Podcasts about pacific

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Ocean between Asia and Australia in the west, the Americas in the east and Antarctica or the Southern Ocean in the south.

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  • May 17, 2022LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about pacific

Orange Lounge Radio
Orange Lounge Radio 914 - 5/15/2022

Orange Lounge Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 178:48


Have pictures leaked to twitter confirmed a new Silent Hill game? Probably not as much as Konami immediately having the pictures pulled. What could this mean for the future of this often speculated about franchise, as it's been 10 years since the last official title? Also in the opening of the show tonight, DarkSakura gives a recap of a local Pinball Convention that she attended. It's not just pinball but plenty of video games on another week of the longest running video game podcast, Orange Lounge Radio!   Also in the News:   * Lawsuit Alleges Steam is too much for Valve * Nintendo Indie World Wrapup * Twitter Gamifies Privacy Policy * Final Fantasy XIV Mod Controversy   All this and more on the show where EVERY gamer has a voice-- Orange Lounge Radio! LIVE on the VOG Network, Sunday nights at 6 Pacific, 9 Eastern www.vognetwork.com Twitter: @olr Mailbag: participate (at) orangeloungeradio dot com

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
What's California Doing About Coastline Erosion?

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 5:52


Dealing with sea level rise along the California coast is not going to be easy. One of the options that cities are encouraged to consider is something called “managed retreat.” In a nutshell, that's when homes are moved away from the coast as it crumbles toward the sea. With so many expensive California homes perched on oceanside cliffs, the idea has become very controversial. There's even debate over the use of the term “managed retreat.” (1)Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review. Managed retreat is a concept that's been around for a while. It's been used after natural disasters that have flooded whole communities. As reported by the SF Chronicle, The town of Soldiers Grove, Wisconsin, began relocating about 600 homes in 1979, after the Kickapoo River had flooded 25 times. It cost more than $27 million in federal, state, and local funds to buy new land and move 70 buildings, including 24 homes.“Managed Retreat” to Fight Rising Sea LevelsNow, with increased concern about rising sea levels because of climate change, there's been more discussion about how to deal with it, and “managed retreat” is one of the options. But it's not being embraced by everyone. Managed retreat is something that goes against the desirability and value of oceanside real estate.As the Chronicle reports, it “represents a radical departure from decades of coastal development philosophy and runs counter to our proclivity to build houses and cities up against the ocean.” And now cities along the shore have a tremendous challenge to deal with. As UC Santa Cruz professor, Gary Griggs, puts it: “Dealing with sea level rise and (cliff) retreat… is the biggest challenge that human civilization may ever have to face.”The Cost of California Sea Level RiseIn a 2019 study that was published in the journal Scientific Reports, researchers estimated that sea level rise along California's 1,271 mile-long coast could negatively impact $150 billion in property and 600,000 people. Two thirds of the impact is expected to hit the San Francisco Bay Area. But the same study predicts substantial erosion in Southern California over the next 80 years, and the disappearance of 67% of its beaches.California has already tried to fight erosion with other less aggressive measures such as seawalls, the reinforcing of cliffs, and the building of levees and jetties. Professor Griggs says the state has used these methods to protect about 10% of the coastline, but they are expensive and they don't last forever. They need maintenance and updating in the race to keep ahead of climate change.In some places, sand has been added to help keep the ocean at bay. The city of Santa Cruz has been doing this for decades. The Chronicle reports that Santa Cruz has dumped additional sand onto beaches 58 times since 1965. The price tag? Almost $18 million.Pacifica's Crumbling Cliff and Lost HomesOne well-known example of the need for the relocation of homes has made headlines in San Mateo County. Winter storms in 2010 and 2015 caused so much damage to the cliff along Esplanade Drive in Pacific, the city was forced to condemn, purchase, and demolish several homes and apartment complexes. But even in a situation like this, it is not easy to tell people they must relocate because homes are at risk of falling into the sea. In 2015, the Coastal Commission asked cities to study how they would deal with sea level rise. Pacifica considered the use of managed retreat but after feedback from the community, rejected it. The city council said that it did not align with the city's goals or the desires of the residents.SF State economist Philip King told the Chronicle: “When you ask people to leave their homes, even if you could fully compensate them 100% economically, you still would be pulling them away from their community.” He says: “It's an issue we're going to have to face in California.”The Term “Managed Retreat” Conveys “Defeat”The term “managed retreat” also sounds too much like “defeat” for some people. An article in Slate suggests changing the term to something more obscure like “managed realignment” or “planned relocation.” Or maybe something like “aggressive resilience” or “strategic advance” which sound more proactive. (2)One city that's embracing the idea of managed retreat is the city of Marina in Monterey County. Officials there have created a plan that allows for some amount of property relocation. That includes support from the owner of a beach resort who will have to move some buildings.One of the co-authors of a UC Santa Cruz paper on Marina said in the report: “So there are cases in which private property owners have seen the writing on the wall and they know that they're not going to be able to constantly rebuild their infrastructure after flooding and erosion. They are on board with the plan, and they want to help preserve the community.” (3)You can read more about this topic by following links in the show notes at newsforinvestors.com.Also, please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!You can also join our real estate investor network for free at newsforinvestors.com. That gives you access to the Investor Portal where you'll find information on rental markets and sample property pro-formas. You can also connect with our experienced investment counselors, property teams, lenders, 1031 exchange facilitators, attorneys, CPAs and more.Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 -https://www.sfchronicle.com/travel/article/California-coast-sea-level-rise-17091737.php2 -https://slate.com/technology/2022/04/managed-retreat-climate-change-language.html3 -https://www.eenews.net/articles/managed-retreat-unpopular-expensive-and-not-going-away/

Centre Circle LIVE!
CPL Week 6 Recap: Late drama in Halifax & Winnipeg, Pacific stay perfect at home (ft. Manny Aparicio)

Centre Circle LIVE!

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 65:29


Fresh off another scintillating weekend of Canadian Premier League action, the CanPL.ca Newsroom crew is back to break down all four games in reverse order. Kristian Jack and Charlie O'Connor-Clarke avoid dwelling on hockey by jumping right into Valour FC's 1-0 win over York United, as they give some much-deserved credit to the Winnipeg club's two CF Montreal loanees, Sean Rea and Jonathan Sirois, for their heroics at IG Field on Sunday (2:50). After that, they head east to Nova Scotia, where they're joined by Mitchell Tierney for a full discussion of a thrilling 2-2 draw between HFX Wanderers FC and Cavalry FC which featured plenty of set-piece magic and a late equalizer from Daan Klomp for the visitors (16:03). From there, it's all the way to the opposite coast for a chat about Pacific FC's 2-1 home win over FC Edmonton on Saturday night. Alexandre Gangué-Ruzic joins the show first to give his full analysis of the two sides from a competitive contest (27:32). After that, Pacific midfielder Manny Aparicio drops by to share his thoughts on the champions' start to the season -- as well as his side's "recovery day" spin class on Sunday (35:15). Finally, KJ and Charlie return to Ontario to break down a close-fought 1-1 draw between Forge FC and Atlético Ottawa at Tim Hortons Field (48:22), and they end the show with a brief discussion of some breaking news, with dual national Marcelo Flores officially choosing to represent Mexico rather than Canada in international football (1:02:40).

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast
The Wait is over for Vika and Linda

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 8:34


Vika and Linda had one of their busiest recording years in 2020, releasing three highly successful albums. Album 'Akilotoa' debuted at #1 on the ARIA charts, and 'Sunday (The Gospel According To ISO)' and 'The Wait' both reached #2 - and now they're taking them on tour.

Rear Vision - ABC RN
Trouble in the ‘family'—Australia's relationship with its Pacific neighbours

Rear Vision - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 29:06


The recent signing of the security pact between China and the Solomon Island has sent shock waves through the Federal election campaign. Questions are being asked about our relationship with the Solomon Islands and with other Pacific nations. What is behind Australia's relationship with the Pacific nations?

Freedomizer Radio Network
Everlasting Covenant Free from Paul 5.14.22 on Freedomizer Radio

Freedomizer Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 176:00


Welcome to an "old path" group of followers of the Father who established the everlasting, perpetual covenant that is not changed until heaven and earth are removed.  Everlasting Covenant Free from Paul is a fellowship on Saturdays noon Pacific..1pm Mtn, 2 pm Central, 3 pm Eastern for 3 hours.  319-527-6208 to call.  Again that number is 319-527-6208.  Pressing 1 gets you in the queue to speak.   Your host today is Rachel.  We invite you weekly to join an "Old Path" group of followers of Yahuah. - We study the everlasting covenant established by Father in Heaven.  Truth is absolute and yet we may be in varying places in coming out of Babylon!  Our focus is on discovering the truth of the Way of the Father in Heaven. We study the old path referred to in Jeremiah 6:16, This is what the Father says: “Stand at the crossroads and look. Ask for the ancient paths: ‘Where is the good way?' Then walk in it, and you will find rest for your souls. But they said, ‘We will not walk in it!' We are the ones that want to walk in the old path and study the prophets, lost books and the words of the Messiah only,  free from the lying pen of the scribes referred to in Jeremiah 8:8 How can you say, ‘We are wise, and the Law of the Father is with us,' when in fact the lying pen of the scribes has produced a deception? We also study free of the opposing gospel according to Paul, free of religious corruption and also free of the influence of the Roman Catholic Church.  Join us weekly on Saturdays at noon Pacific. Welcome to our fellowship where we expose religion and explore the nature of the Father and His ways.  Shalom!  Research for yourselves! We also routinely research flat earth  and the vegetarian lifestyle.

KFBK Outdoor Show
KFBK Outdoor Show May 14th, Hour 1

KFBK Outdoor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 41:26


SF Bay halibut/ocean salmon; Crescent City salmon; Trinidad rockfish/Pacific halibut; Former Secretary of the Interior, David Bernhardt, accused of bribery

American Conservative University
Assassination by Artillery- George Friedman and Peter Zeihan. Jesse Watters, Voter Fraud Investigations.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 35:43


Assassination by Artillery- George Friedman and Peter Zeihan. Jesse Watters, Voter Fraud Investigations. Russia Should Give Up | George Friedman Podcast Assassinations And Artillery | Peter Zeihan Jesse Watters: The woke are facing a revolt. 2000 Mules Sparks County Sheriff to Initiate 2020 Fraud Investigation: 16 Cases Already Open Note- ACU Recommends this Recap of the Ukraine Conflict- How Ukraine Won the First Phase of the War - Modern Warfare DOCUMENTARY. https://youtu.be/yBZPE9o2gHU   Russia Should Give Up | George Friedman Podcast https://youtu.be/D9ufjw47X6I GEOPOP 81.7K subscribers Listen to full interview here... https://geopoliticalfutures.com/georg... #Russia has been waging war in #Ukraine for a little over two months now. That's not an especially long time. The Korean War lasted for three years, World War II for six. The Arab-Israeli wars, on the other hand, took only a matter a matter of days. A variety of factors contribute to a war's duration. The size of the battlefield is just one. The smaller the battlefield, the fewer soldiers can fit on it and, generally, the shorter the war. In Ukraine, the battlefield is substantial. On that criterion alone, the war there might last for years. As important are the forces arrayed against each other. All three axes of Russia's initial attack – against Odesa, Luhansk and Kyiv – broke because of logistical difficulties. The lines of attack were built largely around infantry with supporting artillery and airstrikes, but the primary strategic principle remained the same. They continued to try to seize cities rather than destroy the Ukrainian army. Thus, about a month after Moscow ruled out Kyiv as a primary target, it has yet to eliminate resistance in the east and south. Part of this has to do with the fact that cities are difficult battlefields. The advantage goes to the defender, who knows the city well and can formulate a strategy around that knowledge. However, the continued problem for Russia is that rather than concentrating its forces on one critical target in order to create optimal circumstances for a victory before moving to another target, it is still driven by its primary mission and vision, much of which is predicated on the assumption that the Ukrainian army is an insignificant force that can be defeated in the course of pursuing its primary strategy: seizing cities. Indeed, the idea of seizing cities as the operational task comes from the Russian goal of conquering all of Ukraine. In pursuit of that goal, there is a logic to defeating the Ukrainian army and occupying cities. But Moscow miscalculated the initial problem. Ukraine is big, and its forces fought from dispersed and tactically mobile positions, the exact kind of defense Russia is ill-suited to fight. The Ukrainians could decline combat where they chose and engage at the time of their choosing. Russia had tons of armor, but armor is not so useful against dispersed infantry or in cities. Russia also gave Ukraine warning of its intentions and staged forces in such a way that Kyiv could prepare its forces for the attack. Ukrainians appear to have dispersed so as to deny Russia a center of gravity to attack. The Ukrainians also accepted limited strategic control over their forces while giving tactical control to local forces. That meant that the Russians were deprived of a primary advantage: the ability to destroy any military concentration or interfere with communication in the field. The Ukrainians did not create vulnerable command centers or a jammable communications network. Infantry teams of various sizes were free to deploy and strike based on tactical opportunity. In other words, forces familiar with the situation were not under the continual control of a central command that was unfamiliar. The Russians could not occupy Ukraine in one blow as they expected. Moscow has since tried to impose a war of attrition. The problem is that this war of attrition costs the Russians as much as the Ukrainians, and in some ways more. The Ukrainians had a second advantage: the United States. The U.S. wanted the Russian invasion to fail. If Ukraine fell, then the Russian army would be face to face with NATO, from Poland to Romania. Russian intentions were always unclear, but assuming the worst case, Russia might follow a successful invasion with another drive westward to recover its pre-1991 position. Washington would then inevitably be drawn into direct conflict with Russia. And the U.S. above all did not want to deploy troops into combat. Circumstances dictated that Ukraine not be defeated and that U.S. troops not be drawn in. The early stages of the invasion showed that denying Russia its victory without U.S. forces was possible. What Ukraine needed was a massive infusion of advanced weapons. Wars change. What had been an effective infantry operation had to be reinforced with anti-tank, anti-air and advanced reconnaissance systems. Confronting the Russian army now is the same infantry that had fought them to a standstill, coupled with advanced weapons and munitions. These need to be managed from a central command, which changes Ukrainian operations but puts Russia at risk in any strategic offensive.   Assassinations And Artillery | Peter Zeihan https://youtu.be/vrluuD-QlYI GEOPOP 81.7K subscribers The Ukraine War, Assassinations, and Artillery by Peter Zeihan on May 6, 2022 The Ukrainian military has enjoyed an outsized amount of success when it comes to successfully finding--and eliminating--a variety of high-value Russian targets. The Ukrainian military did not have a reputation of hitting above their weight before the Russians invaded this past February, nor do we think of them as the kinds of technical wunderkinds to quickly build up indigenous signals and targeting intelligence capabilities. Which means they're probably getting some help. A constellation of various American military and civilian officials have spoken openly about the United States' intelligence sharing relationship with the Ukrainians, either while testifying before the US Congress or directly with the media. They typically frame the intelligence sharing as necessary for helping to keep Ukrainian civilians safe, or giving the government in Kyiv a heads up about Russian intentions. There's little evidence to believe that this represents the full scope of intelligence sharing. Not the least of which is the growing list of Russian generals and military commanders who keep ending up dead. Or the absolutely stunning amount of Russian planes, tanks, armored personnel carriers, rocket launchers and ships (including the flagship of the Black Sea fleet) that the Ukrainians have successfully eliminated. We should give credit where credit is due. The Ukrainian military and volunteers are by all accounts a highly motivated bunch. It is not easy to metabolize new weapons systems, training and tactics--especially against a larger force.   Recommended Recap of the Ukraine Conflict- https://youtu.be/yBZPE9o2gHU How Ukraine Won the First Phase of the War - Modern Warfare DOCUMENTARY Kings and Generals 2.56M subscribers Claim your SPECIAL OFFER for MagellanTV here: https://try.magellantv.com/kingsandge.... Start your free trial TODAY so you can watch the documentary called Tony Robinon's VE Day: Minute by Minute and the rest of MagellanTV's history collection: https://www.magellantv.com/explore/hi... Kings and Generals animated historical documentary series on Modern Warfare continues with the video on the first phase of the Russian Invasion of Ukraine in 2022, as we talk about the build-up to the new stage of the Russo-Ukrainian War, how Putin's unprovoked invasion of Ukraine continued, and cover events between February 24th and April 7th, as we see how Ukraine managed to win the first phase of the war, and set up the second phase of the war - battle of Donbas. Pacific War Series: https://youtu.be/MEgIHN63ojU?list=PLa... Cold War channel: http://bit.ly/2UHebLI Modern Warfare series: http://bit.ly/2W2SeXF Battle of Khalkhin Gol 1939: https://youtu.be/GGwUlET2tbw Winter War: https://youtu.be/1Uk5bY22RSE Greco-Italian War, Battle of Greece, Battle of Crete: https://youtu.be/_jDBQijICTo Soviet Invasion of Afghanistan - Operation Storm-333: https://youtu.be/bpm5dPIULF0 German Raiders in the Pacific: https://youtu.be/JbiWX9pkWns Battle of Hong Kong 1941: https://youtu.be/TrqlSSA2xUc Italian Raids on Alexandria and Gibraltar: Italian Raids on Alexandria and Gibraltar Battle of Taranto 1940: https://youtu.be/Wdbel62kZl0 Sihang Warehouse 1937 - Chinese Thermopylae: https://youtu.be/IxpG19OTmns Support us on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/KingsandGenerals or Paypal: http://paypal.me/kingsandgenerals or by joining the youtube membership: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMma... We are grateful to our patrons and sponsors, who made this video possible: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1o... The video was made by Leif Sick, while the script was developed by Turgut Gambar (https://youtube.com/c/ThePacificWarCh...). The video was narrated by Officially Devin (https://www.youtube.com/user/Official...) ✔ Merch store ► teespring.com/stores/kingsandgenerals ✔ Patreon ► https://www.patreon.com/KingsandGenerals ✔ Podcast ► http://www.kingsandgenerals.net/podcast/ ✔ PayPal ► http://paypal.me/kingsandgenerals ✔ Twitter ► https://twitter.com/KingsGenerals ✔ Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/KingsGenerals ✔ Instagram ►http://www.instagram.com/Kings_Generals Production Music courtesy of Epidemic Sound: http://www.epidemicsound.com #Documentary #RussianInvasion #RussoUkrainianWar   Watters: The woke are facing a revolt. https://youtu.be/MXwIWpLKlzo 473,644 views May 13, 2022 Fox News 9.47M subscribers 'Jesse Watters Primetime' host says 'people start looking for alternatives' when large companies start fighting the culture wars. #FoxNews #Primetime Subscribe to Fox News! https://bit.ly/2vBUvAS Watch more Fox News Video: http://video.foxnews.com Watch Fox News Channel Live: http://www.foxnewsgo.com/ FOX News Channel (FNC) is a 24-hour all-encompassing news service delivering breaking news as well as political and business news. The number one network in cable, FNC has been the most-watched television news channel for 18 consecutive years. According to a 2020 Brand Keys Consumer Loyalty Engagement Index report, FOX News is the top brand in the country for morning and evening news coverage. A 2019 Suffolk University poll named FOX News as the most trusted source for television news or commentary, while a 2019 Brand Keys Emotion Engagement Analysis survey found that FOX News was the most trusted cable news brand. A 2017 Gallup/Knight Foundation survey also found that among Americans who could name an objective news source, FOX News was the top-cited outlet. Owned by FOX Corporation, FNC is available in nearly 90 million homes and dominates the cable news landscape, routinely notching the top ten programs in the genre. Watch full episodes of your favorite shows The Five: http://video.foxnews.com/playlist/lon... Special Report with Bret Baier: http://video.foxnews.com/playlist/lon... Fox News Primetime: https://video.foxnews.com/playlist/on... Tucker Carlson Tonight: http://video.foxnews.com/playlist/lon... Hannity: http://video.foxnews.com/playlist/lon... The Ingraham Angle: http://video.foxnews.com/playlist/lon... Fox News @ Night: http://video.foxnews.com/playlist/lon... Follow Fox News on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FoxNews/ Follow Fox News on Twitter: https://twitter.com/FoxNews/ Follow Fox News on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/foxnews/om/   2000 Mules Sparks County Sheriff to Initiate 2020 Fraud Investigation: 16 Cases Already Open https://youtu.be/gmK3_z_fOpg 106,871 views Facts Matter with Roman Balmakov 771K subscribers

RNZ: Tagata o te Moana
Tagata O ta Moana for 14 May 2022

RNZ: Tagata o te Moana

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 31:09


Tonga's deputy pm loses seat after bribery conviction; Samoa court ruling for more women MPs welcomeD; concerns raised for Pacifica students dropping out to work and support their families all that and more coming up on Tagata O Te Moana.

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Podcast [Washington Roundtable May 13, '22]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 48:45


On this Washington Roundtable episode of the Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast, sponsored by Bell, our guests are Dov Zakheim, PhD, former DoD comptroller, now with the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Dr. Patrick Cronin of the Hudson Institute and Dr. Kathleen McInnis, the director of the Smart Women, Smart Power Initiative at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Topics: — Implications of one lawmakers, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., blocking move by Congress to approve $40 billion in aid for Ukraine, $7 billion more than requested by President Biden — Finland's formal move to join NATO and what Helsinki brings to the alliance and how Russia will respond — Whether Sweden will follow suit and if enlargement will face opposition from Hungary and Turkey — How Ukraine war will shape the strategic concept to be adopted by NATO members at upcoming summit in Madrid — Value of UK move to strike security pacts with Finland and Sweden in advance of NATO membership announcements — Need for national leaders to make the case for continued support for Ukraine to avoid the conflict becoming “frozen,” handing Russia a victory — Grading President Biden and his team on making the same for Ukraine support — Key takeaways from extraordinary meeting of ASEAN leaders at the White House — Update on newsflow across the Pacific including North Korea's admission of covid outbreak — Britain's strategic security agreement with Japan — Deadly violence in Israel and what it means

Pacific Review
Tuberculosis is on the rise in Papua New Guinea as health organisations seek funding

Pacific Review

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 30:00


Tuberculosis is on the rise as health groups call for more funding for Papua New Guinea.

RNZ: Dateline Pacific
Pacific Waves for 14 May 2022

RNZ: Dateline Pacific

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 19:53


Tonga's deputy pm loses seat after bribery conviction; Samoa court ruling for more women MPs welcomed; Concerns raised for Pacifica students dropping out to work and support their families; Issuing of the writs for PNG postponed to next week.

RNZ: Dateline Pacific
Tonga's deputy pm loses seat after bribery conviction

RNZ: Dateline Pacific

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 5:31


Four MPs have now been dumped f rom the Tonga parliament over election petitions

RNZ: Dateline Pacific
Samoa court ruling for more women MPs welcomed

RNZ: Dateline Pacific

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 3:12


Samoa court ruling for more women MPs welcomed.

RNZ: Dateline Pacific
Students dropping out to work and support their families

RNZ: Dateline Pacific

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 4:11


Concerns raised for Pacifica students dropping out to work and support their families.

RNZ: Dateline Pacific
Issuing of the writs for PNG postponed to next week

RNZ: Dateline Pacific

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 5:29


Issuing of the writs for PNG postponed to next week.

Sales Tips For Smart People
05.13.2022 - Self Image

Sales Tips For Smart People

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 10:51


Eric Lofholm is excited to bring you another FREE resource to maximize your business and personal results! Check in daily (Mon-Fri at 7:45am Pacific) for new messages and growth strategies. Calendar

40 Plus: Real Men. Real Talk.
172: Moving Past Being “Friendzoned” – Rick Clemons

40 Plus: Real Men. Real Talk.

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 12:04


We've all been there and you are NOT alone. Friendzoned! It isn't fun and it can truly screw with your confidence and cause you to lose hope in ever finding a man and being in a relationship. But fear not gay men, there is life after being Friendzoned and here's how to move forward. Join Our Live 40 Plus Gay Men, Gay Talk Chats The first Monday of each month at 6:00 p.m. Pacific, we gather together on a zoom chat to talk about the stuff us gay gays aren't talking about but should - careers, finances, sex, love, health, coming out - all that stuff that we think we're talking about but aren't. It's fun, it builds community, and you never know when you just might make a great connection or a friend. https://rickclemons.com/mens-chats/ (Click Here To Join The Calls!) P.S. get your free My Bold Life Manifesto, right here - https://rickclemons.com/manifesto/ (rickclemons.com/manifesto/) You can also listen to the podcast on… https://apple.co/2Q4nnbt ()   https://open.spotify.com/show/3D4LvaRQjd5EcHWW4nKmQp ()https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/rick-clemons/forty-plus-real-men-real-talk ()   http://tun.in/pjrug ()https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/40-plus-real-men-real-talk-854094 ()   https://radiopublic.com/40-plus-real-men-real-talk-WoBlp5 ()  

AccuWeather Daily
'Triple-dip' La Niña to hold vast influence over Pacific hurricane season this year

AccuWeather Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 8:49


AccuWeather Daily brings you the top trending weather story of the day - every day.

Prevail with Greg Olear
The Democracy Game (with Brynn Tannehill)

Prevail with Greg Olear

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 102:41


Greg Olear talks to Brynn Tannehill, author of the new book AMERICAN FASCISM, about how the United States got to the precipice of fascism, how minoritarian rule might look, and what, if anything, we can do to turn the ship around. Plus: a new ballad on a house in Chevy Chase. Follow Brynn Tannehill: https://twitter.com/brynntannehill Brynn's website: http://www.brynntannehill.com Buy AMERICAN FASCISM: https://www.amazon.com/American-Fascism-How-Subverting-Democracy/dp/1955348030/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= Watch The Five 8, Fridays at 5pm Pacific, 8pm Eastern. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0BRnRwe7yDZXIaF-QZfvhA Subscribe to the PREVAIL newsletter: https://gregolear.substack.com/about Give to How We Win Fund swingleft.org/fundraise/howwewin

The Tony DUrso Show
$2000 to Multi-Millions with Fredrik van Huynh & Tony DUrso

The Tony DUrso Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 60:00


Fredrik van Huynh is the Co-Founder of Absolute Internship, one of the world's largest internship programs for students. Frequently covered by Forbes Magazine, The New York Times, Bloomberg Businessweek, Financial Times, and BBC News, Freddie is recognized as one of Sweden's top entrepreneurs, having built a multi-million dollar business from the ground up. Listen to The Tony DUrso Show on VoiceAmerica Influencers Platform every Friday at 2pm Pacific or listen on Apple Podcasts or tonydurso.com/podcast.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Super Rugby: Fijian Drua ready to face Moana Pasifika

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 3:01


The two teams that put the Pacific into Super Rugby Pacific will meet for the first time this weekend, with the Fijian Drua hosting Moana Pasifika in Sydney. The newcomers have already recruited loyal fan bases. Rugby reporter Joe Porter has more on tomorrow evening's historic match.

The Boundaries.me Podcast
Episode 348 - The Dr. Cloud Show - Shorts - The Toxicity of Triangulation in Relationships

The Boundaries.me Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 12:51


In this highlight from the podcast, Dr. Cloud talks about how damaging triangulation can be in relationships. Triangulation is a common and often destructive problem in relationships in families, friendships, working relationships. When a conflict arises between two people, a third party is often brought in, unintentionally or intentionally, to ease the tension and pain. We're not talking about professional counseling here or having a third person there for the conversation. That's one thing. But what often happens is a "Victim, Persecutor, Rescuer,"triangle.  This is where the "victim" doesn't talk to the "persecutor" but instead goes to the third party, the "rescuer." From there, matters tend to get worse. So what can you do about it? What matters most is that when a third party is involved they have resolution as their goal.   Got a narcissist in your life? Not sure what to do? Then you're in luck! We have an upcoming workshop on Narcissism on June 28th at 5pm Pacific! If you can't attend live, don't worry, you can stream the recording as much as you like. To find out more about it go to Boundaries.me/Narcissism.     Get a free 14 day trial to Boundaries.me with over 90 video courses, daily coaching emails and more. We've got courses on codependency, finding safe people, dealing with a narcissist, and over 90 other courses. You'll also get daily coaching videos delivered to your inbox--short 2-4 minute videos that give you one thing to do that day to build your way to a better version of yourself. We've also got a members-only support community on the site where you can discuss what you're learning, and get support and share support along the way. It's a free two-week trial, cancel at anytime, and only $9 a month after that. https://www.boundaries.me

Night Dreams Talk Radio
SHIPWRECKS & TREASURES Dr. Spence / WORLD 3 AFTER Sean Patrick Hazlett

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 126:02


Dr. Spence Shipwrecks And Sunken Treasures Dr. Spence is an internationally known expert on shipwrecks and sunken treasures. His bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies was perhaps the first accredited academic degree ever awarded in the United States for any program in marine archaeology. He also received one of the first five doctorates (Doctor of Marine Histories, College of Marine Arts, 1972) ever awarded for marine archaeology anywhere in the world and he has long been considered one of the founding fathers of marine archaeology. His work has been funded by such institutions as the Savannah Ships of the Sea Museum, CRIL (the Caribbean Research Institute Ltd., Colombia, South America), the College of Charleston, the South Carolina Committee for the Humanities, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. In the early 1990s he served as Chief of Underwater Archaeology for Providencia Y San Andres, a 40,000 square mile archipelago in the Western Caribbean. He has authored more than two dozen books, and has served as an editor for a number of nationally distributed magazines. He is also an award winning cartographer and has published a number of maps and charts dealing with shipwrecks and treasure. Always an adventurer, Spence has traveled to a wide range of exotic places in the Far East, Europe, Central and South America. He has explored castles, palaces, shipwrecks, ancient ruins, secret tunnels, and subterranean and underwater caves. He has dived in the Great Lakes, the Atlantic, the Pacific, the Mediterranean, and the Caribbean. He has been shot at, buried in cave-ins, tangled in fishing nets, pinned under wreckage, run out of air, lost inside a wreck, and bitten by fish while pursuing his quests. Although Dr. Spence has discovered numerous historically significant shipwrecks, including the Civil War blockade runner Georgiana and the Confederate submarine Hunley, he hasn't only made discoveries underwater. He considers his identification of Charleston born banking and shipping magnate George Trenholm as the “Real Rhett Butler” to have been his most interesting non-shipwreck discovery. Trenholm's fleet of fast steamers earned today's equivalent of over one billion dollars running munitions, medicines, and merchandise through the Federal blockade. By the end of the Civil War, Trenholm was a major figure in the Confederate government. The United States actually charged Trenholm with treason and claimed he had made off with and concealed hundreds of millions in Confederate assets. Trenholm died without revealing his secrets. Spence is currently trying to uncover them. The State of South Carolina's claim of ownership to the Civil War submarine Hunley was based on Spence's 1970 discovery of that vessel and his subsequent gift of his salvage rights to it to the State. Spence's gift of his rights was made in September of 1995 at the official request of the Attorney General of South Carolina and the South Carolina Hunley Commission. In 2013, Dr. Spence announced his discoveries at Cape Romain of the 1894 wreck of the SS Ozama and the 1881 wreck of the SS United States. As an historian, Spence believes the biggest key to success on any expedition is the archival research that precedes it. Spence calls historical research “his drug of choice” and says, “In today's world, time is the most expensive part of a salvage expedition. Man-hours spent in the archives can cut hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of time from the field phase of most projects.”5/12/22 Sean Patrick Hazlett World War 3 Aftermath Sean Patrick Hazlett is an Army veteran and former captain, speculative fiction writer and editor, and finance executive in the San Francisco Bay area. He was born in Wilmington, Delaware, but trekked across the country to pursue an AB in history and BS in electrical engineering from Stanford University on an ROTC scholarship. He earned a Master in Public Policy from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government where he won the 2006 Policy Analysis Exercise Award for his work on policy solutions to Iran's nuclear weapons program under the guidance of future secretary of defense Ashton B. Carter. While at the Harvard Kennedy School, he worked on the Harvard-Stanford Preventive Defense Project. He also holds an MBA from the Harvard Business School, where he graduated with Second Year Honors.As a cavalry officer in the elite 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, Seam trained various units for war in Iraq and Afghanistan. While at the National Training Center in the Mojave Desert, he became an expert in Soviet doctrine and tactics, leading a Motorized Rifle Battalion. He has also published a Harvard Business School case study on the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment and how it exemplified a learning organization.Sean has worked in various roles in finance. He was an investment banker, an equity analyst covering industries ranging from cleantech to semiconductors to enterprise software. His seminal equity research report on the smart grid was cited in The Economist magazine. He has also worked in various corporate finance roles in Silicon Valley companies ranging from cybersecurity to hardware to enterprise software.Sean is a 2017 winner of the Writers of the Future Contest. Nearly fifty of his short stories have appeared in publications such as The Year's Best Military and Adventure SF, Year's Best Hardcore Horror, Robosoldiers, Worlds Long Lost, Terraform, Galaxy's Edge, Writers of the Future, Grimdark Magazine, Vastarien, and Abyss & Apex, among others. He is the editor of the Weird World War III and Weird World War.

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
We learn (some of) what Jerome Powell is thinking

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 12:48


Today, instead of guessing what Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell is thinking, we asked. Our hosts talk about the newsiest and funniest parts of Kai’s interview with the Fed chairman. Plus, a scientific revelation about sudden infant death syndrome may provide some peace for parents. And, speaking of incredible science, we marvel at mind-blowing new pictures of the black hole at the center of the Milky Way. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Fed Chair Jerome Powell: ‘Whether we can execute a soft landing or not, it may actually depend on factors that we don't control.’” from Marketplace “Researchers Pinpoint Reason Infants Die From SIDS” from BioSpace “World first breakthrough could prevent SIDS” from the Sydney Children’s Hospitals Network “Black hole: First picture of Milky Way monster” from BBC News “Astronomers reveal first image of the black hole at the heart of our galaxy” from Event Horizon Telescope “Sagittarius A*: NASA Telescopes Support Event Horizon Telescope in Studying Milky Way’s Black Hole” from NASA Your donation powers the journalism you rely on. Give today to support “Make Me Smart.” Join us Friday for Economics on Tap. We'll be livestreaming on YouTube starting at 3:30 p.m. Pacific time, 6:30 p.m. Eastern.

Marketplace All-in-One
We learn (some of) what Jerome Powell is thinking

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 12:48


Today, instead of guessing what Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell is thinking, we asked. Our hosts talk about the newsiest and funniest parts of Kai’s interview with the Fed chairman. Plus, a scientific revelation about sudden infant death syndrome may provide some peace for parents. And, speaking of incredible science, we marvel at mind-blowing new pictures of the black hole at the center of the Milky Way. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Fed Chair Jerome Powell: ‘Whether we can execute a soft landing or not, it may actually depend on factors that we don't control.’” from Marketplace “Researchers Pinpoint Reason Infants Die From SIDS” from BioSpace “World first breakthrough could prevent SIDS” from the Sydney Children’s Hospitals Network “Black hole: First picture of Milky Way monster” from BBC News “Astronomers reveal first image of the black hole at the heart of our galaxy” from Event Horizon Telescope “Sagittarius A*: NASA Telescopes Support Event Horizon Telescope in Studying Milky Way’s Black Hole” from NASA Your donation powers the journalism you rely on. Give today to support “Make Me Smart.” Join us Friday for Economics on Tap. We'll be livestreaming on YouTube starting at 3:30 p.m. Pacific time, 6:30 p.m. Eastern.

Ask the Vets with Dr. Jeff - Best Veterinary Podcast on Pet Life Radio (PetLifeRadio.com)

This week's topics include raw diets, park water, and more! Tune in every SUNDAY at 12 Noon Eastern, 9am Pacific and call in with your questions at 877-385-8882 or join us on Zoom.

Pacific Beat
Moana and Drua's first Super Rugby Pacific encounter symbolic in more ways than one

Pacific Beat

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 6:50


The first ever Super Rugby battle of the Pacific between Fijian Drua and Moana Pasifika has been more than 25 years in the making. But now the Pacific has a foot in the door, a rugby revolution in the islands is starting to build.

Pacific Beat
First Super Rugby encounter between Fijian Drua and Moana Pasifika with plenty of Pacific pride at stake, and a symbol of a revolution in the sport.

Pacific Beat

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 39:16


Fijian Drua and Moana Pasifika's first Super Rugby encounter promises to be quite a match with so much Pacific pride at stake, and Tongan Rugby Union CEO, Peter Harding, finally back in country after being stranded in Sydney sets to work on rebuilding.

RNZ: Dateline Pacific
Pacific Waves for 13 May 2022

RNZ: Dateline Pacific

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 21:49


Papua New Guineans mourn the death of deputy prime minister Sam Basil; Call for more consultation on deployment of US military assets in Guam; Pasifika artists living with disabilities empowered to chart their own course.

RNZ: Dateline Pacific
PNG mourns the death of deputy prime minister Sam Basil

RNZ: Dateline Pacific

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 9:31


Papua New Guineans mourn the death of deputy prime minister Sam Basil.

RNZ: Dateline Pacific
Call for more consulation on deployment of US military in Guam

RNZ: Dateline Pacific

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 6:59


Call for more consulation on deployment of US military assets in Guam.

Sales Tips For Smart People
5.12.2022 - It's OK to fall short

Sales Tips For Smart People

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 17:05


Eric Lofholm is excited to bring you another FREE resource to maximize your business and personal results! Check in daily (Mon-Fri at 7:45am Pacific) for new messages and growth strategies. Calendar

ChinaPower
China's Relationship with the Middle East: A Conversation with Dr. Jon B. Alterman

ChinaPower

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 37:41


In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, we are joined by Dr. Jon B. Alterman to unpack the relationship between China and the Middle East. Dr. Alterman begins with an overview of China's role in the region, detailing China's varied individual relationships with different countries. He states that China's growing presence in the region is mostly motivated by Chinese self-interest and China is not willing to commit large sacrifices to deepen its relations with the region or with particular countries like Iran. Dr. Alterman concludes that the future of China-Middle East relations is unpredictable, and the United States should not overestimate China's power in the region. Dr. Jon B. Alterman is a senior vice president, holds the Zbigniew Brzezinski Chair in Global Security and Geostrategy, and is director of the Middle East Program at CSIS. Prior to joining CSIS in 2002, he served as a member of the Policy Planning Staff at the U.S. Department of State and as a special assistant to the assistant secretary of state for Near Eastern affairs, and from 2009-2019 he served as a member of the Chief of Naval Operations Executive Panel.

Energypreneurs
E105: Journey of a Renewable Energy Specialist: From Bangladesh to the Pacific

Energypreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 35:24


Today, Emily So, a renewable energy specialist with the Asian Development Bank, shares her professional transformation from working in a think-tank to a startup to finally a development professional today.  In this episode, we hear about her challenges in installing solar power in luxury lodges in Africa, poor off-grid locations in Bangladesh, and countries across the Pacific. She explains why and how the smaller Pacific countries are introducing solar power and batteries to tackle climate change. Emily explained why development organizations need to invest more in innovative systems and projects to tackle climate change.  To find out more, including how she got convinced of the need for the urgency of tackling climate change while stranded on a remote island, please listen in:  Please listen in to find out more.  Connect with Sohail Hasnie: Facebook @sohailhasnie Twitter @shasnie LinkedIn @shasnie ADB Blog Sohail Hasnie

Equipping the Corps
17. Amphibious Vehicle Test Branch with Lt. Col. Scott Graniero

Equipping the Corps

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 46:16


Conducting amphibious operations is part of the Marine Corps DNA and amphibious vehicles have been a critical component to Marine Corps operations since their introduction during WWII. The names and models have changed but one thing has remained constant since their development. Before many of them first crossed the surf in the Pacific, they most likely spent some time in the shores of California at a small test facility called the Amphibious Vehicle Test Branch, or AVTB. During the preceding decades, AVTB maintained an integral role in testing many variants and upgrades of the Amphibious Assault Vehicle, the Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle, the Marine Personnel Carrier, the Amphibious Assault Vehicle Survivability Upgrade and most recently the Amphibious Combat Vehicle. Manny has the pleasure of speaking with the AVTB Director, LtCol Scott Graniero. The views expressed in this podcast reflect those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect the views, policies, or positions or the United States Marine Corps or Department of Defense. Recommended Reading- Defense Acquisition Research Journal https://www.dau.edu/library/arj/ U.S. Naval Institute https://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings?gclid=Cj0KCQjwjN-SBhCkARIsACsrBz6Z8ARFydAiPTdfAVzN76Vl33m_2SFk7fs5aWCQrcwjAWWqwiZg1bcaAnJEEALw_wcB Marine Corps Gazette https://mca-marines.org/magazines/marine-corps-gazette/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/equipping-the-corps/message

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
"Totally mishandled strategic interests": Australia's former High Commissioner to Solomons

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 14:09


Australia's former High Commissioner to the Solomon Islands says the Morrison Government has "totally mishandled" Australia's strategic interests in region. The Coalition, has faced criticism over its handling of national security after Honiara signed a security pact with China which could see a military base in the Pacific. Guest: Trevor Sofield, Former Australian High Commissioner to Solomon Islands

Kathy's Kids Storytime
A Room for Grandmother — by Kay Heistand

Kathy's Kids Storytime

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 6:04


Do you like visiting your grandparents? How would you feel if one of them moved in with you? In our story today, a young girl is having her grandmother move in with them and she is only thinking about how that would inconvenience her, however one of her friends helps her pivot her thoughts. If you're interested in any other books published by the Seventh-day Adventist Church, please visit adventistbookcenter.com or call 1-800-765-6955.Visit our website: www.kathyskidsstorytime.org We'd love to hear from you. Write to us at:Kathy@kathyskidsstorytime.orgorKathy's Kids StorytimePO Box 44270Charlotte, NC 28215-0043Special Thanks:Recorded by: Kathy Russell, Children's Ministry Director Edited by: Communication Department

NXTLVL Experience Design
Ep. 42 Telling Architecture's Story In Film with Kyle Bergman, Founder - Architecture and Design Film Festival

NXTLVL Experience Design

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 80:06


ABOUT Kyle Bergman:Kyle's LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kyle-bergman-629809131/Twitter: https://twitter.com/ADFILMFESTInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/adfilmfest/Websites:Architecture and Design Film Festival: https://www.adfilmfest.com/Pacific Rim Parks: https://pacificrimpark.org/Kyle Bergman's Bio: Founder & Festival Director - Architecture & Design Film Festival / New YorkArchitect Kyle Bergman founded the Architecture & Design Film Festival (ADFF) in 2009 and serves as its festival director. He has always recognized the strong connection between architecture and film and ADFF provides a unique opportunity to educate, entertain and engage people who are passionate about the world of architecture and design. Now in its 14th season, ADFF has grown to become the largest film festival dedicated to the creative spirit of architecture and design.Mr. Bergman also serves as president of Pacific Rim Park (PRP) whose mission is to use the process of designing and building parks as a tool to connect people and communities around the Pacific. Mr, Bergman has been involved with PRP since its first park built in Vladivostok, Russia in 1994.Mr. Bergman has been involved with design/build education since 1992 when he created and moderated an architectural lecture series about the design/build process for the Smithsonian Institute. He has taught community design/build classes in the Dominican Republic for the Yestermorrow Design/Build School in Vermont, and served on their board of directors for 9 years.An entrepreneur at heart, Mr. Bergman founded Alt Spec in 1999, a publishing company that produced a visual resource of unique and alternative products for architects and designers. He also produced a play, The Glass House, about the design and construction of two famous homes — Mies van der Rohe's Farnsworth House and Phillip Johnson's Glass House. SHOW INTRO:When I was in college I took an elective in hypnosis and one of the few things that I learned during that course is that everyone can be hypnotized, to some degree. That degree has a lot to do with the individual's ability to let themself go, to suspend disbelief, to have a strong imagination as well as the proclivity to get lost in story.What I have always know about myself is that when I watch a movie, the outside world disappears. I am with Frodo on our way to Mordor, in a landing craft on the beach of Normandy on my way to Save Private Ryan, falling in love with the heroine, summiting the mountain… I could go on but you get the idea.The same happens with great novels where I am fully in the narrative and I find portrayals of human excellence deeply moving.Over the years, I have found myself using expressions of famous novelists, musicians, architects and filmmakers as truisms to live my life by.  I love documentaries because I learn things I did not know. I love discovering how things work in our world and how things we often take for granted in out built environment are not there by happenstance but have come to be through an intense, and usually lengthy, process of collaborative making.I often stand in places and I'm amazed at the amount of decisions that had to be made to bring the thing that I'm experienced into the world. This is no small thing and it's something that I think the general public is unaware of. I would hazard a guess that most walk through their environments blissfully unaware of the magnitude of human invention and hard work that it took to bring most buildings to the world.There have been stories I have read - biographies, monographs and radio shows and podcasts that I have listened to that have described the lives of famous makers, builders, architects, artists, designers and musicians - these alchemists of human ingenuity bringing things to the world that are lasting expressions of what it means to be human - in a certain place - at a certain time.And so, it's probably not so surprising that documentaries that focus on the work of architects or TV shows that show how things are made or how to make them better or how our built world has come to be I find particularly fascinating. I think that if people better understood architecture and design, and the intricate set of interdependencies and decisions made to make the beautiful building or ice cream scoop, the world of design and architecture maybe experienced with more reverence.I've often heard it also said that architects tend to make buildings for architects and the much of the subtlety and deep meaning of what architects and designers do is lost on the general public.An this may be, in part , due to the fact that architects haven't been too good at explaining what they do to the public. In the past there were various guilds, associations of craftsmen or merchants that formed for mutual aid and protection and for the furtherance of their professional interests.And indeed, knowledge of the craft was often held in confidence among its members. I've often heard it also said that architects tend to make buildings for architects and the much of the subtlety and deep meaning of what architects and designers do is lost on the general public. Maybe this is a hold-over from ancient guilds. If so, the consequence has been a poor understanding of the world of architecture and one that needs some revision.This is just one of the mandates that Kyle Bergman and the architecture and design Film Festival have set out for themselves in bringing stories of architecture and design to the general public. The architecture and design Film Festival attempts to write that story in a different way. To bring the art and science of architecture and design, what it means, why we do it and how we do it, to the general public so they better understand the nature of the built world and what it means to be a participant in it.ArchitectKyleBergman founded the Architecture & Design Film Festival (ADFF) in 2009 and serves as its festival director. He has always recognized the strong connection between architecture and film and how the ADFF can provide a unique opportunity to educate, entertain and engage people who are passionate about the world of architecture and design. Now in its 14th season, ADFF has grown to become the largest film festival dedicated to the creative spirit of architecture and design.Kyle Bergman has been involved with design/build education since 1992 when he created and moderated an architectural lecture series about the design/build process for the Smithsonian Institute. He has taught community design/build classes in the Dominican Republic for the Yestermorrow Design/Build School in Vermont, and served on their board of directors for 9 years.He is also the president of Pacific Rim Park (PRP) whose mission is to use the process of designing and building parks as a tool to connect people and communities around the Pacific. The architecture and design Film Festival now screens about 300 documentary films every year. They curate the best of them and bring them to the public in major cities across the US and Canada as well as releasing them online.Because of the work of Kyle Bergman, the general public continues to be invited into a deeper understanding of architects, designers and the nature of the built environment.The architecture critic Paul Goldberger has said “Architecture begins to matter when it brings delight and sadness and perplexity and awe along with a roof over our heads.” For the past 13 or 14 years, the architecture and design Film Festival has brought together the story of architecture and design offering those who participate a felt sense of delight and sadness, a deeper appreciation for the complexity of the practice of design and architecture and a sense of awe about the magic and meaning of buildings. ABOUT DAVID KEPRON:LinkedIn Profile: linkedin.com/in/david-kepron-9a1582bWebsites: https://www.davidkepron.com    (personal website)vmsd.com/taxonomy/term/8645  (Blog)Email: david.kepron@NXTLVLexperiencedesign.comTwitter: DavidKepronPersonal Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/davidkepron/NXTLVL Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nxtlvl_experience_design/Bio:David Kepron is a multifaceted creative professional with a deep curiosity to understand ‘why', ‘what's now' and ‘what's next'. He brings together his background as an architect, artist, educator, author, podcast host and builder to the making of meaningful and empathically-focused, community-centric customer connections at brand experience places around the globe. David is a former VP - Global Design Strategies at Marriott International. While at Marriott, his focus was on the creation of compelling customer experiences within Marriott's “Premium Distinctive” segment which included: Westin, Renaissance, Le Meridien, Autograph Collection, Tribute Portfolio, Design Hotels and Gaylord hotels. In 2020 Kepron founded NXTLVL Experience Design, a strategy and design consultancy, where he combines his multidisciplinary approach to the creation of relevant brand engagements with his passion for social and cultural anthropology, neuroscience and emerging digital technologies. As a frequently requested international speaker at corporate events and international conferences focusing on CX, digital transformation, retail, hospitality, emerging technology, David shares his expertise on subjects ranging from consumer behaviors and trends, brain science and buying behavior, store design and visual merchandising, hotel design and strategy as well as creativity and innovation. In his talks, David shares visionary ideas on how brand strategy, brain science and emerging technologies are changing guest expectations about relationships they want to have with brands and how companies can remain relevant in a digitally enabled marketplace. David currently shares his experience and insight on various industry boards including: VMSD magazine's Editorial Advisory Board, the Interactive Customer Experience Association, Sign Research Foundation's Program Committee as well as the Center For Retail Transformation at George Mason University.He has held teaching positions at New York's Fashion Institute of Technology (F.I.T.), the Department of Architecture & Interior Design of Drexel University in Philadelphia, the Laboratory Institute of Merchandising (L.I.M.) in New York, the International Academy of Merchandising and Design in Montreal and he served as the Director of the Visual Merchandising Department at LaSalle International Fashion School (L.I.F.S.) in Singapore.  In 2014 Kepron published his first book titled: “Retail (r)Evolution: Why Creating Right-Brain Stores Will Shape the Future of Shopping in a Digitally Driven World” and he is currently working on his second book to be published soon. David also writes a popular blog called “Brain Food” which is published monthly on vmsd.com. 

Third Eye Science
Ep 147: What does Presence really mean and how can we use it to grow?

Third Eye Science

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 35:35


We hear the word presence all the time in yoga, meditation, and wellness circles, but what does that really mean?  In our modern age, we are bombarded by distractions that are pulling our thoughts and energy in a million directions. It's also built into our brains and nervous system as a whole to be constantly aware of our surroundings for evolutionary reasons. We are often thinking about the past or visualizing the future. But when we connect with the present moment—whether we are working, creating, having a moment with our loved ones, or meditating—we are able to connect with our true Selves and magnetize love and abundance. Meditation helps train us to notice when we are being present and gives us the opportunity to choose presence in more moments of our lives. It requires practice and discipline. Give presence a try as often as you can and you'll see how it can magically transform your wellbeing!My upcoming offerings:Join my weekly Energetic Tune-up sessions on Soul Tribe Online on Mondays at 5:30 pm (Pacific).  I'm holding a special series from 4/25 - 5/30: Elemental Magnetism.  In this six-week series, we will work with the physical, emotional, and spiritual aspects of receiving and magnetizing abundance into our beings. Join any time during the series! You can catch up in the class archive. The next TES Collective group energy work session will be Sunday, May 15, 2022 at 7 pm. This session will work with the energy of the Full Moon Lunar Eclipse in Scorpio to help you locate yourself and your true home.My mission is to help others find balance between their spiritual and logical sides and realize these two aspects work best together as a collaborative experience. If you feel called to explore working with me, check out my one-on-one session options. Shop Sage Moon a conscious lifestyle shop offering inspired boho-chic clothing, sacred gifts, and more.Check out the sustainable yoga products at shaktiwarriorshop.com and use the promo code WARRIORSUSAN at checkout for 10% off. Get updates about my offerings directly to your inbox by signing up for my newsletter. To help support the show, please tell a friend, share on social media, subscribe, rate, and review on your favorite podcast platform. 

Behind Greatness by Inspire North
106. Kenneth Oppel – Best Selling Author - “Chasing After the Wonder”

Behind Greatness by Inspire North

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 44:49


Kenneth joins us from his home in Toronto. He is an award winning and best selling author of numerous novels for young readers. He is famed for writing Airborn, the Silverwing Trilogy and now his latest novels, Bloom and its sequels, Hatch and Thrive. This was a fun conversation. He grew up on Vancouver Island on the Pacific coast and spent a few uncomplicated, happy pre-teen years in Halifax, on the Atlantic. Kenneth wanted to be a writer from a very young age, being pig-headed about his vocation from the very beginning. We naturally delve into themes that are important to us on Behind Greatness. Kenneth explains how childhood experiences run parallel throughout our lives, informing also our decisions today. He chats with us about taking pleasure in creation and the quiet, solitary, undramatic process that he invests in to find that pleasure. We discuss the power of encouragement as a lifeblood to pursuing creation and the importance of listening to dreams (encouragement: so easy a word and so elusive for many of us). And, we hark back to a reference from episode 24 with Mike Narducci regarding creativity – to Kenneth existing as a simmering well.   “The are fewer things more powerful than an idea.” Indeed.    To DONATE to the Behind Greatness podcast, please visit here: https://behindgreatness.org. As a charity, tax receipts are issued to donors. Behind Greatness IG: @behindgreatnesspodcast & @inspire_north   Kenneth, Website: www.kennethoppel.ca FB: www.facebook.com/kennethoppelfan YT: www.youtube.com/user/kennethoppel TW: @kennethoppel

About A Girl
Presenting Badlands Season 4 - Sean Penn: A Prison Escape, The Night Stalker, and Madonna's True Blue Bad Boy

About A Girl

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 5:47


In the summer of 1985, Sean Penn's marriage to preeminent material girl Madonna was an epochal moment for ‘80s-era Hollywood. The bad boy from Bad Boys and the boy-toy pop superstar blissfully brought together the worlds of movies and music on a Malibu bluff overlooking the Pacific. But their subsequent attempt to make a movie together was anything but blissful. A wild film shoot in China would lead to even wilder things, like the time Sean dangled a photographer upside-down from a ninth-story balcony. Or the time he escaped a prison in Macau and had to have a pardon from the government negotiated by a former member of the Beatles. Or the time he spent in an American prison, where he found himself passing notes with a fellow inmate down the hall…one who happened to be one of the most notorious serial killers in history. BADLANDS is a true-crime anthology podcast from Jake Brennan, executive producer of ABOUT A GIRL. Follow BADLANDS wherever you get your podcasts to hear a new episode from the current season each Wednesday. As a bonus, Amazon Music listeners can hear all 10 new episodes on-demand right now at amazon.com/badlands. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Boundaries.me Podcast
Episode 347 - The Dr. Cloud Show - Shorts - Beware of Your Automatic Tendencies

The Boundaries.me Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 15:07


In this highlight from the show, Dr. Cloud talks about our automatic tendencies in conflicts. Our default tendencies aren't always so productive, fruitful or stellar. Sometimes they stem from conflicts or trauma and often do us a disservice. Dr. Cloud talks Dr. Karen Horney's way of breaking down these tendencies into categories. Our automatic tendencies fall into one of three modes: Moving Towards, Moving Against, and Moving Away. The first step is figuring out what your default tendency is, and then making a thoughtful decision about whether that's the appropriate way for you to respond to your situation.   Got a narcissist in your life? Not sure what to do? Then you're in luck! We have an upcoming workshop on Narcissism on June 28th at 5pm Pacific! If you can't attend live, don't worry, you can stream the recording as much as you like. To find out more about it go to Boundaries.me/Narcissism.   Get a free 14 day trial to Boundaries.me with over 90 video courses, daily coaching emails and more. We've got courses on codependency, finding safe people, dealing with a narcissist, and over 90 other courses. You'll also get daily coaching videos delivered to your inbox--short 2-4 minute videos that give you one thing to do that day to build your way to a better version of yourself. We've also got a members-only support community on the site where you can discuss what you're learning, and get support and share support along the way. It's a free two-week trial, cancel at anytime, and only $9 a month after that. https://www.boundaries.me

The Gauntlet
#48 - Roommates

The Gauntlet

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 111:39


Stage Door (1937) / Hell in the Pacific (1968) This week we're moving in together, shacking up with the aspiring actresses of Gregory La Cava's Footlights club and staking out a claim on John Boorman's contested island beach

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
Greg Willimas - Lost and Found Gravel Festival

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 34:25


This week we sit down with Greg Williams from the Lost and Found Gravel Festival and Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship to hear about this years festival and the work SBTS does in the Lost Sierra. Episode Sponsor: The Feed Lost and Found Gravel Festival Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship Support the Podcast Join The Ridership  Automated Transcription, please excuse the typos: Lost and Found [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello, and welcome to the gravel ride podcast, where we go deep on the sport of gravel cycling through in-depth interviews with product designers, event organizers and athletes. Who are pioneering the sport I'm your host, Craig Dalton, a lifelong cyclist who discovered gravel cycling back in 2016 and made all the mistakes you don't need to make. I approach each episode as a beginner down, unlock all the knowledge you need to become a great gravel cyclist. Yeah. This week on the podcast, we have Greg Williams from the lost and found gravel festival and Sierra Buttes trail stewardship organization. Talking about the lost and found gravel event coming up this June in California. And all the great work that his nonprofit does to make the trails in the Los Sierra, an amazing place to visit. Before we jump in we need to thank this Week's sponsor the feed. The feed is the largest online marketplace for sports nutrition. They've got all your favorite sports, nutrition brands in one place. If you've developed an affinity like I have for certain brands. You can hop on over to the feed and mix and match. So you get everything you need in one delivery. If you're a frequent listener, you've probably heard me talk about the feed formula. The feed formula is a customizable nutritional supplement package. Available only from the feed. Feed formulas were developed in conjunction with Dr. Kevin Sprouse. Of the EDF pro cycling team. And uses the same techniques he uses with top athletes. Ensuring they have all their nutritional needs covered. You can customize each packet from a base formula. And add on specific formulas for recovery, for aging, a bunch of different things. If you're not already taking a supplement in your daily routine to support your gravel cycling career. I encourage you to take a look at these. They provide a convenient way in individually wrapped pouches to remember to take all the supplements you need to keep your body operating in tip top shape. Podcast listeners can get 50% off their first order of feed formula by visiting the feed.com/the gravel ride. Remember that's 50% off your first order of the feed formula, simply visit. The feed. Dot com slash the gravel ride. Would that business behind us let's jump right into this week's episode with greg williams Hey, Greg, welcome to the show. [00:02:26] Greg Williams: Yeah, thanks for having me. I'm excited. [00:02:28] Craig Dalton: I am T a man. , we're going to talk about the lost and found gravel grinder a little bit later in the broadcast. And it's a, it's an event that I've wanted to talk about for a couple of years now, actually probably four years, maybe because everybody who ever came back from it was like, this is an amazing event. Let's table that for a minute, because I really want to just start with you and just get a little bit about your background and how you ended up in the region. And then let's talk about the nonprofit, because I think everything you do up there is so intertwined with the gravel event and why it's so special that I think it's important to start. [00:03:02] Greg Williams: Yeah. A little bit of my background. My heritage is Milwaukee Indian up in the Northern Sierra and Nevada city region. And my, my tribe, was displaced almost overnight and my grand great grandfather went he ended up in Downieville actually during the gold rush and. Met this family called the Shaughnessy's, who had, they were opening a supply shop. So shovels and food in town. And my grandfather started building trails and Downieville and running pack meals to the minds. And growing up, it was always, the story that my dad would tell me about Downieville and and it didn't really matter until I got into mountain biking as a teenager and started riding Downieville and I was like, okay, this is it, man. This is my spot. This is, this is what I want to do. And as a teenager, I started guiding a mountain bikes, up in the region and then started running shuttles as well. I opened a bike shop in town 1991, and then started an event that was called the coyote classic in 1995. And now that's the Downieville classic. Downieville has been, a part of my heritage, part of my. My personal economy, part of my survival story. And the town was really starting to transition. I would say, it was a mining town primarily when I got there a lot of dredging on the rivers. And then when that became illegal in California, a lot of the miners in the family started to leave. And about that same time, a lot of the loggers were starting to leave as well. Recreation working with the chamber of commerce and the county kind of became this thing of Hey, will this work here in Downieville? And I think it has, Downieville is a, an international destination. The motels and restaurants, all depend on mountain bike, recreation and tourism. So I think it's a great model of like how recreation can keep a town alive that was, could potentially, have burned out the economy was not doing well. [00:04:59] Craig Dalton: It's so interesting. We often hear about how gravel cycling events have played that same role in rural communities. So it's interesting to hear you reference it back as to how mountain biking was playing that role back in the day for Downieville. Can you just for the listener who may be elsewhere outside of the state of California, can you position their minds as to where Downieville is located? [00:05:23] Greg Williams: Yeah. So Downieville this region, we call it the Los Sierra, and it's basically north of Truckee and north Northwest of Reno. We're about two hours. Like in a car from Sacramento or like 45 minutes from Truckee an hour from Reno like an hour and a half to Chico. So this is zone up here. We call it the Los Sierra. And it was really, there was a mail route back in the gold mining days. And the mailman would ski from Downieville up towards Quincy. And I think got lost a few times. And so it's a name we've stuck with. And part of it's loss of opportunities, loss of revenue. Loss of pride. But we're bringing it back through trying to keep it up, keep it a positive, and that's part of lost and found was, come and find yourself up here. [00:06:07] Craig Dalton: Yeah, amazing. So for the listener, who's obviously like my listener has a gravel orientation. The mountain biking in and around Downieville is absolutely exceptional. And as you mentioned, it's it's got a world renowned ship at this point. People from around the world have heard of Downieville and aspire to ride their bikes there. What makes the trail system so special? [00:06:28] Greg Williams: I think the fact that it Was built during the gold rush. There's a lot and there's a lot of trails, but these trails are like our super rowdy and steep, that's, the character of Downieville is like going fast through the rocks on a cliff. Being scared and then going for a swim and having a cold beer afterwards, so like for us as a trail stewardship, it's really important that we maintain the character of those trails. They were built for mules to go from point a to point B. There was no sustainable running grade. There was no thought of people like enjoying themselves on these trials, or certainly wasn't, they weren't thinking mountain bikes would be on them, but They have the character that people love. And so when we do all of our trail work, we're working really closely with the hydrologist to make sure that these trails are sustainable. They're not putting sediment into the creeks. Our region delivers a lot of clean drinking water to California, 65% between the Yuba and feather. Water's a big thing for us up here. And so as a rough and rowdy trails, so we're striking the balance in Downieville. You can't build those kinds of trails today. The forest service would just say out of spec, but the trails we build, today are just different. They're still as fun and enjoyable. They just, they're just more sustainable. [00:07:44] Craig Dalton: Was it that the fact that. Technically you already existed as mutual paths that you were able to get them effectively grandfathered in the format that they already existed in. [00:07:54] Greg Williams: For sure. And these trails, like in. the seventies, the forest service started to take them into their system. And at the time they were there, their solutions, these trails are open the motorcycles too. So you could ride motorcycles. You could ride e-bikes mountain bikes, hike, equestrian. So a trail for everyone. Those are the best. Those are the trails we like up here. Cause we're not, densely populated. We don't have high use necessarily. A lot of these trails are directional and in a sense that, just how people use them. So it all works really well together. Yeah just historic and some prehistoric from the native folks that were here. [00:08:34] Craig Dalton: You mentioned the Sierra Buttes trail stewardship organization. Can you just talk about the origins of that and what the journey has been like over the time it's existed? [00:08:45] Greg Williams: Yeah. Basically like we, we needed tools to put in people's hands. We were doing trail work days. And those started like with, a group of 10 and everybody had fun. And then the next time we'd have one, there'd be 20 people. And so we were getting these like work parties to where, there was like a hundred people showing up and this was before we had our nonprofit. And so we were. We are struggling to put tools in people's hands. We're good at putting a beer in their hands, on a burger at a barbecue, but we were like, man, we need tools. And we formed our nonprofit status in 2003. And the first grants we wrote were really just to buy tools. And so we started tooling up and then We started hiring folks. Henry O'Donnell who grew up in Downieville. He's our trail boss now. He's been working with us for 16 years and is built, probably a hundred miles of trail with his crews alone. As much as it was about taking care of the trails, it became about taking care of each other and the people and the communities. We like to say we're in the business of revitalizing mountain communities and we use trails as the tool to do it. So we're surrounded by national forest up here. And there's, the jobs traditionally have come from logging and mining. So we see recreation as being sustainable and a chance like for us to be more resilient and retain working families and put kids to work and really educate people on the importance of this place so that they can come up. And join us as land stewards or what the next time there's a bill to vote on for land or water issues, maybe they'll vote. Yes. Because they care about a place. [00:10:18] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Yeah. It's quite impressive. The scale of the organization at this point, imagining you starting it, it's quite straightforward to start a nonprofit, but it's quite difficult to generate a significant amount of donations or grants or funding. What did that path look like to obtain this type of scale, where you're able to meaningfully hire people in the community and do a huge amount of work in the last year? [00:10:44] Greg Williams: Yeah. I think one of the early keys and we didn't realize it at the time was just not being. Like, we could have easily said, Hey, we're Downieville mountain bike organization. Cause we were all mountain bikers. We rode dirt bikes, we all hiked. But because we really landed on trail stewardship and we're more inclusive. I think that was a real gift that we gave ourselves early on. Cause in this whole region we work we work in wilderness areas. We maintain huge chunks of the Pacific crest trail associate. Pacific crest trail. We put outdoor classroom and trail on every school campus and Plumas and Sierra county for the kids to get a trail experience and outdoor classroom. And then we build dirt bike trails, we build mountain bike trails. So if there's a trail in our region, like we want to be able to help. We want to be able to maintain it, build it and engage. Any type of recreate or we can become to come join in. So I think that's been a real key to our success. And then also I think, for me, like just growing up a young entrepreneur, like always having to make my own money not, having a big like support system. Get to be like a survivor, and scrappy and your heads up. And, you're just like, okay, what's the next thing. And we've just honestly had that approach with grants and projects, knowing what key projects to take and not take on too much. And and then in times, like with the pandemic and the big fires we've had up here is to really be able. Quickly react and a thoughtful way, like not just panic and not start down a road or a trail, that's like going to be the wrong one, and if it feels wrong in the beginning, we're like, Hey, what are we doing here? Do we have to do this like quick analysis? Like check-ins And so we've just, I think that's just like part of the nature of being up here. If you're raising your family up here and you've been here For generations, you just know like how it is, and it's, it takes everything sometimes. [00:12:38] Craig Dalton: For the listener who wants to support the organization? Do you accept direct donations or is it all grant based? How do you fund it? [00:12:45] Greg Williams: So we fund it. It's interesting. Cause like in 2019, I would say. Okay. Here's how we fund ourselves. We had lost and found we had the Downieville classic. We had grind Duro. We had a UBA expeditions, which is our guide outfitter business and shuttles like shuttling, almost 9,000 people up the hill. That was like 30% actually Yuba was like 28% of our gross revenue and events were up around like 35%. And and then the pandemic hit and took away all of our events took away our shuttles for a whole year limited our operations as a guide service, and then also took away barbecues and volunteer big days. So we got hit really hard. And during that time, We were like, man, what are we going to do? How do we bring up like donations, like to a higher level without events. And so in 21 when that year closed out, our donations were 38% of our gross. When they were at 3% in 2019, we still had no event. Income. Grants are running a right around 40% of our gross. Basically, we have we have public funding, like through grants and programs. We have private funding, we have foundations and then we have Yuba and we're bringing lost and found back on. So really trying to strengthen all the different, legs of the organization. So that. We're more, we can react more. We can be survivors. Like we want this to be A hundred year organization. And like those two years are just really just a little blip, but but at the same time, like when you're in the middle of it, it's like a big mountain in front of you, and so I think just, we've learned so much, we've learned like what we're made of, we know we know how to better support each other as staff and families. So there's really we're pretty confident in that we just need, honestly, we need an investment up here. We have some big projects. We need people sign up for lost and found whether they're going to come and race, or they're going to come and ride and enjoy the aid stations, or they just want to come help volunteer, just like just help us. And that. [00:14:53] Craig Dalton: percent. Yeah. I hope, I hope for any non-profit that's suffered with the elimination of in-person events over the last couple of years, that as you mentioned, just like stepping up their constituents, willingness to donate directly. And hopefully that can become habitualized. So you keep that 30 odd percent of direct donations. Plus you've got event revenue and all the other in-person things you were talking about and you come out of this even stronger than when you began. [00:15:23] Greg Williams: Yeah. That's certainly the goal and like this year we've we're looking at like peer-to-peer crowdfunding. It is one of the components to folks that are lining up or volunteering. But I think it's new, for people they're like, what do I do? How do I do it? Like my son has type one diabetes. And so I do a ride that benefits. It's totally built in, right? Like you're like, oh Yeah. of course this is what you do. This is how you do it. And so we want to get there with each one of our events and have the funding, help us with our operational costs, help us match up grants, no grant is free. It always costs whether it's time or money or volunteers, there's always a cost. So that's like we want, and we want people to be aware, like not just come do the race and be like, Yeah. that was awesome. But really. Have some ownership and some pride and help us like move this, these communities forward a little bit, [00:16:15] Craig Dalton: yeah. Yeah. I think anybody, you put some rubber on the road or on the trail in the Los Sierra comes away knowing it's a really special area. I'm sure as we get more people up there, they're gonna have a similar love for it and loyalty to it. One of the things that I saw mentioned and saw a couple of friends in the gravel community talking about where was the connected community project. Can you talk about what that's all about? [00:16:40] Greg Williams: Yeah connected communities is really, it's a project that the trails master plan got funded through Sierra Nevada Conservancy, which is a state agency. And and I got invited to, to talk at this mountain venture summit. And I was like, okay, I can just talk about all this stuff like we're doing or the normal stuff, but let's do something cool. And our board president Greg Carter, and I got together and we just had this huge regional map and we just started like laying out sticky notes about each of the towns. And how man, could we connect these with trails? And at the same time, like they're already connected with dirt roads, but how do we promote this? How do we make it to where people can look at a map that's readable? Cause there is 10,000 miles of dirt roads in those regions. So trying to plan a trip is holy crap. I don't even know where to start. There's so many roads. So a big effort is we're going to map out all the high quality gravel, dirt road. At linking the towns so people can start, doing bike packing. Part of our Yuba expeditions guide service will be what we're calling a mountain mule, which is basically hauling your gear from point to point which would be a combination of like overnight camping and then getting you into a town and do some accommodations and restaurants. And then we're going to build 620 miles of single track to connect these towns. part of that's already in the works. Some of it exists already. Some of it's been planned out for a long time. And we're in construction, like connecting Quincy to Taylorsville the next town over. So we have this big project and. It's rolling. It's not, we're not just waiting for the plan to be done. We're actually implementing parts of it. Some of it's an environmental review, so heritage botany, wildlife hydrology surveys are being done. We have two crews that are out ground-truthing all the mapping to ensure that those trails are in the optimum location. But when it's done 15 mountain towns, including Reno and Truckee will be connected all throughout the Los Sierra region was single track. All the dirt roads will be mapped out in such a way that you can plan your adventures. And also know what kind of services each of the town has. And then another component of this is to look at the potential overnight hot locations. But really we want to drive people riding with the main street of the downtown, with their credit card. To patronize these businesses because outside of Reno and Truckee, all these communities are severely disadvantaged economically. So everybody's struggling. And some of these businesses are just hanging on. So this is an opportunity to drive an economy into the region. That's going to last for generations. [00:19:14] Craig Dalton: Yeah, amazing. I love it. I love it so much adventuring to be had in the Los Sierra. No question about. [00:19:22] Greg Williams: Absolutely. We have plenty of room for everybody. [00:19:23] Craig Dalton: Let's move on and let's talk about the lost and found gravel festival. It's coming up here in June, and there's still some slots available. So I want to make sure that people walk away knowing what's the festival all about what's the vibe let's get into it. And I'll ask you some questions to just to figure it all out. [00:19:39] Greg Williams: Yeah. This is an interesting one. And just in terms of how we got into this, and we'd been doing Downieville for a long time and Chris McGovern who's a frame builder. And who also grew up in Nevada city, went to the same high school as I did. I ran into him at Interbike in 2013, and he's dude, you need to do a gravel event. And I'm like, What is that? And And I, and it was just like, man, this is what we used to do when we were kids like ride all these dirt roads, it's oh, that's a thing now. And Chris put this bug in my ear, we started talking more, doing some mapping, invited him and Cameron falconer. Up and we just started like testing routes, like those guys are both super fit. I'm like, I'll drive the support vehicle and meet you guys, here's the map. And so we just started really laying out this course, it started just north of Portola and like Davis and and we got the permits pretty quickly working with the Plumas national forest. And the first year we had around 290 racers and [00:20:37] Craig Dalton: What year was that? Greg? [00:20:38] Greg Williams: I was in 2014. [00:20:40] Craig Dalton: Okay. [00:20:41] Greg Williams: Yeah. And we had great folks like Paul components and WTB who were like, we're doing an aid station. That's going to be a party of its own, and so we had these perfect elements to pull this gravel event off. And then, the second year we doubled the entries the next year, we doubled that again. And like in 2019 we had around 1700 people signed up, we were going to cap it at 2000. And I think just the recipe of like how we do these events, we make them super fun. The courses are great. The aid stations are suburb, just an overall great experience camping live music, all the stuff that we like. And then at the same time, how do we introduce people to this whole new area, and bring them into zones that they wouldn't otherwise get out. So really showcases this region as we're calling it the gravel capital of the west. And that's because it has 10,000 miles of dirt roads. Like you can't find that anywhere in the U S and and there's, great rivers, there's great lakes. There's a fire lookouts. You can visit some of them you can rent for overnight stays. So this is it. This is the gravel capital of the west. [00:21:50] Craig Dalton: I love it. Put a stake in the ground there. What community is Los and fountain based out of. [00:21:55] Greg Williams: It's it starts in the city of Portola, which is right on the headwaters of the middle fork of. the feather river next to the Sierra valley, which is the largest Alpine valley in north America sits around 5,000 feet of elevation with a great big mountain right behind it called Beckworth peak. And right from there, you can hit all these roads, just right off the main paved road. It's perfect. [00:22:18] Craig Dalton: Are you offering multiple course distances? [00:22:21] Greg Williams: Yeah, we have a 35 mile course that has two flagship aid stations on it. And then we have a 60 mile course. That has four aid stations on it. And then we have the hundred that has six aid stations on it. They overlap for the start. Everybody does the first 10 and a half miles, which is a climb up to 7,000 feet. Those are essential in any event is to have a big climb that, that separates people, [00:22:46] Craig Dalton: Yeah, for [00:22:47] Greg Williams: And so those Are elements we learned throughout this. Cause we've had different courses over the years. Some of them were great. Some were like, oh man, don't do that again. [00:22:55] Craig Dalton: Are they what's the starting elevation up there in Portola. [00:22:58] Greg Williams: Yeah. It's I want to say the town is like 5,100. [00:23:02] Craig Dalton: Okay. So starting at 5,100, going up to 7,000 with that first climb, I agree. I feel like back when the events were smaller, it was okay to start off on some single track or something like that. But in this day and age, when you've got a thousand people on a course, definitely great to break it up and to have people find their own, their own tribe in the event. [00:23:21] Greg Williams: Yeah, and we have, we have a great relationship with city of Portola. Going into this year, we were hesitant of man, we don't want to, the last thing we want to do is have to cancel another event. And COVID was still a thing. So we got a late start on this thing, like we're really looking at this as like a rebuild year. We realized like, Hey, we're late to the table here. We also conflict with the Kansas ride. So there's a couple of things like working against us, but at the same time This is going to be a hell of a party. Like we're throwing everything we have at this thing to make sure everybody has a great time and comes back, brings friends the next year. And it, like I said, it was important to city of Portola. They approached us and they were like, Hey stewardship, like we need this event. We just went through two years. Our businesses are hurting. The city helps provide a lot of the camping and infrastructure in the town. So they were a real true partner. And then the Plumas national forest has road crews out there right now, like dialing in all these roads. And what we're hoping is developed, like what we're calling a signature route to where every year the road crew has priorities to take care of on the lost and found routes. So it's every year it's just dial Primo. [00:24:30] Craig Dalton: Yeah. It's one of those events, I didn't realize actually it had been around as long as it has, but that makes sense because I feel like at least in the bay area and Marin county, like you talk about gravel riding and. Lost and found, always comes up and it always comes up with two thumbs up saying oh, you gotta do it. It's great. Riding just a great overall community vibe in a sport that is maybe changing a bit to say the least in terms of the amount of resources and the amount of professional athletes coming into it. I think events that just maintain that community vibe are always going to be the ones that are in people's hearts and that they want to do. [00:25:10] Greg Williams: Yeah. And we, we realized like we get top athletes that come here to put it to each other, but the majority of people are here to just go on a bike ride with their buddies, have the aid stations be able to camp out, have the music like that festival atmosphere. That's where we're really trying to position ourselves as Hey, if you want it. There, there is alternatives if you're just purely eraser, but if you want to come and ride like one of the best courses in the world and have some top brands like cater to you throughout the course that their aid stations, like this is where you want to come. And if you want to help support a community recover after, the wildfires and the pandemic and help an organization. With the, with a grand project, a legacy project, like this is the spot like everybody's welcome. And whether you're writing a check or picking up a shovel your help is welcome. [00:26:01] Craig Dalton: Amazing. You talked about a little bit more about from a mountain bike perspective, the type of terrain that's up there for the gravel course, for those who are coming from outside the area. What type of equipment is important to have underneath you to be successful at lost and found [00:26:17] Greg Williams: Yeah, big tires. I think that's the number one thing is the first year we had people like on road bikes because people didn't really know it. Like gravel racing was anyway. They're like, oh, it's this thing. But these you're in the Sierra Nevada up here and it's, there's spots where man, you're like, it's rough. I think like one year, like Carl Decker rode a hard tail man. Fully rigid. So it's just kinda like a mix. And I think, the course that we have this year, I would say you're totally dialed on a gravel bike, but you're going to want like a 40 C tire maybe with a little thicker casing. Just so you're not flattened. [00:26:53] Craig Dalton: Yep. Are you staying primarily on fire roads through the mountains? There are you getting off into this single track? [00:26:59] Greg Williams: We're at, this is a no single track right ride, but some of the roads have single track? lines, right? Like you want to be, you want your head up, you want to be paying attention. There's ruts there's rocks. There's a smoother line, especially on a gravel bike. You don't want to give yourself a whiplash or, too much excitement. But I would say you're paying attention the whole time. You're not, zoning out because the road is just smooth and you gotta pay attention, plus it's so beautiful out here. Like the wild flowers are gonna be coming out. The rivers are flowing the mountain stuff, snow on them. People will be looking around, but they really need to pay attention. [00:27:35] Craig Dalton: once you get a top that first climb, are you doing a commiserate elevation drop? Is it a big descent? [00:27:41] Greg Williams: It's a sweet so the roads were using too are like some of the better system roads, like we've taken people in some pretty primitive back country roads, and there is a mix of this, but this particular road is one of the nicer maintain. Like around a set, like a price of 5% running grade. So you're able to just like big ring paddle through like really big sweeper turns super enjoyable. And then you have another climb that's around 700 feet, another like descent of a thousand. And then a lot of rolling train. Cause you're connecting all these Alpine valleys as you go. And then for the final you come down like the smoothest road in Plumas county. And and then into this tube that goes under the highway. That's a we negotiate this deal with the landowner there. It's a handshake deal, Hey, races are going to be coming through here, your insured. He's great. I'll have my lawn chair and a cooler of beer here to watch, and that's part of what makes the specialty, right? It's just all the community coming together and people working together and allowing stuff like that riders to come through private property, like ordinarily the guy would not allow that, [00:28:45] Craig Dalton: Yeah, you mentioned you've got ample camping situations up there for athletes and families coming up. Are there also other accommodation possibilities? [00:28:54] Greg Williams: Yeah. There's resorts up here. There's motels. there's a ton of camping, honestly, there's forest service camping around like Davis and some of the valleys that the ride's going to be going through. And then city of Portola they have a city park. That's all grass that has like baseball, baseball, diamonds, a swimming pool, the showers are open. And then there's camping all along the middle fork of the feather river, right in downtown. So the idea is get people to stay in town and then they can just ride their bike to the coffee shop or, head over to the pizza place. So that's part of the reason we moved the race down from starting at lake Davis was like, let's get people downtown. Plus, when the lakes full the amount of land we have to work with, decreases quite a bit. It worked great the first year with 200 riders, but now that we're up around 1200 to 2000, we need more. And this park really allows people to spread out. And then we have a little amphitheater for the music and and then there's nothing like just starting in the middle of a downtown, and then finishing at the same place coming through town. [00:29:54] Craig Dalton: Yeah. I had one final question on finishing. So I've been out there on a great adventure on my gravel bike all day. I crossed the finish line. What's the vibe. What's the scene. When I crossed the finish line at last. [00:30:05] Greg Williams: Yeah. So you're going to get greeted by our local bike team, the Los Sierra composite team. They're gonna, they'll take your bike. They'll wash it. They'll put the, lock it up and the tennis courts. So like a fully secured bike zone. And you're going to walk over and grab a cold Sierra Nevada beer. And then we hire this, like top-notch catering company and mountain magic to do like a top quality meal for ya. Then you're gonna pull up a chair in the park, enjoy a beer, enjoy some live music, eat some food, tell some stories, and then if you have it in you, like the music goes and you can dance all night. [00:30:41] Craig Dalton: I love it, Greg. I think that's an amazing point to end on, and I hope everybody's as stoked about this event as I am. And as stoked about the work that you're doing in the Los Sierra, it really is a special part of California. And I hope everybody clicks on the links in the show notes and goes and checks out the Los and found gravel grinder festival as well as the work you're doing at Sierra. [00:31:04] Greg Williams: Yeah, come on up and play with us. [00:31:06] Craig Dalton: That's going to do it for this week's edition of the gravel ride podcast. I hope you enjoyed that episode with Greg Williams, be sure to check out the lost and found gravel festival. It's definitely going to be an amazing event this year. I've heard only good things about it. So I encourage you to check it out. And grab one of those last available slots. Huge, thanks to our sponsor, the feed. Make sure to go check out the feed formulas to get 15% off. Just visit the feed.com/the gravel ride. If you're interested in connecting with me, I encourage you to join the ridership@wwwdottheridership.com. And if you have an opportunity, please leave a rating or review or visit me@buymeacoffee.com slash the growl ride to support the podcast. Until next time here's to finding some dirt under your wheels