Podcasts about Chesapeake

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Best podcasts about Chesapeake

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Latest podcast episodes about Chesapeake

VPM Daily Newscast
01/19/22 - Delegate sponsors legislation to increase police presence in schools

VPM Daily Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 5:16


Some lawmakers want to mandate that all public schools, including at the elementary level, have a police presence; Supply chain issues are affecting school lunches; Parents in Chesapeake are suing Governor Glenn Youngkin over his move to get rid of local mask mandates in schools; and other local news stories.

Checking In with Anthony & Glenn
454: The Return of Chesapeake CEO Chris Green

Checking In with Anthony & Glenn

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 56:06


Chris Green, CEO of Chesapeake Hospitality returns to share the straight scoop. This is a wide ranging conversation touching on myriad problems affecting the current state of hotels as well as long term solutions. The crew focuses on employee crisis, how great professionals fled the hotel business, the drop in hotel school students, the current state of events, omicron and more!

No Vacancy with Glenn Haussman
566: The Return of Chesapeake CEO Chris Green

No Vacancy with Glenn Haussman

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 56:50


Chris Green, CEO of Chesapeake Hospitality returns to share the straight scoop. This is a wide ranging conversation touching on myriad problems affecting the current state of hotels as well as long term solutions. The crew focuses on employee crisis, how great professionals fled the hotel business, the drop in hotel school students, the current state of events, omicron and more!

The History of the Americans
Jamestown and the Powhatans Part 2

The History of the Americans

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 36:59


This episode looks at the prophecy that animated Powhatan's consolidation of power in the region, the violent first encounters between the Virginia Company expedition and the indigenous peoples at the mouth of the Chesapeake, internal squabbles within the English leadership, and the bizarre decision by Jamestown's president Edward-Maria Wingfield to disarm unilaterally, in the fruitless hope of winning the favor of the locals. We also take a first look at the staggering body count that would pile up over the first eighteen years of the Jamestown settlement. Twitter: @TheHistoryOfTh2 Selected resources for this episode Carl Bridenbaugh, Jamestown, 1544-1699 James Horn, A Land As God Made It: Jamestown and the Birth of America David Price, Love and Hate in Jamestown: John Smith, Pocahontas, and the Start of a New Nation Karen Ordahl Kupperman, "Apathy and Death in Early Jamestown," The Journal of American History, June 1979.

Game Brain: A Board Game Podcast with Matthew Robinson and his Gaming Group
Round 14, Turn 10: "Best of 2021" with Tom, Ben, and Jennifer

Game Brain: A Board Game Podcast with Matthew Robinson and his Gaming Group

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 126:02


0:00:00 - Introduction: Welcome Tom, Ben, the Opinionated Gamer, and Jennifer, the Game Pioneer: Golem, Watch What Crappens Podcast, Mayveena You Tube Channel0:11:55 - This Week's Game Night: Ark Nova, Bitoku, Stroganoff, Origins: First Builders, Santiago, Tabannusi, (Tekhenu, Tzolkin, Teotihuacan, [Taiwanitsu]) Forbidden Stars, Obsession, Art Decko, Anno 1800, Tichu, Show Manager, Captain Sonar, (Year of the Dragon)0:34:22 - This Week's Game News: Cardboard Creations Candice's Interview with Emma Larkins: Abandon All Artichokes, Dom PIerre, (Viticulture, Vinhos, Die Macher) Blazon, (Sagrada, Azul, Brass) Squaring Circleville (Crescent City Cargo) Feast of Odin on BGA0:51:09 - 2021 in Review: 18xx.games, 18 Chesapeake, 1860,, LowLands, Tichu, Advanced Civilization/ Western Empires, Imperial Steam, Ark Nova,  Container, Bitoku, Transcontinental, Blood on the Clocktower1:28:28 - Top 5 Games of 2021: (Carnegie)  Mind Mgmt, Meadow, (Everdell) Coffee Traders, 1840: Vienna Tramways, Ark Nova, Imperial Steam, Furnace, Magnate: First City, Bitoku, (Messina1347, Praga, Underwater Cities, Shipyard, Pulsar 2847) Carnegie, Messina 13472: 04:30 - Sign Off

Elliot In The Morning
EITM: Ethan Vasko 1/7/22

Elliot In The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 3:52


Having gone viral this week, the Kansas QB signee from Chesapeake, VA checks in with EITM.

Face Off Hockey Show
Chesapeake Hockey Week 01.04.22 (S4E17): Back in the Saddle with Previews of Maryland Hockey Action

Face Off Hockey Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022


This week, Scotty Wazz talks about the four teams getting back into action for the second half, including a couple of commitments from Team Maryland, as well as a look at what's next for Lacey Eden in her second half of the year. 

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 610 (1-3-22): Wading into the New Year, the New River, and Water Thermodynamics

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:20).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-31-21.TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of January 3, 2022.  This revised episode from January 2014 is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. For this first week of 2022, we listen in on one Virginian's annual New Year's challenge to the laws of physics and chemistry—water-temperature physics and chemistry, that is.  Have a listen for about 35 seconds. SOUNDS AND VOICE - ~35 sec – “It's the New Year, on the shore of the New River. It's 22 degrees and perfect time for a swim. Happy New Year, everyone! Happy New Year! [Series of exclamations about the cold.] Ah, welcome to Antarctica.” You've been listening to Blacksburg resident Alan Moore during the 2014 version of his annual New Year's Day wade into the New River.  The watery welcome to that January 1st—unaided by a wet-suit—lasted only a few seconds, not as much because of the 22-degree air temperature as because of the 39-degree water temperature.  Water that cold can cause exhaustion or unconsciousness within 15 to 30 minutes, and even water at 60 or 70 degrees can be dangerously chilling over one to two hours, depending on a person's body size and other factors. Water's capacity to chill a human body is much greater than that of air at the same temperature, for two reasons.  First, liquids generally conduct heat more rapidly than gases, because liquids are denser (that is, the molecules are closer together).  And second, liquid water has chemical attractions between molecules that can absorb high amounts of energy, such as heat energy coming from a person's body.  These and other interactions among water, heat, and temperature are part of water's thermodynamics, and they exert a big influence on weather, aquatic environments, biology, and taking a plunge on New Year's or any other day. Thanks to Alan Moore for lending his voice and wade-in sounds to this episode.  We close this first episode of the New Year with about 45 seconds of music to give a hydrological hello to 2022. Here's “New Year's Water,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. MUSIC - ~46 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 195, 1-6-14. Thanks to Alan Moore for allowing Virginia Water Radio to record sounds during his annual New River wade-in on January 1, 2014.“New Year's Water” is copyright 2016 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 349, 1-2-17.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Two photos of the New River near the county line between Giles and Montgomery counties in Virginia, looking upstream: At dawn on January 1, 2014 (upper photo) and at 8:40 a.m. on January 1, 2022 (lower photo). EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT COLD WATER SAFETY The following is quoted from the National Weather Service, “Cold Water Hazards and Safety,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/coldwater. “Warm air doesn't always mean warm water in lakes, streams or oceans.  Fifty-five degree water may not sound very cold, but it can be deadly.  Plunging into cold water of any temperature becomes dangerous if you aren't prepared for what the sudden exposure can do to your body and brain.  Warm air temperatures can create a false sense of security for boaters and beach goers, so if you are planning to be on or near the water, arrive knowing the conditions and how to protect yourself.  Cold water drains body heat up to 4 times faster than cold air.  When your body hits cold water, “cold shock” can cause dramatic changes in breathing, heart rate and blood pressure.  The sudden gasp and rapid breathing alone creates a greater risk of drowning even for confident swimmers in calm waters. In rougher open water this danger increases.  Unplanned immersion in cold water can be life-threatening for anyone without protection from the temperatures or a lifejacket to help you stay afloat.  When Cold Shock and Hypothermia begin to impact your ability to think and act, life jackets and flotation can create extra time for help to arrive or for you to get out of danger.   Even the most experienced cold water surfers, swimmers or boaters know to prepare for the conditions.” SOURCES Used for Audio Encyclopedia Britannica, “Thermodynamics,” online at https://www.britannica.com/science/thermodynamics. J. J. Hidore and J. E. Oliver, Climatology—An Atmospheric Science, MacMillian, New York, 1993, pages 55-58. Linus Pauling, General Chemistry, Dover, New York, 1970, pages 343-350. On survival in cold water: National Weather Service, “Cold Water Safety,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/coldwater. University of Minnesota Sea Grant, “Hypothermia Prevention: Survival in Cold Water,” at http://www.seagrant.umn.edu/coastal_communities/hypothermia; see the site's “How Long Have I Got?” section for information on how long one can survive being immersed in cold water. For More Information about Cold Weather Safety, Hypothermia, and Frostbite National Weather Service, “Cold Weather Safety,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/cold. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Prevent Hypothermia & Frostbite,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/winter/staysafe/hypothermia.html. Virginia Department of Health, “Newsroom/Winter Weather Preparedness,” at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/news/public-relations-contacts/winter-weather-preparedness/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to other episodes that focus on an incoming New Year. Episode 296, 12-28-15 – Setting a Course for 2016 with ‘On a Ship' by Kat Mills.Episode 349, 1-2-17 – Water for a World of New Years, Featuring “New Year's Water” by Torrin Hallett.Episode 401, 1-1-18 – Diving into 2018 with “Driving Rain” by Chamomile and Whiskey.Episode 453, 12-31-18 – Water and the New Year of 2019.Episode 505, 12-30-19 – Eyes on the Water as the 2020s Arise. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter (listed separately).  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in late 2021 and early 2022; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes.Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 606, 12-6-21 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18 (especially for grades 4-8).Ice on rivers – Episode 406, 2-5-18 (especially for middle school grades).Polar Plunge® for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades). Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Snow terms – Episode 300, 1-25-16.Surviving freezing – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter weather preparedness – Episode 605, 11-29-21.Bird-related Episodes for Winter Audubon Society Christmas Bird Count – Episode 607, 12-13-21.American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 502, 12-9-19. Canvasback (duck) – Episode 604, 11-22-21.Common Goldeneye (duck) – Episode 303, 2/15/16.Green-winged Teal (duck) – Episode 398, 12-11-17.Grebes (Horned and Red-necked) – Episode 233, 9-29-14.Loons – Episode 445, 11-5-18.Fall migration – Episode 603, 11-15-21.Northern Harrier – Episode 561, 1-25-21.Snow Goose – Episode 507, 1/13/20. Tundra Swan – Episode 554, 12-7-20. Winter birds sampler from the Chesapeake Bay area – Episode 565, 2-22-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.”2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: Force, Motion, and Energy 5.2 – Energy can take many forms. Grades K-3 plus 5: Matter 5.7 – Matter has properties and interactions. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems 4.4 – Weather conditions and climate have effects on ecosystems and can be predicted. Grade 6 6.4 – There are basic sources of energy and energy can be transformed. 6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. Physical Science PS.5 – Energy is conserved and transformed. Chemistry CH.7 – Thermodynamics explains the relationship between matter and energy. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels (* indicates episode listed above in the “Related Water Radio Episodes” section). Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.*Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade.*Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.*Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade.Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.*Episode 606, 12-6-21 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.

Law Abiding Biker | Street Biker Motorcycle Podcast
LAB-288-Harley Davidson 2022 Models & Changes In The Company

Law Abiding Biker | Street Biker Motorcycle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 43:10


Official Website: https://www.lawabidingbiker.com In this episode, we go over the possibilities for the 2022 Harley-Davidson models. There are many rumors floating around out there and we can't wait to see what they actually have in store. They have a virtual launch on 01/26/22 that you can sign up for. It has been confirmed that Harley will be cutting the Sporster 1200, Softail Slim, and Sport Glide from their cruiser lineup.  SUPPORT US AND SHOP IN THE OFFICIAL LAW ABIDING BIKER STORE There are also many changes within the company such and an online system to pre-order your new Harley-Davidson. It seems there will be fewer models at dealerships and Harley wants you to pre-order. You can fill out a form and a dealership will contact you.  Earlier this year, Harley created HD-1 Marketplace.  This allows customers to search used motorcycle inventory at Harley-Davidson dealers. The company also created the Harley-Davidson Certified program this year to help capture more of the used market and keep that business flowing through dealers.  CHECK OUT OUR HUNDREDS OF FREE HELPFUL VIDEOS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL AND SUBSCRIBE! Additionally, Harley-Davidson CEO Jochen Zeits took a $600,000 salary cut, but incentivized Zeitz with Stock Options to stay through 2024. New Free Video Mentioned:  Confessions of a former Michelin Man-Motorcycle Heated Gear Sponsor-Ciro 3D CLICK HERE! Innovative products for Harley-Davidson & Goldwing Affordable chrome, lighting, and comfort products Ciro 3D has a passion for design and innovation Sponsor-RickRak CLICK HERE The Ultimate Motorcycle Luggage Rack Solution Forget those messy straps and bungee cords Go strapless with a RickRak quick attach luggage system & quality bag New Patrons: Larry Burton of Bluffdale, UT  Chris Sothers of United Kingdom Bill Clark of Cape Canaveral, Florida Andrew Smith of Chesapeake, Virginia Willis Wayne of Bellflower, CA  Randall Mercer of New Orleans, LA Larry Mobley of Hixson, TN BARRY T WEISSENBORN of OAK CREEK, WI Ragnar Kjernlie  If you appreciate the content we put out and want to make sure it keeps on coming your way then become a Patron too! There are benefits and there is no risk. Thanks to the following bikers for supporting us via a flat donation: Monty Muehlebach Jamie Hundley of Stow, Ohio Charles Strong of Byron, Georgia _______________________________________________________FURTHER INFORMATION:   Official Website: http://www.LawAbidingBiker.com   Email & Voicemail: http://www.LawAbidingBiker.com/Contact   Podcast Hotline Phone: 509-731-3548 HELP SUPPORT US! JOIN THE BIKER REVOLUTION! #BikerRevolution #LawAbidingBiker

VPM Daily Newscast
12/29/21 - Preservationists open second time capsule from Lee monument

VPM Daily Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 5:31


A Confederate time capsule found 20 feet under the pedestal that once held a statue of Robert E. Lee was opened yesterday; The Visual Arts Center of Richmond is filled with pieces of pottery that look like they just left a tattoo shop as part of the "Of Mud and Blood" exhibit; The state is spending more than 700 million dollars to bring broadband access to rural Chesapeake, Suffolk and other localities; and other local news stories.

They Come to America
Ep. 49. Maryland (Part 2)

They Come to America

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 36:32


This week: We brought the unbelievably funny and awesome Shane Torres to help us discuss the merriest land of them all: Maryland. What can you say about Maryland besides that it has a very regrettable accent? Well, down in the Chesapeake region, when you think rats, you think DC. When you think mouth-breathing Jarheads, you think Virginia. Yo, not so faaaast billy ray! Welcome to Maryland, where all the suburban rats of DC and all the mouth-breathing jarheads from various nearby bases gather in one boring/dangerous place to conspire to hopefully ruin your day. Come for the complete lack of any semblance of culture, stay because you're stuck in a traffic jam. Also something about the Wire and crabs. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 609 (12-27-21): A Year of Water Sounds and Music – 2021 Edition

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:31).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-24-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of December 27, 2021.  SOUND - ~ 5 sec That's the sound of a Belted Kingfisher at Stroubles Creek in Blacksburg, Va., on December 21, 2021.  The year-end chattering of Virginia Water Radio's favorite bird sets the stage for our annual look-back on Water Radio's year.  We start with a medley of mystery sounds and voices from six episodes in 2021.  Have a listen for about 40 seconds, and see how many you recognize. SOUNDS – ~38 sec If you guessed all of most of those, you're a water-sound world champion! You heard Brimley's Chorus Frog;Virginia Tech graduate Maddy Grupper discussing her research on public trust in water systems;Virginia Tech's siren used for tornado warnings;names of some 2021 Atlantic tropical cyclones;Canvasback ducks; andice on Claytor Lake in Pulaski County, Va. Thanks to the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources for permission to use the chorus frog sound; to Lang Elliott for the Canvasback sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs; to Maddy Grupper for the episode on her research; and to Blacksburg friends for the tropical cyclone name call-outs. We close out 2021 with a two-minute sample of music heard in episodes this year.  Here are excerpts of “Wade in the Water,” by Torrin Hallett; “Racing the Sun,” by the Faux Paws; “All Creatures Were Meant to Be Free,” by Bob Gramann; “John Ashe's Spring,” by New Standard; “The Coming Spring,” by Andrew VanNorstand with vocalist Kailyn Wright; and “On a Ship,” by Kat Mills, with violinist Rachel Handman. Thanks to those musicians for permission to use their music. So long, soon, to 2021, and here's hoping for a safe, sound, and sufficiently hydrated 2022. MUSIC – ~105 sec From “Wade in the Water” - ~18 sec – instrumental. From “Racing the Sun” - ~20 sec – instrumental. From “All Creatures Were Meant to be Free” - ~10 sec – instrumental. From “John Ashe's Spring” - ~13 sec – instrumental. From “The Coming Spring” - ~20 sec – Lyrics: “I went outside, the rain fallin' on the branches bare.   And I smiled, ‘cause I could feel a change in the air.” From “On a Ship” - ~25 sec – Lyrics: “We are riding on a ship.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sounds Used and Their Previous 2021 Virginia Water Radio Episodes (Listed in order heard in this episode's audio) The Belted Kingfisher sound was recorded by Virginia Water Radio at Stroubles Creek in Blacksburg, Va., December 21, 2021. The sound of Brimley's Chorus Frog was from “The Calls of Virginia Frogs and Toads” CD, copyright 2008 by the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (now the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources) and Lang Elliott/NatureSoundStudio, used with permission.   The CD accompanies A Guide to the Frogs and Toads of Virginia, Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries; as of February 5, 2021, that publication is no longer available at Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources online store, https://www.shopdwr.com/.  For more information, contact the Department at P.O. Box 90778, Henrico, VA 23228-0778; phone: (804) 367-1000 (VTDD); main Web page is https://dwr.virginia.gov/; to send e-mail, visit https://dwr.virginia.gov/contact/.  This sound was used in Episode 563, 2-8-21. Virginia Tech 2020 graduate Maddy Grupper discussed her research on public trust in water systems in Episode 564, 2-15-21. The tornado-warning siren was recorded in Blacksburg, Va., in the early morning of April 28, 2011.  This sound was used in Episode 568, 3-15-21. The call-out of Atlantic tropical cyclone names for the 2021 season were recorded by Blacksburg friends of Virginia Water radio in June 2021.  The voices were sued in Episode 580, 6-7-21. The sounds of Canvasback ducks were sound were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, online at https://musicofnature.com/.  These sounds were used in Episode 604, 11-22-21. The Claytor Lake ice sound was recorded at the Sloan Creek inlet of the lake, near Draper in Pulaski County, Va., on January 6, 2018. This sound was used in Episode 606, 12-6-21. Musical Selections Used and Their Previous 2021 Virginia Water Radio Episodes (Listed in order heard in this episode's audio) The arrangement of “Wade in the Water” (a traditional hymn) heard in this episode is copyright 2021 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing this arrangement especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used in Episode 566, 3-1-21, water in U.S. civil rights history. “Racing the Sun,” from the 2021 album “The Faux Paws,” is copyright by Great Bear Records, used with permission of Andrew VanNorstrand.  More information about The Faux Paws is available online at https://thefauxpawsmusic.com/.  More information about Great Bear Records is available online at https://www.greatbearmusic.com/.  This music was used in Episode 602, 11-8-21, on photosynthesis, including its connection to climate change. “All Creatures Were Meant to Be Free,” from the 1995 album “Mostly True Songs,” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at https://www.bobgramann.com/.  This music was used in Episode 561, 1-25-21, on the Northern Harrier. “John Ashe's Spring,” from the 2016 album “Bluegrass,” is copyright by New Standard, used with permission.  The title refers to a spring near Ivy, Virginia (Albemarle County).  More information about New Standard is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com.  This music was used in Episode 576, 5-10-21, an introduction to springs. “The Coming Spring,” from the 2019 album “That We Could Find a Way to Be,” is copyright by Andrew VanNorstrand, used with permission.  More information about Andrew VanNorstrand is available online at https://www.andrewvannorstrand.com/.  Information on accompanying artists on “The Coming Spring” is online at https://andrewvannorstrandmusic.bandcamp.com/track/the-coming-spring.  This music was used in Episode 572, 4-12-21, on warblers and spring bird migration. “On a Ship,” from the 2015 album “Silver,” is copyright by Kat Mills, used with permission.  Accompanying artists on the song are Ida Polys, vocals; Rachel Handman, violin; and Nicholas Polys, banjo.   More information about Kat Mills is available online at http://www.katmills.com/.  This music was used in Episode 602, 11-8-21, on photosynthesis, including its connection to climate change. IMAGESAn Image Sampler from Episodes in 2021 From Episode 561, 1-25-21: Northern Harrier, photographed in southeastern Virginia, January 23, 2021.  Photo by iNaturalist user keyojimbo, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/68521040(as of 12-27-21) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.From Episode 563, 2-8-21: Brimley's Chorus Frog, photographed in Chesapeake, Virginia, February 28, 2019.  Photo by iNaturalist user jkleopfer, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/20834796(as of 2-8-21) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.From Episode 580, 6-7-21: Predictions for the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season.  Graphic from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, “NOAA Predicts Another Active Atlantic Hurricane Season,” 5/20/21, online at https://www.noaa.gov/media-release/noaa-predicts-another-active-atlantic-hurricane-season.From Episode 602, 11-8-21: Diagram explaining carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake by trees and other woody plants during photosynthesis, resulting in carbon storage, or “carbon sequestration,” a key concept in the issue of climate change.  Diagram courtesy of John Seiler, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation.From Episode 606, 12-6-21: Thin ice on a pond in Heritage Park, Blacksburg, Va., December 9, 2021.SOURCES Please see the episodes mentioned and hyperlinked above under “Audio Notes and Acknowledgments” for sources of information about the topics of the individual episodes. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Overall Importance o

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Virginia Water Radio
Episode 608 (12-20-21): Virginia's Coastal Resilience Planning Moves Forward in December 2021

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:18).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-17-21.TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of December 20, 2021. MUSIC – ~14 sec - - Lyrics: “When the rains come, when the rains come, is it gonna be a new day?” That's part of “Rains Come,” by the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band The Steel Wheels, from their 2019 album “Over the Trees.”  It opens an update of a previous episode on the Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan—an effort to prepare for and adapt to sea-level rise, recurrent flooding, and impacts of climate change.  As in the earlier episode, we set the stage with part of “Cypress Canoe,” by Bob Gramann of Fredericksburg, Va., from his 2019 album “I Made It Just for You.”  The song's a commentary on the current and potential impacts of sea-level rise, and in the part you'll hear, the story-teller bemoans a lack of planning and action to avoid or reduce such impacts. Have a listen for about 20 seconds. MUSIC – ~18 sec – Lyrics: “Half of a city awash in the tides; when I think of what happened, it tears my insides. Oh, we could've been smarter, we could've have planned, but the world caught a fever, infected by man.” Facing current and predicted impacts to coastal areas from sea-level rise and recurrent flooding, Virginia has started planning.   On December 7, 2021, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam announced completion of Phase One of the Coastal Resilience Master Plan.  Work on the plan started about four years ago accelerated after the November 2020 release of a planning framework identifying guiding principles and specific steps to complete the plan.  Since then, a technical study, the work of a technical advisory committee, and input from some 2000 stakeholders have helped form the plan. The 266-page plan covers the area of Virginia from the Fall Line to the Atlantic coastline, which includes about six million residents.  For those areas, the plan identifies vulnerabilities to, and impacts from, current and expected sea-level rise and increased flooding.  It focuses on ways the Commonwealth can increase resilience, which the plan defines as “the capability to anticipate, prepare for, respond to, and recover from hazards to minimize damage to social well-being, health, the economy, and the environment.”  A Coastal Resilience Database compiled for the plan includes over 500 examples of projects to adapt to changing conditions and of initiatives to build capacity in information, skills, and tools.  Funding for such efforts may come from various sources, but one key source is the Virginia Community Flood Preparedness Fund, created by the Virginia General Assembly in 2020 and using money accrued from the auction of carbon allowances. Implementation of the plan will be managed by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation in cooperation with the Commonwealth's Chief Resilience Officer and the Special Assistant to the Governor for Coastal Adaptation and Protection.  Phase Two of the plan, with more data and project information, is to be completed by 2024, and updates to the whole plan are supposed to occur every five years. According to the plan's impact assessment, between now and 2080 Virginia is projected to face large increases in residents exposed to coastal flooding, in flood property damage, in roadway miles exposed to chronic flooding, and in losses of tidal wetlands, dunes, and beaches.  As Gov. Northam stated in a December 7 letter accompanying the plan's release, the plan provides a “clearer picture of the scope and scale” of these challenges, catalogs current resilience efforts, and identifies gaps in actions and in information.  Here's hoping Virginia puts its Coastal Resilience Master Plan to good use. Thanks to The Steel Wheels and to Bob Gramann for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 10 more seconds of Mr. Gramann's “Cypress Canoe.” MUSIC – ~11 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.   In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode is a follow-up to Episode 552, 11-23-20. “Cypress Canoe,” from the 2019 album “I Made It Just for You,” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at https://www.bobgramann.com/folksinger.html.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 552, 11-23-20. “Rains Come,” from the 2019 album “Over the Trees,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  A July 2019 review by Americana Highways of this album and track is available online at https://americanahighways.org/2019/07/09/review-the-steel-wheels-over-the-trees-is-primary-rhythms-and-organic-melodies/.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at https://www.thesteelwheels.com/ and in a July 2015 article at http://whurk.org/29/the-steel-wheels.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 552, 11-23-20. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Map of the four master planning regions, with their respective and the planning district commissions (PDC) and regional commissions (RC), in the “Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan, Phase I,” December 2021. Map from the plan document, page 9, accessed online https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/crmp/plan. Chart of population and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in the four master planning regions identified in the “Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan, Phase I,” December 2021. Image from the plan document, page 24, accessed online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/crmp/plan. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE VIRGINIA COASTAL RESILIENCE MASTER PLAN, PHASE I Following is an excerpt from the December 7, 2021, news release from Virginia Governor Ralph Northam's office, Governor Northam Releases Virginia's First Coastal Resilience Master Plan; Virginia takes monumental action to build a resilient coast, combating climate change and rising sea levels. “HAMPTON—Governor Ralph Northam today released the Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan, providing a foundational and fundamental step towards protecting Virginia's coast. “Virginia's coastal areas face significant impacts from rising sea levels and increased storm flooding.  The Commonwealth, regional and local entities have to take meaningful and continuous action to ensure the long-term sustainability of Virginia's coastal resources and communities. … “Earlier this year, the Commonwealth worked with 2,000 stakeholders to build the Coastal Resilience Master Plan.  This plan documents which land is exposed to coastal flooding hazards now and into the future, as well as the impacts of those future scenarios on coastal Virginia's community resources and manmade and natural infrastructure. “The Master Plan concluded that between 2020 and 2080: the number of residents living in homes exposed to extreme coastal flooding is projected to grow from approximately 360,000 to 943,000, an increase of 160%; the number of residential, public, and commercial buildings exposed to an extreme coastal flood is projected to increase by almost 150%, from 140,000 to 340,000, while annualized flood damages increase by 1,300% from $0.4 to $5.1 billion; the number of miles of roadways exposed to chronic coastal flooding is projected to increase from 1,000 to nearly 3,800 miles, an increase of nearly 280%; and an estimated 170,000 acres, or 89%, of existing tidal wetlands and 3,800 acres, or 38%, of existing dunes and beaches may be permanently inundated, effectively lost to open water. “The Coastal Resiliency Database and Web Explorer is a publicly available database that shows the impact of coastal flood hazards, current and proposed resilience projects, as well as funding sources.  This database will serve as a vital tool to support resilience efforts at the state, regional, and local levels. … “The Commonwealth intends to develop successive updates of the Master Plan on at least a five-year cycle, managed by the Department of Conservation and Recreation in consultation with the Chief Resilience Officer, the Special Assistant to the Governor for Coastal Adaptation and Protection, and the Technical Advisory Committee. “The next phase of the Master Plan is anticipated by 2024, will aim to address recommendations of the TAC to broaden the analysis of natural hazards by including rainfall-driven, riverine, and compound flooding, expand and improve the inventory of resilience projects, by continuing to add efforts and working with project owners to better understand the benefits of projects, and extend this critical work beyond the coastal region to encompass statewide resilience needs. …” SOURCESUsed for AudioVirginia Governor's Office News Release, Governor Northam Releases Virginia's First Coastal Resilience Master Plan; Virginia takes monumental action to build a resilient coast, combating climate change and rising sea levels, December 7, 2021. Virginia Governor Ralph Northam, December 7, 2021, letter accompanying release of the Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan, online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/crmp/document/CRMP-Gov-Letter.pdf. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Community Flood Preparedness Fund Grants and Loans,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/dam-safety-and-floodplains/dsfpm-cfpf. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/crmp/plan.  The full document and a two-page summary are available on the page.   “Resilience” is defined in the Master Plan “Introduction” on page 5; the areas covered by the plan are identified in the “Introduction” on page 9; who's coordinating the plan is identified in the “Introduction” on page 6. Virginia Legislative Information System (LIS), online at http://lis.virginia.gov/lis.htm. See particularly the following bills related to recurrent coastal flooding: 2014 HJ 16 and SJ 3, calling for formation of the Joint Subcommittee to Formulate Recommendations for the Development of a Comprehensive and Coordinated Planning Effort to Address Recurrent Flooding; 2016 HJ 84 and SJ 58, continuing the work of the joint subcommittee formed in 2014 and changing it to the Joint Subcommittee on Coastal Flooding;2016 SB 282, establishing the Virginia Shoreline Resiliency Fund;2020 HB 22 and SB 320, continuing the Shoreline Resiliency Fund as the Community Flood Preparedness Fund;2020 HB 981 and SB 1027, establishing a carbon allowances trading program for Virginia and providing that some of the revenue from the sale of carbon allowances go to the Community Flood Preparedness Fund. For More Information about Sea Level Rise, Coastal and Tidal Flooding, and Resilience John Boon et al., “Planning for Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding,” Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), October 2008, online (as PDF) at https://www.vims.edu/research/units/legacy/icccr/_docs/coastal_sea_level.pdf. City of Alexandria, Va., “Flood Mitigation,” online at https://www.alexandriava.gov/special/waterfront/default.aspx?id=85880. City of Norfolk, Va., “Flood Awareness and Mitigation,” online at https://www.norfolk.gov/1055/Flooding-Awareness-Mitigation. City of Virginia Beach Department of Public Works, “Sea Level Wise,” online at https://www.vbgov.com/government/departments/public-works/comp-sea-level-rise/Pages/default.aspx. Coastal Resilience, online at https://coastalresilience.org/. Coastal Resilience/Virginia is online at https://coastalresilience.org/category/virginia/. Sandy Hausman, “Online Tool Helps Coastal Communities Plan for Climate Change,” WVTF FM-Roanoke, Va., 10/11/18, 2 min./34 sec. audio https://www.wvtf.org/post/online-tool-helps-coastal-communities-plan-climate-change#stream/0. This is a report about the Virginia Eastern Shore Coastal Resilience Mapping and Decision Support Tool. Joey Holleman, “Designing for Water—Strategies to Mitigate Flood Impacts,” Coastal Heritage, Winter 2019, South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium, online at https://www.scseagrant.org/designing-for-water/. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), “Sixth Assessment Synthesis Report,” online at https://www.ipcc.ch/ar6-syr/.  Sea level rise is addressed in the “Physical Science Basis” section (by Working Group I), online at https://www.ipcc.ch/report/sixth-assessment-report-working-group-i/. The IPCC “Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate,” September 2019, is online at https://www.ipcc.ch/srocc/home/. Rita Abou Samra, “Alexandria is already often waterlogged. How will it adjust to climate change?” 9/13/18, for Greater Greater Washington, online at https://ggwash.org/view/69058/alexandria-is-already-often-waterlogged-how-will-it-adjust-to-climate-change. SeaLevelRise.org, “Virginia's Sea Level Is Rising—And It's Costing Over $4 Billion,” online at https://sealevelrise.org/states/virginia/. U.S. Climate Variability and Predictability Program (US CLIVAR), “Sea Level Hotspots from Florida to Maine—Drivers, Impacts, and Adaptation,” April 23-25, 2019, workshop in Norfolk, Va., online at https://usclivar.org/meetings/sea-level-hotspots-florida-maine. Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), “U.S. Sea Level Report Cards,” online at https://www.vims.edu/research/products/slrc/index.php. Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), “Recurrent Flooding Study for Tidewater Virginia,” 2013, available online (as a PDF) at http://ccrm.vims.edu/recurrent_flooding/Recurrent_Flooding_Study_web.pdf.  This study was significant in the Virginia General Assembly's formation in 2014 of the Joint Subcommittee to Formulate Recommendations for the Development of a Comprehensive and Coordinated Planning Effort to Address Recurrent Flooding. Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS)/Center for Coastal Resources Management, “Climate Change and Coastal Resilience,” online at https://www.vims.edu/ccrm/research/climate_change/index.php.  This site includes a 40-second video on sea level rise in Virginia and a 40-second video on nuisance flooding. Wetlands Watch, “Dutch Dialogues—Virginia: Life at Sea Level,” online at http://wetlandswatch.org/dutch-dialogues. William and Mary Law School/Virginia Coastal Policy Center, 7th Annual Conference: “The Three P's of Resilience: Planning, Partnerships, and Paying for It All,” November 15, 2019, Williamsburg, Va., online at this link. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject category. Following are links to some previous episodes on climate change, sea-level rise, and coastal flooding in Virginia. Episode 231, 9-15-14 – Climate change impacts in Virginia National Park Service units, including Assateague Island National Seashore. Episode 441, 10-8-18 – on sea-level rise and citizen measurement of king tides. Episode 494, 10-14-19 – on sea-level rise and coastal flooding. Episode 511, 2-10-20 – on sea-level rise and the Saltmarsh Sparrow. Episode 552, 11-23-20 – on the Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Planning Framework. Episode 602, 11-8-21 – on photosynthesis, including its relationship to climate change. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems 4.4 – Weather conditions and climate have effects on ecosystems and can be predicted. Grade 6 6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. 6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life Science LS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth Science ES.6 – Resource use is complex. ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. ES.10 – Oceans are complex, dynamic systems subject to long- and short-term variations. ES.11 – The atmosphere is a complex, dynamic system subject to long-and short-term variations. ES.12 – The Earth's weather and climate result from the interaction of the sun's energy with the atmosphere, oceans, and the land. Biology BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Virginia Studies Course VS.10 – Knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia. United States History: 1865-to-Present Course USII.9 – Domestic and international issues during the second half of the 20th Century and the early 21st Century. Civics and Economics Course CE.7 – Government at the state level. CE.8 – Government at the local level. CE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. World Geography Course WG.2 – How selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth's surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it. WG.18 – Cooperation among political jurisdictions to solve problems and settle disputes. Virginia and United States History Course VUS.14 – Political and social conditions in the 21st Century. Government Course GOVT.8 – State and local government organization and powers. GOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and national levels. GOVT.15 – Role of government in Va. and U.S. economies, including examining environmental issues and property rights. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school. Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school. Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school. Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade. Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade. Episode 606, 12-6-21 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.

work bay humans university agency music natural relationships earth political state audio college climate change map steel wheels tech water web index rain pond research climate ocean weather government education public recreation conservation loans trees development forward chesapeake snow sea resilience paying environment adaptation images designing cooperation norfolk governor va domestic funding pages sb planning commonwealth atlantic stream citizens williamsburg environmental dynamic phase one tac sj hj hb biology civics partnership grade resource rc public works bio facing chart billion implementation northam coastal scales govt watershed transcript earth sciences wg freshwater impacts virginia tech ls atlantic ocean sea level rise intergovernmental panel climate change ipcc natural resources comprehensive grades k virginia general assembly fredericksburg harrisonburg master plan phase two virginia governor sea level sections life sciences stormwater pdc special assistant policymakers mitigation bmp ralph northam ipcc special report email campaigns changing climate gross domestic product gdp rockingham county new standard acknowledgment virginia department cripple creek virginia institute cumberland gap technical advisory committee sols tmdl chief resilience officer greater greater washington united states history vus wetlands watch climate variability cryosphere virginia standards water center fall line coastal resilience assateague island national seashore space systems audio notes flood mitigation virginia gov
They Come to America
Ep. 48. Maryland (Part 1)

They Come to America

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 65:13


We brought the unbelievably funny and awesome Shane Torres to help us discuss the merriest land of them all: Maryland. What can you say about Maryland besides that it has a very regrettable accent? Well, down in the Chesapeake region, when you think rats, you think DC. When you think mouth-breathing Jarheads, you think Virginia. Yo, not so faaaast billy ray! Welcome to Maryland, where all the suburban rats of DC and all the mouth-breathing jarheads from various nearby bases gather in one boring/dangerous place to conspire to hopefully ruin your day. Come for the complete lack of any semblance of culture, stay because you're stuck in a traffic jam. Also something about the Wire and crabs. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Face Off Hockey Show
Chesapeake Hockey Week 12.21.21 (S4E16): Black Bears Split, Team Maryland Take Home Five Points

Face Off Hockey Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021


This week, Scotty Wazz talks about the Maryland Black Bears renewing acquaintances with the Johnstown Tomahawks and takes a look at the season as the team hits the midway point. Team Maryland went to another showcase and took points in every game up there. 

Let's Talk Cars Radio
The Untold Truth

Let's Talk Cars Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 59:20


Happy Saturday America, as Christmas nears the guys dig into their Santa sack and answer listeners questions about the groups tickets, insurance and more. So settle in and let's see what they manage to pry out of these three.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 607 (12-13-21): A Winter Holidays History of Counting Birds

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:08).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-10-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of December 13, 2021.  This revised episode from December 2015 is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. SOUNDS – 7 secThis week, the sound of Mallard ducks on a December day in Blacksburg, Va., is the call to explore the annual Christmas Bird Count, organized by the National Audubon Society.Since 1900, the Society has helped organize volunteers to hold local daylong bird counts between December 14 and January 5.  On any single day within that period, volunteer counters follow specific routes within a 15-mile diameter circle, counting every bird they see or hear.  The count provides a snapshot both of the species encountered and of the numbers of individuals within each species.  According to the Society, this effort is the “longest running community science bird project” in the United States, and it actually takes place now in over 20 countries in the Western Hemisphere.  The results of such a long-term inventory help show the status of bird populations and the impacts of changes in habitat, climate, and other environmental conditions. Of course, birds living around water and wetlands are part of the annual count; in fact, the Audubon Society's founding in the late 1800s was due largely to concerns over commercial use of plumes from egrets and other wading birds.  [Additional note, not in audio: This refers to the founding in 1896 of the Massachusetts Audubon Society, the first state-level affiliate of the National Audubon Society, founded in 1905.  For more information on this history, see the Extra Information section below.] So what kinds of water-related birds might Virginia Christmas bird counters find?  Have a listen for about 20 seconds to this sample of four possible species.SOUNDS - 23 secThe Bald Eagle, Belted Kingfisher, Ring-billed Gull, and Greater Yellowlegs are among the many water-related birds that inhabit parts of Virginia during winter, including shorebirds, ducks, herons, and lots of others.  Keeping track of these and other feathered Virginia winter residents is a holiday tradition for many Commonwealth citizens with patience, binoculars, and attentive eyes and ears.Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the eagle, kingfisher, gull, and yellowlegs sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs. Here's hoping that Virginia's Christmas bird counters find good variety and high numbers this year.  We close with a U.S. Fish and Wildfire Service recording of another Virginia water-related winter resident, the Common Loon, a species that some diligent coastalVirginia counter might spot or hear on a winter day or night. SOUNDS - ~6 sec SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 294, 12-14-15. The Mallard sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio at the Virginia Tech Duck Pond in Blacksburg on December 10, 2015. The sounds of the Bald Eagle, Belted Kingfisher, Ring-billed Gull, and Greater Yellowlegs were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern RegionCD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott, whose work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. The Common Loon sounds were taken from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife National Digital Library, http://digitalmedia.fws.gov/cdm/; the specific URL for the loons recording was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/audio/id/57/rec/1, as of 12-13-21. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Mallards (several males, plus one female on right) on Virginia Tech Duck Pond, Blacksburg, December 10, 2015.Great Blue Heron in a stormwater pond near the Virginia Tech Inn and Alumni Center in Blacksburg, December 16, 2021.Canada Geese beside a stormwater pond near the Virginia Tech Inn and Alumni Center in Blacksburg, December 11, 2021. EXTRA INFORMATION On Bird Counts Another nationwide count is the Great Backyard Bird Count, held each February and organized by Audubon, the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, and Birds Canada.  This count calls on volunteers to watch birds for 15 minutes or more, at least once over four days (February 18-21 in 2022), and record the species and numbers of all the birds seen or heard.  Its results also contribute to large-scale and long-term understanding of bird species distribution and health.  For more information, visit http://gbbc.birdcount.org/.On Audubon Society History and Waterbirds “Outrage over the slaughter of millions of waterbirds, particularly egrets and other waders, for the millinery trade led to the foundation, by Harriet Hemenway and Mina Hall, of the Massachusetts Audubon Society in 1896.  By 1898, state-level Audubon Societies had been established in Pennsylvania, New York, New Hampshire, Illinois, Maine, Wisconsin, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Ohio, Indiana, Tennessee, Minnesota, Texas, and California. ...In 1901, state-level Audubon groups joined together in a loose national organization....  In 1905, the National Audubon Society was founded, with the protection of gulls, terns, egrets, herons, and other waterbirds high on its conservation priority list.” – National Audubon Society, “History of Audubon and Science-based Bird Conservation, online at http://www.audubon.org/content/history-audubon-and-waterbird-conservation.On Loon Calls in Winter“Generally loons are silent on the wintering grounds, but occasionally on a quiet winter night one will hear their primeval, tremulous yodel.” – Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay (Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006), p. 285.“All calls can be heard in migration and winter, but compared to the breeding season, they are uncommon.” – Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and American Ornithologists' Union, “Birds of North America Online/Common Loon/Sounds,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/comloo/cur/sounds (subscription required for access to this Web site). SOURCES Used in Audio Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required for this site). Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. National Audubon Society, online at http://www.audubon.org/. National Audubon Society, “Christmas Bird Count,” online at http://www.audubon.org/conservation/science/christmas-bird-count. Kathy Reshetiloff, “Listen for the haunting call of loons on Bay's frigid winter waters,” Bay Journal, 12/8/14, updated 3/31/20. Chandler S. Robbins et al. A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, 2001. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):Fish and Wildlife Information Service, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.The Bald Eagle entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040093&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974.The Belted Kingfisher entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040220&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974.The Ring-billed Gull entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040170&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974.The Greater Yellowlegs entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040130&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974.The Common Loon entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040001&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974. For More Information about Birds in Virginia or Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online athttps://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird.  Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter (listed separately).  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in late 2021 and early 2022; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 606, 12-6-21 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18 (especially for grades 4-8).Ice on rivers – Episode 406, 2-5-18 (especially for middle school grades).Polar Plunge®for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades).Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Snow terms – Episode 300, 1-25-16.Surviving freezing – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter weather preparedness – Episode 605, 11-29-21.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Bird-related Episodes for Winter American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 502, 12-9-19.Canvasback (duck) – Episode 604, 11-22-21.&l

new york science society bay humans university agency california guide music ice broad indiana christmas natural relationships state audio game college history north america frost world change surviving modern illinois accent texas animals cd dark tech water xeno web index fall sora land rain united states pond press research ocean tennessee government education birds plants foundation maine pennsylvania ring chesapeake bay native rhode island connecticut baltimore new jersey ohio fish chesapeake snow wisconsin environment images green new hampshire va cambridge minnesota columbia outrage msonormal commonwealth generally stream menu robbins normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens hawk environmental counting dynamic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology union scientific teal grade special olympics colorful md brant signature bio freezing watershed transcript demonstrate ornithology mallard virginia tech ls aquatic atlantic ocean natural resources grades k populations name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes gull western hemisphere audubon zoology blacksburg minn national audubon society taxonomy cosgrove great blue heron msohyperlink wildlife resources bay journal audubon society bald eagles all about birds osprey sections life sciences ben cosgrove birdsongs stormwater canvasback bird conservation lang elliott loons policymakers msobodytext bmp acknowledgment virginia department christmas bird count michigan museum robert l johns hopkins university press mallards cumberland gap winter holidays tmdl virginia society polar plunge inland fisheries ebird living systems canada geese virginia standards water center audio notes
Newsradio 1070 WKOK
12/16/21 WKOK Sunrise: Shannon Thomas, Chesapeake Conservancy, on volunteer opportunities…

Newsradio 1070 WKOK

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 10:30


: Shannon Thomas, Live Stake Coordinator, Chesapeake Conservancy, Freshwater Research Institute, Susquehanna University, on the live stakes process happening on our area. I'll ask her work, a little about the Chesapeake Conservancy, what volunteers and donors can do, the time frame to planting, how the community can participate in, and benefit from, the live stake planting.

Steeping Around With Rekaya
Reignforest Tea Bar

Steeping Around With Rekaya

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 4:45


In teatime, host Rekaya Gibson features Indigo Punch by Harney & Sons. In Tea Talk, she visits Reignforest Tea Bar in Chesapeake, Virginia in her “Steeping” around segment. In Tea News, she mentions author Emily Winfield Martin's collaboration with Harney & Sons. Mentioned in This Episode: Harney & Sons, Indigo Punch - www.harney.com Reignforest Tea Bar (Chesapeake, Virginia) - www.reignforestco.com Sources: Penguin Random House News. (2021, August 23). Author/Illustrator Emily Winfield Martin Extends Her Brand With "Wonderful Things" Tea. Penguin Random House. https://global.penguinrandomhouse.com/announcements/author-illustrator-emily-winfield-martin-extends-her-brand-with-wonderful-things-tea/

Hallmarkies Podcast
Robert Buckley Interview #2 (The Christmas House, Chesapeake Shores S5)

Hallmarkies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 44:26


Today actor Robert Buckley returns to the podcast to talk about his role on Chesapeake Shores and his new movie The Christmas House 2: Deck Those Halls Follow Robert on twitter https://twitter.com/robertbuckley Follow Robert on instagram https://www.instagram.com/robertearlbuckley/?hl=en Follow Ann on twitter https://twitter.com/awscott21 Please send feedback@hallmarkiespodcast.com or the twitter call +1 (801) 855-6407 For all of our 2021 Christmas Season coverage https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXv4sBF3mPUArQQNyFLq7uEL0-NVuvQhs For all of our Christmas Coverage https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXv4sBF3mPUDo41tHqhkjHCvedmZwLzHx For all of our interviews https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXv4sBF3mPUA_0JZ2r5fxhTRE_-RChCj  Check out the merch store https://teepublic.com/stores/hallmarkies?utm_campaign=Hallmarkies&utm_medium=8581&utm_source=affiliat Please support the podcast on patreon at https://www.patreon.com/hallmarkies Follow us on ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/hallmarkies-podcast/id1296728288?mt=2 https://twitter.com/HallmarkiesPod on twitter @HallmarkiesPodcast on Instagram Check out our website HallmarkiesPodcast.com Follow Rachel's blog at http://rachelsreviews.net Follow Rachel on twitter twitter.com/rachel_reviews Follow Rachel's Reviews on youtube https://www.youtube.com/c/rachelsreviews Follow Rachel on facebook www.facebook.com/smilingldsgirlreviews Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

On The Record on WYPR
What's in your drinking water; and Baker says bye to 'The Bay'

On The Record on WYPR

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 25:01


The call to “Save the Bay” has galvanized Will Baker most of his life. As he wraps up four decades at the helm of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, he points to what's improved and what hasn't, Pennsylvania's foot-dragging on the bay clean-up--and the late governor William Donald Schaefer's wistful assessment that he had thought it would be easier to Save the Bay: “Our elected officials have all thought that it would be easier and they have failed to follow the science and realize the fundamental changes that need to occur to save one of the nation's greatest national resources, the Chesapeake.”   Plus Bay Journal environmental reporter Tim Wheelerexplains ‘forever chemicals' and why they're in our water. Links: Forever chemicals in MD and PA drinking water, Forever chemicals and fish consumption warning, Contamination at Naval Research Laboratory, Have your water tested. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rumble in the Morning
News with Sean (in for Shelley) 12-14-2021 …What was the FBI doing in Chesapeake?

Rumble in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 16:01


News with Sean (in for Shelley) 12-14-2021 …What was the FBI doing in Chesapeake?

Chesapeake Almanac
December: Muskrats and Winter Marshes

Chesapeake Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 6:20


In this episode, John Page introduces us to the Chesapeake's most abundant aquatic mammal and one of the few that are active in winter--muskrats. Curious how a warm-blooded mammal can live in an aquatic habitat in the dead of a Chesapeake winter? Learn that and more. https://www.cbf.org/news-media/multimedia/podcasts/chesapeake-almanac/podcast-december-muskrats-transcript.html (TRANSCRIPT) Subscribe to Chesapeake Almanac, find us on your favorite podcast platform, or visit our podcast page at https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac. (https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac.) Chesapeake Almanac is provided by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation - Saving the Bay through Education, Advocacy, Litigation, and Restoration. Find out more about our work to save the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed's rivers and streams, and what you can do to help, at https://www.cbf.org (https://www.cbf.org). These readings are from John Page Williams, Jr.'s book, Chesapeake Almanac: Following the Bay through the Seasons. The publication is available in print at https://www.amazon.com/Chesapeake-Almanac-Following-Through-Seasons/dp/0870334492/ref=sr_1_1 (Amazon.com). Support this podcast

Temple Beth Am Podcasts
On The Mitzvah of Sustainabilty

Temple Beth Am Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 71:31


Rabbi Nina Beth Cardin leads a class on the Conservative movement's responsum on sustainability. In a world facing the urgent challenges of climate change and environmental degradation, how should a Jew live? What does Jewish Law (Halakhah) teach and require in the matter of sustainability? Nina Beth Cardin is a community rabbi who works at the intersection of faith and sustainability. She makes her home in Baltimore MD where she founded and led the Baltimore Orchard Project, a food and land justice organization dedicated to building healthier connections between people, food, place and each other. She is founder and director of the Maryland Campaign for Environmental Human Rights, an initiative that is working toward a state constitutional provision that would protect all Marylanders' rights to a healthful environment and ensure the pursuit of public health and environmental justice. She is currently on the Board of Waterkeepers Chesapeake, a coalition of independent programs working to maintain and restore the health of the waters – and the communities - of the Chesapeake and Coastal Bays. The class is part of the Green Team initiative at Temple Beth Am Los Angeles. For more information go to https://www.tbala.org/get-involved/green-team. The class was conducted via Facebook and Zoom on December 14, 2021. Rabbi Cardin is introduced by Rabbi Cantor Hillary Chorny.

Walmart Radio Podcast
The Bo Show: The Nice List

Walmart Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 12:10


The show began with Tanya from Store 153 from New Albany, Mississippi, as our lucky Associate Caller of the Day. We also heard from Devin at Store 2948 in Santa Fe Springs, California, who jingled all the way to solving Bo's Impossible Question. Everyone at Store 1682 in Chesapeake, Virginia, got a shoutout from Frances, and the team at Store 2198 in Bloomington, Minnesota, also got a store-wide shoutout thanks to a call from Dennis. But wait, there's more! Sheila at Store 632 in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, gave props to her entire store, too. As they say, teamwork makes the dream work, and we appreciate all the work our associates are doing, especially during the holiday season. We're sharing good tidings in Milestone Minute as we celebrated Clint, Ronica and Doris. Clint at Club 8192 in Dothan, Alabama, celebrated 25 amazing years, Ronica at Club 6644 in Oakwood, Georgia, reached an outstanding 30, and Doris at Store 527 in Angleton, Texas, was honored for her 35 years with the company. There were more than just store and club shoutouts coming in, so tune in to hear if your name made the “nice” list!

Charlottesville Community Engagement
December 14, 2021: UVA announces three sites for affordable housing projects; Rivanna Conservation Alliance issues latest water quality report

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 18:57


Welcome to the antepenultimate Tuesday of 2021, also doing business as the 348th day of the year. This is the 294th installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement. There are many more to come in the future due to the certainty that where will be items to write about far into the future. I’m your host, Sean Tubbs.Charlottesville Community Engagement needs fuel in the form of new subscriptions, paid or unpaid. Sign up today to keep this going! On today’s show:The Regional Transit Partnership ponders a potential future as a regional transit authorityThe University of Virginia picks two sites in Albemarle and one site in Charlottesville on which to build affordable housing The Rivanna Conservation Alliance publishes its 2021 water quality reportRegional broadband expansion projects nets $79M in state fundingIn today’s first Patreon-fueled shout-out:Winter is here, and now is the time to think about keeping your family warm through the cold Virginia months. Make sure you are getting the most out of your home with help from your local energy nonprofit, LEAP. LEAP wants you and yours to keep comfortable all year round, and offers FREE home weatherization to income- and age-qualifying residents. If you’re age 60 or older, or have an annual household income of less than $74,950, you may qualify for a free energy assessment and home energy improvements such as insulation and air sealing. Sign up today to lower your energy bills, increase comfort, and reduce energy waste at home!UVA Housing initiativeThe University of Virginia has announced three sites upon which it will work with a developer to build affordable housing units, two of which are in Albemarle County. They are:The low-density Piedmont housing site on Fontaine AvenueThe corner of Wertland and 10th StreetProperties at the North Fork Research Park President Jim Ryan made the announcement this morning in a written statement.“Economic growth over many decades has had a profound effect on housing in the Charlottesville-Albemarle community, and we are committed to working with community partners to create more housing intended for local workforce and community members who have been priced out of the local housing market,” Ryan said. “We believe these sites may be suitable for affordable housing, to potentially include mixed-use development.”J.J. Wagner, UVA’s executive vice president and chief operating officer, said these sites were selected in part because they were not in any other strategic plan. There’s a website where people can submit feedback. (website) According to a press release on UVA Today, Piedmont would likely be completely redeveloped except for an existing structure. The Piedmont property is on the north side of Fontaine Avenue and is within Albemarle County. UVA owns this site outright. The University of Virginia Foundation purchased 1010 Wertland Street from developer Keith Woodard in February 2017 for $4 million, which was well over the $1.85 million assessment for that year.  That 0.4 acre property is currently occupied by an apartment complex.  The foundation also owns two other properties at this corner, one of which is currently vacant. The North Fork Research Park currently does not have any residential units. This past March, the foundation issued a request for proposals for a firm to help rezone portions of the property to Neighborhood Model District zoning. “Coordination with the UVA Affordable Housing Task Force will be required,” reads the RFP. Existing leases at both Piedmont and 1010 Wertland Street will be honored for their duration. UVA or its foundation will donate the land though a ground lease and will not contribute any funding to the projects. The next step is for the UVA Foundation to issue a request for qualifications for potential builders. Initial work for the project was conducted by the firm Northern Urban Real Estate Ventures. That company is now working with the Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority on a master plan for sustainability. These three sites are the only ones under consideration at this time. UVA spokesman Brian Coy said they will work with the selected firm to meet the goal of building between 1,000 and 1,500 units. Broadband expansion The Thomas Jefferson Planning District has been awarded a $79 million grant from the Virginia Telecommunications Initiative for a project to expand broadband to nearly every home across a 13-county area. Governor Ralph Northam made that announcement yesterday as part of a $722 million funding package for similar Internet expansion meetings across the Commonwealth. The TJPDC was the lead applicant for the RISE project, which stands for Regional Internet Service Expansion. Several localities including Albemarle are contributing a total of $33.5 million as a match for the public-private partnership involving Firefly Fiber Broadband, the Rappahannock Electric Cooperative, and Dominion Energy. Over the next three years, more than 5,000 miles of fiber will be installed across an area that spans from portions of Campbell County to the south to Goochland County to the east to Greene County to the north. In all, an additional 36,283 homes will be connected. They will then ne able then purchase Internet from Firefly Fiber. TJPDC’s award is the third largest in the state. (read the grant application) (Governor’s press release) Avon Street DevelopmentTonight, the Albemarle Planning Commission will hold a public hearing on a rezoning for a planned residential district in the 1800 block of Avon Street Extended. Andy Reitelbach is a senior planner with the county.“It involves a request to rezone two parcels of land on Avon Street right south of Avinity,” Reitelbach said. “The two parcels together total about 3.6 acres and the applicant is requesting a maximum of 85 two-family and multifamily resident units.” Reitelbach made his comments at the 5th and Avon Community Advisory Committee from November 18. So did Kelsey Schlein with Shimp Engineering, the firm taking the project through the review process. “It’s designated urban density residential in the Comprehensive Plan so at 24 dwelling unit per acre with a maximum density on the property, we’re within the recommended density range for urban density residential,” Schlein said. Schlein said there will be a mix of housing types with triplexes, quadplexes, townhomes, and multifamily units. None of the buildings will exceed three stories. She noted that the county has adopted a corridor study to make the area more hospitable to people on bikes or on foot. (read the study)“Since there is an existing sidewalk in front of Avinity that kind of extends in front of the elementary school, we’re proposing to continue that network,” Schlein said. “However, we’ve provided enough right of way for a multi use path improvement so if there’s ever a comprehensive reimagining of the pedestrian network on the [east] side of Avon Street, this application will have provided the right of way for that.” Some members of the 5th and Avon CAC expressed concerns about traffic, the lack of a playground, and the possibility the application did not include open space. The Planning Commission meets virtually at 6 p.m. tonight. (meeting info)New look for tourism websiteThe quasi-government entity charged with marketing the region to tourists has updated their website. The Charlottesville Albemarle Convention and Visitors Bureau launched an refreshed version last week of visitcharlottesville.org. The designer is a firm called Tempest as we learn in a press release.“In addition to better serving visitors and industry partners, the new website will also reduce costs for the CACVB, in anticipation of a significant budget decrease projected for Fiscal Year 2023,” reads the release. “The reduction in budget for the upcoming fiscal year is a direct result of decreased transient occupancy tax collection from local lodging properties, due to the impacts of COVID-19.” The Bureau is governed by a Board of Directors that currently includes two members of the Albemarle Board of Supervisors and two City Councilors. In October, the CACVB Board discussed reducing that to one elected official from each locality in favor of more representatives from the hospitality industry. For more, read Allison Wrabel’s October 25 story in the Daily Progress. For more on the hospitality industry, read a story from me from October 30 on the archive site Information Charlottesville.  The CACVB Board next meets on December 20. *General Assembly 2022With Republicans in control of the House of Delegates next year, that means Delegate Rob Bell (R-Albemarle) will chair a major committee. Yesterday, incoming House Speaker Todd Gilbert (R-Woodstock) assigned Bell to chair the Courts of Justice Committee and made five other appointments. (release)Delegate Lee Ware (R-Powhatan) will chair Agriculture, Chesapeake, and Natural ResourcesDelegate Jay Leftwich (R-Chesapeake) will head General LawsDelegate Bobby Orrock (R-Caroline) will chair Health, Welfare, and InstitutionsDelegate Kathy Byron (R-Bedford) will head Labor and CommerceDelegate Terry Austin (R-Botetourt) will chair Transportation. RCA reportThe Rivanna Conservation Alliance has issued its annual stream health report based on water quality monitoring from 2018 through 2021. Based on their data, the number of impaired streams increased. (read the report)“The percentage of our sampled streams that failed to meet water quality standards for aquatic life grew from 68 percent in last year’s report to 82 percent in this one,” reads the report. However, the document acknowledges difficulty in collecting data in 2018 and 2019 due to heavy rain events that scoured stream beds and banks, as well as difficulty collecting data during the pandemic. “Most notably, seven of the nine sites that moved from an assessment of very good or good down to fair were affected by unusually large hatches of black fly larvae that reduced biodiversity in our samples,” the report continues. Another item of note in 2020 is the completion of a 15-year study on the long-term effects of large-scale water quality improvements such as stream restoration, planting of buffers along streams, or upgrades to wastewater treatments plants. That’s based on looking at all 50 monitoring sites and finding that those that improved were close to some form of improvement. More shout-outsYou’re listening to Charlottesville. Community Engagement. Let’s continue today with two more Patreon-fueled shout-outs. The first comes a long-time supporter who wants you to know:"Today is a great day to spread good cheer: reach out to an old friend, compliment a stranger, or pause for a moment of gratitude to savor a delight."The second comes from a more recent supporter who wants you to go out and read a local news story written by a local journalist. Whether it be the Daily Progress, Charlottesville Tomorrow, C-Ville Weekly, NBC29, CBS19, WINA, or some other place I’ve not mentioned - the community depends on a network of people writing about the community. Go learn about this place today!Regional transit authority?It has been some time since I’ve had an update on transit issues and now is the time to do so. Earlier this month, the members of the Regional Transit Partnership got an informal recommendation from a consultant that it may be time to move from an advisory body into a decision-making body that can raise its own funds. Before we get into all of that, though, there is still time to take two surveys to get your input on the Regional Transit Vision for the Charlottesville Area. That’s a project being led by the Thomas Jefferson Planning District to “evaluate transit service” in the region in order to “establish a clear long-term vision for efficient, equitable, and effective transit service.” One survey is on transition visioning and the other is an interactive map that asks the question: “What are the long-term transit needs for the Charlottesville region?” “You’re able to kind of sort of pinpoint on a map some issues or wants or desires regarding transit,” said Tim Brulle, a project manager for the vision who works for the firm AECOM. “We are using the public survey as part of our main avenue for that public feedback right now.” The project is being funded by the Virginia Department of Rail and Public Transportation with additional funds from the city of Charlottesville and Albemarle County. Albemarle County is conducting its own separate study, and Charlottesville Area Transit has pending route changes that have not yet been implemented. On December 2, 2021, the Jefferson Area Regional Transit Partnership got a status update on the studies, beginning with the Regional Transit Vision. As of that date, only about a hundred and thirty people had responded. (watch this meeting)Also as part of the meeting, Scudder Wagg of the firm JWA briefed the partnership members on the fact that many other transit systems in Virginia are regional. In this community, there are three major transit systems in Jaunt, Charlottesville Area Transit and the University Transit Service. Wagg suggested a reorganization across multiple communities that could yield more funding for expansion. “If you are to think about a regional funding source and a regional funding agency, then you would start to need to think about this on more of a regional scale,” Wagg said. “That’s where we want to help you consider how you might address that.”Wagg said the combined operating budgets of CAT and Jaunt are around $16 million, with about half of that funding coming from local sources. He suggested the total amount could increase if the community took steps to create an authority which can issue bonds. Wagg said three other regions in Virginia have managed to create authorities to expand transit and fund other transportation improvements. “Northern Virginia is using a combination of a sales tax, a grantor’s tax, and bond proceeds,” Wagg said. Legislation passed the General Assembly in 2009 to allow creation of a Regional Transit Authority, but a bill to allow a local referendum on a one-cent tax increase did not pass that year. According to the legislation, the authority could expand to include Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa and Nelson counties. (take a look)In the next General Assembly, Charlottesville is seeking a referendum for a one-cent sales tax for the purposes of funding the reconfiguration of the city’s schools. The director of Charlottesville Area Transit would encourage elected officials to pursue additional sources for funding through an authority. “This is an avenue we do need to explore and consider seriously to make sure that this  happens  eventually in the next three to five years,” Williams said. Albemarle Supervisor Diantha McKeel said the point of the Regional Transit Partnership was to prepare for an eventual next step.“When this Regional Transit Partnership, the intent was for it to be the first step in working towards an authority,” McKeel said.Becca White, director of Parking and Transportation at UVA, said the University Transit Service serves a very small footprint as a “last mile” service to relieve congestion and to shuttle people from parking lots. However, she said there are some portions of the city covered, including Fontaine Avenue and Ivy Road. The members of the Partnership informally directed Wagg to base the next set of potential scenarios for expanded service based on a theoretical $30 million budget.“We’ll have two scenarios,” Wagg said. “We’ll have maps showing where would routes go, how frequently, all of that sort of stuff. And then what would the outcomes of some of those things be in terms of how many more jobs could people in Greene County reach in an hour by transit or how many more people would have access to different kinds of transit services in different places?”A second round of public engagement for the Regional Transit Vision will begin early next year and the study is to be completed by the summer of 2022. Want to help influence it? Fill out those surveys! Resources for Regional Transit Vision Plan: A stakeholder meeting was held on October 7 and around 30 people attended (watch the video)A public meeting was held on November 18 and 20 members of the public participated (watch the video) (view the presentation)A land use assessment was produced by the consultantsA transit propensity technical memo was also produced by the consultantsSpecial thanks to Jenn Finazzo for recording some of the voice work today. Very much appreciated! This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

District of Chip & Friends
"I Took My Shot!" - A Conversation with Ted Alexander, Voice of the ODU Monarchs

District of Chip & Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 20:16


Our first podcast recording remotely in the wild! At Wild Wing Cafe in Chesapeake, Va., Chip and Old Dominion alum Deric chat with a broadcasting juggernaut in the 757. Ted Alexander, Voice of the Old Dominion Monarchs, relives a wild 2021 season for the ODU football program, takes us behind the scenes of getting to his dream job at age 52, and reveals his Top 5 ODU Play-by-Play calls throughout his run in Norfolk.

Face Off Hockey Show
Chesapeake Hockey Week 12.14.21 (S4E15): Black Bears Sweep, Stevenson Wins Sixth Straight, Navy Beats Army

Face Off Hockey Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021


This week, Scotty Wazz talks about the Maryland Black Bears heading up to Danbury and sweeping another road series in Connecticut. Team Maryland faced off against New Jersey, Stevenson Men's team keeps on rolling, while Navy took out Army. 

This Date in Weather History
1779: "Hard Winter"

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 3:08


The autumn of 1779 had been relatively mild across the 13 colonies as they struggled against the British for independence, but on December 14, 1779 and cold wave hit as artic air spilled out of Canada and into the Colonies. It was a portend of what was to come. The winter of 1779–1780 has been called among the harshest in the eighteenth century. The so-called Hard Winter. A total of twenty-eight snowstorms hit the soon to be United States, some dropping snow for several days in succession. The temperature rarely rose above freezing as the Delaware and Hudson Rivers froze over. Sledges moved regularly across ten miles of ice between Annapolis and the opposite shore of the Chesapeake. Wild animals were almost exterminated as people where desperately hunting for food and other animals died of the cold and exposure. General Alexander (Lord Stirling) marched over a saltwater channel to make his unsuccessful Staten Island raid—even his artillery passed over the six miles of open water safely. Washington's main army suffered much more, because of this weather, in their Morristown winter quarters, than they had at Valley Forge two years earlier, with snow lying six feet deep. The British in New York suffered almost as much as the economy in North America ground to a halt and food became scarce everywhere. As inflation took off, Washington found it ever more difficult to obtain much needed supplies for his shrinking Continental army. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Forefront Church
Unto Us: Week 2

Forefront Church

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 22:00


Jesus's birth is a powerful display of God's faithfulness to bring peace, hope, healing, and life to a lost and dying world. This four-week series explores the Christmas story by examining the relationship between the book of Isaiah and the purpose and work of Christ in the New Testament. Because of Jesus, we can experience the joy that comes through his finished work. ‘Unto Us' provides a powerful guide for helping your people understand and apply the nativity story. Find out more about Forefront Church at: http://forefront.org http://forefrontchurch.info http://facebook.com/forefront757 http://twitter.com/forefront757 http://instagram.com/forefront757

Chesapeake Church Sermons
RAW: The Truth About Us | Woe to You

Chesapeake Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 35:08


Sunday, December 12, 2021 - In one of the greatest take-downs ever, Jesus confronts the Pharisees, resulting in what is known as The Seven Woes. Throughout  history, Christians have loved Jesus his raw and spot-on exposure of the hypocrisy and callousness that often comes with high levels of authority. Less popular, however, is turning the mirror on ourselves. The truth about us is that modern-day Christianity has regressed into an often judgmental, unfeeling dogma. This week, we put the spotlight i ourselves and wonder if Jesus might say to us, "Woe to you."

ON THE CALL
ON THE CALL - PAT PATTERSON

ON THE CALL

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 25:17


PAT PATTERSON: With a Masters in Psychology, followed by marriage, Pat turned back to her first love and attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts and HB studios to be classically trained and under the likes of Earle Hyman and Uta Hagen. Motherhood did not deter Pat from returning to the industry and she embarked on a career on stage, film, television and voiceovers, appearing on 30 Rock, the Blacklist, Younger, CrazyTown and more. Some of her film appearances have been Alter Ego, Chronicle of a Serial Killer, The Mustard Seed and others. She formed Fleetwood Stage with 2 Broadway veterans, which produced 4 main stage productions yearly, along with children's theatre and Shakespeare in the Park, for 11 seasons. She formed her own independent production company, Pate Productions, with award winning creations such as: Junction, A Younger Man -now taught in NYU's undergraduate writer's program and part of an outreach program by the Volunteer Services for the Hospice of Chesapeake, Maryland, and her episodic, HereAfter Here which deals with Near Death Experiences (NDE). As a woman, mother, grandmother, actress, producer and line producer of deep faith, the ever busy Pat Patterson's Pate Productions' mission is that of creating uplifting, faith-based stories. Keep up with Pat at: https://www.pateproductions.com/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ozzie-stewart/support

Watch What Crappens
Dwell Hello #205: Choosy in Chesapeake

Watch What Crappens

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 52:33


It's a very Chrissley episode of Dwell Hello! We find ourselves in Chesapeake with a church musical director trying to find a home with a recording studio for his family. And it MUST be by a mall, dammit! Our boy's gotta shop. For those of you that like to watch along, this is Season 155 Episode 12 and we found it on Discovery Plus. 

Chesapeake Almanac
December: Swan Time

Chesapeake Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 9:32


When the cold fronts push into the Chesapeake region, you can expect to see (and hear) large flocks of tundra swans sweeping in after them. These are creatures of habit, or some may say tradition, flying more than 1,000 miles to the same wintering grounds each year. In this episode, John Page shares some of the reasons these birds select the Chesapeake, as well as what changing conditions in the Bay may mean for their future. https://www.cbf.org/news-media/multimedia/podcasts/chesapeake-almanac/december-swan-time.html (TRANSCRIPT) Subscribe to Chesapeake Almanac, find us on your favorite podcast platform, or visit our podcast page at https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac (https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac). Chesapeake Almanac is provided by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation - Saving the Bay through Education, Advocacy, Litigation, and Restoration. Find out more about our work to save the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed's rivers and streams, and what you can do to help, at https://www.cbf.org (https://www.cbf.org). These readings are from John Page Williams, Jr.'s book, Chesapeake Almanac: Following the Bay through the Seasons. The publication is available in print at https://www.amazon.com/Chesapeake-Almanac-Following-Through-Seasons/dp/0870334492/ref=sr_1_1 (Amazon.com). Support this podcast

Face Off Hockey Show
Chesapeake Hockey Week 12.07.21 (S4E14): Stevenson NCAA Squads Sweep, Terps Overtake Towson, Navy Preps for Army

Face Off Hockey Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021


This week, Scotty Wazz talks about the Maryland Black Bears split in Northeast, Team Maryland's trio of games, as well as the Stevenson University Men and Women sweeping their games in NCAA action. Navy split their week, as they prepare for Army/Navy On Ice, while the Terps go to Towson and upset the D1 Tigers. 

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 606 (12-6-21): At the Freezing Point

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:36).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesA Question about Freezing Water and Animals Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-3-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of December 6, 2021.  This revised episode from January 2018 is part of a series this year of winter-relatedepisodes. SOUND – ~8 sec That's the sound of ice on Claytor Lake in Pulaski County, Va., during a January day in 2018.  The sounds set the stage for a freezing-water episode written for Virginia science students in early elementary school, that is, about kindergarten to third grade. You're about to hear two kinds of mystery sounds.  When you do, see if you can answer this riddle: How are the two kinds of sounds the same, but also different?  Here are the sounds. SOUNDS – ~10 sec If you guessed that both sounds were water being put into a glass, you're right!  But the first sound was water as a liquid, while the second was ice, or water frozen into a solid. Now here are two more kinds of mystery sounds.  Try again to guess what they are. SOUNDS – ~8 sec Those were sounds of liquid water flowing in a creek, followed by pieces of ice on the creek's edge breaking off and splashing into the flowing water.  Just like a freezer can turn liquid household water into ice cubes, winter weather can often stay below 32 degrees Fahrenheit long enough to freeze some of the water on land or in a pond, creek, river, or even the ocean.  And there are many words for different kinds of ice in those places, like anchor ice, flake ice, needle ice, pancake ice, and sea ice. Let's try one more pair of mystery sounds, this time about ice safety. SOUND – ~7 sec Any guesses about what you heard?  The first was small rocks bouncing on an ice-covered pond, but the second was that pond's ice breaking and sinking.  That's a reminder that thin ice can hold pebbles, but ice has to be solid and at least about four inches thick to hold people, and ice thickness can be different in different spots.  Ice is never 100-percent safe, according to natural resource experts from Minnesota, where they have plenty of experience with ice-covered water.  But even with thin ice, it's safe—and fun—to stand on the bank and see how far a pebble can bounce!SOUND – ~3 sec – Pebbles bouncing on ice-covered pond. We close with about 45 seconds of music for freezing water.  Here's “Ice Dance,” by Torrin Hallett, a student at the Yale School of Music.MUSIC – ~47 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 408, 1-15-18. The Claytor Lake ice sounds were recorded at the Sloan Creek inlet of the lake, near Draper in Pulaski County, Va., on January 6, 2018. The stream ice sounds were recorded at Toms Creek in Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., on January 11, 2015. The sounds of pebbles bouncing on an ice-covered pond and the sound of thin ice breaking were recorded at the Heritage Park pond in Blacksburg, Va., on December 28, 2012, and January 13, 2013.  Thanks to passer-by Sam for help in recording the sounds of rocks bouncing on ice. “Ice Dance” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 556, 12-21-20, on how organisms survive freezing temperatures. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music.“A Little Fright Music” – used in Episode 548, 10-26-20, on water-related passages in fiction and non-fiction, for Halloween; and Episode 601, 10-31-21, connections among Halloween, water, and the human body.“Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Chesapeake Bay Ballad” – used most recently in Episode 604, 11-22-21, on Canvasback ducks.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic.“Flow Stopper” – used in Episode 599, 10-18-21, on “Imagine a Day Without Water.”“Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards. “New Year's Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently in Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle schoolers calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders. “Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.  Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Ice on Claytor Lake in Pulaski County, Va., January 6, 2018.Patterns in ice formed on a shallow drainage channel in Heritage Park, Blacksburg, Va., January 11, 2015Air pockets under ice on a drainage channel in Heritage Park, Blacksburg, Va., January 11, 2015. A QUESTION ABOUT FREEZING WATER AND ANIMALS All living things have water on their inside.  So, if a wild animal is exposed to freezing temperatures in winter, why doesn't the water inside its body freeze? Here are two possible answers.  For more information, please see references in the Sources section below. 1.  Some animals—birds and mammals—can generate their own heat, and they have fur, feathers, or other coverings to hold in the heat (like people have clothes).  Body fat also helps hold in heat. 2.  In many living things—for example, certain fish and frogs—the water-based fluids inside cells contain biochemicals that act as natural anti-freeze, preventing ice formation and damage to the cells. SOURCES American Museum of Natural History, ‘Three Phases of Water,” online at https://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/water-h2o-life/blue-planet/three-phases-of-water/. Margaret Waring Buck, Where They Go in Winter, Abingdon Press, Nashville, Tenn., 1968. Iowa State University, “How Woody Plants Survive Extreme Cold,” March 1, 1996, online at http://www.ipm.iastate.edu/ipm/hortnews/1996/3-1-1996/brr.html. Lake Superior-Duluth Streams.org, “Ice Terminology,” online at http://www.lakesuperiorstreams.org/understanding/iceterms.html. Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, “Ice Safety,” online at http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/safety/ice/index.html; see particularly “General Ice Thickness Guidelines,” online at https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/safety/ice/thickness.html. Dan Tinker, “These Animals Don't Care That It's Freezing Outside,” December 14, 2013, National Wildlife Federation Blog, online at http://blog.nwf.org/2013/12/these-animals-dont-care-that-its-freezing-outside/. Phys.org, “Living organisms need antifreeze to survive in the cold,” February 18, 2013, online at https://phys.org/news/2013-02-antifreeze-survive-cold.html; and “Why fish don't freeze in the Arctic Ocean,” August 25, 2010, online at https://phys.org/news/2010-08-fish-dont-arctic-ocean.html. Brian Rohrig, “Chilling Out, Warming Up: How Animals Survive Temperature Extremes,” ChemMatters Online Oct.-Nov. 2013 (American Chemical Society), online at http://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/resources/highschool/chemmatters/past-issues/archive-2013-2014/animal-survival-in-extreme-temperatures.html. VocabularySpellingCity.com:“Kindergarten Science Vocabulary,” online at https://www.spellingcity.com/kindergarten-science-vocabulary.html;“First Grade Science Vocabulary,” online at http://www.spellingcity.com/first-grade-science-vocabulary.html;“Second Grade Science Vocabulary,” online at https://www.spellingcity.com/second-grade-science-vocabulary.html;  and“Third Grade Science Vocabulary,” online at https://www.spellingcity.com/third-grade-science-vocabulary.html.The site also has vocabulary for other grade levels and other subjects. Sarah Zielinski, “Eight ways that animals survive the winter,” Science News (Society for Science & the Public), January 22, 2014, online at https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/wild-things/eight-ways-animals-survive-winter. For More Information about Ice Sounds NPR's Skunk Bear (science channel on YouTube), “The Star Wars Sound of Singing Ice,” 3 min./3 sec. video online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OC7_zpyqCrU. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter (listed separately).  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in late 2021 and early 2022; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21. Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18 (especially for grades 4-8).Ice on rivers – Episode 406, 2-5-18 (especially for middle school grades).Polar Plunge®for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades).Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Snow terms – Episode 300, 1-25-16.Surviving freezing – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter weather preparedness – Episode 605, 11-29-21.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Bird-related Episodes for Winter Audubon Christmas Bird Count – Episode 294, 12-14-15.American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 502, 12-9-19.Canvasback (duck) – Episode 604, 11-22-21.Common Goldeneye (duck) – Episode 303, 2/15/16.Green-winged Teal (duck) – Episode 398, 12-11-17.Grebes (Horned and Red-necked) – Episode 233, 9-29-14.Loons – Episode 445, 11-5-18.Fall migration –

new york science society bay university agency music ice natural npr halloween earth state audio living college nashville frost surviving sound accent animals dark tech water web air index fall rain pond research ocean weather government education public chesapeake bay ohio chesapeake snow environment patterns body images green oberlin college va minnesota msonormal new year atlantic stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens arial environmental times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading fahrenheit natural history conservatory teal special olympics oberlin colorful brant yale school signature wild turkey manhattan school scales freezing pebbles watershed transcript science news three phases virginia tech atlantic ocean natural resources american museum grades k american chemical society name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table draper ar sa iowa state university blacksburg tenn msohyperlink runoff sections stormwater canvasback arctic ocean loons policymakers bmp heritage park new standard acknowledgment minnesota department virginia department cripple creek cumberland gap phys sols tmdl abingdon press polar plunge torrin virginia standards water center pulaski county space systems audio notes
Forefront Church
Unto Us: Week 1

Forefront Church

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 20:00


Jesus's birth is a powerful display of God's faithfulness to bring peace, hope, healing, and life to a lost and dying world. This four-week series explores the Christmas story by examining the relationship between the book of Isaiah and the purpose and work of Christ in the New Testament. Because of Jesus, we can experience the joy that comes through his finished work. ‘Unto Us' provides a powerful guide for helping your people understand and apply the nativity story. Find out more about Forefront Church at: http://forefront.org http://forefrontchurch.info http://facebook.com/forefront757 http://twitter.com/forefront757 http://instagram.com/forefront757

Chesapeake Church Sermons
RAW: The Truth About Us | An Awestruck God

Chesapeake Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 39:34


Sunday, December 5, 2021 - There are moments in scripture where even God Himself is amazing. Amazement, however, is not always a good thing. Jesus was amazed at the lack of faith that supposed holy and righteous "God followers" had, and in another account, He was amazed at the faith of a filthy, sinning, Roman centurion. Which would you rather be? Is God in awe of your faith, or in are of your doubt?

Chesapeake Almanac
December: The "Other" Mollusks

Chesapeake Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 9:09


We all know the iconic Chesapeake oyster. But studying less well known members of the Bay community is often a good window into understanding it better. Softshell clams, hard clams, brackish-water clams, hooked mussels, ribbed mussels, and the stout razor clam each have their own niche and specialty--and guidance for eating. In this episode, John Page shares the stories of the "other" Chesapeake mollusks--including one that can dig faster than you can! https://www.cbf.org/news-media/multimedia/podcasts/chesapeake-almanac/podcast-december-the-other-mollusks-transcript.html (TRANSCRIPT) Subscribe to Chesapeake Almanac, find us on your favorite podcast platform, or visit our podcast page at https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac (https://www.cbf.org/ChesapeakeAlmanac). Chesapeake Almanac is provided by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation - Saving the Bay through Education, Advocacy, Litigation, and Restoration. Find out more about our work to save the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed's rivers and streams, and what you can do to help, at https://www.cbf.org (https://www.cbf.org). These readings are from John Page Williams, Jr.'s book, Chesapeake Almanac: Following the Bay through the Seasons. The publication is available in print at https://www.amazon.com/Chesapeake-Almanac-Following-Through-Seasons/dp/0870334492/ref=sr_1_1 (Amazon.com). Support this podcast

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 605 (11-29-21): Preparing for the Season of Freezing Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:17).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-26-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 29, 2021.  This episode is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. MUSIC – ~10 sec – instrumental. That excerpt of “Mid-winter Etude,” by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va., opens our annual episode on winter preparedness.  This coincides with Virginia Winter Weather Awareness Week, which is being observed this year from November 29 to December 3, according to the Wakefield, Va., National Weather Service office. In 2021, winter astronomically begins in Virginia on December 21 at 10:59 a.m.  That's the Eastern Standard time of the winter solstice in the Northern Hemisphere, when that hemisphere is at its maximum annual tilt away from the sun. At its beginning, middle, or end, winter can bring cold temperatures, hazardous roads, power outages, and fire hazards.  To help you be prepared, here are 10 tips compiled from information provided by the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC.1. Avoid traveling in winter-storm conditions if you can. If you must travel, get road conditions from the Virginia 511 telephone system, Web site, or app.   And have an emergency kit for your vehicle, including jumper cables, water, non-perishable food, blankets, a flashlight, and other items.2. Have battery-powered sources of lighting and information, particularly weather information, along with enough batteries to last through a power outage of several days.  Whenever possible, use flashlights and not candles during power outages.  If you do use candles, put them in safe holders away from anything combustible, and don't leave a burning candle unattended.3.  Make a family emergency plan that covers sheltering; evacuation from your area; escape from a home fire; emergency meeting places; communications; a supply of food, water, and medications; and other factors specific to your circumstances; and practice your plan. 4.  Get fireplaces, wood stoves, and chimneys inspected and cleaned.5.  Install a smoke detector in every bedroom and on every floor level, test them monthly, and replace the batteries at least annually. 6.  Install a carbon monoxide detector in your home and check or replace the battery every six months.7.  If you use space heaters, make sure they'll switch off automatically if the heater falls over; plug them into wall outlets, not extension cords; keep them at least three feet from combustible objects; don't leave heaters unattended; and check for cracked or damaged wires or plugs. 8.  Generators, camp stoves, and other devices that burn gasoline or charcoal should be used outdoors only.9.  Learn where to shut off water valves in case a pipe bursts. And 10.  Be careful of overexertion during snow shoveling. More information on preparing for winter weather, fires, and other emergencies is available online from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, at vaemergency.gov.Next time the forecast calls for snow, freezing rain, or other wintry weather, here's hoping that you can stay warm, dry, and safe.Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 25 more seconds of “Mid-winter Etude.”  MUSIC – ~28 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “Midwinter Etude,” from the 1996 album “Incarnation,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Mr. Seaman is available online at http://timothyseaman.com/en/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 561, 1-25-21. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com.IMAGESSnow and ice on a seasonal pond at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., December 26, 2020.Snow along Toms Creek at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., December 26, 2020.Ice hanging from tree twigs at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., February 20, 2021.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT WINTER WEATHER PREPAREDNESS AND FIRE SAFETY On Winter Weather Preparedness The following information is quoted from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM), “Winter Weather,” online at https://www.vaemergency.gov/winter-weather/, accessed 11/29/21.Winter storms can range from freezing rain or ice, to a few hours of moderate snowfall, to a blizzard that lasts for several days.  Many winter storms are accompanied by dangerously low temperatures, power outages and unpredictable road conditions.  Before, during, and after a winter storm, roads and walkways may become extremely dangerous or impassable.  Access to critical community services such as public transportation, child care, healthcare providers and schools may be limited.  Preparing your home, car and family before cold weather and a winter storm arrives is critical. Overview for Dealing with a Winter Storm*During a winter storm, stay off the roads as much as possible and only drive when absolutely necessary.  Always give snow plows the right of way. *Never use a generator, grill, camp stove or gasoline, propane, natural gas or charcoal burning device inside your home, garage, basement, crawlspace or any other partially enclosed area. *Snow shoveling is a known trigger for heart attacks!  Always avoid overexertion when shoveling. *When severe weather occurs, plan to check on elderly or disabled neighbors and relatives. *If you must travel, know road conditions before you leave home.  Visit 511Virginia.org or call 511 for road condition updates. *Protect yourself from frostbite!  Hands, feet and face are the most commonly affected areas so wear a hat, mittens (which are warmer than gloves) and cover your mouth with a scarf to reduce heat loss. *Keep dry!  Change out of wet clothing frequently to prevent a loss of body heat. *Wear several layers of loose-fitting, lightweight, warm clothing rather than one layer or heavy clothing.Prepare Your Home *Make sure your home is properly insulated. *Check the weather stripping around your windows and doors. *Learn how to shut off water valves in case a pipe bursts. *Have additional heat sources on hand in case of a power outages. *Keep a fire extinguisher accessible. *Replace the batteries in your carbon monoxide detector annually. Prepare Your Car *Batteries lose power as temperatures drop, be sure to have yours tested. *Check your car's antifreeze level. *Have your radiator system serviced. *Replace your car's windshield wiper fluid with a wintertime mix. *Proactively replace your car's worn tires and wiper blades. *To help with visibility, clean [snow or ice] off your car entirely, including your trunk, roof, windows and headlights. Did You Know?*Dehydration can make you more susceptible to hypothermia.*If it's too cold for you, it's too cold for your pet!  Don't leave pets outside for prolonged periods of time and have plenty of fresh, unfrozen water on hand.*Each year, snow, sleet, slush and/or ice on the road leads to approximately, 537,000 crashes, 136,000 injuries, and 1,800 deaths.*It can snow at temperatures well above freezing*Temperatures do not have to be below zero degrees to cause harmOn Fire SafetyThe following information is quoted from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM), “Fires,” online at https://www.vaemergency.gov/fires/, accessed 11/29/21. In just two minutes, a fire can become life-threatening.  In just five minutes, a home can be engulfed in flames. Learn About Fires *Fire is FAST!  In less than 30 seconds a small flame can turn into a major fire. It only takes minutes for thick black smoke to fill a house or for it to be engulfed in flames.*Fire is HOT!  Heat is more threatening than flames. Room temperatures in a fire can be 100 degrees at floor level and rise to 600 degrees at eye level. Inhaling this super-hot air will scorch your lungs and melt clothes to your skin.*Fire is DARK!  Fire starts bright, but quickly produces black smoke and complete darkness.*Fire is DEADLY!  Smoke and toxic gases kill more people than flames do. Fire produces poisonous gases that make you disoriented and drowsy. Asphyxiation is the leading cause of fire deaths, exceeding burns by a three-to-one ratio. Create and Practice a Fire Escape Plan*In the event of a fire, remember that every second counts, so you and your family must always be prepared.  Escape plans help you get out of your home quickly.*Twice each year, practice your home fire escape plan.  Some tips to consider when preparing this plan include:*Find two ways to get out of each room in the event the primary way is blocked by fire or smoke.*A secondary route might be a window onto a neighboring roof or a collapsible ladder for escape from upper story windows.*Make sure that windows are not stuck, screens can be taken out quickly, and that security bars can be properly opened.*Practice feeling your way out of the house in the dark or with your eyes closed.*Teach children not to hide from firefighters.  Smoke Alarms*A working smoke alarm significantly increases your chances of surviving a deadly home fire.*Install both ionization AND photoelectric smoke alarms, OR dual sensor smoke alarms, which contain both ionization and photoelectric smoke sensors.*Test batteries monthly.*Replace batteries in battery-powered and hard-wired smoke alarms at least once a year (except non-replaceable 10-year lithium batteries).*Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement, both inside and outside of sleeping areas.*Replace the entire smoke alarm unit every 8-10 years or according to manufacturer's instructions.*Never disable a smoke alarm while cooking – it can be a deadly mistake. Smoke Alarm Safety for People with Access or Functional Needs*Audible alarms for visually impaired people should pause with a small window of silence between each successive cycle so that they can listen to instructions or voices of others.*Smoke alarms with a vibrating pad or flashing light are available for the hearing impaired. Contact your local fire department for information about obtaining a flashing or vibrating smoke alarm.*Smoke alarms with a strobe light outside the home to catch the attention of neighbors, and emergency call systems for summoning help, are also available. During a Fire*Crawl low under any smoke to your exit – heavy smoke and poisonous gases collect first along the ceiling.*Before opening a door, feel the doorknob and door. If either is hot, or if there is smoke coming around the door, leave the door closed and use your second way out.*If you open a door, open it slowly. Be ready to shut it quickly if heavy smoke or fire is present.*If you can't get to someone needing assistance, leave the home and call 9-1-1 or the fire department. Tell the emergency operator where the person is located.*If pets are trapped inside your home, tell firefighters right away.*If you can't get out, close the door and cover vents and cracks around doors with cloth or tape to keep smoke out.  Call 9-1-1 or your fire department. Say where you are and signal for help at the window with a light-colored cloth or a flashlight.*If your clothes catch fire, stop, drop, and roll – stop immediately, drop to the ground, and cover your face with your hands.  Roll over and over or back and forth until the fire is out.  If you or someone else cannot stop, drop, and roll, smother the flames with a blanket or towel.  Use cool water to treat the burn immediately for 3 to 5 minutes.  Cover with a clean, dry cloth.  Get medical help right away by calling 9-1-1 or the fire department. Fire Escape Planning for Older Adults and People with Access or Functional Needs*Live near an exit. You'll be safest on the ground floor if you live in an apartment building. If you live in a multi-story home, arrange to sleep on the ground floor, and near an exit.*If you use a walker or wheelchair, check all exits to be sure you get through the doorways.*Make any necessary accommodations, such as providing exit ramps and widening doorways, to facilitate an emergency escape.*Speak to your family members, building manager, or neighbors about your fire safety plan and practice it with them.*Contact your local fire department's non-emergency line and explain your special needs. Ask emergency providers to keep your special needs information on file.*Keep a phone near your bed and be ready to call 911 or your local emergency number if a fire occurs. After a Fire – The following checklist serves as a quick reference and guide for you to follow after a fire strikes.*Contact your local disaster relief service, such as The Red Cross, if you need temporary housing, food and medicines.*If you are insured, contact your insurance company for detailed instructions on protecting the property, conducting inventory and contacting fire damage restoration companies.  If you are not insured, try contacting private organizations for aid and assistance.*Check with the fire department to make sure your residence is safe to enter. Be watchful of any structural damage caused by the fire.  The fire department should see that utilities are either safe to use or are disconnected before they leave the site.  DO NOT attempt to reconnect utilities yourself.*Conduct an inventory of damaged property and items.  Do not throw away any damaged goods until after an inventory is made.  Try to locate valuable documents and records.*Begin saving receipts for any money you spend related to fire loss.  The receipts may be needed later by the insurance company and for verifying losses claimed on income tax.*Notify your mortgage company of the fire. Cooking*Stay in the kitchen when you are frying, grilling, or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove.*Wear short, close-fitting or tightly rolled sleeves when cooking.*Keep children away from cooking areas by enforcing a “kid-free zone” of 3 feet around the stove.*Position barbecue grills at least 10 feet away from siding and deck railings, and out from under eaves and overhanging branches. Smoking*Smoke outside and completely stub out butts in an ashtray or a can filled with sand.*Soak cigarette butts and ashes in water before throwing them away. Never toss hot cigarette butts or ashes in the trash can.*Never smoke in a home where oxygen is used, even if it is turned off. Oxygen can be explosive and makes fire burn hotter and faster.*Be alert – don't smoke in bed! If you are sleepy, have been drinking, or have taken medicine that makes you drowsy, put your cigarette out first. Electrical and Appliance Safety*Frayed wires can cause fires. Replace all worn, old or damaged appliance cords immediately and do not run

cooking health bay university agency escape music ice children audible natural earth fire state audio college live frost deadly change surviving protect energy accent dark steel wheels tech water heat web index fall rain pond research ocean weather government education transportation birds prevention teach chesapeake bay ohio chesapeake snow environment replace plan hands wakefield images wear green farmers equinox va eastern standard smoking drive msonormal preparing commonwealth northern hemisphere position stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens practice williamsburg arial smoke environmental times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah almanac cdc electrical fires teal oxygen grade special olympics crawl colorful batteries brant winter solstice signature portable speak mid incarnation national weather service dehydration freezing watershed transcript earth sciences etude soak inspect centers disease control red cross virginia tech atlantic ocean natural resources proactively winter storms grades k no strings attached name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table proper use install conduct ar sa seaman cold winter away blacksburg asphyxiation power outage american red cross cosgrove new boots msohyperlink older adults snowstorms fireplaces did you know sections ben cosgrove stormwater canvasback national oceanic temperatures loons policymakers bmp generators heritage park notify federal emergency management agency atmospheric administration noaa car safety emergency management inhaling new standard john mccutcheon acknowledgment virginia department winter weather cumberland gap frayed sols cold world prepare your home tmdl polar plunge smoke alarms solstices timeanddate virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
Face Off Hockey Show
Chesapeake Hockey Week 11.30.21 (S4E13): Stevenson Men Sweep; Black Bears, Stevenson Women Split

Face Off Hockey Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021


This week, Scotty Wazz talks about the Black Bears return to the ice after a week off and their split with Danbury. Stevenson's Men squad swept Tufts University and got some weekly awards out of it, while Stevenson's Women split their weekend in the Codfish Bowl with a gritty come from behind win on Sunday. 

Chesapeake Church Sermons
RAW: The Truth About Us | How we Love to Judge

Chesapeake Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 34:50


Sunday, November 28, 2021 - "Thank You, God, that I am not like them." WE think we;re being humble, but are we? Or are we judging? "I'm not judging," is such a common statement that, the moment we hear it, we know the person is judging. But do we hear ourselves? In Luke 18, Jesus tells a parable of a Pharisee and a tax- collector. One was  so busy being humble - he couldn't hear his pride. The other was so broken he had no pride at all. The raw truth about us is that we often take great pride in our humbleness.

Forefront Church
Prepare The Way: Week 4

Forefront Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 20:00


This four-week series teaches the importance of Advent, a special time in the Christian tradition. The time leading up to Christmas is a moment for believers to prepare to receive the gift of their King. Preparation takes a great deal of practice, readiness, some waiting, and trusting God will go above and beyond our expectations as Jesus comes to set us free. Find out more about Forefront Church at: http://forefront.org http://forefrontchurch.info http://facebook.com/forefront757 http://twitter.com/forefront757 http://instagram.com/forefront757

High Intensity Business
342 - Dr Bryce Lee - What Should You Do Alongside High Intensity Strength Training?

High Intensity Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 61:59


Dr. Bryce Lee (bryce @ strength-space.com) is the Co-founder, Director of Therapy, and CEO of StrengthSpace, an evidence-based strength training studio and provider of physical therapy services in Chesapeake, Virginia. He focuses on muscle activation, orthopaedics, pain neuroscience, and evolutionary biology.  In this episode, Bryce talks about heat adaptation, regular loading, activities for range of motion, supplementary activities to strength training, and much more.  Become a successful strength studio owner  This podcast episode is brought to you by ARX Do you struggle to attract and retain clients in your strength training studio? ARX machines use breakthrough motorized resistance and computer software to give your clients the perfect workout every time, so you can start to deliver great workouts and grow your business with confidence. Get $500 OFF by going to ARXFit.com/HIB and booking a call with the ARX sales team – Book Here For all of the show notes, links and resources - Click Here

Forefront Church
Prepare The Way: Week 3

Forefront Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 22:00


This four-week series teaches the importance of Advent, a special time in the Christian tradition. The time leading up to Christmas is a moment for believers to prepare to receive the gift of their King. Preparation takes a great deal of practice, readiness, some waiting, and trusting God will go above and beyond our expectations as Jesus comes to set us free. Find out more about Forefront Church at: http://forefront.org http://forefrontchurch.info http://facebook.com/forefront757 http://twitter.com/forefront757 http://instagram.com/forefront757

Chesapeake Church Sermons
RAW: The Truth About Us | We Still Want a Show

Chesapeake Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 37:21


Sunday, November 21, 2021 - Thrill me, God! Do a big thing! We want God to show Himself in power and might. And we want it so much that we can often miss when God will speak in big ways. He will give us a mountaintop experience - an undeniable experience with His presence. Other times, He will communicate tenderly and more quietly. The raw truth about us is that God speaks to us as we need - not as we want.

Eye On Annapolis Daily News Brief
Local Business Spotlight: The Arc - Central Chesapeake Region

Eye On Annapolis Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 29:58


Times are changing. Forty years ago, someone with a developmental or mental disability was a candidate for institutionalized care. Today...not so much. And locally we can thank The Arc - Central Chesapeake Region for that! Today we speak with Jonathon Rondeau who is the President and CEO at their Severn headquarters. Their services range from day services, to workforce development, to residential programs for clients and their families across the Chesapeake region on the Eastern and Western Shore of Maryland. Jonathon has had a call to help quite literally since summer camp as a youth. And from that point on, he has dedicated himself to helping our neighbors with disabilities. And currently, they are looking for caring individuals to join their team. Have a listen! LINKS: The Arc - Central Chesapeake Region (Website) The Arc - Central Chesapeake Region (Facebook) The Arc - Central Chesapeake Region (Twitter) The Arc - Central Chesapeake Region (Instagram) The Arc - Central Chesapeake Region (Linked In) The Arc - Central Chesapeake Region (YouTube)  

Chesapeake Uncharted
So You Think You Can Save the Chesapeake

Chesapeake Uncharted

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 33:11


A massive effort to clean up the Chesapeake Bay faces more problems with a hotter, stormier world because of climate change.

Eric Krasno Plus One
Nate Smith

Eric Krasno Plus One

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 63:05


This week on Plus One, drummer Nate Smith joins Kraz to talk about the making of his new record, Kinfolk 2: See the Birds, his eclectic range of influences which spans from The Police to Living Colour, and how he developed his vamp-based groove style that still allows for the addition of rhythmic color through the drums. You'll also hear Nate dive deep on a songwriting credit that he received on a Michael Jackson tune, and Kraz tells Nate about a similar experience he had when 50 Cent used one of his own beats. The two friends also discuss how they were inspired by Herbie Hancock's implementation of new-age technologies in his music, discovering James Brown and other funk artists through hip hop samples, and why Nate is thankful that he didn't grow up around other musicians. Nate Smith is an American drummer, songwriter, producer, and three-time Grammy nominee from Chesapeake, Virginia. He has been a key piece in reinvigorating the international music scene with his visceral, instinctive, and deep-rooted style of drumming. Nate's resume of collaborators includes diverse and legendary names including Pat Metheny, Dave Holland, members of Vulfpeck, Brittany Howard, Chris Potter, José James, John Patitucci, Ravi Coltrane, and Somi among many others. His 2x Grammy-nominated debut album, KINFOLK: Postcards from Everywhere, exhibits the fusion of his original modern jazz compositions with R&B, pop, and hip-hop. In recent years, through a series of viral videos, he has emerged as one of the most influential and popular drummers of his generation. His videos have been viewed millions of times and have inspired countless musicians and fans, and in this episode he tells Kraz about the creative work that goes into his music. This podcast is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating or review on iTunes!Eric Krasno Plus One is presented by Osiris Media. All original music by Eric Krasno. Executive Producers are RJ Bee and Christina Collins. Audio Production by Matt Dwyer. Produced by Ben Baruch of 11E1even Group.Visit SunsetlakeCBD.com and use the promo code PLUSONE for 20% off premium CBD productsIt's visit BetterHelp.com/plusone to get 10% off your first month of professional online therapy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Swindled
The OB-GYN (Javaid Perwaiz)

Swindled

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 59:17


An anonymous tip leads to the arrest of a beloved gynecologist in Chesapeake, Virginia. Prelude: Dr. Roger Beyer is investigated for improperly reusing a rectal pressure device. –––-–---------------------------------------- PATREON: Patreon.com/Swindled DONATE: SwindledPodcast.com/Support CONSUME: SwindledPodcast.com/Shop WATCH: SwindledVideo.com –––-–---------------------------------------- MUSIC: Deformr.com –––-–---------------------------------------- FOLLOW: SwindledPodcast.com Instagram.com/SwindledPodcast Twitter.com/SwindledPodcast Facebook.com/SwindledPodcast Thanks for listening. :-) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices