Podcasts about pacific

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Ocean between Asia and Australia in the west, the Americas in the east and Antarctica or the Southern Ocean in the south.

  • 6,339PODCASTS
  • 22,974EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 19, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about pacific

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Latest podcast episodes about pacific

RNZ: Morning Report
Equal Pay Act nearly 50 years old

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 4:25


The Equal Pay Act turns 49 today. Yet, Maori, Pacific people, women and those with disabilities continue to be underpaid. Mind the Gap is a year-long campaign starting today to make some significant progress before the 50th Anniversary next year. Spokeperson Dellwyn Stuart spoke to Susie Ferguson.

RNZ: Morning Report
Pacific islands relieved by climate aid promise

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 2:34


Pacific Islands are relieved that New Zealand has finally delivered on a climate pledge made six years ago. New Zealand's promise of $1.3 billion over four years to countries most vulnerable to climate change is part of the commitment it signed up to in the Paris Climate Agreement in 2015. At least half of the money is to go to the Pacific. Johnny Blades has more

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ
Úc được kêu gọi phải hỗ trợ các đảo quốc Thái Bình Dương phục hồi kinh tế sau đại dịch

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 5:11


Mặc dù hầu hết các đảo quốc ở Thái Bình Dương đều tránh được những đợt bùng phát COVID-19 lan rộng, nhưng tác động cuả nó lên các đảo quốc này không hề nhỏ, thất nghiệp, bạo hành, khả năng chi trả đang hiện diện ở các gia đình.

The Roddenberry Podcast Network
ML-Live: 157 - Lower Decks: "First First Contact"

The Roddenberry Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 74:38


John and Ashley and our many callers celebrate the end of the second year of the Cerritos' mission on Star Trek: Lower Decks! Be sure to join us live! We're on the Mission Log Facebook page every Monday at 7pm Pacific/10pm Eastern

Mission Log Live: A Roddenberry Star Trek Podcast
157 - Lower Decks: "First First Contact"

Mission Log Live: A Roddenberry Star Trek Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 74:38


John and Ashley and our many callers celebrate the end of the second year of the Cerritos' mission on Star Trek: Lower Decks! Be sure to join us live! We're on the Mission Log Facebook page every Monday at 7pm Pacific/10pm Eastern

The Athletic Hockey Show: A show about the NHL
Auston Matthews set for season debut tonight, Brady Tkachuk signs longterm with the Ottawa Senators, Filip Zadina postgame comments about Conor Garland, Nikita Kucherov potentially headed to LTIR (again), Multiple Choice Madness, and much more

The Athletic Hockey Show: A show about the NHL

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 70:20


First, Ian and Hailey talk about the the origins of Hailey's dog's name, and Ian shares a Gilbert Brulé story involving U2 frontman Bono, and then they discuss the biggest first week surprises of the NHL season, Auston Matthews making his season debut against the New York Rangers tonight, and whether he'll hit the 50-goal plateau or not, Brady Tkachuk's 7-year, $57.5 million deal with the Ottawa Senators, Filip Zadina's questionable postgame comments about Conor Garland, another potential LTIR stint for Nikita Kucherov, if the NHL should start to move away from a hard salary cap, the beauty of unique arena foods, and more. Plus, to close things out, Ian and Hailey run through a series of Multiple Choice Madness questions including which teams or players should be most concerned after the first week of the season, which team win the Pacific division, and the ideal start time for Sunday NHL games. And, right now, you can save 50% on an annual subscription to The Athletic when you visit http://theathletic.com/hockeyshow

RNZ: Morning Report
Covid-19: Epidemiologist concerned traffic light system would be too rigid

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 6:55


An expert says he's concerned a traffic light system for the future management of Covid-19 could be too rigid. Epidemiologist Rod Jackson told Morning Report he has concerns whether it will be a nimble enough system. "My response to a traffic light is that Covid doesn't follow the road rules," he said. "I believe if we look at what's happening around the world, particularly in places like Singapore, next year is going to be messy, whatever happens, and we're going to have to be nimble. "We're going to have to be able to be flexible, we're going to have to be able to stop and start." Professor Jackson said at the moment vaccination remains the only game in town, and there's two groups who are currently unvaccinated. "There are those who just haven't got around to it yet, and we need to go hard on them with no jab, no job, no fun... and the second group are those people who don't trust the system. "For those we have to find the people they trust, it may be gangs, it will be Maori leaders, Pacific leaders, GPs." He added everything needs to be thrown at the unvaccinated to encourage them, because if the vaccine doesn't find them Covid-19 will. "Do we buy them off? Yeah, it's worth it. Do we punish or punish? Do we have no jab, no job, no fun mandates? Absolutely. Do we send gangs out to their communities and fund them to do it? Absolutely. We need to do absolutely everything to protect our businesses. "At the very beginning of this vaccine rollout period, I mean about a month ago I had a one liner: 'Hate lockdowns? Get a jab. Really hate lockdowns? Get two'. I'm changing that now to: 'Hate lockdowns? Get a mate jabbed. Really hate lockdowns? Get two mates jabbed'."

Legendary Chiropractor Podcast
S11E2: Importance of Self-Care & Extracurricular Activities

Legendary Chiropractor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 11:38


Chiropractic Conversations with Dr. Johnny on the Legendary Chiropractor Podcast!This episode we are diving into...Importance of Self-care and Extracurriculars as a Chiropractic DoctorsKeeping your mind and body balanced as well as the mind and body working together is a recipe for success. Having self-care and extracurriculars will keep that connection lasting longer, so you can serve anyone and everyone that seeks out your craft:Allows you to be open mindedLearn new thingsReinforces what you may already know

Orange Lounge Radio
Orange Lounge Radio 888 - 10/17/2021

Orange Lounge Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 129:32


Steam has decided to ban Virtual Currency driven games from it's marketplace, causing Epic to open the door and say perhaps they would allow it in certain circumstances. Do we think these sorts of newer kinds of currency have a place in games? Or are we reminded a bit much of Diablo 3's auction house, which brought down the reception of that game until it was taken out. We discuss all this and much more in the news, even after a late start to our recording due to the power outage. Come join us for a lucky episode of the longest running video game podcast, Orange Lounge Radio!   Also in the News: * Minecraft Live Announcements * Animal Crossing Direct * Nintendo Online Expansion Pack * G4 Coming Back to Cable   All this and more on the show where EVERY gamer has a voice-- Orange Lounge Radio! LIVE on the VOG Network, Sunday nights at 6 Pacific, 9 Eastern www.vognetwork.com Twitter: @olr Mailbag: participate (at) orangeloungeradio dot com

All The People You Should Know
Bayocean - The Atlantic City of the Pacific Northwest

All The People You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 27:48


Check out Politics and War: politicsandwar.comAnd, One Day University (promo code: obscurehistory) onedayu.com/obscure-historyAlso, earbudspodcastcollective.orgAnd, indiedropin.com for all your podcast discovery needs!

Locked On Cougars
BYU film review: Baylor runs roughshod & weekend recap - October 18, 2021

Locked On Cougars

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 34:55


The Locked On Cougars Podcast for Monday, October 18, 2021 Monday's podcast (released Sunday) began with a film review of BYU's disappointing 38-24 loss to Baylor as Jake Hatch explains that the Cougars' defensive gameplan was blown to smithereens with the Bears doing essentially what they wanted to in the victory Film Review Monday continued in the second stanza as Jake talked about the offensive performance for the Cougars, explaining that the offense did a lot of good things, but the failures on the defensive side limited their opportunities along with a green right side of the offensive line Finally, the podcast wrapped up with a look at the rest of the BYU teams that were in action over the weekend, including the cross country programs, No. 15 women's soccer rolling past Pacific and No. 8 women's volleyball making it a 12-match win streak in Malibu Support Us By Supporting Our Locked On Podcast Network Sponsors!  Built Bar - Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to BuiltBar.com and use promo code “LOCKEDON15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline.AG - There is only one place that has you covered and one place we trust to place our wagers. That's BetOnline! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use the promo code "LOCKEDON" for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto - Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. SweatBlock - Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code "LOCKEDON," or at Amazon and CVS. PrizePicks - Don't hesitate, check out PrizePicks.com and use promo code: “LOCKEDON” or go to your app store and download the app today. PrizePicks is daily fantasy made easy! Follow the Locked On Cougars podcast on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to stay up-to-date with the latest with regards to the podcast and BYU sports news. Please remember to subscribe, rate and review the show. Also, please consider subscribing to the Yawk Talk Newsletter that Jake writes and is delivered directly to your email inbox. If you are interested in advertising with Locked On Cougars or the Locked On Podcast Network, please email us at LockedOnBYU@gmail.com or contact us here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

RNZ: Checkpoint
Top epidemiologist concerned at 'outbreak of the unvaccinated'

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 6:27


Epidemiologist Professor Michael Baker told Checkpoint his biggest concern the spread of Delta is an "outbreak of the unvaccinated". "The unvaccinated are increasingly Māori and Pacific people. So we do run the risk of this becoming a very unequal outbreak, and I think that's a really critical factor that government needs to look at, at the moment." He also said a level 4 lockdown may still be necessary, depending on the outbreak's movement.  

Japan Baseball Weekly
Vol. 11.35: Tony Barnette, Pennant Races, Draft Notes, Skipper Tatsunami And Staff, Roki, HighHeat

Japan Baseball Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 88:24


Yakult Swallows scout Tony Barnette is the guest, we discuss the pennant and playoff races in the Central and Pacific leagues, drop some notes on the Oc.t 11 draft, take a quick look at incoming Chunichi skipper Kazuyoshi Tatsunami and his staff, quickly go through the latest Roki Sasaki start and handle some HighHeat.

RNZ: Morning Report
Covid-19: Concerns Pacific economic progress could be wiped

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 4:33


There are dire warnings a decade of economic development in the Pacific region could be wiped out by the Covid-19 pandemic. A new report by World Vision reveals 60 percent of households in the Pacific have lost jobs and incomes, forcing them to skip meals and send their young children to work. World Vision international partnerships director TJ Grant spoke to Corin Dann.

RNZ: Morning Report
Government pledges $1.3b to climate change-affected countries

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 7:18


New Zealand's Pacific neighbours are in for a climate aid boost. The government's committing $1.3 billion over four years to support countries most vulnerable to climate change - at least half of that money will go to the Pacific. The announcement comes ahead of the UN's Climate Change Conference in Glasgow, which begins at the end of October. Climate Change Minister James Shaw spoke to Susie Ferguson.

Science Friction - ABC RN
In deep: Why mining is heading to the seafloor

Science Friction - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 25:46


Is the key to a battery-powered future lying 4000 metres below the sea surface?

Full Story
An impossible choice: what does the world owe the Pacific?

Full Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 24:02


In the final episode of our three-part series, we speak to Pacific politicians fighting it out with much larger, wealthier and more heavily polluting countries on the world stage; Pacific leaders facing the gargantuan task of attempting to relocate entire villages, infrastructure and even burial grounds as communities are threatened; and legal experts about what options Pacific countries have for compensation, to find out what the future is for the Pacific in the face of the climate crisis

LeggLife Podcast
Good Boss Bad Boss :: Episode 43 :: LeggLife Podcast

LeggLife Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 32:34


In honor of National Bosses Day (October 15th) we're telling our boss stories, both good and bad. What makes a good boss? What makes a bad boss? We share our thoughts and experiences. Have a comment or question about this topic? Want to engage in the conversation? Subscribe to the LeggLife Podcast on YouTube and comment on this episode: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQrR4KEXjgcOT91y5IqOijg New episodes are uploaded weekly on Saturday mornings at 7am Pacific / 10am Eastern Support us and the LeggLife Podcast by becoming a patron at https://www.patreon.com/legglife Learn more about LeggLife by following us on: YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/legglifeak/?sub_confirmation=1 Instagram: https://instagram.com/legglifeak Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/legglife You can reach us via email at legglife@gmail.com

The John Batchelor Show
1767: Hollywood on Strike. Jeff Bliss, @JCBliss, Pacific Watch

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 11:20


Photo:  Holly wood. Hollywood on Strike.  Jeff Bliss, @JCBliss, Pacific Watch  https://www.latimes.com/entertainment-arts/business/story/2021-10-13/iatse-names-date-for-possible-strike-if-talks-with-producers-stall Jeff Bliss, @JCBliss, #PacificWatch; formerly associate director for communications at the Hoover Institution; also, director of public affairs at California State University, San Luis Obispo.  

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
The Geopolitics of the US-UK-Australia Submarine Deal

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 9:38


President Biden recently made a nuclear submarine deal with the UK and Australia to counter China's military influence in the Pacific. But what does that mean for future trade deals that could counter the communist country's economic influence? Ian Johnson with the Council on Foreign Relations chatted with Boyd about what the US has to balance to be in the best position possible. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Podcast [Washington Roundtable Oct 15, 21]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 48:17


On this Washington Roundtable episode of the Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast, sponsored by Bell, our guests are Dov Zakheim, PhD, former DoD comptroller, now with the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Dr. Patrick Cronin of the Hudson Institute and Steve Grundman of the Atlantic Council and the Grundman Advisory consultancy. Topics: — Congressional update as US borrowing limit is raised and Democrats work to forge a compromise spending package — Implications of budget deliberations and new Biden administration climate strategy on Pentagon spending — Whether allegations by former USAF software chief Nick Chaillan will drive DoD to address known cyber software and hardware vulnerabilities — Inflation impact on the Pentagon's spending power — How China's economic stumble could ripple across the global economy — Beijing's continuing provocations across the Pacific and America's allies increase their cooperation in the region and beyond — Europe's continuing shift on its view of China as Beijing's muscular stance alienates potential partners — UK investment in Africa ports to contest growing Chinese regional role — Takeaways from the Association of the United States Army's annual meeting this week and Cold War lessons from the US Army in Europe that are applicable today  — Israel's about face on the Iran nuclear deal, Israel's air strike in Syria and what's next in Afghanistan

Full Story
An impossible choice: leave your island or fight to stay?

Full Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 31:38


In the second part of our special podcast series, we travel across the Pacific to islands in Papua New Guinea where people are being forced to leave due to rising sea levels, and to the tiny nation of Tuvalu where people are fighting to remain. We speak to islanders who have been forced to make devastating decisions due to a climate crisis not of their making ‘My father will go down like the captain of the Titanic': life on the Pacific's disappearing islands An impossible choice: when climate change arrives at your door – podcast In Samoa we are born into land, climate change threatens to take it away from us

The 2 Half-Squads: Advanced Squad Leader Podcast

One of the better blogs out there is created by Jackson Kwan. You have heard his voice here when he has called into the show to advertise various Advanced Squad Leader tournaments in Asia. He is very active on Twitter and is a great source to find out what the latest plans are in ASL game production.  We are sure you will enjoy this look at the ASL scene in the Pacific.  We had a very good time

The Tony DUrso Show
Explode Your Referrals with Seth Greene on The Tony DUrso Show

The Tony DUrso Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 60:00


Seth Greene is the nation's foremost authority on growing your business with a podcast. He's the co-host of the Sharkpreneur podcast with Shark Tank's Kevin Harrington that was just named “One of the Top 10 Podcasts to Listen to in 2019” by Nasdaq. He is the founder of the direct response marketing firm Market Domination llc, and is a 7-time best selling author who has been interviewed on NBC, CBS, Forbes, Inc, CBS Moneywatch and many more. Listen to The Tony DUrso Show on VoiceAmerica Influencers Platform every Friday at 2pm Pacific or listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or tonydurso.com.

The Tony DUrso Show
Explode Your Referrals with Seth Greene on The Tony DUrso Show

The Tony DUrso Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 57:56


Seth Greene is the nation's foremost authority on growing your business with a podcast. He's the co-host of the Sharkpreneur podcast with Shark Tank's Kevin Harrington that was just named “One of the Top 10 Podcasts to Listen to in 2019” by Nasdaq. He is the founder of the direct response marketing firm Market Domination llc, and is a 7-time best selling author who has been interviewed on NBC, CBS, Forbes, Inc, CBS Moneywatch and many more. Listen to The Tony DUrso Show on VoiceAmerica Influencers Platform every Friday at 2pm Pacific or listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or tonydurso.com.

Adafruit Industries
Deep Dive w/Scott: CircuitPython on a Raspberry Pi

Adafruit Industries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 142:21


Join Scott as he works on bringing CircuitPython to the Raspberry Pi. Work on USB has stalled so he's taking a break by working on getting CircuitPython working over UART. Chat with Scott and lot of others on the Adafruit Discord at https://adafru.it/discord. Deep Dive happens every week. Normally Fridays at 2pm Pacific but occasionally shifted to Thursday at 2pm. Typically goes for two hours or more. Questions are welcome. Next week is on Friday. 0:00 Getting started 0:03:25 Hello everyone / Housekeeping 0:05:51 Today - working on Arm Cortex A as bare metal micro (raspberry pi 4) 0:06:37 last week: interrupts / tiny usb 0:07:29 Exception Levels. EL3, EL2 (hypervisor), EL1 (OS), EL0 (applications) 0:09:13 Last week - EL2 hypervisor bits needed to be set 0:10:47 Looked into ARM architecture reference manual HCR_EL2 (64 bit register) 0:12:39 TGE bit Trap General Exception 0:16:19 D1.13 asynchronous exception type, routing, masking and priorities 0:18:09 Non-secure mode, SCR, TDE “C - interrupt remains pending” TGE bit set to 1 0:19:44 the magic bit that needed to be set in broadcom peripherals repo 0:21:00 NVM3722 ARM and AUX_IRQhandler 0:23:25 Pointer boxing ( using ‘extra' bits in 64 bit pointer ) 0:24:10 Open OCD, Gdb, and uart screens 0:25:06 CP repl on Rasbperry Pi 0:25:33 print(“hello world”) hangs / next week HDMI output, but first fix this bug 0:28:21 ARM exception decoding using cortex-a.py arm8a-exception 0:29:40 pointer greater than 32 bits - probably a problem 0:30:30 Memory mapping ( only the first ‘gig' of memory mapped ) 0:37:19 question: can a zero 1.3 use with any lcd??? 0:40:55 aapcs arm call stack research / Procedure call standard for the Arm Architecture 0:43:51 decode failing - irq_entry and irq_exit call stack creation 0:45:20 Frame pointer 0:50:58 ARM ABI 0:53:40 Microsoft arm arch 64 ABI documentation - very similar 0:54:54 experiment with h=”hello world” 0:55:58 gdb) info frame 1:02:25 typical C function call 1:05:28 exceptions should save the ‘callers' state 1:06:13 ‘101' review of memory ( heap and stack ) 1:25:00 disassemble mp_obj_print_helper to look at use of frame pointer 1:28:00 back to github libunwind 1:34:35 Unwinding frames in python 1:35:10 CP uses PIO for neopixels on RP2040 1:37:52 aarch64-unwind.h 1:41:10 does it come down to the exception entry code needing to update frame pointer (x29) to be stored on the stack to a GDB "correct" value, rather than storing the previous frame pointer value when exception occurs? 1:51:20 Digikey has a small number of the LED glasses and nRF driver boards available 1:54:00 stack-unwind-samples 1:56:10 greyed out command completion from fish shell 1:59:08 code is compiled for 64 bit ARM 2:00:43 oh, my fish extension - otherwise it's pretty standard .fishrc (omf and bobthefish) 2:02:44 looking at github rsta2/circle for examples 2:03:51 exception stub 2:04:32 edc/bass to use bash utilities in fish shell 2:05:12 circle irq handler - might like what we want “exceptionstub64.S” 2:16:23 trying out the experiment - it's worse :-( 2:18:55 wrap up - shop at adafruit.com or digikey.com if not in stock 2:20:47 wake the cat - and catch the links at github tannewt rpi branch 2:21:55 bye spook Visit the Adafruit shop online - http://www.adafruit.com ----------------------------------------- LIVE CHAT IS HERE! http://adafru.it/discord Adafruit on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/adafruit Subscribe to Adafruit on YouTube: http://adafru.it/subscribe New tutorials on the Adafruit Learning System: http://learn.adafruit.com/ -----------------------------------------

Fantha Tracks Radio: A Star Wars Podcast
Making Tracks: Star Wars: Visions Roundtable: With James Waugh and Kanako Shirasaki

Fantha Tracks Radio: A Star Wars Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 25:57


Welcome to a special roundtable episode of Making Tracks as we join fellow sites and podcasts in putting questions to Star Wars: Visions Executive Producer James Waugh and Producer Kanako Shirasaki about this groundbreaking nine-episode anime show that has thrilled fans both new and old. Remember to tune in to our weekly Fantha Tracks news show Good Morning Tatooine, LIVE Sunday evenings at 9.00pm UK, 4.00pm Eastern and 1.00pm Pacific on Facebook and YouTube. You can contact any of our shows and send in your listeners questions by emailing radio@fanthatracks.com or comment on our social media feeds: www.youtube.com/channel/UCZ7LZotr3rQhVJwpO3b2ELw www.instagram.com/fanthatracks www.facebook.com/FanthaTracks www.twitter.com/FanthaTracks www.pinterest.co.uk/fanthatracks/ www.fanthatracks.tumblr.com/ www.tiktok.com/@fanthatracks

RNZ: Morning Report
Covid-19: Pasifika Youth Vax fest planned for Saturday

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 3:01


One of the Super Saturday events planned for tomorrow is the Pasifika Youth Vax Festival in Porirua East. It's on from 9am to 5pm at the Cannons Creek shops, and is being organised to encourage young people in particular to get vaccinated. As well as live music and DJs, cultural performances, free food, and a video game room, there will be a stall where everyone is invited to have a friendly down-to-earth conversation about vaccinations. Organisers Jaistone Finau spoke to Corin Dann.

Daily Kos Radio - Kagro in the Morning
Kagro in the Morning - October 14, 2021

Daily Kos Radio - Kagro in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 116:23


Listen to our archived episodes: RadioPublic|LibSyn|YouTube Support the show: Patreon|PayPal: 1x or monthly|Square Cash * David Waldman and Greg Dworkin have a million things to share with you today, and about a thousand links with me... Bill Shatner's still trending, forcing David to reveal that he is not a “Star Trek nerd” (Like we didn't guess that when he claimed that “Star Trek ships went everywhere at ‘maximum warp'...” SMH) That doesn't mean David's not willing to put in some effort though, especially when there's charts and statistics involved. Meanwhile, the January 6 Committee announced that they are subpoenaing Jeffrey Clark, a Trump plotter if there ever was one, and promised to hang tough on contempt charges, and maybe send some marshals to tase Steve KG Bannon. Who says Christmas is canceled? Of course, there are people saying that. Those people are kind of dumb, or at least forgetful. Joe Biden will run ports 24/7 to fix supply chain problems, and there will be more complexities to address, notably by those paying shit. The pandemic is also slowing things up, here and around the world, but more importantly it is still killing people. Quite a few will be killed in the name of freedom, which is just the way the GQP likes it, especially lately. It wouldn't surprise Republicans to know that mandates work, what matters is they just don't work for them. The FDA is meeting on booster shots. Joe says smarten up and get vaccinated. Marjorie TP Greene and Joe Rogan support the Republican vaccine, Ivermectin. It's not just COVID-19. Republicans have a big tent for morons of all stripes. A man killed 5 people in Norway with a bow and arrow, but Lauren Boebert is certain he would've done better in the US. Michelle Steele wants to get rid of those ships ruining her view of the Pacific. Scott Pio wants all boats out of the ocean… just a thought… Islands are even bigger, so let's move those onshore also. Trump ralliers pledge allegiance to the insurrection. Donald Trump doesn't actually need people that dumb to succeed. People have been plenty dumb enough for him all along. The NRCC noted a a 74% increase in dumbasses just this quarter however. (A&TT will be sad to see them leave.) Texas finally smoked out their last intelligent Republican. In Tennessee, if you show enough bigotry and hypocrisy, you might just slide. Still, not enough people want Donald Trump to run again in 2024 for him to actually get elected, but there's plenty enough if voting doesn't matter anymore. In Virginia, Glenn Trumpkin wants his Trump love on the DL, but Donald keeps sending flowers. Chuck Schumer will file cloture on a bill to overhaul voting laws, cutting loose pesky Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema, who seem pretty awful until you look across the aisle. 

Full Story
An impossible choice: when climate change arrives at your door

Full Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 24:19


In the first episode of this three-part series, we look at how families, communities and Pacific leaders are facing huge decisions about the future of their islands and trying to figure out if they can stay on their land – land that defines their identity, on which their ancestors are buried – or whether they'll be forced to leave In Samoa we are born into land – climate change threatens to take it away from us An impossible choice: leave your island or fight to stay? – podcast ‘My father will go down like the captain of the Titanic': life on the Pacific's disappearing islands

Gayish Podcast
Gayish: 249 Twinks

Gayish Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 82:34


BUT REALLY, WHAT IS A TWINK? We explore twinks hard and deep with the etymology of twinks, twink tops, the twink lifecycle, Tyler Oakley, twink erasure, twinking in video games, twink erasure, and the Twink Buttle Royal. Can you even handle that much twink!? (Yes. Yes you can.) Send in your questions for our Q&A episode, livestreaming on Sunday, Oct. 17 @ 2pm Pacific. https://www.facebook.com/events/299375832019454 In this episode: News- 5:39 || Main Topic (Twinks)- 25:24 || Gayest & Straightest- 1:14:05 On Monday's bonus Patreon segment, Fucking Dan talks about the Twinkie Defense, which is not what Kyle thinks it is, and the important (and tragic) LGBT history of it. patreon.com/gayishpodcast.

Based on a True Story
The Pacific Part 2 with Marty Morgan

Based on a True Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 153:05


We're continuing our look at the HBO miniseries The Pacific by looking at the three episodes that cover Peleliu. Episodes we're covering today: 5. Peleliu Landing 6. Peleliu Airfield 7. Peleliu Hills Want to learn more? Find Marty's work: D-Day: A Photographic History of the Normandy Invasion Down to Earth: The 507th Parachute Infantry Regiment in Normandy Get Call of Duty: Vanguard Learn more about Marty's work on his site. Did you enjoy this episode? You can find the transcript and show notes for this episode at: https://www.basedonatruestorypodcast.com/191/ Support our sponsors: https://www.basedonatruestorypodcast.com/advertisers Or get ad-free content and exclusive bonus content by supporting the show directly: https://basedonatruestorypodcast.com/support/ Get a peek at upcoming episodes with the email newsletter: https://www.basedonatruestorypodcast.com/newsletter/ Want a chance to be heard on the show? Leave a voicemail at +1 (405) 334-4672.

Sea Control - CIMSEC
Sea Control 284 – Planning the Pacific War and Admiral Richmond Kelly Turner

Sea Control - CIMSEC

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


By Jon Frerichs Rear Admiral Tom Williams, Dr. Tim Francis, and Dr. Shawn Woodford join the program to discuss the career of Admiral Richmond Kelly Turner and his role in planning the war in the Pacific during World War II. Download Sea Control 284 – Planning the Pacific War and Admiral Richmond Kelly Turner Links … Continue reading Sea Control 284 – Planning the Pacific War and Admiral Richmond Kelly Turner →

Hoopstradamus
Division Preview: Pacific

Hoopstradamus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 60:39


Adam and Kurt cut it up about the Pacific Division. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hoopstradamus/support

Midnight Train Podcast
The British Columbia Foot Problem

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 113:24


Today on the train we're switching up gears a bit. Tonight we are discussing British Columbia's foot problems. Did you know that the most common foot problem in British Columbia and actually the world is athlete's foot? Well it's true! The feet are made of up 26 bones each, making them one of the most intricate areas of the body. Nevertheless, according to the College of Podiatry, a person will walk an estimated 150,000 miles in their lifetime, roughly the equivalent of walking around the world six times. Improper footwear, diabetes, and aging are some of the chief contributors to foot problems. Bunions are another of the biggest four problems. Bunions are abnormalities of the feet that cause a bump to develop on the large toe joint. This can cause the big toe to turn slightly inward. Doctors call bunions “hallux valgus.”   Women are more likely to have bunions due to increased pressures from narrow footwear. Wait...I think I got the wrong notes… What are we talking about? Oh… Shit… Yes, the British Columbia foot problem… Sorry, it had nothing so with actual foot problems. If you know it's… It is much stranger and a bit more macabre than bunions… Maybe… Bunions are gross.    So the British Columbia foot problem… What exactly is it? Well when most people go to the beach they are on the lookout for cool shells, maybe some crabs or other animals, good looking ladies and gents, but on the shores of the Salish sea, in the Pacific northwest, people are on the lookout for something else… Human feet. Yep… Human feet.    On August 20, 2007, a 12-year-old girl spotted a lone blue-and-white running shoe—a men's size 12—on a beach of British Columbia's Jedediah Island. She looked inside, and found a sock. She looked inside the sock, and found a foot. That in and of itself, while kinda gross, isn't necessarily a really strange thing. But Six days later on nearby Gabriola Island, a Vancouver couple enjoying a seaside hike came across a black-and-white Reebok. Inside it was another decomposing foot. It, too, was a men's size 12. The two feet clearly didn't belong to the same person; not only were the shoes themselves different, but they both contained right feet.   Police were stunned. “Two being found in such a short period of time is quite suspicious,” Garry Cox of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police told the Vancouver Sun. “Finding one foot is like a million to one odds, but to find two is crazy. I've heard of dancers with two left feet, but come on.”   So now we've got something weird going on right… Well maybe but let's not jump the gun….ok let's jump the gun. In the following year, 2008, five more feet were found on the shores of the islands of British Columbia in the Salish Sea.    Needless to say people started freaking out. Speculation came from everyone. Ranging from plane crashes and ship wrecks to serial killers, to aliens. Moody thinks it was all people who pissed off sasquatch.    All in all as of January 1st 2019, 21 feet have been found in total. So what is going on up there? Well let's take a look at the first and see if that helps.    The ass says before the first four was found in Augusta 2007. According to an article on the Vancouver Sun,  a girl visiting from Washington picked up a size 12 Adidas shoe and opened the sock to find a man's right foot. What a vacation! They ended up finding out that The remains were those of a missing man suffering from depression. There's not much known about the man other than that. The family never revealed much.    Within a week, on August 26, 2007, another foot was found. A man's right foot, discovered by a couple, also disarticulated due to decay. It was waterlogged and appeared to have been taken ashore by an animal. It probably floated ashore from the south. According to the Vancouver Sun again. This foot was found in a size 12 Reebok shoe. It was obviously a different person due to the site you're and the fact it was another right foot.    February 8, 2008, number 3 popped up. It was another right foot belonging to a man. This time on a size 11 Nike.  May 22, 2008 number 4. This time it was a woman's foot that was found. And yes we're 4 for 4 on the right feet. CBS news reported The fourth foot was discovered on an island in the Fraser Delta between Richmond and Delta, British Columbia. It was also wearing a sock and sneaker. the shoe was a new balance. It is thought to have washed down the Fraser River, having nothing to do with the ones found in the Gulf Islands. According to our friends at the Vancouver sun.   June 16th, 2008 two hikers came across number five. CBS news reported that it was a man's  left foot. It was found floating in the water in Delta. According to cbs, It has been confirmed that the left foot found on June 16 on Westham Island and the right foot found February 8 on Valdes Island belonged to the same man. We have a match!!!   So number 3 and number 5 are a match!   Number six showed up on August 1, 2008. This was the first one not found in British Columbia, it was found near Pysht, Washington. According to CTV news, it was confirmed that the foot was human. Police say the large black-top, size 11 athletic shoe for a right foot contains bones and flesh.The RCMP and Clallam County Sheriff's Department agreed on August 5 that the foot could have been carried south from Canadian waters.   November 11, 2008, number 7. a A shoe that was found floating in the Fraser River in Richmond.The shoe was described as a small New Balance running shoe, possibly a woman's shoe. New balance eh? Sound familiar? A woman's new balance. Well it should because the foot was linked via DNA testing to foot number 4. They belonged to the same woman. Eventually it would be known that this woman jumped from the Pattullo Bridge in New Westminster in April 2004. This one was seemingly a suicide.    Number 8 come on down, your the next contestant on Who's Foot Is This! October 27, 2009A right foot in a size 8½ Nike running shoe on a beach in Richmond. The remains were identified as a Vancouver-area man who was reported missing in January 2008. The Vancouver Sun gave us this info… shocker we know.    Number 9. A woman's or child's right foot was found on Whidbey island on August 27 2010, without a shoe or sock. This foot was determined to have been in the water for two months. Detective Ed Wallace of the Island County Sheriff's Office released a statement saying the foot would be tested for DNA. However, there was no match found in the national DNA database. Guess where we got this info from...WRONG… CBS news.. Hahaha got ya bitches!   On December 5th 2010 we reach#10. Ten fucking feet found.. only two matching pairs.    This was another one found outside, but near British Columbia. It was found in the tidal flats in Tacoma Washington. Sadly this one likely belonged to a young boy. The boot was a boys size 6 hiking boot. Thanks Vancouver Sun.   Hey Vancouver Sun any info on number 11? Oh you do? Well let's hear it.  On August 30, 2011, in a man's size 9 running shoe. It was a blue and white shoe. It was found floating next to the Plaza of Nations marina, attached to the lower leg bones. Yuck. Investigators said that there wasn't any sign of foul play though and the leg was naturally disarticulated due to decomposition in the water. The sex of this victim was not determined.    Hey guys, guess what, there's more.. Shall we press on?    November 4, 2011 number 12 is found. A man's right foot inside a size 12 hiking boot was discovered by a group of campers in a pool of fresh water at Sasamat Lake near Port Moody. Fucking Moody. A year later this foot was identified by the B.C. Coroner's Service as that of Stefan Zahorujko, a local fisherman who went missing in 1987. Again foul play was not expected as chickens are generally not able to remove the feet of humans.    Lucky number 13, well not so lucky in this case. This one brings us back to the states. Lake Union in Seattle to be more specific. Human leg bone and foot in a black plastic bag under the Ship Canal Bridge. As of January 2, 2012, the medical examiner had not found a cause of death or identified the body. This one sounds nice and shady. Also where the fuck were you on this one Vancouver Sun, we had to get this info from the Seattle times.. Jeeze.   Anyway, back to Vancouver. January 26, 2012 number 14 is found. According to, of course, the Vancouver Sun, On January 26, 2012, the remains of "what appears to be human bones inside a boot" were found in the sand along the water line at the dog park near the Maritime Museum at the foot of Arbutus Street, in Vancouver. This one doesn't show up in some of the stories about this issue only because it seems that they never confirmed it was human. At least not that we could find, which is strange. But… Whatever.   According to fox news "Adding to one of the great mysteries of the Pacific Northwest, a human foot still in a tennis shoe was found near Seattle's Pier 86 Tuesday." Tuesday was may 6 2014, and this was number 15. "It could be debris from Japan. It could be debris from the airplane that had crashed into the water. I wouldn't be surprised,” resident Karen Klett said. Volunteers cleaning up trash made the discovery and immediately called police.A local expert on tides told Q13 Fox News the feet could be local or they could come into the Sound by way of the Strait of Georgia in Canada or the Strait of Juan de Fuca here at home. The New Balance model 622 athletic shoe was white with blue trim, size men's 10½. It was A left foot.    Ladies, do you remember your sweet sixteen? Was it memorable? Did you get a car?  Big party? Severed foot? Wait… What? Well number 16 was found February 7, 2016. Hikers on Botanical Beach, near Port Renfrew on Vancouver Island, found a foot in a sock and running shoe. We could not find any information on if this one was ever identified.   She's only 17...SEVENTEEN! Only five days after number 26 was found… Number 17 popped up. On February 12, 2016 A foot washed up near Port Renfrew on Vancouver Island. This foot was found to match the one that washed up 5 days before.    Now to number 18. Almost there folks! The discovery was made by a man walking his dogs along the beach at around 8 a.m. along the Jordan river again on Vancouver Island. One of the dogs found the foot.    Number 19 was found May 6, 2018 on gabriola Island in British Columbia. Around noon, a man walking along the shore near South Road found a foot inside a hiking boot stuck in a logjam.   Number 20. September 20, 2018. The foot was found  within a light grey Nike Free RN shoe on the shore near the 30th Street beach access point in West Vancouver.   The size 9.5 shoe was manufactured between February 1 and April 17, 2017, and has a white base and a black Nike swoosh. The foot was in a blue sock. The test revealed that the foot belonged to a male.   The B.C. Coroners Service's identification specialist believes that the foot belonged to a man under the age of 50, based on its bone structure.   According to the West Vancouver Police Department, there is no evidence of a death from foul play at this point. DNA testing would eventually link this to a male who went missing in 2018.     Number 21 was another one that was found in the US. January 1, 2019 it was found on jetty Island in Everett Washington. The foot was found in a bit and DNA later linked it to Antonio Neill. At the time of the identification officials shockingly attenuated that Neill was presumed dead. His mother Jenny Neill believes someone harmed her son.   “We are no closer to finding what happened to him,” she said Tuesday. “We have had a lot of leads that are just rumors. We feel that someone is responsible for this, and we need help finding whoever did this.” He'd been staying in his car or on couches in 2016. Around the time he went missing, his car was stolen. Antonio was 22 when he went missing. His mother has seen no evidence confirming he was alive after December 2016.   Ok so those are the feet that have been found. We will post a picture that shows locations, and another with a little more info on the people they may have belonged to. Many of the get have been linked to missing people, and a couple to suicide. But aside from those suicides, what happened to those linked to missing people.    Theories range far and wide. From plane crashes, to human trafficking, aliens, and yes… Bigfoot.    One early suggestion was the quadra Island plane crash. The locations each of the first give feet were found in the first year seems to indicate they were from the similar sources (via body decomposition) and the time of discovery Oceanographists determined no known currents could have contributed to the spread. Detectives at the time had theorized the feet came from the 5 person fatality Quadra Island plane crash that occurred approximately 60–90 miles northwest in 2005 . The image below shows the locations of the five feet found in 2007–2008 with the location of the Quadra Island plane crash in Blue. It is likely that some of the feet originate from this plane crash, but there is no proof to date that this is the case; four bodies remain unrecovered. At first, the Quadra Island plane crash makes sense regarding the origin of said feet, but later DNA testing showed one of the feet was female, with the plane crash victims (5 total) were all men.    Other theorists believe the coastline is being used as a body dump for organized crime activity; a third scenario is a serial killer is at work.   In the past few years, more than 20 men in the Vancouver area have gone missing. Their disappearances have never been accounted for despite pleas from families for information.    There is a faction of the public who believe that many of these discoveries are due to alien abduction and that of course the fact is being covered up. There may be some evidence to back up this claim! Ufology Research, an organization  in Canada,  has collected and analyzed Canadian UFO report data since 1989. Their 2017 survey showed that a total of 1,101 sightings were reported across the country, at a rate of roughly three per day — the fifth highest number since the group began collecting data in 1989. The survey also showed that there was an average of two witnesses per UFO sighting and that the sightings lasted about 15 minutes each. Many witnesses were police officers, pilots and other people with keen observational skills. In 2017 British Columbia had the third most reported UFO sightings in Canada. Hmmm maybe… Just maybe there's something to this.   Then again maybe not. 10 out of the 15 feet have been identified as belonging to people who died either accidentally—by falling off a boat or being swept away by a large wave—or by suicide. but what about the rest?     The location of the feet washing up isn't that that strange actually. Given the tidal currents of the area it actually makes sense that the feet are collecting in the area. It's seems the bigger mystery is what happened to all of those other people but identified? ….. …… …...   Top ten Canadian horror movies according to imdb   https://screenrant.com/best-canadian-horror-films/ BECOME A P.O.O.P.R.!! http://www.patreon.com/themidnighttrainpodcast   Find The Midnight Train Podcast: www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com www.facebook.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.twitter.com/themidnighttrainpc www.instagram.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.discord.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.tiktok.com/themidnighttrainp   And wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts.   Subscribe to our official YouTube channel: OUR YOUTUBE   Support our sponsors www.themidnighttraintrainpodcast.com/sponsors   The Charley Project www.charleyproject.org

The Critical Hour
Is the US Labor Shortage an Informal Strike?; House Passes Temporary Debt Ceiling Fix

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 113:09


Ray Baker, political analyst and host of the podcast Public Agenda, joins us to discuss the debt ceiling fight. The US House of Representative has passed a temporary debt ceiling bill that will expire in December. The bill passed without a single Republican vote and many Republicans are arguing that it should not be raised. Will Congress imperil the credit of the United States? Steve Poikonen, national organizer for Action4Assange, joins us to discuss Amazon. A recent investigation has revealed that Amazon is copying products and then rigging its internal searches to promote its own products. The tech giant has previously denied those allegations and the investigation reveals that at least two senior executives were in on the plot.Jack Rasmus, professor in economics and politics at St. Mary's College in California, joins us to discuss the economy. Dr Jack Rasmus has an interesting new article in which he argues that the desperate shortage in the labor market is a new type of worker action. Dr Jack says that because the workers are withholding their labor for better pay and working conditions their action can be classified as a strike. Laith Marouf, broadcaster and journalist based in Beirut, joins us to discuss Israel. Israel settlers have desecrated one of the oldest Muslim graveyards near the Al Aqsa mosque. Cheryl LaBash, Cuban solidarity activist and co-chair of the National Network on Cuba, joins us to discuss Cuba. Cuba's Henry Reeve Medical Brigade has been recognized worldwide for its work on the coronavirus pandemic. Our guest argues that the US is hampering actions that work for the betterment of humankind in its quest for domination over the tiny island nation and ultimately the world.Scott Ritter, former UN weapon inspector in Iraq, joins us to discuss the US military. A US marine who was disciplined for publicly criticizing the US handling of the Afghanistan withdrawal will reportedly plead guilty to a few charges. Lt. Col. Stuart Scheller is seeking to work out a plea bargain in which he is allowed to maintain some of his retirement benefits.K. J. Noh, peace activist, writer, and teacher, joins us to discuss China. A Democratic congresswoman has proposed that President Biden should have the authority to attack China and potentially start World War 3 without congressional approval. Also, our guest discusses the potential for war in the Pacific.Mark Sleboda, Moscow-based international relations security analyst, joins us to discuss the AUKUS nuclear submarine deal. Mark Sledoba lends us his technical expertise on submarines to discuss the issue of underwater warfare and in particular in regards to the US/China/Russia confrontation. Many observers believe that Europe must realign itself diplomatically for a closer relationship with Russia, China, and the Eurasian realm due to the recent actions of the US empire.

The Catholic Gentleman
Pipe Smoking The Catholic Way (w/ Kadesh Swanson)

The Catholic Gentleman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 69:54


In this episode of The Catholic Gentleman, Sam and John meet Kadesh Swanson, a Catholic artisan pipe maker, to discuss the joys of smoking a pipe and the benefits it has to our lives and souls. We go into the transcendentals inherently found in the craft of making high-quality pipes, as well as how fraternity, contemplation, and more can be found in smoking. Join us as we unpack the rich history of pipe smoking. In this episode we discuss; How to get started making pipes How pipe smoking is rich in history and tradition How God can use a craft or trade to bring you closer to Him The beauty found in enjoying a pipe And More Kadesh J Swanson (pronounced Kuh-day-sh) was born and raised in the Pacific northwest. He has been a Catholic his whole life and a pipe maker for close to 8 years. He loves studying theology, and spending time with my family. When he is not in the shop making pipes he is usually at a farmers market making tacos for the locals. Instagram Page: https://www.instagram.com/kjpipes Video: https://vimeo.com/326082806 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Louisiana Considered Podcast
Louisiana Considered: Killian & the Comeback Kids to perform live at the Zeitgeist Theatre

Louisiana Considered Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 24:29


Also, a forecast of Hurricane Pamela's effects on Louisiana and a look at how NOLA's criminal legal funds itself through arrests. Karl Lengelhosted this Wednesday's episode of Louisiana Considered. Film director and actor Taylor Purdee joins us to discuss his most recent musical film, “Killian & the Comeback Kids” (2020). The cast, composers and filmmakers will host a live Q&A session and performance of selected songs from the film this Friday, Oct. 15 at the Zeitgeist Theatre in New Orleans. Meteorologist Dan Hollidaytalks about Hurricane Pamela, which made landfall on Mexico's Pacific coast near Mazatlan. The storm's remnants are expected to hit Texas by Thursday morning. In a segment originally aired on the podcast “70 Million,” radio producer Eve Abrams follows up on her series “Unprisoned,” which explored the impact of New Orleans' criminal legal system on the lives of residents. This segment breaks down how the system passes its costs onto arrested individuals. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hakai Magazine Audio Edition
Rebroadcast: Defenders of the Forgotten Fish

Hakai Magazine Audio Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 19:12


by Ben Goldfarb • Tribes of the Columbia River watershed are hustling to keep the Pacific lamprey alive, one fish at a time. Originally published in July 2015, the story, along with photos and videos, can be found on hakaimagazine.com.

Walk Among Heroes
Walk Among Heroes Podcast Episode 28A - Paul Frederick (U.S. Marine Corps, Iwo Jima)

Walk Among Heroes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 44:20


Walk Among Heroes is honored to welcome Paul Frederick as our guest for Episode 28.  A lifelong resident of Kentucky, Mr. Frederick's served in the United States Marine Corps, 3rd Division, during World War II.  Mr. Frederick experienced combat as a bazooka man and machine gunner on several islands in the Pacific before finally invading Iwo Jima in February 1945.  During 30+ days on Iwo Jima, Mr. Frederick lost many friends and witnessed tremendous carnage, in one of the most difficult battles our military has ever experienced.   Prior to Iwo Jima, Mr. Frederick's ship was struck by torpedo, which killed dozens, causing the ship to sink.  Mr. Frederick was injured, but he refused to leave his unit.Earlier this year, Nashville songwriter Jim Collins (writer of many hits like ‘Big Green Tractor' and ‘Are You Gonna Kiss Me or Not') reached out to Mr. Frederick and asked to write a song about his life and military service.  Collins wrote a song for Mr. Frederick, titled ‘Guardian Angels', which provides a touching account of Mr. Frederick's life, including his 71-year marriage to the love of his life, Myrtle.  The song can be found at:  https://www.lex18.com/community/positively-lex-18/acclaimed-nashville-songwriter-writes-song-about-lexington-wwii-veteranThis episode consists of two parts.  Episode 28A focuses on Mr. Frederick's early life, bootcamp, and Marine Corps service.  Episode 28B opens with the invasion of Iwo Jima, then takes us through the rest of his life, including lessons learned.As always, ‘thank you' to Shreyas for donating your time as sound engineer for this podcast.

The Austin Daily Drop
Austin Daily Drop - Tuesday October 12, 2021

The Austin Daily Drop

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 8:51


Austin officially drops from Stage 4 to Stage 3 precaution range - a big step as vaccinated people can now safely forego masks in any situation where social distancing is possible. Governor Greg Abbott adds a general vaccine mandate ban to the agenda of the third special session of the Texas Legislature. Southwest Airlines appears to be recovering from the service crisis it suffered over the weekend into Monday, while the root cause remains a mystery. Tesla's move to Austin is likely to exacerbate real estate and transit issues across the area. Former Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo appears to be out as Chief in Miami, after just six months. Rattlesnake bites strike two local kids - time to refresh the do's and don'ts. George Strait and Willie Nelson will co-headline a huge coming out party for the new Moody Center at UT. The Uchi crew is bringing a more affordable spinoff to downtown Austin next fall. Austin Bergstrom International Airport makes a top-5 ranking for food and beverage options. And a Pacific hurricane stands to cross Mexico and bring the Austin area even more rain late this week.

ChinaPower
Deciphering the PLA's New Joint Doctrine: A Conversation with Dr. David Finkelstein

ChinaPower

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 34:06


In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Dr. David Finkelstein joins us to discuss the PLA's new joint doctrine and how it will impact China's military modernization. Dr. Finkelstein describes his research process behind his new report and predicts the major new components of the doctrine. He argues that the concept of an integrated joint force represents a major doctrinal development within the PLA and is a response to a paradigm shift in how warfighting is conducted in an information-centric era. In addition, Dr. Finkelstein emphasizes how the joint doctrine will enhance the PLA's abilities to engage in all types of military operations, including high-end conventional operations. Lastly, Dr. Finkelstein analyzes the possible internal and external challenges the PLA will face when implementing the new doctrine, and how this timeline aligns with China's military modernization goals for 2027, 2035, and 2049.   Dr. Finkelstein is a vice president of the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA) and director of CNA's China & Indo-Pacific Security Affairs Division. He is a long-time student of Chinese military and security issues, serving as a member of the National Committee on US-China Relations (NCUSCR) and the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS). A retired US Army Officer, Dr. Finkelstein has spent his career in several tactical assignments, to include in Panmunjom, Korea, and in various China and Asia-related positions at the Pentagon, and has taught Chinese security issues at West Point. He is the author of “The PLA's New Joint Doctrine: The Capstone of the New Era Operations Regulations System.”

SuperFeast Podcast
#137 Love, Sex and Psychedelics with Dr. Molly Maloof

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 73:52


We have one of our favourite returning guests on the podcast today, entrepreneur and practicing MD Molly Maloof, who is back this time going straight to the heart of health and happiness; Love, sex, relationships, and the harmonious intersection of medicine and love. One of the many reasons we love the work of Dr. Molly is she's all about maximising potential and better function within the human body. Evolving in her practice and true to form with her ever-innovative mind, Dr. Molly's work has recently taken a more focused move into the space of relationships and how the quality of our close relationships significantly determines our long-term health. Healthy relationships help us cope better and defuse the external stresses of life; So why not focus on improving relationships? Inspired by years of experience and research in psychedelics, the neurobiology of love, and drug-assisted therapy, Dr. Molly is developing a company that aims to improve relationships and strengthen bonds through drug-assisted therapy. A complete paradigm shift in the way we view modern medicine and an upgrade to the human condition and relationships. As always with Mason and Dr. Molly, this episode is energised and thought-provoking. They explore the topics of psychedelic-assisted therapies, sexual dysfunction and the root causes of relationship problems, the history of MDMA and couples therapy, where modern medicine is falling short, and so much more. Tune in for good convo and sovereign health.   "I think technology is where we see these bonds decay. We're seeing people give up their marriages, we're seeing people walk away from long-term relationships, and we're seeing families and children affected. One of the most adverse childhood experiences a kid will have is a divorce. Why are we not looking at these fundamental facets of society and saying, gosh, why can't we do better?" And maybe there's a way we can do better that's ethical, honourable, that's scientifically sound, and will leave people better than we found them".   - Dr. Molly Maloof     Mason and Molly discuss:   Natural Aphrodisiacs. Entactogens (empathogens) The psychedelic movement. Psychedelic assisted therapy. Combatting stress through love. Relationships, community, and happiness. How relationships affect long-term health. Exploring root trauma and healing sexuality. Technology and the decay of relationships. Sexual dysfunction and relationship problems. Dopamine, Norepinephrine, Oxytocin, and Serotonin.   Who is Molly Maloof? Dr. Molly Maloof's goal is to maximise human potential by dramatically extending the human healthspan through medical technology, scientific wellness, and educational media. Her fascination with innovation has transformed her private medical practice, focused on providing health optimisation and personalised medicine to San Francisco & Silicon Valley investors, executives, and entrepreneurs. Molly's iterative programs take the quantified self to the extreme through comprehensive testing of clinical chemistry, metabolomics, microbiome, biometrics, and genomic markers.   CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Cordyceps Deer Antler Molly's Twitter   Molly's Linkedin  Molly's Website Molly's Facebook Molly's Instagram  Psychedelic News Hour with Dr Molly Maloof Maximising Your Human Potential with Dr. Molly Maloof (EP#47) Spiritual Awakening and Biohacking with Dr. Molly Maloof (EP#108)   Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Mason: (00:03) Molly, how are you?   Molly Maloof: (00:05) I'm alive and well in the middle of a chaotic world. And somehow I feel like one of the more sane people in the room these days.   Mason: (00:14) You're the sane person. It's great because I like the fact that the sane person and one of the sane people on Instagram. I love your Instagram endlessly.   Molly Maloof: (00:23) Thanks.   Mason: (00:23) And I love you're the doctor whose drugs I want to take.   Molly Maloof: (00:28) Yeah, right. Like I kept on asking myself, "What if we made drugs that people wanted to take? What if we made drugs that actually improve the human condition?" What if we made drugs that actually improved resilience and improved our relationships? How come that's not medicine?   Mason: (00:46) Now, let me start with this little light question.   Molly Maloof: (00:48) Yeah.   Mason: (00:49) Where does the intersection of medicine and love begin and integrate?   Molly Maloof: (00:56) Yeah, right? Okay. Here's what occurred to me. And I haven't really even announced my company because I've been stalled, but I can talk about the big picture because I think it's really important. I spent my entire life trying to figure out how and ever since I was a child, and I was like, wanting to become a doctor at a young age, and then hit puberty in all sorts of hormonal disarray. And I was just like, "What is this happening to my body?" I remember thinking, someday I'm going to figure out my whole body, and I'm just going to understand all this weird shit that's happening to me. And so I spent a lot of my life trying and testing out things to see what would they would do. I would take supplements when I was in ninth grade. I was just constantly doing weird stuff to see what I could do to make my body function better.   Molly Maloof: (01:41) And then, left my residency, started my own medical practise, and really was like, "Fuck, I want to make a practise around optimising health, instead of just fixing sickness." So I want to understand health from first principles. So I spent all this time studying and practising . And fortunately, I had patients who would pay me a lot of money to like, be my lab rats. And they were willing, they were coming to me with experiments that they're like, "I want to do this, will you be help me?" And I'm like, "Sure." So I was one of those doctors that was just like, helping executives find greater performance. And then I had a bit of a come to Jesus moment.   Molly Maloof: (02:18) And I was just like, I did not go into medicine to be doctor just to rich people. That's not cool. And this is like been an interesting experiment. But I should probably be doing more with my life than just helping rich people stay healthy. So it really was that. That was really going through my head. I was at Esalen Institute, and I was just like, "Yeah. I'm pretty sure that there should be more to life than this."   Mason: (02:39) It's an elephant a lot of the time in the health sector.   Molly Maloof: (02:42) Yeah. But at the same time, I'm super grateful that I actually was able to do what I did because A, I could show I actually was part of like a massive trend movement, which was like, precision medicine for individuals was like, not a thing until, a few years after I started practising . So I've always been a bit ahead of the curve. But I've always also been one of those people who's just like, I can't settle for like surface level anything. So I have to get under the surface. So I got asked to teach at Stanford, a course. And she was like, "You seem to be this healthspan expert. So why don't you teach about it?" And I was like, well, of course, I got really insecure. And I was like, "Well, I know a lot. But I can't know enough to teach a second best school in the country." So I went and I started researching even deeper and started studying even more and started like coming up with this framework of what health was about.   Molly Maloof: (03:28) And in my process of studying everything, I was creating electron relationships. And I started figuring, I saw a couple TED Talks, and I started looking into the research of these two psychologists and this researcher from Stanford. And basically, the conclusion was that long term health and happiness is literally dependent on your relationships, like the number one factor in whether you're going to live long and healthy or not is your relationships. And why do you think that is? Well, usually they're the biggest source of stress or stress relief. And we know that stress is a huge source of disease, and yet everybody talks about stress, but nobody talks about what to do about it. Even like some of the best most famous doctors in America.   Molly Maloof: (04:11) Well, even doctors are on stress, like sit around talking about how they don't know what to do with stress. So I was like, "I wonder if we could actually create medicine, that improved relationships." And so I started figuring out through the psychedelic movement, that a lot of what entactogens do is they fundamentally reproduce the neurobiology of love. And so I started digging into the neurobiology of love and I was like, oh, so dopamine, norepinephrine, oxytocin, and serotonin are essentially like some of the bigger molecules involved with love and connection as well as hormones. So to me, it was like kind of a lightbulb moment happened when I was like, "Whoa, what if we actually were to create medicine that can reproduce the love that you had early in your relationship when you first got married, when you first started dating?" What would happen if you could actually reintroduce that feeling again, in your relationship, when you've been together for 10 years, and you're already annoyed by each other constantly. And there's all this resentment built up?   Molly Maloof: (05:17) And what if you could work on that resentment, work on your attachment issues, work on your relationship and your bond and strengthen that bond, through drug assisted therapy? And so that's kind of what I came up with as an idea. And so I'm in this process of investigating the possible ways to do this. But really, it's like a complete paradigm shift in modern medicine because A, it's not about individuals taking drugs, it's about two people taking a drug together. And B, it's not about doctors just handing people drugs, but it's drugs plus therapy. Drugs plus a therapeutic journey that you take, in order to achieve a certain outcome. So not only does medicine have to change in a few different ways, like A, we have to like see if the FDA will even let us give two people drugs. But B like, the payment system of medicine is about you go to a therapist, you go to a doctor, you get a drug, and the doctor is paid for that visit. And that psychologist is just paid for that visit.   Molly Maloof: (06:14) So I have friends that are in payments systems, and they're developing like bundled payment programmes because essentially you need to like create an entire outcome based experience that is paid for in a lump sum. And so there's a lot of things that need to change about in medicine. But I think that fundamentally the human bonds that we create, like are the hugest source of survival that we have. And a lot of people have overlooked this in this pandemic. We know now from isolation, that there's nothing healthy about people being by themselves in their homes, especially the elderly. Come on, and young people and children with families in one house, like we're meant to be in community, we're meant to be touching other people, we're meant to be around other people. And I think it's really a shame that we have ignored this factor for so long, and we're continuing to ignore it while people are killing themselves with alcohol and drugs and other substances.   Molly Maloof: (07:07) And it's just like, and even food, right? Like kids are gaining weight at record rates, people are gaining weight at record rates. And it's all because we're not supposed to be alone. We're not supposed to be indoors by ourselves isolated, like it's not productive, and it's the antithesis of health. So that's my shtick in my soapbox description. And I'm just going to say this, this is a really ambitious endeavour, there is a very good chance that it will not work because the government will stop me. That doesn't mean that people shouldn't be doing stuff like this because we actually need to change the way that people think about medicine. We actually need to change how medicine is delivered.   Mason: (07:42) You know what, like what brings up, I've been reading a lot of like management books because I'm at that stage by my business where I was like Peter Pan and I'm back in the real world a little bit where am I growing up and becoming a little bit adulty.   Molly Maloof: (07:56) We're both becoming adults, dude.   Mason: (07:57) We're both adulting the shit out of life right now.   Molly Maloof: (08:01) We're adulting the shit out of life.   Mason: (08:04) The one Tani got like the whole management team to raid was like a Patrick Lencioni one. I don't think that's how you pronounce his name, but he's got business fables, and it's the Five Dysfunctions of a Team and one of the dysfunctions, I can't remember if it's an exact dysfunction or just something I took out of the fable, but it's like you get an executive team and you go through all the different departments like what's our goalposts? Like what are we all agreeing on that we're looking at as like what we're all trying to get? Is it like customer acquisition? Is it customer happiness ratings? Is it revenue? It doesn't matter what the hell it is, we just focus on that and we go for it and then that unifies you. I think most people and including people that get into health and are entrepreneurs in the health same doctors what the thing that happens is they still they can't get over the hangover of getting dumped.   Mason: (08:53) The goalposts been put on you by a pretty old medical system that just like, just keep people alive. Just improve the condition somewhat. And I think why when you speak and when people listening, I know people like loving my team like listening to your last podcast in the community really excited is because the boldness that you have and it's screaming me, you're like, "No, I'm creating my own goalpost, not taking on that one, and I can see the bridge, and I'm going..." Like you actually can bridge it. It's not just, I'm defying you. It's like, "No," I'm just like, I can work with in that and I can see what you're focused on. And I'm very clear about what I'm focusing on. It's like relationship and then measure the markers to see that your relationships have improved and we know it because we have these markers. And that focus is really inspiring. It's really intimidating for people that have just allowed themselves to be handed what the goalpost is. So cheers you, I raise my hot chocolate to you.   Molly Maloof: (10:00) It's like I ask myself, "Okay, I've got this personal brand. If I like go and be Dr. Molly brand, Dr. Molly, how is that going to like..." Okay. So let's say there's Andrew Weil, there's Dr. Oz, there's all these, like leaders in the space. I could do that. And I can always fall back on that if this thing doesn't work, like I'll only be 40 by the time I fail at this, right? So I think I'm going to give myself like solid three years before I give up. Look, it's really hard to do this thing, but I'm going to give myself some significant time and commitment, like five to 10 years, then we'll see what happens. If I can get through past three years, I'll be fucking stoked. So point is, is like I can always fall back on like the Dr. Molly brand because it's like, that's cool. But that's just an evolution, right? That's just like, me becoming branded doctor 2.0. But the thing about this other thing is like, if we actually were to accomplish this, this just fundamentally changes medicine, and also could transform human relationships, which are falling apart.   Molly Maloof: (11:02) People are getting divorced after eight years, and kids are getting damaged by these relationships. Kids are missing their relationships with their parents, parents are not bonding, kids are feeling neglected. We've got to save the family unit and I think it starts with the primary relationship. And to me, this is something that is interesting to me that, I just don't think a lot of people work on their relationships, like I don't think it's something that a lot of people consider to be a thing that they should be doing every day. But it's actually so fundamental to survival, right? And yet, it's like when things are getting really bad, that's when they get to work. So we are looking at different indications. But fundamentally, the big picture, what I'm trying to do, it's kind of like bring what people have been doing underground above ground.   Molly Maloof: (11:49) The history of MDMA was like couples therapy, right? And Shulgin was giving it to psychologists to improve couples relationships. And it turns out, like underneath a lot of dysfunction, a lot of sexual dysfunction in men and women is relationship problems. So if you just keep on getting to the root cause of anything, it's like, "Oh, why don't we just like deal with the root cause? And go with that?" So it's pretty-   Mason: (12:15) I've definitely experienced with underground MDMA.   Molly Maloof: (12:17) Yeah.   Mason: (12:19) Therapy?   Molly Maloof: (12:19) Sure. Exactly.   Mason: (12:22) Yeah. With my wife. Can you just enlighten people about how you'd use it in like a clinical setting and why in particular it has been used there?   Molly Maloof: (12:37) So MDMA, we're not technically using MDMA, unless we can't use the substance we're going to work on toward developing which there's a lot of reasons why, like drug developments hard, right? But MDMA would be a good backup solution because of its history. MDMA is essentially an entactogen. So what it does is it means to touch with that it means to generate, it's also known as enpathogen. So it creates a deep sense of empathy and human connection. And that empathy reminds you of like, "Oh, there's this person next to me." And I can actually feel how they feel right now.I can actually, more noticeably understand their emotional experience. And I can be a part of that experience, rather than feeling so separate from someone else. And fundamentally, it also works on the neurobiology of love. So it's a love drug. So it creates a similar experience to what I call post coital bliss, which is kind of like right after you had sex, and you're feeling like really comfortable and really blissed out, it's like, that's kind of the MDMA experience.   Molly Maloof: (13:42) And the interesting thing is that through different types of combinations of different chemicals, we're going to be able to modulate consciousness in ways that we never thought we could do and it's fascinating, just this whole field of psychedelic medicine because it's just beginning like this whole revolution is just beginning. And it's like happening from a place of like deep interested in science and understanding the brain, but also from like a deep reference to the past. So like MDMA, for example, in the past was used in couples therapy. So two couples would come in and take the medicine with the therapist. And the therapist will help them work through their issues whether it be like attachment trauma, or deep seated resentment that's been carried or anger or betrayal or just trust issues. And therapist would use this medicine to help people come together again.   Molly Maloof: (14:32) And one of the rules interestingly, for couples therapy with when Ann Shulgin was doing it and was giving it to other therapists was no sex. So it's funny because I actually think that psychedelics go great with sex. And I think that like, you have to know what you're doing, you have to know the dose, but I do think that there will be a role in the future for psychedelic assisted therapy, and there should also be a role for psychedelic aphrodisiacs.   Mason: (15:00) Speak more about that.   Molly Maloof: (15:02) Well, okay, so I'm giving a talk at delic on this is actually quite kind of interesting. I'll give you a little preview of my talk. So it turns out that psychedelic aphrodisiacs have probably been used since like the beginning of human history.   Mason: (15:17) Cool thing. The two best things.   Molly Maloof: (15:21) Right? So people are fascinating, right? So turns out that there's like a whole bunch of categories of psychedelic aphrodisiacs. And they're so interesting. So there's the Acacia DMT, harmelin combo, there's an Alaska DMT harmelin combo, there's also the combination, that combo the drug. There's also MDMA, and MDA, which is the entactogen class of synthetic love drugs. There's LSD and psilocybin, which are the tryptamines. There's actually like a salamander that in Romania, they put into a vodka, and they use it as aphrodisiacs. There's also toads that people use as aphrodisiacs. There's Morning Glory, which is an LSD derivative, there's Hawaiian woodrose, there's all sorts of cool plants and animals that have been used since primitive times that are psychedelic, and that can turn you on.   Molly Maloof: (16:25) And there's also dangerous ones things like scopolamine, which is not technically a psychedelic, but it's a deliriant. And you don't really want to take like the tour up. But people in Brazil apparently, occasionally accidentally get dosed by like prostitutes, who are trying to take advantage of them. So there's actually a pretty good Vice episode on that. But turns out that it's not exactly a psychedelic, but you can't have psychosis and hallucinations. So I was like, "Wow, these are really interesting. There's all sorts of different mushrooms and fungi that people use, there's also like, what is it called? There's a type of fungus. Actually, let me look it up. I've got my computer right here. So why don't I come out and give you a little bit more detail on this because it's kind of getting good.   Molly Maloof: (17:14) So there's like this substance, there's actually a fruit in Southeast Asia called my Marula bean. And it has all sorts of weird ingredients in it, that can make you trippy. And then interestingly, alcohol has the effect of creating beta-carboline in the body, which I didn't know. So it's actually technically slightly psychedelic, which I never knew this. And then absinthe has wormwood which has thujone in it, which is mildly psychedelic as well. So it's essentially there's different doses of different ingredients that are kind of used for different reasons, right? And so there's basically like the medicinal dose, they said, which is the lowest dose, like the sort of the micro dose of medicine. And that's kind of like people taking things just for overall improvement of their health, mental health. And then there's the sort of aphrodisiac dose, which is a little bit higher than that. So it's enough to get you to start noticing a shift in your perception, but not so much to make the trip really hard.   Molly Maloof: (18:12) And then there's the shamanic dose, which is like what's being used in a lot of clinical studies, which is like people try to get to the root of really deep trauma. And oftentimes, getting to the root of trauma is actually what a woman or man needs to do in order to actually heal their sexuality. So I got particularly interested in this space because MDMA kind of accidentally helped heal my sexual dysfunction that I had in my 20s because of some trauma that I had in college, that I didn't even realise was causing sexual dysfunction because I didn't know I had sexual dysfunction. I just knew that I wasn't aroused. I was in pain every time I had sex, and it wasn't orgasming. And then I met a guy, we were using MDMA together and all these problems went away. And I was like, "What just happened"? And I had my first orgasm with a guy. I had orgasmed on my own, but never with a man before because of unfortunately, my history of sex was not positive.   Molly Maloof: (19:07) So I basically been trying to figure this out, "Wow, it seems like there's an opportunity for healing sexual dysfunction." Because a lot of the root causes of sexual dysfunction are relationship problems and trauma. And so then I started uncovering the whole trauma, Pandora's box, and I started discovering natural numbers on sexual trauma. And it became this whole holy shit moment, like fuck the world is so fucked up when it comes to sex. Talk about like, this Me Too movements, just the tip of the iceberg. Underneath all of it is like, clearly dysfunctional sexual upbringing that most people have because of our completely outdated religious culture, right? Basically really religiosity in a lot of ways really ruins sexuality for people because it makes it into this forbidden fruit and then in that you start wanting all sorts of things that are wrong because you're like, "Oh, I can't have it. So I want all these things that I can't have."   Mason: (20:05) Forbidden fruit. And the guys our snake tells us you want the fruit.   Molly Maloof: (20:09) Oh yeah, and women want it too, by the way. I was like, when I discovered masturbation was a sin in like fifth grade. I was like, "Oh, dear god, I've been masturbating my entire life." So funny, right? And there was just this moment I had growing up being like, really feeling like I went from like a really good Christian girl to like, a very bad child because I masturbated. And that's just not okay. So then I get into the history of psychedelics. And this talk and essentially, before Christianity, psychedelics were being used by medicine women and priestesses, and medicine men, and they were given to people as a tool for enhancing their virility and their fertility and their sexual function. And it was like, part of nature, sex was something beautiful, it was something acceptable, it is something that was part of life, right? It was celebrated. And then Christianity basically turned polytheism into this monotheistic culture, and basically started burning witches, and saying that these love potions are evil, and that anything related to sex was wrong.   Molly Maloof: (21:09) And now sex is the thing that you have to have in the bounds of marriage, which the church of course has to govern. And if you do anything outside of that, or let alone, you're homosexual, you're now a deeply evil person, and you deserve to be harmed. And you really think about this history. It's kind of epically fucked how much, no offence to men, but like patriarchy, took over religion, and basically made it all about men being in charge of the religious experience. Even though women were actually very much part of like polytheistic religious culture, and sexuality was part of that culture. And so it's like all this stuff is really went downhill from there.   Molly Maloof: (21:50) And now we live in this modern time where like, the Catholic Church has unending problems with brutalising children sexually. And we have not woken up to this reality that sex is not evil. It's part of life. It's a beautiful part of life. It's a part of life that is one of those magical mystical, if not psychedelic experiences. And it shouldn't be demonised, but I do think we need to return it back into a place of wholesomeness and respect and love and really treating people the way we would want to be treated and I don't think any woman or man wants to be raped.   Molly Maloof: (22:29) I don't think any woman or man wants to be assaulted, and I don't think if any child grows up thinking that, that's normal. And I don't know what changes in culture that makes it okay for kids and adults to like mistreat each other, but I really think that like part of my mission in life is actually to create a better culture around sex and love and really this company that I started called the Adamo Bioscience is basically a company that's dedicated to studying the science of love because I think that if we understood it better, we might be able to create more of it, and through multiple pathways and products and services. And yes, I have a commercial interest, but mostly because like it seems totally a better thing to be spending my life making money off of than anything else right now, which is like why not try to create more love in the world? I think there should be like 15 to 20 companies trying to do this.   Mason: (23:22) I think there will be once you show them the way. That's the that's the beautiful thing about being someone who's charging and leading the way. Something as a couple, I was just like thank you, epic download by the way and I saw... And I think it's nice openly talking about religion this way, we can see that it's gone far away from the natural and the original intentions. And I saw you like, I can just see you reshare the meme the other day. It tickled me the most of it was just like white Jesus cuddling someone going, "I'm sorry I made you a drug addict. Let me a book before I send you to hell." It just popped me in school I was like doing things that potentially was going down the way of being like condemned and told by teachers, "Well, your stepfather is going to go to hell because he believes in evolution."   Molly Maloof: (24:16) Oh my god, I remember being in sixth grade being like, "I think evolution is real and my school thinks I'm..." But they don't believe in it. Like, holy shit, that was our lives.   Mason: (24:28) Oh man, I got a few pop moments. I was like, "Hang on. So I'm going down this route. Where I'm sinning because I'm trying to think critically here and so now I'm going to go to hell, but you created me in your image and I'm doing? You set me off. You know all, you know I'm going to end up here. And then you're going to send me to hell?" I'm like, "You asshole. You sadist." Anyway, that was my pop.   Molly Maloof: (24:54) What got me to like what really challenged my beliefs when I was 18 was talking to a guy who went to Harvard and messenger, you're in messageboard you're talking to people smarter and older than you. And I remember talking to this guy and he asked me this question. He's like, "How can God be omnipotent, omniscient and omnipresent and how can there be a hell? If he's everywhere all the time all at once? How can it be ever a separation from God because hell is a separation from God?" And I was like, brain explode like oh that's impossible logical, total it felt like this doesn't work, right? Like does that work does not compute. And my brain just exploded I went into the bathroom and cried and cried in front of the mirror. I was like, "Oh my god, it means I'm all alone." I actually still believe in God now, but like my belief in God is much different than the patriarchal God that I grew up.   Molly Maloof: (25:50) I still pray to Jesus because I'm used to it's like a pattern, but I don't think Jesus is the only God. I think there's plenty of Gods you can pray to. But realistically I think that God is like infinite intelligence and beauty underneath everything that whether, and it's totally no gender or God can't have a gender.   Mason: (26:09) I'm going to send you my podcast with George Kavassilas. It's another mind blowing one. It's talking about the God matrix and the universe, the natural, the synthetic it's like really, really clear.   Molly Maloof: (26:25) Oh, cool.   Mason: (26:25) I'll send you because it's a very good one. And you know what, you were saying things that don't work and you know what I like that does work is aphrodisiac. So this is like telling before we move on from that point it's something that really jumped out at me that I really love and I might go a little bit of a tangent because I just wrote about it this kind of topic, this nuance. Yesterday we sent out a newsletter around lion's mane and I'm like I really love Lion's Mane because it's a bridge herb and for so often people are looking at, "I want a nootropic and so they go into a narrow," which is nice sometimes. It's nice to go reductionist. And you go, "I want something that's going to increase output and give me something now and I'm going to use this nootropic in order to get something. And then they eventually fall to Lion's Mane as like a nootropic and the word sits there very medical and very [inaudible 00:27:20], which is nice as well I use it.   Mason: (27:24) But then Lion's Mane is one if you get like a complete non grown on grain, you get one grown on wood, it's got elements of wild to it, all of a sudden you look past the textbook written black and white, in the tropic and you got the same intention here and then you look up at nature and you see, "Wow, my brain is so much more than what I thought it was and the output of my brain and the way the way that it operates in conjunction with my organs in my blood and my outlook in my life, it's connected to where I'm going to be. What I do now is connected to how I'm going to be when I'm 90 years old."   Molly Maloof: (27:59) Totally.   Mason: (28:00) it's not just take something get some output, it's like this pattern you can see the brain function connecting to the constant pattern of like, like the waves in never ending. Internally there are things that are like constantly happening that I can cultivate and work with and look at and ease into that are going to have my brain on the sea of marrow is the Daoists.   Molly Maloof: (28:21) I love that. The sea of marrow.   Mason: (28:26) And the aphrodisiacs are the same like that. And it's a fun one because people go, "Oh, aphrodisiacs great, it'll get your horny." And what you're talking about it's like a carrot that leads like you go and that's what I see. Like how I see Daoist aphrodisiacs as well, like deer antler in your pants.   Molly Maloof: (28:46) Yeah.   Mason: (28:48) Horny goat weed, like epimedium. These herbs cordycep, Eucommia, schisandra. People say the word aphrodisiac, and you go, "Great, okay, cool. I'm going to engage because I want to be horny." And you think there's more substance too, behind it. And then you get onto these aphrodisiacs and you start engaging with your sexuality, and all of a sudden it's an opportunity to connect to yourself and the word aphrodisiac falls away, and you start connecting to the sexuality. And I just heard it, then you're saying we're using aphrodisiacs to go and connect to the sexual trauma so we can connect to ourselves and our partner. And I think it's beautiful. I love it.   Molly Maloof: (29:32) Well, it's actually that the sexual trauma can damage your relationship to sex. So because it actually programmes your brain. There's this thing called the Garcia effect, and it's like when you eat something that makes you sick, you don't want it anymore because your brain associates that with feeling sick. Now not all women or men who have trauma end up with having sexual dysfunction, but a large percentage of women do that. In fact, like somewhere between 60 to 80% of women who had sexual trauma have some form of sexual dysfunction. And like in America, the numbers, which I think are underreported, are like one in five women are raped, one in four women are abused as children, one and three are assaulted in her lifetime. And so there's quite a lot of women who have sexual dysfunction because of the fact that their sexual experience was not pleasant. And it was, in fact, potentially scary and dangerous.   Molly Maloof: (30:26) So now their brain says, "Oh, that experience that's not good. I don't like that. And that's scary." And so it's kind of programmed as a traumatic memory. Now, only 30% of women with sexual trauma end up with PTSD, which is interesting. So there's actually more women with sexual dysfunction, than PTSD from sexual trauma, which is fascinating. So the theory is, is that with MDMA assisted therapy, that the medicine can actually help you revisit the trauma from a place of feeling safe and feeling okay and loved with a partner, preferably with a partner, if you're with someone that you feel safe with. And you can revisit that trauma, and then it gets reprogrammed in your brain, reconsolidated as, "Oh, this is not the worst thing in the world anymore." This is not something I need to like, fear or be afraid of anymore. That was just an event that happened. And in fact I think the real magic will come from when women can experience pleasure, again, through psychedelic medicine. As I did.   Mason: (31:32) How ironic that there's an aphrodisiac involved in that process.   Molly Maloof: (31:36) Well, you think, right? You think that like, that would make sense. It's just funny. I think we're just beginning to understand space. But I don't know if people even though this, but there's actually like three phases of neurobiology of love. The first is like the intense sex drive, which is like, our body is designed to get us to fuck a lot of people when you're young. Actually, the sex drive is like oestrogen and testosterone. And then like, you're horny, and you're young, and you want to have sex, and not everybody does. A lot of young people aren't these days, but the point is, is that it's designed to get you to be turned on and attracted to a lot of people. And then when you meet someone and you have sex with them, what happens is, is that you start activating other hormones. So dopamine starts getting released, oxytocin gets released after orgasm, and that can actually increase the attachment to this person.   Molly Maloof: (32:29) So especially in women particular. So then we start moving on to romantic love, which is actually an attachment device that's designed like we really evolved it in order to basically bond ourselves to someone, become obsessed and addicted to someone, so that we're more likely to have a baby with that person. And then keep that baby alive long enough that they will not die, right? And so the romantic love starts to switch over to pair bonding. And pair bonding is actually designed to keep that baby alive and family unit strong. Because pair bonding hormones are very similar to familial bonds. Like they think it's all mostly oxytocin vasopressin. So like, you actually look at the neurobiology of all this. It's highly adaptive, and it's a huge survival advantage to have love in your life, huge survival advantage to find someone to care about them. You're more likely to reproduce, you're more likely to make a child and a family and you're more likely to have a healthy family if there's healthy bonds.   Molly Maloof: (33:26) And so I think that we should be really looking at these things from the lens of science because a lot of what's happening in society today because I think technology is seeing these bonds decay, we're seeing people give up their marriages. We're seeing people walk away from long term relationships, and we're seeing families affected and children affected. And one of the main adverse childhood experiences a kid will have is divorce. So I'm just like, "Fuck, why are we not looking at these fundamental facets of society and saying, gosh, why can't we do better?" And maybe there's a way we can do better that's ethical, and that's honourable and that's scientifically sound and that will actually leave people better off and we found them. But again, this is like very much new territory. I don't think anybody has tried to do this or thought about doing this. And I'm actually giving you a lot of information that I like is going to keep kind of quiet but whatever you like might as well announce it to like your community first.   Mason: (34:20) Yeah. I think we're worth the drop. It's interesting, it's such a return to the natural. And I've been using that a lot because I feel like I'm saying for the matrix. I'm like nailing all over the bloody place at the moment like people.   Molly Maloof: (34:36) All the time.   Mason: (34:39) And it's so confronting for people which and I agree, as a system we haven't... What you're doing is going like, "Screw it, go to the core and think, multiple generations around leading to the core. Like, let's look at the divorce rates, let's look at the unhappiness and the lack of love in relationships and how that impacts ourselves and children." And I think about it a lot. And it gives me that raw, even talking about it now, there is tingling and there's a rawness and a raw excitement, when you know you're actually in the right place. But it's very confronting, looking at just how much healing there is to be done.   Molly Maloof: (35:18) Yeah. Well, someone told me when I was like, everyone was like, "No one's going to invest in this, and no one's going to do this. And this is crazy." I know, actually, I have a lead investor. So if investors are listening, I'm about to fundraise. So you should probably email me because it's going to be really good. It's going to be a really exciting time in the next few months because I'm actually going to be-   Mason: (35:37) I think I have like, probably $400 liquid at the moment.   Molly Maloof: (35:45) I'm not going to take your last $400. But maybe we could do something with-   Mason: (35:47) But that's not the last 400. We're being responsible in other areas.   Molly Maloof: (35:50) ... Lion's Mane. Yeah. No, but it's interesting. So like, I have a lot of people from biotech say, "This is absolutely never going to happen. It's impossible. Don't even try." And then I had a lot of people who are starting biotech companies say, "Fuck, if this problem is as big as you describe it is, then I'm pretty sure we should be throwing like a billion dollars at this." And I was like, "Fuck. Yeah, dude. Totally."   Mason: (36:16) Absolutely. Is there a market for this? If the people who would poohing it are probably the ones that just can't look in the mirror and be like, "I am the market." It's like, it's in your backyard. It's everywhere. Every time you go to a family reunion, every time you go to bed.   Molly Maloof: (36:40) I shouldn't say this out loud, but family members of mine-   Mason: (36:43) Just say it in a monologue.   Molly Maloof: (36:44) Yeah. I know my family story pretty well. I like deconstructed all of our problems at this point. I've plugged my computer in. And having deconstructed a lot of these problems, and really examined the people in my family who struggle with different problems. In my extended family, in particular, like my aunt and my grandmother, and just people I know. There's a lot to be said about early relationships, and about how important families are to the long term health of children. And when things go wrong in families, it can really, really hurt people long term. And I just looked at like, my great, great grandparents and their relationship with my grandmother. And I looked at my grandmother's relationship with her daughters, and I just looked at all this, and I was like, "Wow there's so many things that we don't realise that if we just fix that one thing, right, then it would have transformed the entire rest of a person's life."   Molly Maloof: (37:59) But there's a lot of things, we don't have solutions for. A lot of things we don't have pathways for, and a big one of those is healing trauma. And I recently did about 21 hours of deep, deep neuro somatic trauma healing from a friend of mine who's like a super gifted healer. And I can't explain in scientific terms what he did with me, but I do know one thing, and that's that we do not do a good job in our society, helping people who have trauma, heal, and express it immediately right over this happened. In fact, the medical system typically, when a girl has raped, she'll basically get a rape kit, and maybe sent to a psychologist. And if she's lucky, she'll get in, in a few months. And it's like, we don't actually have pathways for healing and caring for kids who've had major... I saw this, by the way, in health care system. I saw kids who were abused by their parents. And they go to social workers, and they kind of handed around the foster care system.   Molly Maloof: (39:00) And it's really crazy how much people experienced trauma in society. And there's really not a lot of good solutions besides talk therapy. And if talk therapy worked so well, we probably not be seeing so many problems. Like if talk therapy was like a really effective solution for all of our problems, we'd probably be seeing a lot of problems solved. Now I'm not saying talk therapy doesn't work.   Mason: (39:23) It doesn't pop the champagne. I think that's where I'm with you on that. I'm at the point in my journey where I'm like talk therapy with someone who's got a Jungian background is like perfect for me because I went so hard on psychedelics. And so I'm loving just the groundedness of it. But to get it going-   Molly Maloof: (39:36) Totally. I'm not saying it doesn't work. I think talk therapy is very much like working on your consciousness, right? Your conscious brain. Everyone actually need to talk therapy in order to fundamentally create sense, sense making around their life experience. Like that's the best thing it does. Is it creates a framework of understanding of like, "This happened to me, this happened to me, this happened to me and I understand why, and I understand how I dealt with it." And I'm trying to do a better job at it, right? But I think what's really more interesting about like, what's happening in psychedelic medicine is what's on a subconscious and the unconscious level, right? Like hypnotherapy does a pretty decent job at getting into the subconscious level.   Molly Maloof: (40:27) But what's fascinating is like all this stuff that's buried in the unconscious, right? That comes out in your dreams, that comes out in your... A lot of people have nightterors. That is most definitely a bunch of unconscious process trauma, like unprocessed trauma that needs to be like addressed. And I don't think people see it that way. They're just like, "Oh, it's a nightmare disorder." It's like, "No, you probably have like a major unresolved trauma from your childhood that you really should look at." And oftentimes, I know, multiple people who've taken psychedelics, and it just comes up to them. They're like, "Oh, my God, I was raped in high school by a few guys." And it just like comes up. Or they're like, "Oh, my God, I was sexually assaulted as a child." And this stuff comes up underneath because it's lifted out of the subconscious and unconscious.   Molly Maloof: (41:21) And that's what we don't talk enough about in like modern medicine. And even like psychology, I think, is this like, "Oh, wow," like everybody has deep trauma. But if you do have deep trauma, and it's like running in the background, it's like malware, it's just draining your energy. It's draining CPUs, it's actually playing a huge role in your behaviours and your triggers and how you interact with people. And if it's not looked at or addressed, and especially if they're things like internal family systems, like there's a lot of good forms of talk therapy that can really do a good job of bringing you back to your childhood or bringing you back these moments. And I don't even think drugs are completely necessary to get to these places. Meditation is also a phenomenal tool that a lot of people don't take advantage of. And there's a bunch of different types of meditation that are fairly obscure that can do a great job at helping people get underneath the surface of their pain.   Molly Maloof: (42:11) But a lot of this stuff is isn't mainstream. And it's a shame because a lot of people are still just like, "Where do I go to deal with all this stuff?" Most of the stuff that's worked really well for me has been very obscure stuff that I have had to find through word of mouth. And it's like not highly advertised experiences and therapies and meditation schools and it's like a lot more on the realm of like woo, but it works these things have worked. And it's like strange to me that they're not more well studied and in the mainstream.   Mason: (42:46) Yeah. We've got such a wide array of people with such a wide array of histories at different stages in their processes. And there's naturally going to be different therapies and different angles that are going to pierce the veil to whatever is sitting there behind the curtain in the subconscious and I definitely, like for me it was like personal development back in the day going like you know landmark forum was like one of the things to kind of like a bang. And I could see behind it and then okay that lost its relevance at some point. And then psychedelics became very relevant, got me probably went a little bit too hard into identifying with that community and the mannerisms around taking medicine and like that feeling like I finally belonged rather than doing the work. And then getting beautiful lessons and now it's like getting to the point where talk therapy for me 10 years ago just would have been like I think just sort of lapping up against a great wall.   Mason: (43:48) Whereas now I know how to scale that concrete wall, and I know what it looks like when I do connect to the subconscious. And I understand my processing bringing it out and what my process is, thanks to the work I did with psychedelics. I know how I'm going to bring that into awareness in my everyday and that's when personal practise comes in. That's where I know to the extent of like, with my exercise regime, I know keeping me strong enough and healthy enough to be able to handle staying in that space, where I can constantly acknowledge that part of me that wants to hide behind that veil and run everything. And I know someone like Tani she's like, there was a point where psychedelics were like, incredible. She goes, "I know I need that." And then she's like, "I don't need that anymore." And my meditation practise is exactly where I need to be and that's where I'm going to get the biggest bang.   Mason: (44:39) Not that it's about a bang, but she's going to get the rubber hitting the road. So I think that's like that integration because you see a lot of people in the psychedelic world, kind of pooh poohing therapy going like modern therapies like this domesticated little dog and psychedelics are this big dog in terms of what it can do. And it's like, true in one context, and in another context, if it's just integrated, you have an array of ways of approaching as you're talking about them. Then all of a sudden, the approach becomes multicoloured and multifaceted. And hopefully, it becomes more effective.   Molly Maloof: (45:16) I really think that we just maybe just need to marry them more. Even like MDMA assisted therapy today, is largely like, hands off. It's largely don't talk to the patient, let them do, they have their own experience, and let them do whatever they need to do to heal, it's not really guided at all. It's mostly kind of like, it's guided, but it's not really like lead. It's like, you're there. You're like going through this process, and you're having these experiences, but they're not actually trying to get you to go anywhere on your trip, they're trying to let you have your experience. Whereas like, I think that, in particular, it may be possible that like, we can give people medicine that gives them have the... I think that the idea is that you have the preparation. And then you have the creating the right set and setting. And then you take the medicine, and then you have this like deep integration experience. And that's typically what the experiences for psychedelic assisted therapy today. The question is, will the FDA let us give people drugs that turn them on unsupervised?   Molly Maloof: (46:26) Because you kind of need to be a little bit... You don't really want anyone watching you while you are with your partner. So I got a lot of questions, I need to figure out to make this thing, an actual proper model. But I think that it'll be really interesting to see how this thing evolves because I'm at the very beginning of this journey. I have an idea of what I think that this business model could look like. I have no idea what I think this therapy could be. But a lot of it is I'm like figuring it out, right? I'm like in this total creative mode of what will the future of medicine look like, if you could create it from scratch? And I've already done this once, and it turned out really great for me. And I could easily have just gone and scaled personalised medicine clinics for wealthy people. But now I'm like, "Let's see if we can create a democratised version of this medicine that actually is like it's going to start out expensive, but let's figure out how we can make this something that's eventually affordable for people." That's the goal.   Mason: (47:28) I think the other thing, that's why it feels like a safe bets. And interesting way to put it, but it makes sense, and has substance is because I think a lot of people approach this, and what we've always been taught how to do, lecture people on how they should be, and I'm going to create a product based on how I think you should act. Whereas what you're talking about, is going there's, let's say we're looking at, like morality around let's stay in our marriage, so that we don't destroy this family unit. There's a way that, that's been happened, we've been told what to do by the media. And therefore the part of us goes, if someone goes you have to stay on your marriage because it's the morally right thing to do. You're bad if you do that, there's no attraction there because it's an external like judgement , and we want to revolt against being told what to do, especially by society.   Mason: (48:31) It's why we get your rage against the machine, etc. And then, if you just understand the patterns that emerge when people do connect back to themselves, and do deal with their trauma within a relationship, what's natural for people and seems to be the pattern is people do naturally resonate with maintaining the relationship that they've chosen or maybe in some instance. Like a very conscientious uncoupling in a way that you're very connected and aware to the way that children are going to be affected by it and minimising that impact. Either way, there's an emergence of morality an emergence of ethics, rather than being told what to do.   Molly Maloof: (49:19) Yeah. There's emergence of just like, knowing what's right and wrong. Like, "Oh, yeah. We're not meant to be together. But we're also not meant to destroy each other's lives as we get divorced." I think if we were to be able to help people stay together, that would be ideal. But if we're also able to help people consciously uncouple in a way that doesn't destroy their lives. And I've heard this from multiple people, like one of my friends did MDMA with his ex wife when they were getting divorced and it completely transformed the divorce process because they were actually able to love each other through the process, and they're now really good friends. They're like super good friends. They just didn't want to be married. And it's like, that's appropriate, right? Like, it's also appropriate not to hate people for years. Just the number of people I know that have deep seated resentment for their exes. And it's like, that's not healthy for your nervous system, that's not healthy for your long term health. That's not going to keep you well.   Mason: (50:20) So we've both dived into exploring what health is, especially in the context of, and in this what we're talking about in this context of like synthetic morality, versus what emerges as right. I've just started in the last few months really feeling icky about the way I've used the word health and the way it's been used because it's natural, if you talk about healthy, then naturally, there's an opposition of unhealthy there. And so much of what's implied is basing yourself on, "I'm healthy because I'm not that." And so there's this intrinsic opposition, that... An opposition and kicking back against something in order to form identity around health. And we need the word because healthy, it's just a fun word that everyone knows. But kind of similar and synonymous with what we're talking about, and the emergence of morality and the emergence of ethics coming just through whether it's psychedelic therapy or whatever, how are you relating to health now?   Mason: (51:28) Because I definitely am finding, the more I move away from being wrapped in and around that world of being healthy versus unhealthy, and the more I kind of sit in that middle and see. What's emerging through the patterns of myself doing, I don't know, finding harmony for myself, delving into my shit, coming out the other side. Doing things that are maybe I've seen is unhealthy in one way, in one ideological circle. So I want to talk about dropping that coming back to what emerges within me. It makes the space, I don't know, I feel very roared and identified in terms of, even though we're leaders in the health space, I feel very, unidentified with anything that revolves around that word healthy. I'm curious as to where you're at, in your relationship to what is healthy.   Molly Maloof: (52:25) I used to think it was what the WHO said, which was like the complete absence of disease or infirmary. And then I was like, "No, it's not realistic." Health is actually a dynamic function of life. And to me, I have a very unique perspective on how I think, and it all stemmed from this other definition, that was the ability to adapt and self managed in the face of adversity. But I started digging under the surface, and I really started understanding things like biology, and fundamental human anatomy, and microbiology and physiology and molecular and cellular biology. And I was really thinking about it from like a mechanistic perspective as well. And I think that if you actually just look at any system, you can ask how healthy a system is based on its capacity. And whether it's able to perform its functions properly, basically, whether it's able to maintain its integrity of its structure. And that's usually a function of how much energy and how much work capacity is available.   Molly Maloof: (53:31) So, for example, the healthcare system, deeply unhealthy in America. Demands outspent capacity and it just completely started crumbling, right? Like just did not work, was not resilient, was not flexible, it was actually really struggling and breaking a lot and a lot of people have been broken through the experience of going to the healthcare system. So capacity and demands, if there's more capacity than demands, you're usually in a really good healthy state because you have enough energy to maintain the structure to do work. Now, when your demands are really high, and your capacity is really low, shit starts to break down. And so this is like the mitochondrial theory of ageing, which is fundamentally that when we lose about 50% of our functional capacity of organs, they start to malfunction, they actually start producing the ability to do the work functions that they had. And then we start to break down.   Molly Maloof: (54:27) And largely this is driven by metabolic dysfunction and stress. And like lack of exercise is really a big huge driver of disease because it's the number one signal for making more energy. So basically, I look at how we... If you actually think about like the biology of like metabolism, when we breathe air, we drink water, we eat food, it goes into our cells, it gets turned into substrates, those get put into the mitochondria, which are like little engines that could of our cells, and they have this called the electron transport chain which pulls off electrons kind of like power line. Like electrons are running through this electron transport chain. And they're powering this hydrogen turbine that creates an electrochemical gradient. And that gradient creates a battery and a capacitor. So a battery is like a differential charge between two, it's like a charge polarity. And then the capacitor is like a differential charge between two late membranes.   Molly Maloof: (55:22) And then so capacitors can deploy energy quickly. Batteries store energy as potential energy. So when you really look at it, like most people have broken their metabolisms in modern society, there's so many people with diabetes, so many people with heart disease, somebody with cancer, so many people with dementia. And those are really symptoms of broken metabolism, broken mitochondrial function. And it's funny because like, we look at all these things as separate diseases, but actually, they have the same root causes and like half of cancers are made up of metabolic in nature. So everyone's been kind of obsessed with this like, DNA and genetics theory of ageing. I'm just so unconvinced because it's kind of like, okay, that's like the architectural plans of the body. But in order to actually express those plans, you need energy. You actually need to make energy to take the plants and turn into a structure, which is proteins, right?   Molly Maloof: (56:15) So my perspective is that, like life is this interplay between energy matter and information. And essentially, like life itself, is negative entropy. So we're just constantly trying to fight against entropy, and the best way we know how to do that is like, maintain our functional capacity and be able to repair ourselves. And so this lack of being able to repair ourselves is often a function of the fact that a lot of people are just like, the biggest complaint in medicine is, "I'm tired," right? Being tired all the time is actually a reflection of energetic inefficient, insufficient energy production.   Mason: (56:56) Is that in particular with like the battery storage as you work-   Molly Maloof: (56:59) Yeah, exactly.   Mason: (57:00) Which is funnily used when you talk about, like his Yin and Yang.   Molly Maloof: (57:05) Yes. There you go. Right? We need time off to store energy. The most interesting thing about the Yin and Yang, is that there's this clear relationship between this toggling of switching between different states in biology to flourish. So you actually have to go from intense work to relaxation or rest. You have to go for ideally if you actually just look at all the best [inaudible 00:57:30] stressors, it's like, hyperoxia hypoxia breathwork. What is that? It's breathwork. Right? If you look at cold and heat, that's sauna and coal plant right? What are these things work so damn well, for making us feel healthy and feel good? Well, they're literally boosting mitochondrial biogenesis. And in some cases, like eating fasting is my toffee G, right? It's throwing-   Mason: (57:53) Being awake, being asleep.   Molly Maloof: (57:56) Being outside being indoors, like we actually need to spend way more time outdoors than we're doing. And like being in buildings and having your feet grounded into the earth, like being alone being with people, like life is this constant interplay, right? Yeah, there you go.   Mason: (58:14) That was earthing that I just mumbled.   Molly Maloof: (58:16) Yeah. So like today I've been experimenting with like different ways of movement throughout my day because I'm kind of sick of being in front of the computer constantly. And it makes me feel really unhappy. And there's this great meme you posted, feel dead inside, go outside. Fucking love that meme. And it's like, everybody loved that meme. I got it posted so many times. And it was like, actually, I spent two hours today on phone calls outside. And like, people get annoyed when you're not on a Zoom call. But I'm like, "Look, if I can walk, I will walk." And I got two separate workouts and that were like about 10 minutes each in the gym that were like broken up throughout the day. And it's like, holy shit, did I feel better today than I did for like many other previous days where I was just in front of a computer the whole time? Like, we're not meant to be in front of screens all day long. It's not healthy.   Molly Maloof: (59:06) It's not a healthy period. So the more that we can try to align our lives as much as possible with something with how we're actually like primitively programmed because our genes have not evolved since primitive times. We're the same genetically, there's been a few changes, but fundamentally, we're basically the same people as we were in hunting and gathering times. So it's no question that we've lost a lot of our health in the process of becoming more modern because we basically hijacked all of these different pathways that are actually ancient pathways of survival that are now being used to take advantage of people. Like the salt, sugar and fat in foods, the convenience of cars, right? Like humans are designed to conserve energy and to find food.   Molly Maloof: (59:53) So the society is now designed to like make everything ultra convenient, and eat too much. And it's like, okay. We don't move our bodies enough, we drive everywhere, we know what that's done to society. And so it's kind of like the real process of becoming a truly modern human is to actually try to like life according to your genetics, while also existing in a modern culture. It's a huge challenge.   Mason: (01:00:19) Can be a great thing. This is like the Daoist and the Yogi's would need to go outside of society to go and live in a cave so their life could revolve a

ADHD reWired
397 | September Live Q&A with Brendan Mahan, Will Curb, MJ Siemens, coaches Moira Maybin & Roxie Martin, & Barb McDonagh

ADHD reWired

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 75:14


Want to join the ADHD reWired Coaching & Accountability Groups? Go now to and get your name added to our winter interest list so you can join our kickoff registration event this month in October!  Shownotes & timestamps coming soon... Check out the Other Podcasts on the ADHD reWired Podcast Network: with Brendan Mahan with Will Curb with MJ Siemens with Moira Maybin coming soon - Wait, What Was the Question? with Will Curb and Coach Roxie Martin. Reach out to Will and Roxie at questions@whatwasthequestionpodcast.com  Don't Forget These, Too: — Support the show by becoming a Patron! — Get your name on the waitlist to join the winter season of ADHD reWired's Coaching and Accountability Groups! — Join your ADHD-friendly co-working space! — Join Eric, Brendan, Will, MJ, Moira, Roxie, and Barb for an hour of Live Q&A on Zoom, every 2nd Tuesday of the month at 12:30pm Central (10:30am Pacific / 1:30pm Eastern)

Mission Log Live: A Roddenberry Star Trek Podcast

Norman and Ashley are back to explore every ship's Lower Decks, and our callers have plenty to say about the "three ships" in the episode's title. Be sure to join us live! We're on the Mission Log Facebook page  every Monday at 7pm Pacific/10pm Eastern

Voice Over Body Shop
Voice Over Body Shop Episode #214 with VO Coach Marc Cashman

Voice Over Body Shop

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 129:26


On This Weeks  Voice Over Body Shop, We Welcome the Dean of Voice acting, Mr. Marc Cashman!  With over 40 years in the voiceover industry, Marc has written hundreds of articles about voice acting for Voices.com, Backstage and NowCasting.com; is in demand for V-O Conventions and Conferences as a Keynote Speaker and Master Class instructor, and has authored one of the top-selling books on voice acting, “V-Oh! Tips, Tricks, Tools and Techniques to Start and Sustain Your Voiceover Career.” When Dan, George and Marc get together, The VO wisdom just gushes out, so grab a bucket We'd love getting questions from you! Send them now to “theguys@vobs.TV or ask them in our Facebook OR YouTube chat! HEY! Catch it live if you can this Monday at 5 Pacific 8 Eastern, or the replay all week on Facebook @https://www.facebook.com/voiceoverbodyshop/ our homepage, VOBS.TV, or our podcast for those of you who love to listen on the go!  We love our supporters and donors for your continued support. VOBS can't be here without YOU and our other great supporters:

Afford Anything
Are We Heading for a Housing Crash in 2022?

Afford Anything

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 63:25


Hey Podcast family! Enrollment for our flagship course, Your First Rental Property, is open from now until Thursday, Oct 14 at 11:59 p.m. Pacific! If you want a structured, step-by-step framework to guide you from “clueless novice” to “confident investor,” this course is for you. Your First Rental Property provides all the knowledge, structure, support, spreadsheets, checklists, red flag warnings, and other tools you need to make smarter investing decisions. Last chance! Enrollment closes on Thursday at 11:59 p.m. Pacific: See you in class! https://affordanything.com/enroll ——- The real estate market in 2021 has been bonkers. That's the technical term. From 2012 to 2020, home prices nationwide rose at an annualized average of 5.8 percent per year. From April 2020 to April 2021, home prices climbed 17.2 percent. This sudden surge in prices has many homeowners and would-be investors fearful of a crash. The memories of the stark price run-up prior to The Great Recession are all too salient. What goes up must come down, right? Not exactly. In this episode, we walk through market fundamentals — discussing housing supply, lumber prices, and the distinction between cheap credit vs easy credit — to illustrate how today's market is unlike anything we've ever seen. More importantly, we offer tips for everyone —.whether you're a renter looking to get into your starter home, an empty-nester looking to downsize, an owner-occupant who wants to lock in your gains, or a curious aspiring investor who wonders if it's too late. Enjoy! For more information, visit the show notes at https://affordanything.com/episode343

The Sons Of History
World War II Fighter Pilot Talks Fighting Japanese Zeros, Shooting Gunboats, and Life on The Pacific

The Sons Of History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 47:21


Art Leach was a fighter pilot in the United States Navy during World War II was given credit for shooting down 3.5 enemy aircraft. Leach discusses the difficulties of launching and landing on the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown, shooting gunboats and Japanese Zeros in the Philippine Islands, and his experience of flying the F6F Hellcat. Art Leach was awarded two air medals and the Distinguished Flying Cross for his service during WW2. Watch all of our military interviews of American soldiers on this playlist. To find out what all we are doing at The Sons of History, visit our website: https://www.thesonsofhistory.com/. If you enjoy the podcast, be sure to subscribe, rate and review! Thanks!

Gen X, This is Why.
Little House on the Prairie S5 Ep24 Odyssey

Gen X, This is Why.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 56:26


Little House ends the season with a big ol' downer. We meet Dylan, a moody kid who sits in the woods and paints while reciting Homer and dreaming of the ocean. In other words, teenage Amye's perfect high school boyfriend. Dylan is diagnosed with leukemia and ropes Laura and Albert into accompanying him on a mission to see the Pacific before he dies. Carrie definitely played with Duplo blocks, Albert is a terrible train thief, and Pa beats the crap out of some rando. Jennie fails miserably at her index card...thank God Amye was there to pick up her slack. Show Notes:To sign up for our Patreon feed, download the Patreon app or visit www.patreon.com/genxthisiswhyFollow Gen X, This is Why on Facebook: facebook.com/genxthisiswhy/Join our Facebook Group, The Me-Me B's for extra content, giveaways, and some fun Gen X introspection: facebook.com/groups/genxthisiswhy/And find us on Instagram at: @genxthisiswhyYou can find Amye at: @amyearcherwriterYou can find Jennie, but good luck with that.Questions? Comments? Email us at info@genxthisiswhy.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/genxthisiswhy)

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
As dark place as it gets

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 15:22


On this hollowed-out shell Thursday, we waste no time getting to the dark place. The Biden administration released reports today detailing just how big of an impact climate change will have on our lives, from more traffic, to higher rates of depression and anxiety, and even more bugs. We’ll talk about those challenges. Plus, other stories of note, including a big win for Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen. Then, a beef over Bruce Springsteen lyrics has finally been put to bed. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Biden administration releases alarming reports on climate change challenges” from NBC News “Caesars Palace To Host 3-Day Climate Denier Conference” from HuffPost “Ireland Signs On to Global Deal Seeking to Curb Tax Avoidance” from The Wall Street Journal “The trillion-dollar coin scheme, explained by the guy who invented it” from Vox  “San Francisco to Ease Some Face-Mask Requirements” also from The Wall Street Journal Tweet thread about the correct Bruce Springsteen lyrics Join us on YouTube Fridays at 3:30 p.m. Pacific/6:30 p.m. Eastern for our live happy hour episode! Subscribe to our channel and sign up for notifications so you don't miss it.