Podcasts about Watershed

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  • 676PODCASTS
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  • Jun 27, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Watershed

Latest podcast episodes about Watershed

Sunday Messages - Watershed Charlotte
Tipping Toward Love | Chasing Inclusive Community: Why the Church Still Matters | David Roberts

Sunday Messages - Watershed Charlotte

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 33:24


Teaching Team member David Roberts shares in the second week of our Tipping Toward Love series (highlight Watershed's justice partnerships) about Launchpad Partners and explores why choosing church is still a decision that matters.

MyLife: Chassidus Applied
Ep. 407: Why Was the Rebbe's Coming to America a Watershed Event? What Does 3 Tammuz Mean to Us Today?

MyLife: Chassidus Applied

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 62:04


Rabbi Jacobson will discuss the following topics: Chassidus Applied to 28 Sivan and 3 TammuzWhy was the Rebbe's coming to America a watershed event? What does Gimmel Tammuz mean to us today? 28 years have passed since Gimmel Tammuz. How much longer do we have to wait? What can I do about my feelings of disappointment in the Rebbe? Why can't we unite and directly address our post-Gimmel Tammuz challenges? If prayers are not answered, how can we continue to trust G-d? If the Rebbe's promises did not get fulfilled, how can we continue to trust that they will be fulfilled in the future? Is it possible that since we did not have the right mindset to bring Moshiach, we will not merit to see it, like the scouts who did not enter the Promised Land? Is Moshiach only a mindset but not an actual event? Chassidus applied to KorachDid Karl Marx borrow ideas from Korach who said if everyone is equal why are some people higher than others? Why was Korach wrong? Why are secular studies not taught in Yeshiva? What is a chinuch al taharas hakodesh and what is the source for it? Gender issues – follow-up

The Paul Tripp Podcast
324. The Watershed Confession [Mark Series 25]

The Paul Tripp Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 30:36


"You are the Christ." This four-word confession from Peter is one of the most important moments in the entire book of Mark. Today we're going to continue through Paul's sermon series in the gospel of Mark, and in this message, Paul applies how this watershed confession changes our daily living.If you've been enjoying The Paul Tripp Podcast, would you consider leaving a review? Each review helps us reach more people with the transforming power of Jesus Christ.

Spoon Mob
#62 - Jack Moore of Ruffled Feather Ferments

Spoon Mob

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 131:13


On this episode of the Spoon Mob Podcast, Ray chats with Ruffled Feather Ferments owner/founder Jack Moore about growing up in the country with a family garden, working as a car mechanic, getting his start in the food industry with delivering pizzas, enrolling in culinary school on a whim, working at Sage American Bistro, moving up to Cleveland to work at The Greenhouse Tavern, why he went to cook at The Black Pig, his experience cooking in the San Pellegrino Young Chefs competition, how the opportunity to run the kitchen at Watershed Distillery's Kitchen & Bar restaurant came about, the biggest challenge with setting up a brand new restaurant concept, the one thing he'd change if opening Watershed Kitchen & Bar today, local awards & press, why he took the bacon steak off the menu, his decision to leave Watershed after 5 years at the helm, launching Black Cap Hot Sauce, the realizations he came to during the pandemic lockdown, the process behind the creation of a hot sauce batch, what the current marketplace for hot sauce looks like, the current state of restaurants in Columbus, what's next, answers the question left behind from Josh Martinez of Pretentious Barrel House, and more before taking on the "burning grill" questions! For more on Jack Moore, visit spoonmob.com/jackmoore and follow him on Instagram @j_moore87 & @blackcaphotsauce. For all things Spoon Mob, visit spoonmob.com and make sure to follow us on Instagram (@spoonmob), Twitter (@spoonmob1), and Facebook (@spoonmob1). Audio Editing by @TrackEditPrint. Intro music by @kabbalisticvillage. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Hiking the Highlands
Hiking Nathan's Divide Watershed Education Center

Hiking the Highlands

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 68:39


Tucked away in the forest surrounding the Ebensburg Municipal Authority's upper reservoir is Nathan's Divide Watershed Education Center. Dave Lester has dreamed of creating an outdoor destination for decades and in 2016 decided to make that dream a reality. Thus far, the center sports roughly five miles of trails and several educational programs for various ages. But he's not done. Lester has many more ideas for developing the area while also preserving the natural scenery. On this episode of Hiking the Highlands, the local man walks me through not only what he and numerous volunteers have accomplished to date but his hopes for the future. For more information, visit www.nathansdivide.org.

Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast
WFS 332 - Upper Missouri Watershed Alliance with Sherry Meador

Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 39:24


Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/332 Presented By: Trxstle Sponsors: https://wetflyswing.com/sponsors Sherry Meador, Board Chair for the Upper Missouri Watershed Alliance (UMOWA), sheds light on their organization's conservation mission. Sherry helps us understand how the Upper Missouri River watershed is threatened by a silent invasion of noxious weeds that degrades the water quality, reduces native biological diversity, and negatively impact the population of many wild species like elk, deer, swans, variety of ducks, other plants, and of course our fish. We discover how we can help prevent the spread of these invasive weeds, how we can contribute to the water and streambanks restoration projects, and how we can get involved in ways we can and become more aware of the overall health of this river. There's more to it than I could describe so here's Sherry from UMOWA.org to enlighten us about it. Upper Missouri Watershed Alliance Show Notes with Sherry Meador 02:50 - Sherry and I connected through John Smigaj from Trxstle. John was on the podcast at WFS 310. 03:30 - Sherry had been involved with the noxious weed project on the Smith River. UMOWA board started in 2014 and Sherry joined 6 years ago. 04:50 - The Missouri River is the longest river in the country. It starts at 3 forks which is about 75 miles upriver from the dams of Helena down to the great falls but they're primarily focused on the primary fishing area between Holter Dam and Cascade. 08:55 - UMOWA was established by a group of guides and fly fishers. It was established to get baseline data and to get the river back to the high quality or what was considered a good level. They collect water quality samples 3 times a year. 10:10 - They will have the river's health summary report available on their website for us to see this summer 11:25 - They're done a couple of restoration projects on banks where they're trying to get the plants back there to get less erosion - read more here 11:40 - They also work on noxious weeds which are on the land but goes up to the habitat. They work with land owners by the river, trying to get them involved in this project. Noxious weeds are silent invasive and a threat to the watershed. Read more about this project here 12:30 - They educate anglers about the importance of washing their boat and waders to prevent spreading invasive species along the river. They provide boat washing stations that are open to the public and at no charge. 13:30 - The highest amount of angler days recorded was 180,000 a year 16:20 - UMOWA is an all-volunteer board. They have 8 members. John Smigaj is also one of them. 16:30 - UMOWA is in need of enough funding. They are to the point of getting the to the next level because there's so much integration they need to do with the Department of Environmental Quality and Dep. of Natural Resource. 19:00 - You can help UMOWA's mission by checking their website to understand more about their projects, spreading the word about their mission, and sign up for their newsletter. 21:40 - Sherry kind of retired as an attorney. For the past 5 years, she hasn't been working much as an attorney and into some other projects. She describes what her job looked like when she was practicing law. 26:10 - You can also support Montana Watershed Coordination Council - they are doing similar work on watersheds in Montana. UMOWA works with Pat Barnes from Trout Unlimited. Sun River Water Shed Group is a smaller watershed group but also doing some great work out there. 28:40 - They also do some river clean-up where everybody can also volunteer. They have a big event on August 20th this year at the New Brewery in Craig. There's going to be a raffle too where people can win a Ro drift boat. Upper Missouri Conclusion with Sherry Meador So there you go.. If you want to take part in UMOWA's movement, you can reach out to them via website at UMOWA.org - they always welcome new ideas and volunteers. Conservation topics may not always be the most interesting topics out there but it should be our responsibility as anglers to be aware of the things that destroy our rivers and their habitats. So if you want to enjoy these rivers at their best quality, there are many ways to contribute like spreading the word, donating, volunteering, or at the least, be a more disciplined angler - keep the fish wet, wash your boats and your waders after use. Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/332

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 630 (6-20-22): A Sampler of Shrubs from Soggy Spaces

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:49).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-16-22.

music university texas earth education college water state zoom land living tech research government benefits foundation search north america environment dark normal web natural tree va rain disease climate change ocean voices snow plant citizens trees agency stream priority richmond plants biology environmental bay images ash found dynamic grade bio soil published conservation spaces copyright index charlottesville processes sh rub pond signature fort worth arial ludwig virginia tech asheville scales accent atlantic ocean life sciences townsend natural resources forests maple adaptations environmental science compatibility msonormal colorful forestry populations photographs times new roman ls sampler sections aquatic poison ivy possum watershed organisms montgomery county calibri chesapeake soggy policymakers forest service alder photosynthesis shrubs new standard blacksburg university press acknowledgment cambria math elderberry style definitions worddocument saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning stormwater breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves trackformatting harrisonburg lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup donotpromoteqf subsup undovr virginia department ar sa latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub lmargin smallfrac dispdef rmargin defjc wrapindent intlim narylim sols allowpng defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority qformat lsdexception locked semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles table normal bmp forest management name title name normal name strong name emphasis name subtle emphasis name medium grid name intense emphasis name dark list name subtle reference name colorful shading name intense reference name colorful list name book title name default paragraph font name colorful grid name bibliography name subtitle name light shading accent name toc heading name light list accent name light grid accent name table grid name revision name list paragraph name placeholder text name quote name no spacing name intense quote name light shading name dark list accent name light list name colorful shading accent name light grid name colorful list accent name medium shading name colorful grid accent name medium list john peterson cripple creek rhododendron living systems grades k biotic name e space systems steel wheels colorful accent light accent dark accent waterside name list cumberland gap rhododendrons great dismal swamp name date name plain text name list continue name table colorful name list table name message header name table columns name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table ilex name closing name no list name grid table light name grid table name signature name outline list name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic understory rockingham county relyonvml penn state extension aronia forest resources cornus augusta county vaccinium audio notes itea tmdl 20image water center stormwater runoff donotshowrevisions virginia standards
Orchard Community Church Sermon Audio

I remember teaching my kids to walk.  My wife and I would sit on the floor a few feet apart. One of us would steady our child while the other would wait with outstretched arms.  As our child took his or her first steps, we would encourage them, saying, "Keep going, you can do it!" They would take one tentative step, and then maybe another.  But they would teeter, wobble, and then go down into their more familiar crawling position to go the rest of the way.  Each try would lead to more steps taken until finally they walked into the arms of the waiting parent.  In a sermon called "Continue in Christ" we  look at Colossians 2:6-8.  In these verses, which are the heart of Paul's message in Colossians, Paul tells the Colossians to keep going in their faith in Christ.  They started well by trusting in Jesus Christ as their Lord and Savior and now Paul is telling them to keep on trusting him.  We all need to hear that message still today.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 629 (6-6-22): The 2022 Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Season Begins with a Re-formed Pacific Storm

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:52).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-3-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks June 6 and June 13, 2022. MUSIC – ~11 sec – instrumental. That's part of “Driving Rain,” by the Charlottesville- and Nelson County-based band, Chamomile and Whiskey.  The storm-themed music sets the stage for our annual preview of a potential bunch of rainy, windy, and storm-surge-causing summer and fall visitors.  Have a listen for about 35 seconds to some more of the music accompanying 21 names that we hope will NOT become infamous this year. MUSIC and VOICES ~36 sec – Music lyrics: “In the driving rain”; then instrumental.  Voices: “Alex.  Bonnie.  Colin.  Danielle.  Earl.  Fiona.  Gaston.  Hermine.  Ian.  Julia.  Karl.  Lisa.  Martin.  Nicole.  Owen.  Paula.  Richard.  Shary.  Tobias.  Virginie.  Walter.” Those were the names planned for storms that may occur during this year's Atlantic basin tropical cyclone season.  The Atlantic basin includes the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic tropical cyclone season runs officially from June 1 through November 30.  Most Atlantic tropical cyclones occur within this period, but not all of them do.  In fact, 2022 is the first year since 2014 in which there was NOT a named Atlantic basin storm before June 1, although it was close: as of June 3, the remnants of Pacific basin Hurricane Agatha, which formed in late May and made landfall in southern Mexico, were predicted to re-form in the Gulf of Mexico as the Atlantic basin's first named storm. [Editor's note, not in the audio: Pre-June named Atlantic storms in the previous seven years were Ana in 2015, Alex in January 2016 and Bonnie in May 2016, Arlene in April 2017, Alberto in May 2018, Andrea in May 2019, Arthur and Bertha in May 2020, and Ana in May 2021.  The first named storm in 2014 was in July.  The National Hurricane Center upgraded Potential Tropical Cyclone One to Tropical Storm Alex around 2 a.m. EDT on June 5, 2022.]Tropical storms and hurricanes are two categories of tropical cyclones, which are rotating storm systems that start in tropical or sub-tropical latitudes.  A tropical cyclone is called a tropical storm—and gets a name—when sustained wind speeds reach 39 miles per hour; at 74 miles per hour, a tropical cyclone is considered a hurricane.  Tropical depressions—with wind speeds below 39 miles per hour—don't get named if they never reach tropical storm wind speed,* but they can still bring damaging rainfall and flooding.  Hurricane-force storms are called typhoonsin northwestern areas of the Pacific Ocean. [Editor's note, not in the audio: A tropical system that never gets above the tropical depression wind-speed level won't be given a name, but a lingering tropical depression that previously was at the wind speed of a tropical storm or hurricane will have a name associated with it.]Before a tropical system of any speed or name barges into the Old Dominion, here are five important preparedness steps recommended by the National Weather Service.1.  Know your zone – that is, find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation area by checking the Virginia Department of Emergency Management's “Hurricane Zone Evacuation Tool,” available online at  vaemergency.gov/prepare, or by contacting your local emergency management office. 2.  Assemble an emergency kit of food, water, flashlights, first aid materials, a battery-powered radio, and other items that would be useful in a power outage.3.  Have a family emergency plan, including plans for evacuating and for getting in touch with one another in an emergency. 4.  Review your insurance policies to ensure that you have adequate coverage for your home and personal property. And 5.  Establish ways to stay informed, especially if the power goes out. Detailed safety tips for hurricanes and other severe weather are available from the “Safety” link at the National Weather Service Web site, www.weather.gov; from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, online as noted earlier at vaemergency.gov/prepare; and from various other sources. Thanks to eight Blacksburg, Va., friends for lending their voices to this episode.  Thanks also to Chamomile and Whiskey for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Driving Rain.” MUSIC – ~21 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “Driving Rain,” from the 2012 album “The Barn Sessions,” is copyright by Chamomile and Whiskey and by County Wide Records, used with permission.  More information about Chamomile and Whiskey is available online at http://www.chamomileandwhiskey.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 579, 5-31-21. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Satellite photo of Tropical Storm Alex off the southeastern Atlantic Coast of the United States at 2:51 p.m. EDT (18:51 Z), on June 5, 2022.  Photo from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), “GOES Image Viewer: GOES-East/U.S. Atlantic Coast/Band 1 (Blue Visible)”, online at https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/goes/sector.php?sat=G16§or=eus; specific URL for the photo was https://cdn.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/GOES16/ABI/SECTOR/eus/01/20221561851_GOES16-ABI-eus-01-500x500.jpg, as of June 6, 2022.Predictions for the 2022 Atlantic tropical storm season.  Graphic from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), “NOAA predicts above-normal 2022 Atlantic Hurricane Season; Ongoing La Niña, above-average Atlantic temperatures set the stage for busy season ahead,” May 24, 2022, online at https://www.noaa.gov/news-release/noaa-predicts-above-normal-2022-atlantic-hurricane-season.Map showing the names, dates, and tracks of named Atlantic basin tropical cyclones (tropical storms and hurricanes) in 2021. Map from the National Hurricane Center, “2021 Atlantic Hurricane Season,” online at https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/data/tcr/index.php?season=2021&basin=atl.“5 Things to Know About Having and Evacuation Plan” poster from the National Weather Service, “What to Do Before the Tropical Storm or Hurricane,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-plan.  The site also has posters with “5 Things to Know About…” hurricane hazard risks, strengthening one's home, getting information, and insurance. EXTRA INFORMATION ON TROPICAL CYCLONE PREPAREDNESS The following information is quoted from the National Weather Service, ‘Hurricane Safety,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane, as of June 6, 2022. Plan for a Hurricane: What to Do Before the Tropical Storm or Hurricane(online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-plan) “The best time to prepare for a hurricane is before hurricane season begins on June 1.  It is vital to understand your home's vulnerability to storm surge, flooding, and wind.  Here is your checklist of things to do BEFORE hurricane seasons begins.Know your zone: Do you live near the Gulf or Atlantic Coasts?  Find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation area by contacting your local government/emergency management office or, in Virginia, by visiting https://www.vaemergency.gov/hurricane-evacuation-zone-lookup/. Put Together an Emergency Kit: Put together a basic emergency kit; information to do so is online at https://www.ready.gov/kit.  Check emergency equipment, such as flashlights, generators, and storm shutters.Write or review your Family Emergency Plan: Before an emergency happens, sit down with your family or close friends and decide how you will get in contact with each other, where you will go, and what you will do in an emergency.  Keep a copy of this plan in your emergency supplies kit or another safe place where you can access it in the event of a disaster.  Information to help with emergency plan preparation is online at https://www.ready.gov/plan. Review Your Insurance Policies: Review your insurance policies to ensure that you have adequate coverage for your home and personal property.Understand NWS forecast products, especially the meaning of NWS watches and warnings.Preparation tips for your home are available from the Federal Alliance for Safe Homes, online at https://www.flash.org/. Preparation tips for those with chronic illnesses are available from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, online at https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/infographic/emergency.htm. Actions to Take When a Tropical Storm or Hurricane Threatens(online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-action) “When a hurricane threatens your community, be prepared to evacuate if you live in a storm surge risk area.  Allow enough time to pack and inform friends and family if you need to leave your home. Secure your home: Cover all of your home's windows.  Permanent storm shutters offer the best protection for windows.  A second option is to board up windows with 5/8 inch exterior grade or marine plywood, built to fit, and ready to install.  Buy supplies before the hurricane season rather than waiting for the pre-storm rush. Stayed tuned in: Check the websites of your local National Weather Service office (online at https://www.weather.gov/) and local government/emergency management office.  Find out what type of emergencies could occur and how you should respond. Listen to NOAA Weather Radio or other radio or TV stations for the latest storm news. Follow instructions issued by local officials. Leave immediately if ordered! If NOT ordered to evacuate: *Take refuge in a small interior room, closet, or hallway on the lowest level during the storm.  Put as many walls between you and the outside as you can. *Stay away from windows, skylights, and glass doors. *If the eye of the storm passes over your area, there will be a short period of calm, but at the other side of the eye, the wind speed rapidly increases to hurricane force winds coming from the opposite direction.” After a Hurricane(online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-after) Continue listening to a NOAA Weather Radio or the local news for the latest updates. If you evacuated, return home only when officials say it is safe. Once home, drive only if necessary and avoid flooded roads and washed-out bridges.  If you must go out, watch for fallen objects in the road, downed electrical wires, and weakened walls, bridges, roads, and sidewalks that might collapse. Walk carefully around the outside of your home to check for loose power lines, gas leaks, and structural damage. Stay out of any building if you smell gas, if floodwaters remain around the building, if the building or home was damaged by fire, or if the authorities have not declared it safe. Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the leading causes of death after storms in areas dealing with power outages.  Never use a portable generator inside your home or garage. Use battery-powered flashlights.  Do NOT use candles.  Turn on your flashlight before entering a vacated building.  The battery could produce a spark that could ignite leaking gas, if present.”

united states tv music university earth education college water state mexico zoom walk tech research office government predictions national write plan safety greek environment dark normal web natural va rain skills ocean voices atlantic snow weather preparation citizens air hurricanes presidential agency stream pacific prevention whiskey secure priority environmental bay images grade centers earl carbon index charlottesville permanent map gulf establish satellites disease control pond formed signature arial graphic virginia tech tropical pacific ocean detailed accent atlantic ocean stayed assemble govt natural resources hurricane irma gaston compatibility msonormal colorful american red cross edt times new roman sections cyclone hurricane sandy noaa civics watershed national archives emergency management wg chesapeake old dominion emergency preparedness national weather service policymakers hurricane season earth sciences glossary shenandoah tropical storms blacksburg hurricane matthew national oceanic acknowledgment put together cosgrove cambria math style definitions atmospheric administration virginia governor worddocument chamomile saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning stormwater breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves trackformatting lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate centergroup msonormaltable donotpromoteqf virginia department subsup undovr latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin defjc wrapindent rmargin intlim narylim caribbean sea sols defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked qformat semihidden unhidewhenused atlantic coast latentstyles table normal nws bmp safe home north pacific name title name normal name strong name emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name colorful grid name book title name default paragraph font name light shading accent name bibliography name subtitle name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis federal register wmo national hurricane center atmospheric administration noaa news releases world meteorological organization emergency kit grades k shary name e space systems light accent dark accent roanoke times colorful accent atlantic hurricane season name list cumberland gap nelson county name date name plain text name table simple name body text name table classic name body text indent name table colorful name list continue name table columns name list table name message header name table list name salutation name table 3d name table contemporary name body text first indent name table elegant name note heading name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name table web name normal indent name balloon text name normal web name table theme name list bullet name normal table name plain table name list number name no list name grid table light name closing name outline list name grid table name signature do before driving rain prepare now ben cosgrove audio notes national ocean service 20know water center tmdl 20image donotshowrevisions 20things virginia standards
Sunday Messages - Watershed Charlotte
Gold Leaf | A Lasting Impression | Mark Smith

Sunday Messages - Watershed Charlotte

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 24:28


Long time Watershed member and guest speaker Mark Smith shares a deeply personal talk on the first Sunday of Pride month about the importance of the impressions that we make on the people around us and how those impressions can have lasting impact.

Orchard Community Church Sermon Audio
The Gospel Proclaimed

Orchard Community Church Sermon Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 37:27


The gospel is an amazing truth.  Jesus Christ, the Son of God, took our place on the cross. He died so that we can live.  He paid the price that was ours to pay.  This truth is powerful and powerfully changes us.  But at the end of chapter 1 of Colossians, Paul points out that something is "lacking" in this gospel.  We are looking at Colossians 1:24 - 2:5 in a sermon called "The Gospel Proclaimed" and we see what Paul thought was "lacking" in the gospel of Jesus Christ and what our role is in this.

Stories for Action
Life in the Land: Laura Nowlin; Rancher, Winnett ACES, Musselshell Watershed Coalition

Stories for Action

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 67:52


Laura Nowlin grew up on her family's ranch in Winnett, MT, in the prairies and coulees of Central Montana. After a decade away, Laura returned home and continues her family's tradition as a cattle rancher. Her passion and heart is clearly tied to not only the land and waters here, but the community of Winnett. Laura speaks to her involvements with locally led organization Winnett ACES, whose holistic approach touches on everything from ranch viability, ecosystem health, and reviving old buildings to serve the needs of the community.   She also speaks to her work with the Musselshell Watershed Coalition and the value in partnerships and local voices leading the work. In this conversation, Laura offers inspiration and insight for others who may be looking to push forward a locally-driven group in their own communities, from boosting Main Street to the health of your watershed. This segment also features Aaron Clausen, Senior Program Officer of World Wildlife Fund's Sustainable Ranching Initiative. LINKS: Winnett ACES Musselshell Watershed Coalition World Wildlife Fund's Sustainable Ranching Initiative The Nature Conservancy's Matador Ranch grassbank This episode is part of the Life in the Land project, which is a series of films and podcasts produced by Stories for Action, which hears from folks that interact with the complexities of Montana's landscapes, speaking to the value of locally-led work and the holistic approaches needed for the health of communities and the ecosystems they're a part of. Find out more about the project and watch the films at LifeintheLand.org   Stories for Action holds a mission to use the power of storytelling to create human connection and advance a thriving planet for all. StoriesforAction.org  Follow along on our Instagram and Facebook: @StoriesforAction

Today with Claire Byrne
Should the lotto be included in watershed ad ban?

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 16:34


Brian O'Connell, David Coleman, Clinical Child Psychologist

Orchard Community Church Sermon Audio

A river overflowing its banks can be a catastrophic event.  This dangerous situation often begins by a small trickle running outside the natural boundaries of the river.  This trickle creates another channel.  The water flows, the channel widens and allows more water to flow. Soon a torrent of water is gushing outside the normal riverbanks.  In a sermon called "Stay the Course", we look at Colossians 1:21-23 where we will see Paul remind the Colossians of the amazing truth of how they are reconciled to God through what Jesus did for them on the cross.  But then he warns them to keep going in the gospel, to not deviate in any other direction, to stay the course.  We need to hear this truth today as, just like them, we are often tempted to wander from the gospel in big and little ways.  We, too, need to "Stay the Course."

Duluth News Tribune Minute
Rainy River watershed continues to spill out of its boundaries

Duluth News Tribune Minute

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 9:26


Here's a look at the top headlines from around the Northland for Friday, May 27, 2022.  The Duluth News Tribune Minute is a product of Forum Communications Company and is brought to you by reporters at the Duluth News Tribune, Superior Telegram and Cloquet Pine Journal. Find more news throughout the day at duluthnewstribune.com. If you enjoy this podcast, please consider supporting our work with a subscription at duluthnewstribune.news/podcast. Your support allows us to continue providing the local news and content you want.

War & Peace
S3 Episode 18: The Ukraine War: A Watershed Moment for EU Foreign Policy?

War & Peace

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 29:10


Russia's full-scale invasion of Ukraine has been a watershed moment for EU foreign policy. Since then, the EU has mobilised €2 billion of military aid and levied some of the harshest sanctions ever imposed. At the same time, there is concern about how the effects of the Ukraine war will be felt in conflicts elsewhere, as geopolitical tensions threaten to derail fragile peace processes and undermine international cooperation.This week on War & Peace, Elissa Jobson is joined by Crisis Group's Senior EU Analyst Lisa Musiol and Head of EU Affairs Giuseppe Famà to run through the recommendations from our Spring Update to the 2022 Watch List. They discuss the EU's response to the Ukraine war and how it can capitalise on an emboldened foreign policy to promote peace in some of the world's other conflicts. Highlighting the threats to peace in Libya, Mali, Nagorno-Karabakh and Pakistan, they argue the EU must step up its engagement to prevent escalation and help save lives around the globe, not just in Ukraine. Check out Crisis Group's 2022 EU Watch List – Spring Update in full to learn more about the crises and conflicts where the EU and its member states can act for peace. This episode of War & Peace was produced with the support of Stiftung Mercator. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Front Row
ABBA Voyage, Terence Davies, Zaffar Kunial's poem for George Floyd

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 42:14


48 years after the British jury gave them nul points at the Eurovision song contest, ABBA the avatars begin a long term arena residency in London. Samira talks to the director Baillie Walsh and the choreographer Wayne McGregor about creating the show. Terence Davies, director of some of the finest films ever made in the UK, such as Distant Voices, Still Lives and The Long Day Closes, talks to Samira Ahmed about his new film Benediction. It's based on the life of Siegfried Sassoon, one of the great poets of the Great War. As well as writing about its horrors and having fought with great courage, he declared his refusal to take any further part in it because he saw that the people in power, who could bring the suffering to an end, were prolonging the slaughter. The film chronicles his troubled life as a gay man after the war. It is two years tomorrow since George Floyd was murdered in Minneapolis. To mark this sad anniversary, we asked the poet Zaffar Kunial, whose first collection Us was shortlisted for the T.S. Eliot prize, to reflect on this and see if he could write a poem. He did, and reads Watershed, for the first time.

The Astrology Hub Podcast
[WEEKLY ASTROLOGICAL WEATHER] "A Watershed Moment" May 23rd - 29th w/ Bronwyn Simons

The Astrology Hub Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 55:16


In this Weekly Horoscope from the Astrology Hub Podcast, Astrologer Brownyn Simons and Amanda ‘Pua' Walsh discuss the energies coming our way as described by astrology. You'll learn... How to finalize the Eclipse Integration process What it means for planets to be at 29 degrees of a sign  About the new 2 year long Mars & Jupiter Cycle Grab Your Personalized Astrology Reports Life has never been more full of surprises, challenges, and opportunities. Now you can purchase a personalized astrology report and receive guidance for your life's journey straight to your inbox.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 628 (5-23-22): Memorial Day's Origin, from a Potomac River Perspective

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:27).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-20-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of May 23 and May 30, 2022.  This episode, marking the Memorial Day holiday observed this year on May 30, repeats an episode first done in 2015. MUSIC – ~17 sec – instrumental. That tune, composed during the U.S. Civil War, sets the stage for a water-related exploration of the origin of Memorial Day.  Have a listen to the music for about 35 more seconds. MUSIC – ~35 sec – instrumental. You've been listening to a version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” recorded by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales.  The tune was composed in 1863 by John Hill Hewitt.  The title, and the lyrics associated with the tune, are from “The Picket Guard,” a poem by Ethel Lynn Beers, published in 1861.  The poem relates the loneliness, homesickness, and then sudden death of a rank-and-file soldier patrolling the dark, wooded, and deceptively quiet Potomac riverbank.  As a similar tragic fate befell tens of thousands of Civil War soldiers along rivers, ridges, and battle lines in Virginia and elsewhere, surviving family and friends began honoring fallen soldiers by decorating their graves with flowers, especially during spring.  The practice grew across both North and South, eventually becoming a spring tradition known as “Decoration Day.” On May 5, 1868, Gen. John Logan called for Decoration Day to be an annual, national holiday on May 30, and the first national ceremony was held that year in Arlington National Cemetery, near the banks of the Potomac.  After World War I, the annual observance began to include honoring those who had died in all U.S. military conflicts.  In 1971, Congress declared Memorial Day an official national holiday, to occur on the last Monday of May. Memorial Day invokes very personal and local expressions of honor and remembrance, true to the holiday's origin of individuals decorating Civil War graves with flowers.  In that spirit, we close this tribute to Memorial Day with about 25 seconds of “Flowers of the Forest,” by No Strings Attached, from their 2002 album, “Old Friend's Waltz.” MUSIC – ~26 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 215, 5-25-15, and Episode 318, 5-30-16. The version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight” heard in this Virginia Water Radio episode was performed by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales, used with permission.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 619, 3-7-22.  Another version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” by Bobby Horton, was featured in Episode 101, 3-5-12. Information on “All Quiet Along the Potomac,” about Ethel Beers, the author of the poem from which the song was derived, and about John Hill Hewitt, who composed the tune, is available from Bartleby.com, online at http://www.bartleby.com/270/13/474.html; from Britannica Encyclopedia, online at www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/58438/Ethel-Lynn-Beers; from Library of Congress, “All quiet along the Potomac to-night,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200002411/; and from Song of America, online at https://songofamerica.net/song/all-quiet-along-the-potomac-tonight/. “Flowers of the Forest” and “Old Friend's Waltz” are copyright by No Strings Attached and Enessay Music, used with permission.  More information about the now-retired, Blacksburg/Roanoke-based group No Strings Attached is available online at https://www.enessay.com/index.html.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 573, 4-19-21.  Information on “Metsäkukkia,” the original Finnish tune on which the No Strings Attached selection was based, is available from Andrew Kuntz, “The Fiddler's Companion,” online at http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/MER_MIC.htm; and from Jeremy Keith, “The Session,” online at http://thesession.org/tunes/4585. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES(Unless otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Looking towards the confluence of the Shenandoah River with the Potomac River at Harper's Ferry, West Va., August 14, 2008.  Harper's Ferry was a strategic location and the site of a federal arsenal during the Civil War era.The confluence of Antietam Creek (foreground) with the Potomac River in Maryland, as seen from the C&O Canal Towpath, August 13, 2008.  The confluence is several miles downstream of where the creek flows through Sharpsburg, Md., the site of a major Civil War battle in 1862.      EXTRA INFORMATION ON THE HISTORY OF MEMORIAL DAYThe following information is quoted from the Library of Congress, “Today in History—May 30/Memorial Day,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/may-30/. “In 1868, Commander in Chief John A. Logan of the Grand Army of the Republic issued General Order Number 11 designating May 30 as a memorial day ‘for the purpose of strewing with flowers or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village, and hamlet churchyard in the land.' “The first national celebration of the holiday took place May 30, 1868, at Arlington National Cemetery, where both Confederate and Union soldiers were buried.  Originally known as Decoration Day, at the turn of the century it was designated as Memorial Day.  In many American towns, the day is celebrated with a parade. “Southern women decorated the graves of soldiers even before the Civil War's end.  Records show that by 1865, Mississippi, Virginia, and South Carolina all had precedents for Memorial Day.  Songs in the Duke University collection Historic American Sheet Music include hymns published in the South such as these two from 1867: ‘Kneel Where Our Loves are Sleeping,' dedicated to ‘The Ladies of the South Who are Decorating the Graves of the Confederate Dead,' and ‘Memorial Flowers,' dedicated ‘To the Memory of Our Dead Heroes.' “When a women's memorial association in Columbus, Mississippi, decorated the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers on April 25, 1866, this act of generosity and reconciliation prompted an editorial piece, published by Horace Greeley's New York Tribune, and a poem by Francis Miles Finch, ‘The Blue and the Grey,' published in the Atlantic Monthly.  The practice of strewing flowers on soldiers' graves soon became popular throughout the reunited nation. “President Lyndon Johnson proclaimed Waterloo, New York, as the ‘Birthplace of Memorial Day,' because it began a formal observance on May 5, 1866.  However, Boalsburg, Pennsylvania, also claims to have held the first observance, based on an observance dating back to October 1864.  Indeed, many other towns also lay claim to being the first to hold an observance. “In 1971, federal law changed the observance of the holiday to the last Monday in May and extended the honor to all soldiers who died in American wars.  A few states continue to celebrate Memorial Day on May 30. “Today, national observance of the holiday still takes place at Arlington National Cemetery with the placing of a wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and the decoration of each grave with a small American flag.  Protocol for flying the American flag on Memorial Day includes raising it quickly to the top of the pole at sunrise, immediately lowering it to half-staff until noon, and displaying it at full staff from noon until sunset. … “Many veterans of the Vietnam War, and relatives and friends of those who fought in that conflict, make a pilgrimage over Memorial Day weekend to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., where they pay their respects to another generation of fallen soldiers.” SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION On the History of Memorial Day Library of Congress, “Today in History—May 30/Memorial Day,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/may-30/. Smithsonian Institution/National Museum of American History, “You asked, we Answered: Why do we celebrate Memorial Day?”, by Ryan Lintelman, May 24, 2013; available online at http://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/2013/05/you-asked-we-answered-why-do-we-celebrate-memorial-day.html. Public Broadcasting System, “National Memorial Day Concert/History of Memorial Day,” online at http://www.pbs.org/national-memorial-day-concert/memorial-day/history/. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs:“America's Wars,” online (as a PDF) at http://www.va.gov/opa/publications/factsheets/fs_americas_wars.pdf;“Memorial Day,” online at https://www.va.gov/opa/speceven/memday; and“Memorial Day Order,” by Gen. John A. Logan, May 6, 1868, online at https://www.cem.va.gov/history/memdayorder.asp. On Rivers and Other Water Bodies in the U.S. Civil War The History PlaceTM, “The U.S. Civil War,” online at http://www.historyplace.com/civilwar/ USA Civil War Web Site, “Civil War Rivers and Streams,” online at http://usa-civil-war.com/CW_Rivers/rivers.html RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “History” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on Virginia waters in history related to military conflicts. Battle of Yorktown in the Revolutionary War – Episode 390, 10-6-17.Bull Run's present and Civil War past – Episode 223, 7-21-14. Civil War Battle of the Ironclads – Episode 412, 3-19-18.Lincoln's James River trip to Richmond at the end of the Civil War – Episode 459, 2-11-19.Potomac River in the Civil War – Episode 101, 3-5-12.Rivers and attempts to capture Richmond in the Civil War – Episode 164, 6-3-13 (for Memorial Day 2013).River origins of Virginia signers of Declaration of Independence – Episode 220, 6-30-14. Various waters involved in the Revolutionary War – Episode 168, 7-1-13. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 History Theme1.2 – Virginia history and life in present-day Virginia.1.4 – Lives of people associated with major holidays.2.5 – Lives of people associated with major holidays. Virginia Studies CourseVS.1 – Impact of geographic features on people, places, and events in Virginia history.VS.7 – Civil War issues and events, including the role of Virginia and the role of various ethnic groups. United States History to 1865 CourseUSI.2 – Major land and water features of North America, including their importance in history.USI.9 – Causes, events, and effects of the Civil War.Virginia and United States History CourseVUS.7 – Knowledge of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels.Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics

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