a civilian prosthetics program. So I was, you know, volunteering and showing up at the Manhattan VA, which has a wonderful prosthetics program. And then we also launched a breast cancer program and be launched a concussion program. So that was kind of like my first entree into concussion about 1011 years ago. And we were the only really only office in New Jersey with that type of rehabilitative practice at approaching concussion. And so very Dunning Kruger ask, it was like, you know, you don't know what you don't know until you kind of are made self aware of it. I got hit by a car. So I was hit by a car in October 3 of 2013. And right before then, oh, actually, it wasn't even right before then care. I'm sorry about that. But it was two years before it was our last day of residency. We saw that there was a conference at NYU at the hospital. And it was on concussion and it was NY us first concussion conference. Now this was 2011. So my best friend from Italy Beatrice, you know, hi, BIA. She's in Lucca. She's a great physio, if you're out in Italy listening in. And we were like, What do you want to go and it was our first weekend off for residency. I mean, we were exhausted, excited. And we're like, let's do it. So we went to this conference, I fell in love with it. And so we were at least aware of what this program was at NYU. Fast forward two years from there. And I was actually hit by a car here in Manhattan. So that's really where it's my life's work and passion is to become because I actually live with persistent symptoms. So and went through quite a recovery. So that's kind of how it all kind of came together and coalesced.   03:49 And when you suffered a concussion, and this was in 2013 It did you did you have kind of the self awareness at that time to think, well, you know, I've been learning a lot about concussions, I think I can I can kind of help myself here and did that then really propel you to learn more and to dive in even more.   04:19 So when I was hit, I was hit by an unlicensed driver from behind and my airbags did not go off. I was in my Toyota Prius you may have even been in that car at some point. And I didn't think anything of it but I knew I when I said the story is I I got out of the car. I want to get out of the car. I got hit so hard. I was stoplight at a red light wasn't looking behind me because we were stopped. And it was the traditional traffic right care like we're just inching forward. And I was probably on that block of 12 Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenue for about two or three light cycles because of traffic. So I just got Walt from behind and so the New Yorker in May right so born and raised New Yorker You know, unbuckle the seatbelt and get out of the car to give this guy the business. And I was just so dizzy care. And I held onto the top of the hood of my roof of the car and I was like, I gotta sit down. Fast forward. I thought this was quote unquote, just going to be a concussion. And at that time, we really thought concussions were pretty much resolved spontaneously within seven to 10 days based off of the literature from 2002. From Brolio and McCrea at all from the NCAA study. But we don't have that's false. And we have so much updated information we can chat about if you'd like. So I thought it was just going to be seven to 10 days. I went back to work for for a week, I thought, you know, I would just be sore, kind of like a whiplash or like a Dom's. And now, I just kept D compensating and then from there went from 10 to 14 hours of rehab a week for 14 months.   05:53 And how did you continue to work and continue to function during all this time?   05:58 I did not. So I went off of I went out of work, mind you, I was just promoted to junior partner the week I got hit. So I remember I was like directing a prosthetics program, we had all these other programs, I just became junior partner, which would have been a profit share with a company and I loved my job, I would still send people back to that clinic, those four clinics in New Jersey in northern New Jersey. So essentially what happened was, it was a conversation that went on for months. So I was on short term disability for six months. And I say this to all physical therapists, physicians, OTs, PTs, whoever's listening to this, when you're young, make sure you have extended disability on yourself, because our bodies are so fragile at the end of the day. And again, I was an athlete, I was a cyclist I was training for, for a century bike ride and life changes in the blink of an eye. And I was underinsured with a $50,000 policy policies for car insurance to go up to 300,000 to 3 million for certain policies. And it would have been an extra $12 a month. But again, you're a new grad, you're just out of residency, just out of DPT school and you know, you're thinking about student loans and just being out of school. And so you don't really plan that far. So that's a whole other conversation we can have on another podcast. So I was on short term disability and we all know the legality of and we all have our own cognitive biases about this, right? So when people are involved in litigation, we know that their care tends to go a little bit longer. So I just I knew that. And I didn't want to, I almost didn't want to set myself up for failure, right? I just wanted to be a good soldier, show up for therapies, neuro psychology, vision therapy, talk therapy, vestibular therapy, regular musculoskeletal for the whiplash therapy, and just be a good soldier and show up as a good patient, just thinking that I would get better and slightly different than a musculoskeletal injury. The difference is with with brain injury is that there are cognitive and behavioral impairments that differentiate those from brain injury from musculoskeletal injury and rehab. On top of that, add the environmental aspect, and that's a whole other aspect of the injury. So there's no finite, you know, six to eight weeks of tissue healing or things like that, when it comes to brain brain injury, that it's a very gray area. So I was on disability for six months. And then that ended and that was petrifying. So two weeks before disability ended. I wanted to burn it down. That's when I got angry. And I think that's when I really went through that whole grief cycle, because I just kept showing up to therapy thinking I was going to get better, and then I did not. So went back after 14 months, I had the no fault car insurance, which helped pay some bills back home with mom at the time. And that was it. So after that, when I went back to work, I actually realized I had a vision handicap with overhead LED lights. So I still live with persistent symptoms, I still live with neuro fatigue, I still have an ocular motor disorder. But we learn how to manage and cope and I have wonderful support systems and definitely a grit that a lot of people don't have as well, I think I'm missing a chromosome there somewhere.   09:03 And you know, and this was eight years ago. So I think it's important for the people listening to understand that, you know, when one is diagnosed with a concussion, it's not just like you said over and seven to 10 days or maybe a week or a month or even a year, and that there are symptoms that can persist. And I think that's a great segue into what are some common myths around concussions. So I asked Jessica give me like maybe your top three common myths that surround concussion and and post concussion. So Jessica, I'll throw it over to you. So what would be Myth number one that is circulating out in whether it be layman's world or even the medical world? Well,   09:53 um, I was actually I'm going to give you something that we didn't speak about. I'll kind of combine one of them with three but One of them, actually two that we didn't speak, I'll surprise you as well. But there's actually no evidence based definition agreed upon international definition of concussion or traumatic brain injury. And that kind of will segue a little bit into two is that there's actually been zero phase three clinical trials on TBI concussion in over 30 years. So, when we're talking about research, I mean, talk about ground floor ground level, I mean, we were in the basement 10 years ago, just not having any idea what we were looking at. So I even I try to tell people like when we're talking about this, and looking at the literature, the medical legal literature got ahold of this injury 50 plus years ago, and it's been in the trapped with closed head injury and medical legal literature, but really not until 22,004. And on how we've been talking about this as a rehabilitative injury, and things like that. So, you know, historically, when we don't know what to do with someone in medicine, we tend to send them down to trajectories, we send them, we allude that they're milling, lingering, or looking for a secondary gain, or we tell them that's all in their head, and it can't be real, right. So that's what's kind of happening with these patients that we know up to 30% of folks now have persistent symptoms of concussion, they don't just spontaneously. You know, in even two weeks, we even actually, because we didn't really know what we're looking for right care. So we didn't have an agreed upon definition. So how can you know what you're looking at unless you know where you're looking for. So that's so very important to connect to is that a lot of the mismanagement of concussion was so much more prevalent in a well cared for patient.   11:38 That's wild. And so before 2004, basically, if you had persistent persistent symptoms after a concussion, it was like, good luck.   11:50 Yeah, you were allude that you're faking it. You were looking at this, that it was a psychological injury. Yeah. You know, and   11:57 that, that in and of itself is crazy making?   12:00 Yes, well, that's the whole thing and the chicken or the egg, right. And you can't deny psychological conversations when it comes to the brains like Hello. However, you know, it's really the chicken or the egg, you have these somatic things that we have the ability today in 2021, in a well versed clinician to validate the patient's symptom profile by doing targeted, comprehensive physical examinations as it pertains to concussion. So we actually the best thing that we can do for a patient like this, and I'm sure you've had all the chronic pain people on your podcast and things like that is validate their symptom profile. Listen, you're not crazy for seeing words coming up off the page. No, you didn't drop some LSD or an illegal drug. You have an ocelot Xia? You know, but the difference between the moderate and severe TBI is is that these folks have the self awareness to know that something's not right. But they do not have this objective language to express the what or how they feel with brain injury. So what do we do all day care? And how are you feeling? What's your pain level? What's your number? How are you feeling? But brain injury folks do not have the subjective language to express that so when they go to the mall and our fear avoidant of that, or they go to the supermarket, and they are don't like to be in a complex visual sensory environment, because the colors may blur, and things like that, that is then looked at as a fear avoidant behavior. And that's been sent to psychological counseling for decades. So how can we as physios how do we get these guys first and gals? So not to Detroit too much to keep you on track. But those are two. The first two is that there have been there are over 43 working definitions of concussion. One of them is evidence based. And to that there are zero phase three clinical trials in over 30 years for TBI concussion.   13:42 Wow. Wow. Wow, those are two biggies. Two big myth.   13:46 I would think so then I'll combine the last three because there are points. So the third one is, you know, I really, I'm really into education care. And I really believe that if we can teach one we can serve many, okay. And that's just what I've been privy to. And this implicit trust in the last, like eight to 10 years with this injury, that I've been invited to all different conferences for emergency physician athletic training, PT, you name it, because we all need to be on the same page here. So folks really need to I always say that we need to have a really humble approach when we come here because and I say this with kindness and I but I say this very firmly, is that with concussion, we have infinite ports of access to entry to care. Okay, you can go to the urgent care the emergency department, you could even be at your OB GYN appointment and you might have had this fall and a ski injury over the weekend and in your annual or biannual you know OBGYN appointment if you're a woman. And you know, you could have had you could have pre presented with signs and symptoms of concussion and not be aware of it. So I see that because there's infinite ports of entry on like cancer or unlike cardiology, you have a heart attack, where do you go care and you go to the emergency room, right? And then you see the cardiologist just right or you get diagnosed with cancer or your PCP or you start losing weight, you have some red flag showing up. Where do you go? Yeah, young colleges right to the oncologist, right. So that's a, that's a defined pathway. With concussion, we don't have a defined pathway. And that's not necessarily a bad thing. However, it's where a lot of this mismanagement has come up over the last few years and decades, and that's where patients start to suffer. And that's where it healthcare, we've actually imparted something that's called AI atherogenic suffering, which is where actually the health care system where your doctor is actually part of a way of suffering on a patient. So I bring that to our attention with these three quick facts. I'll say them quickly, and then we can chat about them. Go for one 2012. That's the number you got to know. 2012 was the first year the international consensus statement discuss the cervical spine in terms of examination treatment, that whole stick that connects the central nervous system to the peripheral nervous system and runs the autonomics up and down, right 2012. We just started talking about the cervical spine internationally. 2015 was the first academic year in which there was a formal training for both TBI and concussion, if you are a neurology resident. So if you were a brain physician in 2015, that was their first formal didactic year, they had training in concussion and brain injury. So just let that settle in there for a second because that's, that's just wow. Again, this is a place to build up, not tear down, but that was taking place within the behavioral neurology section of the American Academy of Neurology. And the third one was that 2017 was the first year on the international consensus statement that we actually identified the concussion as a rehabilitative injury. 2017. So, like, what? So if you think about it, as physical therapists, congratulations, happy 100 years care. We just had our centennial, right. So we were rehabilitation aids, literally in the trenches 100 years ago, like now, and we were treating what we were treating brain injury, what are we doing in the ICUs for treating brain injury? We're getting them up, we're getting them moving. But what do we prescribe when we don't know what to do with someone and healthcare rest? So we now know that that's not the ideal thing to do beyond the first 72 hours, but yeah, 2012, cervical spine 2015, brain physician started learning how concussion and 2017 was we call the rehabilitative so that's my third.   17:29 Wow, that's, it just seems like that cannot be possible.   17:33 Yeah. And, and it seems like that and because we know better, right? But imagine then being, you know, having deficits and having trouble thinking and processing, and what's our most valuable resource attention, but then you can't process. So it's, it's so horrible when you're a patient, and you have to negotiate the system, if you go through a no fault, or you go through a worker's comp, and there's all these other aspects, you know, of that of, of the injury. So I always say, sorry, I always say is that concussion as an injury of loss of it, I am, so you have to really pay attention to where your patients are in space and time when you when you meet them.   18:10 And it all seems to me like just not having a clear pathway. To me sounds like barriers to treatment, and barriers to to improvement. And then my question, I just one quick question. It. If you if the patient doesn't quite know who to go to, they don't know that they're they they have a concussion? Because some people like oh, you know, he got his bell rang, or whatever. And they don't even go to see a doctor, but they're having some symptoms, but they're not quite sure who to go to? Is it that the longer your symptoms go on, the less likely you are to recover?   18:50 So there's a yes or no answer to that. I don't want to say it depends. But the good news is, is that we have folks five and 10 years out who may have not sought treatment, like the patient you just alluded to, or sought treatment, then kind of plateaued, the brain wasn't ready yet. And that's totally fine. And we've got to tell patients that No, hey, maybe we need to take three to six months and just kind of let this settle. Let's reset, regroup, and then let's come back. Because the brain just may not be ready. You cannot force this. This is not about grit and resilience, in terms of being sore and pushing through. You've got to listen to the brain and I talked about it with like the knee effusion principle. You know, we have residency in orthopedic so I talk ortho all the time, although I love the neuro, neuro world these days as well. But you know, it's like the knee effusion principle, right? You do too much the knee fuses, we want to give it if it doesn't come down in two days, we did too much. Let's cut in half, right. So it's the same thing with concussion except the difference that is super frustrating to both patients and clinicians that aren't in the know is that you can have delayed symptom onset. So you can do something within the therapy office or they can do something like for example, have a vestibular migraine, where they feel good while they're walking outside and they feel okay walking But as soon as they stop their body like isn't really caught up to them yet. And then they get this distributor migraine within 20 to 60 minutes, and then they feel like garbage. But then they don't know what even to associate with. And that right there, Karen will make you feel crazy. So so it's very important to have somebody in the know, but you said something right before that question about barriers? And you're absolutely right, there are barriers, but I'll do you one better is that we're not only have barriers to accessing quality care for concussion, we also have i atherogenic, suffering, where they come and I, as a provider may not know enough about concussion to look at this from 360. So we have providers that don't know, they may be maybe in 2021, we'll be able to pull up the international consensus statement. But that's only for sport, and it's very limited. So it doesn't go through the nuance of the suffering and the delayed symptom onset and things like that. It's very white paper esque, right? So we actually then cause harm by quote unquote, just treating the neck, not looking at the vestibular system, not looking at sleep, not looking at the ocular motor system, not looking at is the the migrant or aspect of it, not, you know, all these other things and aspects that make concussion concussion. So from a symptom profile standpoint, so if you feel typically I should say,   21:15 yeah, and, and, you know, like you said earlier, you're all about education, and getting people to therapists, and whether you're a physical therapist, occupational therapist, you've been a personal trainer, physician, really understanding the ins and outs of concussion. And so I'm going to, I'm going to plug your educational entity that is that is launching, and it's concussion, corner Academy. And so now, I really like that you're coming at this from the patient and the provider standpoint. So talk a little bit more about concussion, quarter Academy, and what separates it from other educational programs. Because, you know, as you know, there's a lot out there in the world, right? So how, what, what is it about this that makes it different, and that you're really proud of as you should be?   22:08 Oh, I appreciate that care. And, golly, I mean, talk about like, your life's work, right? And I really, I just get goosebumps thinking about this. And I'm like, wow, this is this is really just a dream. And I'll be very honest with you, this is a we're in a pandemic, still, some people may not want to admit that. But we're, we're still in a pandemic. And we all kind of went through something, right, especially in New York City, we really went through it initially in the acute phase of this pandemic. And I did, I lost a good chunk of my practice, and I had to really sit with myself and I said, Gosh, just what do you want to keep doing? You know, what do you want to do with your life, I had patients no less than four years, some 11 years as patients. And I was like, I'm not doing this again, I just don't have the energy. And that was from just a like a, like, almost like a burnout aspect. I just couldn't imagine re building up my my practice again, I have no problem seeing patients, if they call me but I have no desire to market. Now. I was like, Well, my ideal life based off of my symptoms and persistent symptoms. You know, I really work every other day. So yeah, I can push through every five days and do a regular work week if needed, but I don't feel well. And then I'm not pleasant. And it's just, you know, I just know my limits. So with the neuro fatigue and the stuff that I live with, I said, Well, what's, uh, what's, what's something I can do? Well, if I could work remotely, that was kind of it. And I said, How can I help the concussion community? So we decided, and my partner is a graphic designer and in to animation and editing and all of this stuff. We said, how can we make this beautiful, and deliver it? Because the user experience was so important to us? And then how can we deliver it internationally to where it's accessible? So we're, we formed the academy, and essentially, the goal has always been to promote healing, decrease suffering, increase support, and deliver it with kindness to this mismanage patient population, but we need to have access. So I have a tremendous faculty. We're launching we are we have a nonprofit partnership. We have the faculty are actually the people on the international consensus statement. They're the people treating the the boots on the ground, their clinician scientists, and they get it, they get concussions, and they're vested in concussion. So it's going to be a 12 week online course for our first cohort. It's fixed. It's from January 16 to April 10. It's going to be two hours per week one posted for you and one live on Sunday mornings at 10am. Eastern which will allow for our European friends and our California friends as well on the West Coast. And it's going to be 24 hours of CEU activity for for for physical therapists and athletic trainers. As long as we have 10, ot speech pathologists, neuropsychologist, psychologists, social workers, we can see you them as well, but it's the first round so it's kind of a lot of investment here. So I'm just going with PT and 80 to start unless we have 10 of the others. And we're going to have a nonprofit partnership, but the the beauty of it all is already I'm actually going to have, we're going to be doing research on our students. So we're actually going to be looking to change outcomes based off of evidence based practice and education. So we're going to be able to study our students, and then link up with our nonprofits as well to support them because it's really an underfunded sector of research where cancer gets billions and trillions and and TBI and concussion tend to get hundreds of millions. So we're really going to try and support the folks you know, who are boots on the ground.   25:29 I love it. It sounds so great. Where can people find more information about it?   25:34 Sure. It's going to be it? Well, it's already at it's at concussion corner.org.org. If you follow the podcast, we tried to give things away just like you do with healthy, wealthy smart. So we've had the concussion corner podcast is 2018. I hosted the Super Bowl concussion are moderated, I should say, the Super Bowl concussion conference in Minneapolis and we launched it then it's been around in over 50 countries, it's been so well received, we have a lovely community. So we're going into education, and how can we have a supportive community with open office hours and open office hours and things like that, that will what will provide our students with, with eventually a rehabilitation video database, where that's going to be searchable for folks as well. So they can search, you know, cervical spine examination intervention, what's the referral process look like. So it'll be a robust program, but we're going to be beta in January with I just want to point out, we're going to have a referral program. And, again, I'm a person and have one right, so we're not going to have an early bird special, like we're used to at conferences. But the whole thing is to spread this word of mouth. So instead of taking $100 off, we're going to give a $75 referral. If you have seven to eight people that you refer your whole tuition is paid for Plus, you get your 24 hours of CEU. So we want to really just want this to be word of mouth, from from like grassroots, let's build it by conversation and internal marketing and get people in who are invested in wanting to learn about this injury.   27:02 Awesome, awesome. And of course, we'll have a link to it in the show notes here at podcast at healthy, wealthy, smart calm for anyone who wants to learn more about the program and about the modules and how it's set up. Or you want to just get some more information. Or if you're ready, you heard this and you're like, I see people with concussion all the time. I'm not 100% comfortable, I need to learn more, or this is something I want to learn more about, I think now you have the perfect opportunity to learn. So we'll have a link there in the podcast notes for anyone who is ready to pull the trigger and join Jessica in January. So now just is there anything that you really want the listeners to take away from this conversation around concussion and rehab of concussion?   27:58 Yeah, so I'm sure there's, there's so many things off the top of my head, really connecting to that concussion is a rehabilitative injury. And if we can connect to that the injury of concussion is an injury of loss. It's a loss of your I Am your I am funny, I am husband, I am wife, I am Doctor, I am surgeon, you're I am. So if we are sensitive to that and connect to that concussion is an event, it's not an event there, it has to be a mechanism of injury, don't get me wrong, but it's not an event, it's an actual process. And we have this neuro metabolic cascade. And then we tend to have this loss of function in our in our environment. So that is really what I want folks to connect to. Because we have to make sure we're meeting our patients where they are and their moments of recovery. So that's really the big thing to connect to is that folks tend to really connect to the event of the concussion, you know, the post traumatic amnesia, the domestic event, the loss of consciousness, and less than 10% of those folks, but they're not connecting to where those folks are in their trajectory. And how many folks have they seen before you on average, people see six to 10 providers before they walk into my door. Okay, connect to that. Do they trust healthcare providers before they've talked to you? Did they have physical therapy in a hospital gym that wasn't really, neurologically sensitive to their needs, their smell, their sound, their lights, things like that. So connect to your patients in a different way. I can guarantee you if you're a new grad, this is going to this is going to get you excited. And if you're a little more seasoned, like Karen and myself and you're feeling a little burnt out, this is a great way to look at your patients 360 We're looking at autonomics we're looking at neurology, vestibular ocular motor. The physiological aspect of its sleep, nutrition, neuro endocrine, let's talk about sexual dysfunction and concussion. That's a whole other podcast. But it really is something that you can hear my passion about, or these patients are being mismanaged much more probably than they're being well cared for. And we can change that and there's no reason that we can't change that for next day. Not Knowledge Translation in the clinic, so I challenge your listeners to that care.   30:03 Amazing, amazing. And now I have one more question to ask. And it's one that I asked everyone. And that's knowing where you are now, in your life and in your career, what advice would you give to your younger self, let's say, you know, straight out of straight out of Ithaca physical therapy school.   30:21 Um, let's see here, straight. So I've honestly joined Twitter, I have had so many, I've had so many positive experiences, the 99 that I've had positive and the one negative, you know, and you really have to conduct yourself in a certain way, of course, but I joined Twitter, I've had so many amazing opportunities. I was invited to the Super Bowl, I was asked to be one of our spokeswoman like you for American Physical Therapy Association, I've been invited to speak at conferences and, and just network with people who I would never have access or touch points to. And I really think it was the most powerful thing I've done for my education, besides, you know, maybe a residency postdoc, really. So I really do and we wouldn't have met the same way either. So I think it's been great.   31:05 All right. Well, that I think that might be the first time I've gotten that. What advice would you give to your younger self is to join, join Twitter and join social media. So thank you for that. And like you said, you have to make it your own, and you have to approach it, approach it in the right way. So I think that's great advice. And now, again, people can go to concussion corner.org. To find out more. And of course, like I said, we'll have all the links at podcast at healthy, wealthy, smart, calm. So a big thank you, Jessica, for coming on the program busting some concussion myths. So thank you so much.   31:42 Oh, thank you so much for having me and to all your listeners. Thanks so much for your time and attention. I really appreciate it.   31:47 Of course and everyone thanks so much for listening, have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart

The Brian Lehrer Show
Revisiting Los Angeles 1992 with Anna Deavere Smith

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 15:38


Anna Deavere Smith, playwright, actress and University Professor at Tisch School of the Arts at NYU talks about the relevance of her play, "Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992" that examined the violence in Los Angeles after the police officers charged in beating Rodney King were acquitted, now staged for an ensemble of performers at the Signature Theatre. →Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992 is in performance at the Signature Theatre through November 21.

Food Psych Podcast with Christy Harrison
[Repost] #207: Doctors Without Diet Culture with Louise Metz, Health At Every Size Physician

Food Psych Podcast with Christy Harrison

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 78:13


Medical doctor and Health At Every Size advocate Louise Metz joins us to discuss why weight management has no place in evidence-based medicine, how our current medical system can get in the way of providing compassionate care, why it's actually not necessary for doctors to weigh their patients, how physicians can shift their practice to be more weight-inclusive, and so much more! Plus, Christy answers a listener question about dealing with digestive symptoms. (This episode originally aired on September 30, 2019.) Louise Metz is an Internal Medicine Physician who has expertise in the medical management of eating disorders and gender-related health care. She is the owner and founder of Mosaic Comprehensive Care, a medical practice in Chapel Hill, NC offering primary care and specialty care that is inclusive and affirming of all bodies. After receiving an undergraduate degree in Biology and Women's Studies at Duke University, she attended medical school at the University of North Carolina. She completed her internship and residency in Internal Medicine at the University of California at San Francisco. She has previously held academic positions at NYU's Bellevue Hospital and Duke University, and has published research on heart disease in women. She created Mosaic using a unique model of individualized and collaborative care with a focus on body diversity and complexities of health. She is passionate about providing weight-inclusive medical care, and committed to helping to change the paradigm surrounding the way we address weight and health. Find her online at MosaicCareNC.com. Subscribe to our newsletter, Food Psych Weekly, to keep getting new weekly Q&As and other new content while the podcast is on hiatus! If you're ready to break free from diet culture once and for all, come check out Christy's Intuitive Eating Fundamentals online course. You'll get all your questions answered in an exclusive monthly podcast, plus ongoing support in our private community forum and dozens of hours of other great content. Christy's first book, Anti-Diet, is available wherever you get your books. Order online at christyharrison.com/book, or at local bookstores across North America, the UK, Australia, and New Zealand. Grab Christy's free guide, 7 simple strategies for finding peace and freedom with food, for help getting started on the anti-diet path. For full show notes and a transcript of this episode, go to christyharrison.com/foodpsych. Ask your own question about intuitive eating, Health at Every Size, or eating disorder recovery at christyharrison.com/questions.

Nailed It Ortho
71: SLAP Tears w/ Dr. Jazrawi

Nailed It Ortho

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 72:39


Find show notes at: www.naileditortho.com/slaptears Dr. Laith Jazrawi is the chief of sports medicine at NYU Langone where he is committed to developing techniques that would minimize the recovery period of the patients. His clinical research focuses on developing treatments for complex problems on shoulder, elbow, and knee disorders such as meniscal insufficiency, patellofemoral instability, and ligament injuries. He worked with physiatrists, physical therapists, dietitians, and sports psychologists at NYU Langone's Center for Musculoskeletal Care's Sports Medicine Center to assist athletes recover their strength, balance, and endurance skills. He has made significant contributions to both the clinical and research arenas as an academic sports medicine specialist in order to improve patient outcomes in the surgical therapy of cartilage injuries. Moreover, he serves as team physician for the NYU and Long Island University athletics groups and provides lectures on orthopedic surgery both nationally and internationally. Alse, Castle Connolly's "Top Doctors" series acknowledged him for the New York Metro Area. He completed his residency at NYU Medical Center and completed his fellowship at the American Sports Medicine Institute. Goal of episode: To develop a baseline knowledge on SLAP Tears. We cover: SLAP tear classification Mechanism Symptoms PE findings Imaging for SLAP tears Decision making factors Operative tx options SLAP repair tips Post-op protocol

Velshi
It Really Is Infrastructure Week

Velshi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 92:31


Ali Velshi is joined by Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg, Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, Congressman Dan Kildee, Investopedia's Caleb Silver, the New Yorker's Sheelah Kolhatkar, Politico's Kyle Cheney, The Washington Post's Carol Leonnig, NYU history professor Ruth Ben-Ghiat, NBC's Leigh Ann Caldwell and Kristen Welker, MSNBC columnist Dean Obeidallah, Princeton professor Imani Perry, and former federal prosecutor Paul Butler.